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Sample records for beam interference microscope

  1. Shearing interference microscope for step-height measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trịnh, Hưng-Xuân; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Chen, Liang-Chia; Yeh, Sheng-Lih; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Hoang, Hong-Hai

    2017-05-01

    A shearing interference microscope using a Savart prism as the shear plate is proposed for inspecting step-heights. Where the light beam propagates through the Savart prism and microscopic system to illuminate the sample, it then turns back to re-pass through the Savart prism and microscopic system to generate a shearing interference pattern on the camera. Two measurement modes, phase-shifting and phase-scanning, can be utilized to determine the depths of the step-heights on the sample. The first mode, which employs a narrowband source, is based on the five-step phase-shifting algorithm and has a measurement range of a quarter-wavelength. The second mode, which adopts a broadband source, is based on peak-intensity identification technology and has a measurement range up to a few micrometres. This paper is to introduce the configuration and measurement theory of this microscope, perform a setup used to implement it, and present the experimental results from the uses of the setup. The results not only verify the validity but also confirm the high measurement repeatability of the proposed microscope. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. The interference Linnik type microscope (IM) developed at Inmetro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinovski, I; Couceiro, I B; Lima, M S; França, R S; Von der Weid, J P

    2015-01-01

    The interference Linnik type microscope was developed and it design was modernized to provide high resolution nanometrology facility. This microscope can perform length measurement directly relative to wavelength standards such as the frequency stabilized lasers. Thus, one can use interference microscope for primary calibration of the step heights. These step heights can be used to calibrate vertical axis of the other instruments like optical coherence tomography, atomic force microscope, confocal microscope, etc. In all cases the traceability to the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology length primary standards was attempted to be established

  3. Phase-shifting interference microscope with extendable field of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Hsu, Wei-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shiang

    2018-04-01

    An innovative phase-shifting interference microscope aimed at extending the field of measurement is proposed in this paper. The microscope comprises a light source module, a phase modulation module, and an interferometric module, which reconstructs the micro-structure contours of samples using the five-step phase-shifting algorithm. This paper discusses the measurement theory and outlines the configuration, experimental setup, and experimental results obtained using the proposed interference microscope. The results confirm the efficacy of the microscope, achieving a standard deviation of 2.4 nm from a step height of 86.2 nm in multiple examinations.

  4. White light differential interference contrast microscope with a Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Pavan Kumar, Y

    2014-01-10

    A new technique for producing a white light differential interference contrast (DIC) image using a lateral shearing, rotation phase shifting Sagnac interferometer (SI) is proposed. The SI, placed in the image space after the tube lens of a microscope system with spatially coherent white light Kohler illumination, splits the image forming beam into coherent components with small lateral shear. Phase shifts, between the interfering components, which can be considered as biased phase difference (BPD), are introduced by applying small angular rotation of the SI in its own plane. This variable BPD between the interfering white light components produces a uniform intensity colored background. The object related phase shift, due to the height difference between two close points on the object surface with separation on the order of least resolvable separation of the microscope objective, in addition to the BPD would produce a change in intensity/hue/color against a uniform background due to the BPD. Thus a DIC image is formed and the variable BPD provides an excellent means of improving the contrast of the image.

  5. Wide field of view common-path lateral-shearing digital holographic interference microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Priyanka; Trivedi, Vismay; Mahajan, Swapnil; Patel, Nimit; Joglekar, Mugdha; Chhaniwal, Vani; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Javidi, Bahram; Anand, Arun

    2017-12-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of living cells provides important information about the cell morphology and its time variation. Off-axis, digital holographic interference microscopy is an ideal tool for 3-D imaging, parameter extraction, and classification of living cells. Two-beam digital holographic microscopes, which are usually employed, provide high-quality 3-D images of micro-objects, albeit with lower temporal stability. Common-path digital holographic geometries, in which the reference beam is derived from the object beam, provide higher temporal stability along with high-quality 3-D images. Self-referencing geometry is the simplest of the common-path techniques, in which a portion of the object beam itself acts as the reference, leading to compact setups using fewer optical elements. However, it has reduced field of view, and the reference may contain object information. Here, we describe the development of a common-path digital holographic microscope, employing a shearing plate and converting one of the beams into a separate reference by employing a pin-hole. The setup is as compact as self-referencing geometry, while providing field of view as wide as that of a two-beam microscope. The microscope is tested by imaging and quantifying the morphology and dynamics of human erythrocytes.

  6. Evaluation of reflection interference contrast microscope images of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, K; Bereiter-Hahn, J

    1981-03-01

    Reflection contrast microscope methods are generally used for studies of those portions of the cell that are turned towards the glass coverslip, to comprehend the structure of the cytoskeleton and the dynamics of cell movement, as well as formation of cell-glass contacts. In incident illumination only reflected light contributes to picture formation. The intensity of which in the case of observation of unstained cells is small because of small refraction differences. To overcome this problem a reflection contrast system was developed by Leitz according to Ploem [49], in which by using contrast preserving measures the reflection becomes prominent in comparison with the lens reflexes. The emerging pictures are a result of interferences of reflections at glass-cell, cell-culture medium and culture medium-cell interfaces. According to Fresnel's equations the reflected intensity depends on the differences of the particular refractive indices and the thickness of the layers, which determine the phase of interfering beams. In idealized systems of thin films the reflected intensity is a measure for their optical constants. Relative reflection measurements from glass-cell areas is comparison with the known glass-medium reflection, can therefore be revealing as far as refraction index, cell-glass distance or cell thickness are concerned. The estimates by Bereiter-Hahn et al. [15] were made in the assumption of vertical illumination neglecting its actual conical shape: the comparison of two Fresnel functions of cytological relevant measurements show - in accordance with Gingell and Todd [24] - that this is only permitted under certain conditions, depending on the required accuracy of the measurements; an incidence angle of about 30 degrees leads to an error of about 10%, an angle of 50 degrees to more than 50%.

  7. Measurement of step height by traceable interference microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y L; Wang, C Y

    2005-01-01

    A Traceable Interference Microscope (TIM) to calibrate the step height standards is presented. The construction of the TIM includes an interference microscope, a stabilized He-Ne laser, and a rotated ground glass. The instrument's original white light source is replaced by the stabilized laser through an optical fiber. The step height is measured by calculating the phase difference of two fringe patterns both on the upper and lower surfaces of the specimen. A new methodology called Double-Tilt Imaging (DTI) method is proposed to determine the Numerical Aperture Correction Factor (NACF). The wavelength of the light source and the difference both in angles and in spatial frequencies between the positive and negative tilts would reveal sufficient information to allow for the determination of the NACF directly. The light source used is a stabilized He-Ne laser traceable to the definition of the meter and the angle measurement to the angle standards by an autocollimator. The calculation of the aperture correction factor for the interference microscope with a 10x Mirau-type objective lens yields a traceable average value of 1.01936 with a relative standard uncertainty of about 5.74 x 10 -4 . The expanded uncertainty of this step height calibration system is determined to be approximately 3 nm

  8. Interference-aware random beam selection for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed M.

    2012-09-01

    Spectrum sharing systems have been introduced to alleviate the problem of spectrum scarcity by allowing secondary unlicensed networks to share the spectrum with primary licensed networks under acceptable interference levels to the primary users. In this paper, we develop interference-aware random beam selection schemes that provide enhanced throughput for the secondary link under the condition that the interference observed at the primary link is within a predetermined acceptable value. For a secondary transmitter equipped with multiple antennas, our schemes select a random beam, among a set of power- optimized orthogonal random beams, that maximizes the capacity of the secondary link while satisfying the interference constraint at the primary receiver for different levels of feedback information describing the interference level at the primary receiver. For the proposed schemes, we develop a statistical analysis for the signal-to-noise and interference ratio (SINR) statistics as well as the capacity of the secondary link. Finally, we present numerical results that study the effect of system parameters including number of beams and the maximum transmission power on the capacity of the secondary link attained using the proposed schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both

  10. Weighted iterative algorithm for beam alignment in scanning beam interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Shan; Bayanheshig; Zhang, Ning

    2017-11-01

    To obtain low phase errors and good interference fringe contrast, an automated beam alignment system is used in scanning beam interference lithography. In the original iterative algorithm, if the initial beam deviation is large or the optical parameters are inappropriate, the beam angle (or position) overshoot may exceed the detector's range. To solve this problem, a weighted iterative algorithm is proposed in which the beam angle and position overshoots can be suppressed by adjusting the weighting coefficients. The original iterative algorithm is introduced. The weighted iterative algorithm is then presented and its convergence is analyzed. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed weighted iterative algorithm can reduce the beam angle and position overshoots at the expense of convergence speed, avoiding the alignment failure caused by exceeding the detector's range. Besides, the original and weighted iterative algorithms can be combined to optimize the iteration.

  11. Pattern of liquid crystalline droplets induced by two beam interference in azobenzene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Maciej; Dradrach, Klaudia; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Galewski, Zbigniew

    2013-10-01

    A pattern of liquid crystalline droplets dispersed in the isotropic liquid can be formed during illumination by two interfering laser beams in certain range of the temperature and the light intensity. Azobenzene derivative substituted by long alkyl and alkoxy chains exhibiting smectic phases has been used for the study. The pattern can be reversibly erased and rewritten by shutting down and opening of the interfering beams. Polarized microscope images have shown the formation of numerous liquid crystalline droplets at bright regions of the interference fringes. Influence of the temperature and the light intensity has been studied by measuring the diffraction efficiency dynamics. Photothermal and photoorientational mechanisms of the formation of liquid crystalline droplets pattern have been proposed and discussed.

  12. Micrometer positron beam characterization at the Scanning Positron Microscope Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteneder, J.; Dickmann, M.; Kögel, G.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.; Dollinger, G.

    2017-01-01

    For the investigation of inhomogeneous defect distributions the Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) of the Universität der Bundeswehr München provides a pulsed positron beam with a diameter of about 1 µm and a time resolution of 250 ps (FWHM). To increase the count-rate the SPM is currently transferred to the intense positron source NEPOMUC. To connect the SPM to the NEPOMUC source a special interface was build, which transforms the NEPOMUC beam to the requirements of the SPM. In this contribution we will give an overview of the SPM interface, and its performance. The beam is characterized at the finale stage of the interface, the positron elevator, where the potential energy of the beam is increased, without altering other beam parameters. From our measurements we are able to predict the performance of the SPM at NEPOMUC. In future position resolved measurements will be possible with an improved spatial resolution of about 0.3 µm and an event rate of about 3.7 kHz.

  13. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  15. Upgrade of a Scanning Confocal Microscope to a Single-Beam Path STED Microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Klauss

    Full Text Available By overcoming the diffraction limit in light microscopy, super-resolution techniques, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy, are experiencing an increasing impact on life sciences. High costs and technically demanding setups, however, may still hinder a wider distribution of this innovation in biomedical research laboratories. As far-field microscopy is the most widely employed microscopy modality in the life sciences, upgrading already existing systems seems to be an attractive option for achieving diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy in a cost-effective manner. Here, we demonstrate the successful upgrade of a commercial time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscope to an easy-to-align STED microscope in the single-beam path layout, previously proposed as "easy-STED", achieving lateral resolution < λ/10 corresponding to a five-fold improvement over a confocal modality. For this purpose, both the excitation and depletion laser beams pass through a commercially available segmented phase plate that creates the STED-doughnut light distribution in the focal plane, while leaving the excitation beam unaltered when implemented into the joint beam path. Diffraction-unlimited imaging of 20 nm-sized fluorescent beads as reference were achieved with the wavelength combination of 635 nm excitation and 766 nm depletion. To evaluate the STED performance in biological systems, we compared the popular phalloidin-coupled fluorescent dyes Atto647N and Abberior STAR635 by labeling F-actin filaments in vitro as well as through immunofluorescence recordings of microtubules in a complex epithelial tissue. Here, we applied a recently proposed deconvolution approach and showed that images obtained from time-gated pulsed STED microscopy may benefit concerning the signal-to-background ratio, from the joint deconvolution of sub-images with different spatial information which were extracted from offline time gating.

  16. Superconducting quantum interference monitor of charged particle beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsev, K.F.; Mikheev, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Description and test results of the monitor of charged particle beam current on the base of the high-frequency superconducting quantum interference detector with lead slotted shield are presented. The toroidal superconducting coil, which covers the measured beam has 16 turns wound by the lead belt of 7 mm width with 0.5 mm gaps between the turns. A superconducting low-coupling monitor having two holes and point oxidated niobium contact has been used in the mode of quanta counting of magnetic flux. The lead point shield was 2 mm thick and it had 30 mm aperture. The coefficient of background shielding within 0-200 Hz frequency range constituted more than 10 8 . The threshold current resolution of the monitor had the value less than 01 μA √Hz. The suggested monitor requires helium cooling. The proposed design of the monitor is applicable for mounting on the vacuum chamber when it is surrounded by helium conductor. In other cases mounting of low-powerful autonomic system or cryostat of helium storage up to several weeks is possible [ru

  17. Fabrication, Cleaning, and Filtering of Microscopic Droplet Beam Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J.; Hunter, M.; Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Doak, R. B.

    2006-10-01

    Structure determination of proteins is a subject of intense current interest. Most relevant is a protein's native conformation, which generally requires it be immersed in water (if water-soluble) or a lipid jacket (if a membrane protein). Emerging schemes of serial protein diffraction propose to embed proteins in microscopic water droplets (membrane proteins encased in a detergent micelle) and pass these in vacuum through an x-ray or electron beam. Droplet diameters of tested, with and without sonication and both before and after the nozzle tip was formed. Flame burnishing was employed to smooth and clean the nozzles. In situ formation of silicate filter frits was investigated. Still, only about 30% of the 4 μm nozzles would run without clogging. An alternative to solid convergent nozzles will be described.

  18. Record number (11 000) of interference fringes obtained by a 1 MV field-emission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Harada, Ken; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kasai, Hiroto; Tonomura, Akira; Furutsu, Tadao; Moriya, Noboru; Yoshida, Takaho; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Koichi; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2002-01-01

    An electron biprism for a 1 million-volt field-emission electron microscope was developed. This biprism is controlled similarly as a specimen holder so that it can be driven and rotated precisely and is tough against mechanical vibration and stray magnetic field. We recorded the maximum number of interference fringes by using this biprism in order to confirm the overall performance as a holography electron microscope, and obtained a world record of 11,000 interference fringes

  19. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  20. Full-field optical coherence tomography using immersion Mirau interference microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng-Hua; Chang, Chia-Jung; Kao, Ching-Fen

    2013-06-20

    In this study, an immersion Mirau interference microscope was developed for full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). Both the reference and measuring arms of the Mirau interferometer were filled with water to prevent the problems associated with imaging a sample in air with conventional FFOCT systems. The almost-common path interferometer makes the tomographic system less sensitive to environmental disturbances. En face OCT images at various depths were obtained with phase-shifting interferometry and Hariharan algorithm. This immersion interferometric method improves depth and quality in three-dimensional OCT imaging of scattering tissue.

  1. Standard practice for scanning electron microscope beam Size characterization

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a reproducible means by which one aspect of the performance of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) may be characterized. The resolution of an SEM depends on many factors, some of which are electron beam voltage and current, lens aberrations, contrast in the specimen, and operator-instrument-material interaction. However, the resolution for any set of conditions is limited by the size of the electron beam. This size can be quantified through the measurement of an effective apparent edge sharpness for a number of materials, two of which are suggested. This practice requires an SEM with the capability to perform line-scan traces, for example, Y-deflection waveform generation, for the suggested materials. The range of SEM magnification at which this practice is of utility is from 1000 to 50 000 × . Higher magnifications may be attempted, but difficulty in making precise measurements can be expected. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

  2. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  3. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  4. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  5. Topography of hidden objects using THz digital holography with multi-beam interferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valzania, Lorenzo; Zolliker, Peter; Hack, Erwin

    2017-05-15

    We present a method for the separation of the signal scattered from an object hidden behind a THz-transparent sample in the framework of THz digital holography in reflection. It combines three images of different interference patterns to retrieve the amplitude and phase distribution of the object beam. Comparison of simulated with experimental images obtained from a metallic resolution target behind a Teflon plate demonstrates that the interference patterns can be described in the simple form of three-beam interference. Holographic reconstructions after the application of the method show a considerable improvement compared to standard reconstructions exclusively based on Fourier transform phase retrieval.

  6. Axial resolution of confocal Raman microscopes : Gaussian beam theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauw, C J De; Sijtsema, N M; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1997-01-01

    A straightforward and transparent model, based on Gaussian beam optics, for the axial ro resolution of a confocal microscope is presented, A confocal Raman microscope was used to determine the axial confocality in practice. The axial response of a thin planar object was measured for three different

  7. Axial Resolution of Confocal Raman Microscopes: Gaussian Beam Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A straightforward and transparent model, based on Gaussian beam optics, for the axial r0 resolution of a confocal microscope is presented. A confocal Raman microscope was used to determine the axial confocality in practice. The axial response of a thin planar object was measured for three different

  8. Dual ion beam irradiation system for in situ observation with electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Tetuo; Hojou, Kiiti; Furuno, Sigemi; Otsu, Hitosi; Izui, Kazuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new in situ observation system for dynamic processes under dual ion beam irradiation. The system consists of a modified 400 keV analytical electron microscope (JEOL, JEM-4000FX) and two 40 kV ion beam accelerators. This system allows evaluation of microscopic changes of structure and chemical bonding state of materials in the dynamic processes under two kinds of ion beam irradiations, that is required for the simulation test of the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors onto which He + , H + , and H 2 + ions are irradiated simultaneously. These two ion accelerators were equipped symmetrically both sides of the electron microscope and individually controlled. Each ion beam extracted from a duo-plasmatron ion gun is bent downward by an angle of 30deg with a mass-separating magnet, and introduced into specimen chamber of the electron microscope. Inside the specimen chamber the beam is deflected again by an angle of 30deg with an electrostatic prism so as to be incident on the specimen surface. Finally, two ion beams from both side are incident on the specimen surface at an angle of 60deg. The maximum ion current density of helium is more than 250μA/cm 2 at the specimen at an ion energy of 17 keV. Images of the electron microscope during dual ion beam irradiation are observed through a TV camera and recorded with a VTR. (author)

  9. Evaluating Red Reflex and Surgeon Preference Between Nearly-Collimated and Focused Beam Microscope Illumination Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionni, Robert J; Pei, Ron; Dimalanta, Ramon; Lubeck, David

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the intensity and stability of the red reflex produced by ophthalmic surgical microscopes with nearly-collimated versus focused illumination systems and to assess surgeon preference in a simulated surgical setting. This two-part evaluation consisted of postproduction surgical video analysis of red reflex intensity and a microscope use and preference survey completed by 13 experienced cataract surgeons. Survey responses were based on bench testing and experience in a simulated surgical setting. A microscope with nearly-collimated beam illumination and two focused beam microscopes were assessed. Red reflex intensity and stability were greater with the nearly-collimated microscope illumination system. In the bench testing survey, surgeons reported that the red reflex was maintained over significantly greater distances away from pupillary center, and depth of focus was numerically greater with nearly-collimated illumination relative to focused illumination. Most participating surgeons (≥64%) reported a preference for the microscope with nearly-collimated illumination with regard to red reflex stability, depth of focus, visualization, surgical working distance, and perceived patient comfort. The microscope with nearly-collimated illumination produced a more intense and significantly more stable red reflex and was preferred overall by more surgeons. This is the first report of an attempt to quantify red reflex intensity and stability and to evaluate surgically-relevant parameters between microscope systems. The data and methods presented here may provide a basis for future studies attempting to quantify differences between surgical microscopes that may affect surgeon preference and microscope use in ophthalmic surgery.

  10. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  11. On-column refractive-index detection based on retroreflected beam interference for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y; Li, B

    1998-02-20

    A novel refractive-index detection scheme used for capillary electrophoresis detection, based on the interference of two retroreflected beams from the outer surface of a capillary tube illuminated by a focused laser beam, is described. A theoretical description and experimental measurement of the intensity profile of the interference fringe pattern in the detection plane are presented. The factors that limit the sensitivity of the proposed refractive-index detection scheme are discussed and compared with the transmitted beam interference and backscatter-based refractive-index detection configurations. The proposed refractive-index detector was used successfully for detection of capillary electrophoresis separations of saccharose, maltose, and lactose with a capillary tube of 50-mum inner diameter and a simple experimental setup.

  12. Interference-aware random beam selection schemes for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Spectrum sharing systems have been recently introduced to alleviate the problem of spectrum scarcity by allowing secondary unlicensed networks to share the spectrum with primary licensed networks under acceptable interference levels to the primary users. In this work, we develop interference-aware random beam selection schemes that provide enhanced performance for the secondary network under the condition that the interference observed by the receivers of the primary network is below a predetermined/acceptable value. We consider a secondary link composed of a transmitter equipped with multiple antennas and a single-antenna receiver sharing the same spectrum with a primary link composed of a single-antenna transmitter and a single-antenna receiver. The proposed schemes select a beam, among a set of power-optimized random beams, that maximizes the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of the secondary link while satisfying the primary interference constraint for different levels of feedback information describing the interference level at the primary receiver. For the proposed schemes, we develop a statistical analysis for the SINR statistics as well as the capacity and bit error rate (BER) of the secondary link.

  13. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  14. Generation of complete coherence in Young's interference experiment with random mutually uncorrelated electromagnetic beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Dogariu, A.; Visser, T.D.; Wolf, E.

    2005-01-01

    The recently developed theory that unifies the treatments of polarization and coherence of random electro-magnetic beams is applied to study field correlations in Young's interference experiment. It is found that at certain pairs of points the transmitted field is spatially fully coherent,

  15. Evaluating Red Reflex and Surgeon Preference Between Nearly-Collimated and Focused Beam Microscope Illumination Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionni, Robert J.; Pei, Ron; Dimalanta, Ramon; Lubeck, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the intensity and stability of the red reflex produced by ophthalmic surgical microscopes with nearly-collimated versus focused illumination systems and to assess surgeon preference in a simulated surgical setting. Methods This two-part evaluation consisted of postproduction surgical video analysis of red reflex intensity and a microscope use and preference survey completed by 13 experienced cataract surgeons. Survey responses were based on bench testing and experience in a simulated surgical setting. A microscope with nearly-collimated beam illumination and two focused beam microscopes were assessed. Results Red reflex intensity and stability were greater with the nearly-collimated microscope illumination system. In the bench testing survey, surgeons reported that the red reflex was maintained over significantly greater distances away from pupillary center, and depth of focus was numerically greater with nearly-collimated illumination relative to focused illumination. Most participating surgeons (≥64%) reported a preference for the microscope with nearly-collimated illumination with regard to red reflex stability, depth of focus, visualization, surgical working distance, and perceived patient comfort. Conclusions The microscope with nearly-collimated illumination produced a more intense and significantly more stable red reflex and was preferred overall by more surgeons. Translational Relevance This is the first report of an attempt to quantify red reflex intensity and stability and to evaluate surgically-relevant parameters between microscope systems. The data and methods presented here may provide a basis for future studies attempting to quantify differences between surgical microscopes that may affect surgeon preference and microscope use in ophthalmic surgery. PMID:26290778

  16. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for insitu measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification

  17. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  18. Alignment of multiple-off-axis-beam imaging/interference systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivel, Shruthi K; Leibovici, Matthieu C R; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2016-04-20

    The alignment of components in complex multibeam arrangements is typically prone to errors that limit the performance of the system. A systematic procedure for aligning such systems is presented here. The method facilitates the precision alignment of the optical elements to achieve the accurate projection of multiple on- and off-axis images and the simultaneous interference of the multiple beams. In addition to the multibeam imaging/interference system presented, the procedure can be employed in other multibeam imaging and/or interfering configurations.

  19. Fabricating a regular hexagonal lattice structure by interference pattern of six femtosecond laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Masataka; Osawa, Kazuhito; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2017-09-01

    Interference of six countering femtosecond (fs) laser beams at a wavelength of 785 nm has been utilized to fabricate nanostructures in a regular hexagonal lattice. A diffractive-optical element for six-beam splitting was introduced to a beam correlation system. The lattice structure was in accordance with the simulated structure based on the principle of superposition of electric fields. The unit structures fabricated on gold thin films were nanobit, nanodrop, and metallic hole array. The height and diameter of a representative nanodrop were 450 and 210 nm, respectively. Molten structures such as nanodrops are believed to have been fabricated via a solid-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism, as in the case of previous experiments using four beams. In addition, multi-shot processing is examined to fabricate through-holes at lower fluences.

  20. Experimental Results of Network-Assisted Interference Suppression Scheme Using Adaptive Beam-Tilt Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Murakami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a network-assisted interference suppression scheme using beam-tilt switching per frame for wireless local area network systems and its effectiveness in an actual indoor environment. In the proposed scheme, two access points simultaneously transmit to their own desired station by adjusting angle of beam-tilt including transmit power assisted from network server for the improvement of system throughput. In the conventional researches, it is widely known that beam-tilt is effective for ICI suppression in the outdoor scenario. However, the indoor effectiveness of beam-tilt for ICI suppression has not yet been indicated from the experimental evaluation. Thus, this paper indicates the effectiveness of the proposed scheme by analyzing multiple-input multiple-output channel matrices from experimental measurements in an office environment. The experimental results clearly show that the proposed scheme offers higher system throughput than the conventional scheme using just transmit power control.

  1. Investigation of a magnetic flux-guide for a HTS scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, B; Moon, S H; Lee, Su-Young; Lee, S M; Kye, J I; Lee, H J; Khim, Z G

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic flux-guide in the form of a sharp needle is known to enhance the spatial resolution of the scanning SQUID microscope. We investigated the properties of a soft ferromagnetic tip as a flux-guide by measuring the local field of the tip end. The effects of the flux-guide, such as the transmission of a magnetic signal, length dependence, and nonlinear distortion, were observed. We also present the design and construction of a HTS scanning SQUID microscope with a flux-guide and a planar gradiometer. The gradiometer with a flux-guide is an appropriate solution for improving the performance of the scanning SQUID microscope with a flux-guide as regards the prevention of external field noise without magnetic shields

  2. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-07

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  3. Interference of diffraction and transition radiation and its application as a beam divergence diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Fiorito

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have observed the interference of optical diffraction radiation (ODR and optical transition radiation (OTR produced by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a micromesh foil and a mirror. The production of forward directed ODR from electrons passing through the holes and wires of the mesh and their separate interactions with backward OTR from the mirror are analyzed with the help of a simulation code. By careful choice of the micromesh properties, mesh-mirror spacing, observation wavelength, and filter band pass, the interference of the ODR produced from the unperturbed electrons passing through the open spaces of the mesh and OTR from the mirror are observable above a broad incoherent background from interaction of the heavily scattered electrons passing through the mesh wires. These interferences (ODTRI are sensitive to the beam divergence and can be used to directly diagnose this parameter. We compare experimental divergence values obtained using ODTRI, conventional OTRI, for the case when front foil scattering is negligible, and computed values obtained from transport code calculations and multiple screen beam size measurements. We obtain good agreement in all cases.

  4. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  5. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55±0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 μm. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5±4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the SPM

  6. A compact Airy beam light sheet microscope with a tilted cylindrical lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Prokopas, Martynas; Nylk, Jonathan; Coll-Lladó, Clara; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Ferrier, David E K; Vettenburg, Tom; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-10-01

    Light-sheet imaging is rapidly gaining importance for imaging intact biological specimens. Many of the latest innovations rely on the propagation-invariant Bessel or Airy beams to form an extended light sheet to provide high resolution across a large field of view. Shaping light to realize propagation-invariant beams often relies on complex programming of spatial light modulators or specialized, custom made, optical elements. Here we present a straightforward and low-cost modification to the traditional light-sheet setup, based on the open-access light-sheet microscope OpenSPIM, to achieve Airy light-sheet illumination. This brings wide field single-photon light-sheet imaging to a broader range of endusers. Fluorescent microspheres embedded in agarose and a zebrafish larva were imaged to demonstrate how such a microscope can have a minimal footprint and cost without compromising on imaging quality.

  7. Flexible method based on four-beam interference lithography for fabrication of large areas of perfectly periodic plasmonic arrays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vala, Milan; Homola, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 15 (2014), s. 18778-18789 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Interference lithography * Polymer substrate * Four-beam interference Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  8. Correlated two-photon interference in a dual-beam Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiat, P.G.; Vareka, W.A.; Hong, C.K.; Nathel, H.; Chiao, R.Y.

    1990-01-01

    We report on an interference effect arising from a two-photon entangled state produced in a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal pumped by an ultraviolet argon-ion laser. Two conjugate beams of signal and idler photons were injected in a parallel configuration into a single Michelson interferometer, and detected separately by two photomultipliers, while the difference in its arm lengths was slowly scanned. The coincidence rate exhibited fringes with a visibility of nearly 50%, and a period given by half the ultraviolet (not the signal or idler) wavelength, while the singles rate exhibited no fringes

  9. Many-beam effects in electron microscope images of lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izui, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Takahiko; Furuno, Shigemi; Otsu, Hitoshi

    1974-01-01

    Multi-beam effects in electron microscopic images were investigated. A computation program was developed on the basis of a matrix theory of the multi-beam effects. The matrix theory for a perfect crystal and an imperfect crystal is described, and expression for absorption coefficient is presented. The amplitude of electron wave penetrating through lattice defects is expressed by using scattering matrices which correspond to crystal slices. Calculation of extinction distance was performed, and compared with experimental results. In case of systematic reflection, the difference between two beams and from four to eight beams approximation was small, while a large effect was seen in case of accidental reflection. The intensity profile of bend contour was calculated for silicon and copper-aluminum alloy. Distance between submaxima becomes short with increase of thickness. The change in stacking fault fringes with diffraction condition was investigated. Samples were copper-aluminum alloy. Systematic behavior of the fringes was obtained, and the calculated results reproduced experimental ones. (Kato, T.)

  10. Optical recording in functional polymer nanocomposites by multi-beam interference holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuk, Dmitrij; Burunkova, Julia; Kalabin, Viacheslav; Csarnovics, Istvan; Kokenyesi, Sandor

    2017-05-01

    Our investigations relate to the development of new polymer nanocomposite materials and technologies for fabrication of photonic elements like gratings, integrated elements, photonic crystals. The goal of the present work was the development and application of the multi-beam interference method for one step, direct formation of 1-, 2- or even 3D photonic structures in functional acrylate nanocomposites, which contain SiO2 and Au nanoparticles and which are sensitized to blue and green laser illumination. The presence of gold nanoparticles and possibility to excite plasmonic effects can essentially influence the polymerization processes and the spatial redistribution of nanoparticles in the nanocomposite during the recording. This way surface and volume phase reliefs can be recorded. It is essential, that no additional treatments of the material after the recording are necessary and the elements possess high transparency, are stable after some relaxation time. New functionalities can be provided to the recorded structures if luminescent materials are added to such materials.

  11. Optical and tribomechanical stability of optically variable interference security devices prepared by dual ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinörgü-Goldenberg, Eda; Baloukas, Bill; Zabeida, Oleg; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta; Martinu, Ludvik

    2011-07-01

    Optical security devices applied to banknotes and other documents are exposed to different types of harsh environments involving the cycling of temperature, humidity, chemical agents, and tribomechanical intrusion. In the present work, we study the stability of optically variable devices, namely metameric interference filters, prepared by dual ion beam sputtering onto polycarbonate and glass substrates. Specifically, we assess the color difference as well as the changes in the mechanical properties and integrity of all-dielectric and metal-dielectric systems due to exposure to bleach, detergent and acetone agents, and heat and humidity. The results underline a significant role of the substrate material, of the interfaces, and of the nature and microstructure of the deposited films in long term stability under everyday application conditions.

  12. Achieving unlimited recording length in interference lithography via broad-beam scanning exposure with self-referencing alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Donghan; Zhao, Yuxuan; Zeng, Lijiang

    2017-04-19

    Large-area holographic gratings are of great importance in diverse fields including long-range interference metrology, high-resolution astronomical telescopes, and chirped-pulse-amplification systems. However, in conventional interference lithography, the recording length is limited by the aperture of the collimating lenses. Here we propose broad-beam scanning exposure which employs the latent grating generated continuously during scanning for real-time dynamic fringe locking and thus achieves unlimited recording length. This method is experimentally proved to make high-quality gratings, and is expected to be a new type of interference lithography.

  13. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiye; Kim, MinJung; An, JinWook; Kim, Yunje

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) could be applied to determine the sequence of line crossings. The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. EDX was able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersection. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using gel pens and red sealing ink with highest success rate (100% correctness). These observations show that the FIB/SEM was the appropriate instrument for an overall examination of document. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Research and Design of a Sample Heater for Beam Line 6-2c Transmission X-ray Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policht, Veronica; /Loyola U., Chicago /SLAC

    2012-08-27

    There exists a need for environmental control of samples to be imaged by the Transmission X-Ray Microscope (TXM) at the SSRLs Beam Line 6-2c. In order to observe heat-driven chemical or morphological changes that normally occur in situ, microscopes require an additional component that effectively heats a given sample without heating any of the microscope elements. The confinement of the heat and other concerns about the heaters integrity limit which type of heater is appropriate for the TXM. The bulk of this research project entails researching different heating methods used previously in microscopes, but also in other industrial applications, with the goal of determining the best-fitting method, and finally in designing a preliminary sample heater.

  15. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  16. It may be possible to use Microscopic Black Holes as a Propulsion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriske, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Several years ago during the commissioning of the LHC, the question as to whether a miniature Black Hole would be formed, and what to do with it if it was, came up as a legitimate topic of discussion. It was calculated at that time that although it was possible, the possibility was extremely small, and it would evaporate quickly, and would be safely ejected into space, as its mass would be so great as to simply continue along its inertial path, out the end of the circular LHC accelerator. New improvements to the LHC are the increase in energy to about 15 TEV. Linear accelerators, such as the ILC, claim to be able to produce much higher TEV, as they collide electrons and positrons, as opposed to Protons, as does the LHC. This author has heard incredible numbers, such as 250 TEV, with a beam current of 1 Amp. With this incredible increase in Energy and Current, one could turn the Black Hole investigation around, and try to determine how one could produce a steady stream of Microscopic Black Holes. A Black Hole machine. When the Black Holes evaporate do they expand, space in space time. Would the old theory of expanding space behind a craft warp space, and enable the craft to exceed the speed of light. The warp theory was proposed before Star Trek, is it now feasible to prove?

  17. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Liu, Jianping [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China); Asadirad, Mojtaba [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Kwon, Min-Ki [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Das, Suman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500 nm, depth of 50 nm, and a periodicity of 1 μm were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  18. Study of morphological changes in breast cancer cells MCF-7 under the action of pro-apoptotic agents with laser modulation interference microscope MIM-340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogatikov, V.; Nikitiuk, A.; Konysheva, A.; Ignatyev, P.; Grishko, V.; Naimark, O.

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy is a new method to measure and evaluate the microlevel processes characterized by the high resolution and providing ample opportunities to quantitatively analyze various parameters, including specimens from biological matter. In this study, a laser interference microscope was used to evaluate the state of cancer cells (living and apoptotic). Apoptotic cancer cells were obtained by treatment of MCF-7 cells with the use of betulin-based α-bromomethyl ketone (BMK) derivative. When using the microscope, the main differences in the morphometric parameters of living and apoptotic cells such as height, diameter, perimeter, area and volume were appraised. The criteria that can be used as markers of apoptosis activation were identified.

  19. Apparatus for observing a sample with a particle beam and an optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus for observing a sample (1) with a TEM column and an optical high resolution scanning microscope (10). The sample position when observing the sample with the TEM column differs from the sample position when observing the sample with the optical microscope in that in the latter case the

  20. An optical remote sensing model for estimating oil slick thickness based on two-beam interference theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingcheng; Li, Xiang; Tian, Qingjiu; Han, Wenchao

    2012-10-22

    Oil slick thickness was an important parameter for estimating oil spill volume. Two-beam interference theory could be used to interpret the behavior of reflected and refracted light in oil slick. A quantitative relationship between thickness and spectral reflectance of oil slick could be established based on this theory. Some parameters have the properties of numerical oscillation and can be ignored in practical application. In addition, numerical approximation results showed that two parameters of the relationship were closely related to the spectral reflectance of background water and the thick oil slick. Therefore, a practical model for estimating oil slick thickness could be derived and proved to be consisted with theoretical relationship.

  1. Experimental Investigations of Cochannel Interference Reduction Effect at High Elevation Base Station Using Beam Tilt and Orthogonal Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuta Uwano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of cochannel interference (CCI generated in a mixed cell architecture in microcellular systems. In this type of microcellular systems in which both microcells and macrocells coexist in the same geographical urban area, the base station antennas mounted on the rooftops of buildings to cover wide circular radio zones suffer severe CCI from the surrounding low base stations. A dielectric-loaded slotted-cylinder antenna (DSCA is applied to horizontally polarized omnidirectional array antennas in a height-diversity configuration with the high gain of 8 dBi, which is comparable to that of a collinear antenna, to reduce the CCI. The measurements conducted in a suburban area clarify the reduction in the CCI for three techniques. The beam-tilt technique reduces the CCI level by approximately 10 dB for both collinear antennas and the DSCA array antennas. The use of horizontal polarization reduces the CCI level by approximately 13 dB for the DSCA array antennas with and without beam tilt. The combination of the beam tilt and horizontal polarization or the DSCA array antennas with beam tilt significantly reduces the CCI level by approximately 23 dB.

  2. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  3. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  4. Single-beam image encryption using spatially separated ciphertexts based on interference principle in the Fresnel domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qu; Guo, Qing; Lei, Liang; Zhou, Jinyun

    2014-12-01

    A new optical security system for image encryption based on optical interference principle and translation property of Fresnel transform (FrT) has been proposed in this article. The algorithm of this proposal is specially designed for single-beam optical decryption and can thoroughly resolve the silhouette problem existing in the previous interference-based scheme. Different from earlier schemes using interference of phase-only masks (POMs), the inverse FrT of primitive image is digitally decomposed into a random POM and a complex field distribution. Information associated with the primitive images can be completely smoothed away by the modulation of this random POM. Through the translation property of FrT, two linear phase-only terms are then used to modulate the obtained random POM and the complex distribution, respectively. Two complex ciphertexts are generated by performing digital inverse FrT again. One cannot recover any visible information of secret image using only one ciphertext. Moreover, to recover the primitive image correctly, the correct ciphertexts must be placed in the certain positions of input plane of decryption system, respectively. As additional keys, position center coordinates of ciphertexts can increase the security strength of this encryption system against brute force attacks greatly. Numerical simulations have been given to verify the performance and feasibility of this proposal. To further enhance the application value of this algorithm, an alternative approach based on Fourier transform has also been discussed briefly.

  5. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  6. Modeling of the fringe shift in multiple beam interference for glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are Fourier transform lenses each of focal length 20 cm. (u, v) is the spectral. Fourier plane of the object plane (x, y). (x , y ) is the imaging plane where the fringes are imaged. Also, Barakat has obtained a right formula, which is based on ray optics, of multiple beam Fizeau fringes crossing a fiber of circular transverse cross- ...

  7. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described

  8. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-05-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäcke, Olof, E-mail: obacke@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kristiansen, Per Magnus [Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology (INKA), FHNW University of Applied Science and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Olsson, Eva, E-mail: eva.olsson@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV–vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000 kGy. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of a polymer: fullerne blend is increased using electron irradiation. • Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy the nanostructure is studied. • Electron irradiation stops phase separation between the polymer and fullerene. • Electron irradiation quenches the formation and nucleation of fullerene crystals.

  10. Fabrication of bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film for electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Taichi; Kanamori, Satoshi; Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-07-13

    We fabricated a bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film to serve as a nanometric light source for high-spatial-resolution optical microscopy based on electron beam excitation. The Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film was fabricated by annealing a ZnO film on a Si₃N₄ substrate at 1000 °C in N₂. The annealed film emitted bright cathodoluminescence compared with the as-deposited film. The film is promising for nano-imaging with electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy. We evaluated the spatial resolution of a microscope developed using this Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film. This is the first report of the investigation and application of ZnO/Si₃N₄ annealed at a high temperature (1000 °C). The fabricated Zn₂SiO₄ film is expected to enable high-frame-rate dynamic observation with ultra-high resolution using our electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

  11. Multiple beam interference lithography: A tool for rapid fabrication of plasmonic arrays of arbitrary shaped nanomotifs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vala, Milan; Homola, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 14 (2016), s. 15656-15665 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1101 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : displacement talbot lithography * noncoplanar beams * large areas Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  12. Interaction between short fatigue cracks and grain boundaries. Systematic experiments with focussed ion beam microscope and microstructural tomography; Ueber die Wechselwirkung kurzer Ermuedungsrisse mit Korngrenzen. Systematische Experimente mit Focussed Ion Beam Microscope und mikrostruktureller Tomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Wolfgang

    2011-04-15

    Increasing the microstructural resistance of metallic materials to short fatigue crack growth is a major task of today's materials science. In this regard, grain boundaries and precipitates are well known to decelerate short cracks, but a quantitative understanding of the blocking effect is still missing. This is due to the fact that crack deceleration is influenced by many parameters: cyclic load, crack length, distance to obstacles, orientations of grains and obstacles. Even the examination of a huge number of short cracks would not be sufficient to identify the effect of these parameters independently, especially since fatigue crack growth is a 3D problem and investigations of the sub surface orientation of cracks and grain boundaries are scarce. The Focused Ion Beam Microscope (FIB) offers new methods for systematic experiments and 3D-investigation of short fatigue cracks that will help to quantify the microstructural impact on short fatigue crack growth. The ion beam is used to cut micro notches in selected grains on the surface of samples characterised by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Plane fatigue cracks initiate under cyclic loading in defined distances to the grain boundaries. By this technique it is possible for the first time to present quantitative data to describe the effect of grain boundaries on short fatigue cracks in nickel based superalloys (CMSX-4) as well as in mild steels.

  13. Deterministic Integration of Quantum Dots into on-Chip Multimode Interference Beamsplitters Using in Situ Electron Beam Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnauber, Peter; Schall, Johannes; Bounouar, Samir; Höhne, Theresa; Park, Suk-In; Ryu, Geun-Hwan; Heindel, Tobias; Burger, Sven; Song, Jin-Dong; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2018-04-11

    The development of multinode quantum optical circuits has attracted great attention in recent years. In particular, interfacing quantum-light sources, gates, and detectors on a single chip is highly desirable for the realization of large networks. In this context, fabrication techniques that enable the deterministic integration of preselected quantum-light emitters into nanophotonic elements play a key role when moving forward to circuits containing multiple emitters. Here, we present the deterministic integration of an InAs quantum dot into a 50/50 multimode interference beamsplitter via in situ electron beam lithography. We demonstrate the combined emitter-gate interface functionality by measuring triggered single-photon emission on-chip with g (2) (0) = 0.13 ± 0.02. Due to its high patterning resolution as well as spectral and spatial control, in situ electron beam lithography allows for integration of preselected quantum emitters into complex photonic systems. Being a scalable single-step approach, it paves the way toward multinode, fully integrated quantum photonic chips.

  14. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-03

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  15. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  16. Modelling microscopic features of streamer encounters, electric fields, electron beams and X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, C.; Kochkin, P.; Ebert, U.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms emit terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), beams of photons with quantum energies ofup to 40 MeV. Likewise electric discharges in the laboratory, mimicing lightning on a small spatial andenergetic scale, emit X-rays whose energies are limited by the available potential difference betweenthe two electrodes. For a maximal available difference of 1 MV and a gap distance of 1 m between the twoelectrodes, we will present the energy and spatial distribution of generated X-rays.For that we have followed the motion of preaccelerated, monoenergetic and monodirectional electronbeams with energies between 100 keV and the maximal available energy of 1 MeV for different electricfield configurations using a particle Monte Carlo code. Omitting any field, we present the subsequent energy and spatial distribution of X-raysand analyse how the photon number depends on the initial electron energy. Fig. 1 shows the position and energy of photons generated by Bremsstrahlung after 0.3 ns by beams of 500 000 electrons with initial energies of 1 MeV moving in the zdirection in STP air. The electrons have generated electron avalanches and all have cooleddown and attached to oxygen after 0.3 ns. Every cross represents one photon projected onto the xz plane; the photon energies Eγ are color coded. We see that photons with energies of approx. 1 MeV can be produced and that the high-energy tail of X-rays is beamedtowards the direction of the initial electron beam whereas low-energy photons show a more isotropicbehaviour. Analysing the cross sections of photons interacting with air we conclude that photons travelseveral meters in air and can reach detectors several meters from the position of the discharge. Byestimating the electric field ahead of the discharge corona and by simulating the motion of electronbeams in these fields, we exclude that electrons travel as far as photons and disturb the measured X-raysignal.

  17. Complex 3D Vortex Lattice Formation by Phase-Engineered Multiple Beam Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the computational results on the formation of diverse complex 3D vortex lattices by a designed superposition of multiple plane waves. Special combinations of multiples of three noncoplanar plane waves with a designed relative phase shift between one another are perturbed by a nonsingular beam to generate various complex 3D vortex lattice structures. The formation of complex gyrating lattice structures carrying designed vortices by means of relatively phase-engineered plane waves is also computationally investigated. The generated structures are configured with both periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic basis, while these whirling complex lattices possess a long-range order of designed symmetry in a given plane. Various computational analytical tools are used to verify the presence of engineered geometry of vortices in these complex 3D vortex lattices.

  18. Microscopic kinetic analysis of space-charge induced optical microbunching in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Marinelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal space-charge forces from density fluctuations generated by shot noise can be a major source of microbunching instability in relativistic high brightness electron beams. The gain in microbunching due to this effect is broadband, extending at least up to optical frequencies, where the induced structure on the beam distribution gives rise to effects such as coherent optical transition radiation. In the high-frequency regime, theoretical and computational analyses of microbunching formation require a full three-dimensional treatment. In this paper we address the problem of space-charge induced optical microbunching formation in the high-frequency limit when transverse thermal motion due to finite emittance is included for the first time. We derive an analytical description of this process based on the beam’s plasma dielectric function. We discuss the effect of transverse temperature on the angular distribution of microbunching gain and its connection to the physics of Landau damping in longitudinal plasma oscillations. Application of the theory to a relevant experimental scenario is discussed. The analytical results obtained are then compared to the predictions arising from high resolution three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Imaging nanoscale spatial modulation of a relativistic electron beam with a MeV ultrafast electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Liu, Yaqi; Xu, Jun; Yu, Dapeng; Wan, Weishi; Zhu, Yimei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-03-01

    An accelerator-based MeV ultrafast electron microscope (MUEM) has been proposed as a promising tool to the study structural dynamics at the nanometer spatial scale and the picosecond temporal scale. Here, we report experimental tests of a prototype MUEM where high quality images with nanoscale fine structures were recorded with a pulsed ˜3 MeV picosecond electron beam. The temporal and spatial resolutions of the MUEM operating in the single-shot mode are about 4 ps (FWHM) and 100 nm (FWHM), corresponding to a temporal-spatial resolution of 4 × 10-19 s m, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than that achieved with state-of-the-art single-shot keV UEM. Using this instrument, we offer the demonstration of visualizing the nanoscale periodic spatial modulation of an electron beam, which may be converted into longitudinal density modulation through emittance exchange to enable production of high-power coherent radiation at short wavelengths. Our results mark a great step towards single-shot nanometer-resolution MUEMs and compact intense x-ray sources that may have widespread applications in many areas of science.

  20. TDM/FM/FDMA - A modulation technique for multiple-beam satellites which precludes cochannel interference and allows non-uniform geographic distribution of user channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springett, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The technique outlined in this paper is intended to eliminate the problems of cochannel interference and uniform geographic distribution of user channels which arise in conventional designs for a multiple spot beam communication satellite to serve mobile telephony users across the CONUS. By time multiplexing FM/FDMA signal ensembles so that only those beams operating on distinct frequency subbands are allowed to transmit concurrently, cochannel interference arising from simultaneous frequency subband reuse is precluded. Thus, time disjoint frequency reuse is accomplished over a repetitive sequence of fixed time slots. By assigning different size subbands to each time slot, a market of nonuniform users can be accommodated. The technique results in a greatly simplified antenna feed system design for the satellite, at a cost of imposing the need for time slot synchronization on the mobile FM receivers whose ability for rejecting adjacent channel interference is somewhat diminished.

  1. Field modeling and ray-tracing of a miniature scanning electron microscope beam column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A; Gaskin, Jessica A

    2017-08-01

    A miniature scanning electron microscope (SEM) focusing column design is introduced and its potential performance assessed through an estimation of parameters that affect the probe radius, to include source size, spherical and chromatic aberration, diffraction and space charge broadening. The focusing column, a critical component of any SEM capable of operating on the lunar surface, was developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Advanced Research Systems. The ray-trace analysis presented uses a model of the electrostatic field (within the focusing column) that is first calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). This method provides flexibility in modeling the complex electrode shapes of practical electron lens systems. A Fourier series solution of the lens field is then derived within a cylindrical domain whose boundary potential is provided by the BEM. Used in this way, the Fourier series solution is an accuracy enhancement to the BEM solution, allowing sufficient precision to assess geometric aberrations through direct ray-tracing. Two modes of operation with distinct lens field solutions are described. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Helical wavefront and beam shape modulated by advanced liquid crystal q-plate fabricated via photoalignment and analyzed by Michelson's interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Han; Li, Ming-Shian; Ko, Shih-Wei; Fuh, Andy Y-G

    2013-09-10

    In this study, electrically tunable advanced liquid crystal q-plates (ALCQPs) that combine two q values in one device to generate optical vortex beams were fabricated using a photoalignment method that involves the use of azo dye, a surfactant alignment material. The electrically tunable ALCQP device could be modulated to control the shape and polarization of a circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam that propagated through the device. A Gaussian beam modulated by an ALCQP under suitable applied voltage showed a variation beam shape with helical wavefront, as demonstrated by Michelson's interference. This helical wavefront beam carries an orbital angular momentum and can be used in an optical tweezers system to trap, move, and rotate particles simultaneously.

  3. Holographic binary grating liquid crystal cells fabricated by one-step exposure of photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystalline alignment substrates to a polarization interference ultraviolet beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Holographic binary grating liquid crystal (LC) cells, in which the optical anisotropy was rectangularly modulated even as the grating was fabricated using holographic exposure, were fabricated by one-step polarization holographic exposure of an empty glass cell, the interior of which was coated with a photocrosslinkable polymer LC (PCLC). The present study is of great significance in that three types of holographic binary grating LC cells containing twisted alignments can be fabricated by simultaneous exposure of two PCLC substrates to the UV interference beams, which are sinusoidally modulated. The polarization conversion properties of the diffracted beams are explained well by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  4. Label-free cellular structure imaging with 82 nm lateral resolution using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-25

    We present label-free and high spatial-resolution imaging for specific cellular structures using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). Images of the actin filament and mitochondria of stained HeLa cells, obtained by fluorescence and EXA microscopy, were compared to identify cellular structures. Based on these results, we demonstrated the feasibility of identifying label-free cellular structures at a spatial resolution of 82 nm. Using numerical analysis, we calculated the imaging depth region and determined the spot size of a cathodoluminescent (CL) light source to be 83 nm at the membrane surface.

  5. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 {mu}s, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1{sup +} to 4{sup +}. The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  6. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 μs, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1 + to 4 + . The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  7. Argon broad ion beam tomography in a cryogenic scanning electron microscope: a novel tool for the investigation of representative microstructures in sedimentary rocks containing pore fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G; Urai, J L; Pérez-Willard, F; Radi, Z; Offern, S; Burkart, I; Kukla, P A; Wollenberg, U

    2013-03-01

    The contribution describes the implementation of a broad ion beam (BIB) polisher into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) functioning at cryogenic temperature (cryo). The whole system (BIB-cryo-SEM) provides a first generation of a novel multibeam electron microscope that combines broad ion beam with cryogenic facilities in a conventional SEM to produce large, high-quality cross-sections (up to 2 mm(2)) at cryogenic temperature to be imaged at the state-of-the-art SEM resolution. Cryogenic method allows detecting fluids in their natural environment and preserves samples against desiccation and dehydration, which may damage natural microstructures. The investigation of microstructures in the third dimension is enabled by serial cross-sectioning, providing broad ion beam tomography with slices down to 350 nm thick. The functionalities of the BIB-cryo-SEM are demonstrated by the investigation of rock salts (synthetic coarse-grained sodium chloride synthesized from halite-brine mush cold pressed at 150 MPa and 4.5 GPa, and natural rock salt mylonite from a salt glacier at Qom Kuh, central Iran). In addition, results from BIB-cryo-SEM on a gas shale and Boom Clay are also presented to show that the instrument is suitable for a large range of sedimentary rocks. For the first time, pore and grain fabrics of preserved host and reservoir rocks can be investigated at nm-scale range over a representative elementary area. In comparison with the complementary and overlapping performances of the BIB-SEM method with focused ion beam-SEM and X-ray tomography methods, the BIB cross-sectioning enables detailed insights about morphologies of pores at greater resolution than X-ray tomography and allows the production of large representative surfaces suitable for FIB-SEM investigations of a specific representative site within the BIB cross-section. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Analyzing power measurement of pp elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region with the 200-GeV/c polarized-proton beam at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, N.; Langland, J.; Onel, Y.; Bonner, B.E.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cranshaw, J.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Nguyen, C.; Roberts, J.B.; Skeens, J.; White, J.L.; Bravar, A.; Giacomich, R.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Zanetti, A.; Bystricky, J.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; van Rossum, L.; Cossairt, J.D.; Read, A.L.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Meschanin, A.P.; Nurushev, S.B.; Patalakha, D.I.; Rykov, V.L.; Solovyanov, V.L.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Grosnick, D.P.; Hill, D.A.; Laghai, M.; Lopiano, D.; Ohashi, Y.; Shima, T.; Spinka, H.; Stanek, R.W.; Underwood, D.G.; Yokosawa, A.; Funahashi, H.; Goto, Y.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Makino, S.; Masaike, A.; Miyake, K.; Nagamine, T.; Saito, N.; Yamashita, S.; Iwatani, K.; Kuroda, K.; Michalowicz, A.; Luehring, F.C.; Miller, D.H.; Maki, T.; Pauletta, G.; Rappazzo, G.F.; Salvato, G.; Takashima, R.

    1993-01-01

    The analyzing power A N of proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region has been measured using the 200-GeV/c Fermilab polarized proton beam. A theoretically predicted interference between the hadronic non-spin-flip amplitude and the electromagnetic spin-flip amplitude is shown for the first time to be present at high energies in the region of 1.5x10 -3 to 5.0x10 -2 (GeV/c) 2 four-momentum transfer squared, and our results are analyzed in connection with theoretical calculations. In addition, the role of possible contributions of the hadronic spin-flip amplitude is discussed

  9. Laser marking on soda-lime glass by laser-induced backside wet etching with two-beam interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazumi, Tomoka; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    For crack-free marking of glass materials, a beam-scanning laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) process by a beam spot with a fine periodic structure was examined. The fine periodic structure was produced within a beam spot by means of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer incorporated to the optical setup for the beam-scanning LIBWE. A fine structure with a period of 9 µ m was observed within the microstructures with a diameter of ca. 40 µ m fabricated by a laser shot under double-beam irradiation, and they could be homogeneously fabricated within an area of 800  ×  800 µ m. The area filled with the microstructures, including fine periodic structures, could be observed in high contrast under a diffuse, on-axis illumination that was used in commercial QR code readers. (paper)

  10. Non-surgical endodontic treatment for dens invaginatus type III using cone beam computed tomography and dental operating microscope: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a morphological abnormality of the tooth in which the coronal tooth enamel and dentin fold inwards towards the pulp cavity. Dens invaginatus type III (Oehlers: 1957) is characterized by infolding of the enamel and dentin as far as the root apex. This report describes a case of surgical and non-surgical endodontic therapy for a maxillary lateral incisor with type III dens invaginatus, necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. The patient was a 16-year-old man. Periapical radiographs suggested the presence of an untreated area of invagination. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was then used for three-dimensional observation of the morphological details of this area. The CBCT scans revealed invagination and its relationship with the pulp chamber. A dental operating microscope was used to access two primary root canals and the area of invagination. The root canals were then localized, negotiated, enlarged, and filled with calcium hydroxide. Two months later, the canal and invagination were obturated with core-based gutta-percha (FlexPoint Neo: FP core-carrier technique) and restored. Cone beam computed tomography and microscopic techniques allow even complicated cases of dens invaginatus to be diagnosed and treated using non-surgical root canal management.

  11. In-situ integrity control of frozen-hydrated, vitreous lamellas prepared by the cryo-focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, D A Matthijs; Mesman, Rob J; Hayles, Michael F; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Mathisen, Cliff; Post, Jan A

    2013-07-01

    Recently a number of new approaches have been presented with the intention to produce electron beam transparent cryo-sections (lamellas in FIB-SEM terminology) from hydrated vitreously frozen cryo samples with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system, suitable for cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM). As the workflow is still challenging and time consuming, it is important to be able to determine the integrity and suitability (cells vs. no cells; vitreous vs. crystalline) of the lamellas. Here we present an in situ method that tests both conditions by using the cryo-Scanning Electron Microscope (cryo-SEM) in transmission mode (TSEM; Transmission Scanning Electron Microscope) once the FIB-made lamella is ready. Cryo-TSEM imaging of unstained cells yields strong contrast, enabling direct imaging of material present in the lamellas. In addition, orientation contrast is shown to be suitable for distinguishing crystalline lamellas from vitreous lamellas. Tilting the stage a few degrees results in changes of contrast between ice grains as a function of the tilt angle, whereas the contrast of areas with vitreous ice remains unchanged as a function of the tilt angle. This orientation contrast has subsequently been validated by cryo-Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) in transmission mode. Integration of the presented method is discussed and the role it can play in future developments for a new and innovative all-in-one cryo-FIB-SEM life sciences instrument. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of C-shaped canal systems in mandibular second molars using surgical operating microscope and cone beam computed tomography: A clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sanjay; Yadav, Seema; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2014-05-01

    The study was aimed to acquire better understanding of C-shaped canal systems in mandibular second molar teeth through a clinical approach using sophisticated techniques such as surgical operating microscope and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 42 extracted mandibular second molar teeth with fused roots and longitudinal grooves were collected randomly from native Indian population. Pulp chamber floors of all specimens were examined under surgical operating microscope and classified into four types (Min's method). Subsequently, samples were subjected to CBCT scan after insertion of K-files size #10 or 15 into each canal orifice and evaluated using the cross-sectional and 3-dimensional images in consultation with dental radiologist so as to obtain more accurate results. Minimum distance between the external root surface on the groove and initial file placed in the canal was also measured at different levels and statistically analyzed. Out of 42 teeth, maximum number of samples (15) belonged to Type-II category. A total of 100 files were inserted in 86 orifices of various types of specimens. Evaluation of the CBCT scan images of the teeth revealed that a total of 21 canals were missing completely or partially at different levels. The mean values for the minimum thickness were highest at coronal followed by middle and apical third levels in all the categories. Lowest values were obtained for teeth with Type-III category at all three levels. The present study revealed anatomical variations of C-shaped canal system in mandibular second molars. The prognosis of such complex canal anatomies can be improved by simultaneous employment of modern techniques such as surgical operating microscope and CBCT.

  13. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  14. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  15. Evaluation of coherence interference in optical wireless communication through multiscattering channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Debbie; Arnon, Shlomi

    2006-05-10

    Optical wireless communication has been the subject of much research in recent years because of the increasing interest in laser satellite-ground links and urban optical wireless communication. The major sources of performance degradation have been identified as the spatial, angular, and temporal spread of the propagating beam when the propagation channel is multiscattering, resulting in reduced power reception and intersignal interference, as well as turbulence-induced scintillations and noise due to receiver circuitry and background illumination. However, coherence effects due to multipath interference caused by a scattering propagation channel do not appear to have been treated in detail in the scientific literature. We attempt a theoretical analysis of coherence interference in optical wireless communication through scattering channels and try to quantify the resultant performance degradation for different media. We conclude that coherence interference is discernible in optical wireless communication through scattering channels and is highly dependent on the microscopic nature of the propagation medium.

  16. Microscope basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides information on how microscopes work and discusses some of the microscope issues to be considered in using a video camera on the microscope. There are two types of microscopes in use today for research in cell biology-the older finite tube-length (typically 160mm mechanical tube length) microscopes and the infinity optics microscopes that are now produced. The objective lens forms a magnified, real image of the specimen at a specific distance from the objective known as the intermediate image plane. All objectives are designed to be used with the specimen at a defined distance from the front lens element of the objective (the working distance) so that the image formed is located at a specific location in the microscope. Infinity optics microscopes differ from the finite tube-length microscopes in that the objectives are designed to project the image of the specimen to infinity and do not, on their own, form a real image of the specimen. Three types of objectives are in common use today-plan achromats, plan apochromats, and plan fluorite lenses. The concept of mounting video cameras on the microscope is also presented in the chapter. Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interference Spins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovski, Petar; Simeone, Osvaldo; Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen

    2015-01-01

    on traffic load and interference condition leads to performance gains. In this letter, a general network of multiple interfering two-way links is studied under the assumption of a balanced load in the two directions for each link. Using the notion of interference spin, we introduce an algebraic framework...

  18. Thermal Lens Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  19. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  20. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  1. Improvements in low-cost label-free QPI microscope for live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniya, C.; Towers, C. E.; Towers, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports an improvement in the development of a low-cost QPI microscope offering new capabilities in term of phase measurement accuracy for label-free live samples in the longer term (i.e., hours to days). The spatially separated scattered and non-scattered image light fields are reshaped in the Fourier plane and modulated to form an interference image at a CCD camera. The apertures that enable these two beams to be generated have been optimised by means of laser-cut apertures placed on the mirrors of a Michelson interferometer and has improved the phase measuring and reconstruction capability of the QPI microscope. The microscope was tested with transparent onion cells as an object of interest.

  2. Microscopic colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münch, A; Aust, D; Bohr, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory bowel disease presenting with chronic, non-bloody watery diarrhoea and few or no endoscopic abnormalities. The histological examination reveals mainly two subtypes of MC, lymphocytic or collagenous colitis. Despite the fact that the incidence in MC has...... been rising over the last decades, research has been sparse and our knowledge about MC remains limited. Specialists in the field have initiated the European Microscopic Colitis Group (EMCG) with the primary goal to create awareness on MC. The EMCG is furthermore a forum with the intention to promote...

  3. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  4. Uniformity of the soft-x-ray emissions from gold foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams determined by a two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, John F.; Boehly, Thomas; Pien, Gregory; Bradley, David

    1998-01-01

    A two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings was used to image the soft-x-ray emissions from planar foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams. The bandpass of the multilayer coatings was centered at a wavelength of 48.3 Angstrom (257-eV energy) and was 0.5 Angstrom wide. Five overlapping OMEGA beams, without beam smoothing, were typically incident on the gold foils. The total energy was 1500 J, and the focused intensity was 6x10 13 Wcm -2 . The 5.8x magnified images were recorded by a gated framing camera at various times during the 3-ns laser pulse. A pinhole camera imaged the x-ray emission in the energy range of >2 keV. On a spatial scale of 10 μm, it was found that the soft-x-ray images at 257 eV were quite uniform and featureless. In contrast, the hard-x-ray images in the energy range of >2 kev were highly nonuniform with numerous features of size 150 μm. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  5. A MEANS FOR CALIBRATING A MICROSCOPE, A METHOD OF PREPARING THE MEANS AND A METHOD OF CALIBRATING A MICROSCOPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    A means or artefact for calibrating the height/depth or Z axis of a microscope, such as a confocal microscope, an interference microscope or a Scanning Electron Microscope. The artefact comprises a number of tapering or pie-shaped, parallel surfaces each extending from a central axis, whereby all...... surfaces and heights are visible independently of the magnification of the microscope. Thus, the full height range may be calibrated and the linearity thereof checked independently of the magnification....

  6. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Ion photon emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  8. Elastic properties of nanolaminar Cr2AlC films and beams determined by in-situ scanning electron microscope bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieseler, Rolf; Theska, Felix; Stürzel, Thomas; Hähnlein, Bernd; Stubenrauch, Mike; Hopfeld, Marcus; Kups, Thomas; Pezoldt, Jörg; Schaaf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Cr 2 AlC MAX phase structures were investigated by in-situ bending tests. Freestanding structures such as cantilevers and doubly clamped beams of Cr 2 AlC were produced. The structures exhibit a Young's modulus of 184 GPa which is close to the value obtained by vibrational measurements. The in-situ bending test allows the determination of the mechanical properties with a lower variance of the measurement results compared to the vibrational measurement. The results are a good starting point for the development of microelectromechanical structures based on MAX phases. - Highlights: • Cr 2 AlC were produced by deposition multilayers and subsequent rapid annealing. • Freestanding doubly clamped beams and cantilevers of Cr 2 AlC were prepared. • A finite elements model was implemented showing the displacement of the structure. • In-situ bending test at doubly clamped beams and cantilevers were performed. • An in-situ bending test is a valid approach to determine mechanical properties.

  9. A transmission positron microscope and a scanning positron microscope being built at KEK, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Yagishita, A.; Shidara, T.; Nakahara, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the plans of positron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan improving used electron microscopes. The kinetic energies of positron produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays have not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam will be guided near electron microscopes, a transmission electron microscope (JEM100S) and a scanning electron microscope (JSM25S). Positrons are slowed down by a tungsten foil, accelerated and focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam will be injected into an electron microscope. The focusing of positrons and electrons is achieved by magnetic system of the electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (orig.)

  10. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  11. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  12. The system of digital-image optical microscope in semiconductor particle detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lixiang; Li Zhankui; Jin Genming; Wang Zhusheng; Xiao Guoqing

    2009-01-01

    Optical microscopic detection is very important in the process of semiconductor particle detector development. A system of digital-image optical microscope has been constructed with rather low price, which performance is comparable with the moderate-level imports. The system mounts powerful dry objective, and a 2μm resolution could be achieved. Observations with bright and dark field, polarized light,and interference light can be carried out on it. The system have large area on-line monitor,and the photographic device can be controlled by PC. It can be used in the control of defects and contaminations, pattern test, identification of crystal backing, inspection of the smoothness and the flatness of the crystal surface. It can also be used in some precise procedures, such as test, assembly, packaging and repairing. The quality of the bond could be examined by observing the appearance of the bond point and the microscopic structure of the solder. The surface fluctuation can be precisely measured under the microscope with the technology of multi-beam interference. In the article, the application of this system for semiconductor particle detector development has been illustrated, and the construction information has been described in detail. (authors)

  13. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  14. The differential interference in collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xin; Wang Weili

    2012-01-01

    The collisional quantum interference (CQI) on rotational energy transfer was observed in the experiment of the static cell, and the integral interference angles were measured. To obtain more accurate information, the experiment in the molecular beam should be taken, from which the differential interference angle can be obtained. Based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory, the theoretical model of CQI is developed in an atom-diatom collision system in the condition of the molecular beam. The model has taken into account the Lennard-Jones interaction potentials and 'straight-line' trajectory approximation. The effect factors that the interference angle depend on are investigated. The changing tendencies of the differential interference angle with the impact parameter, velocity, and collision partner are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understand or perform the experiment in the molecular beam. (authors)

  15. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  16. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga + -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga + density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. IETS and quantum interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low...... suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference....

  19. A super-oscillatory lens optical microscope for subwavelength imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Edward T F; Lindberg, Jari; Roy, Tapashree; Savo, Salvatore; Chad, John E; Dennis, Mark R; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2012-03-25

    The past decade has seen an intensive effort to achieve optical imaging resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Apart from the Pendry-Veselago negative index superlens, implementation of which in optics faces challenges of losses and as yet unattainable fabrication finesse, other super-resolution approaches necessitate the lens either to be in the near proximity of the object or manufactured on it, or work only for a narrow class of samples, such as intensely luminescent or sparse objects. Here we report a new super-resolution microscope for optical imaging that beats the diffraction limit of conventional instruments and the recently demonstrated near-field optical superlens and hyperlens. This non-invasive subwavelength imaging paradigm uses a binary amplitude mask for direct focusing of laser light into a subwavelength spot in the post-evanescent field by precisely tailoring the interference of a large number of beams diffracted from a nanostructured mask. The new technology, which--in principle--has no physical limits on resolution, could be universally used for imaging at any wavelength and does not depend on the luminescence of the object, which can be tens of micrometres away from the mask. It has been implemented as a straightforward modification of a conventional microscope showing resolution better than λ/6.

  20. Microscopic Engine Powered by Critical Demixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Falko; Magazzù, Alessandro; Callegari, Agnese; Biancofiore, Luca; Cichos, Frank; Volpe, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a microscopic engine powered by the local reversible demixing of a critical mixture. We show that, when an absorbing microsphere is optically trapped by a focused laser beam in a subcritical mixture, it is set into rotation around the optical axis of the beam because of the emergence of diffusiophoretic propulsion. This behavior can be controlled by adjusting the optical power, the temperature, and the criticality of the mixture.

  1. Interference Alignment and Cancellation

    OpenAIRE

    Gollakota, Shyamnath; Perli, Samuel David; Katabi, Dina

    2009-01-01

    The throughput of existing MIMO LANs is limited by the number of antennas on the AP. This paper shows how to overcome this limit. It presents interference alignment and cancellation (IAC), a new approach for decoding concurrent sender-receiver pairs in MIMO networks. IAC synthesizes two signal processing techniques, interference alignment and interference cancellation, showing that the combination applies to scenarios where neither interference alignment nor cancellation applies alone. We sho...

  2. Opportunistic Downlink Interference Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun Jong; Shin, Won-Yong; Jung, Bang Chul; Suh, Changho; Paulraj, Arogyaswami

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an opportunistic downlink interference alignment (ODIA) for interference-limited cellular downlink, which intelligently combines user scheduling and downlink IA techniques. The proposed ODIA not only efficiently reduces the effect of inter-cell interference from other-cell base stations (BSs) but also eliminates intra-cell interference among spatial streams in the same cell. We show that the minimum number of users required to achieve a target degrees-of-freedom (DoF...

  3. Proton microscope design for 9 GeV pRad facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barminova, H.Y.; Turtikov, V.I.

    2016-01-01

    The proton microscope design for 9 GeV proton radiography facility is described. Basic principles of proton microscope development are discussed. Two variants of microscope optical scheme are proposed. Simulation of the proton beam dynamics is carried out, the results showing the possibility to obtain the microscope spatial resolution not worse than 10 μ m.

  4. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  5. Observation of Magnetic Induction Distribution by Scanning Interference Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Yajima, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kuroda, Katsuhiro

    1994-09-01

    A scanning interference electron microscope (SIEM) capable of observing magnetic induction distribution with high sensitivity and spatial resolution has been developed. The SIEM uses a pair of fine coherent scanning probes and detects their relative phase change by magnetic induction, giving raster images of microscopic magnetic distributions. Its performance has been demonstrated by observing magnetic induction distributed near the edge of a recorded magnetic storage medium. Obtained images are compared with corresponding images taken in the scanning Lorentz electron microscope mode using the same microscope, and the differences between them are discussed.

  6. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, Jose; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges...

  7. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  8. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  10. Pattern-integrated interference lithography instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, G M; Leibovici, M C R; Kummer, J W; Gaylord, T K

    2012-06-01

    Multi-beam interference (MBI) provides the ability to form a wide range of sub-micron periodic optical-intensity distributions with applications to a variety of areas, including photonic crystals (PCs), nanoelectronics, biomedical structures, optical trapping, metamaterials, and numerous subwavelength structures. Recently, pattern-integrated interference lithography (PIIL) was presented as a new lithographic method that integrates superposed pattern imaging with interference lithography in a single-exposure step. In the present work, the basic design and systematic implementation of a pattern-integrated interference exposure system (PIIES) is presented to realize PIIL by incorporating a projection imaging capability in a novel three-beam interference configuration. A fundamental optimization methodology is presented to model the system and predict MBI-patterning performance. To demonstrate the PIIL method, a prototype PIIES experimental configuration is presented, including detailed alignment techniques and experimental procedures. Examples of well-defined PC structures, fabricated with a PIIES prototype, are presented to demonstrate the potential of PIIL for fabricating dense integrated optical circuits, as well as numerous other subwavelength structures.

  11. Simple structured illumination microscope setup with high acquisition speed by using a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Ronny; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Jost, Aurélie; Kielhorn, Martin; Wicker, Kai; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2014-08-25

    We describe a two-beam interference structured illumination fluorescence microscope. The novelty of the presented system lies in its simplicity. A programmable spatial light modulator (ferroelectric LCoS) in an intermediate image plane enables precise and rapid control of the excitation pattern in the specimen. The contrast of the projected light pattern is strongly influenced by the polarization state of the light entering the high NA objective. To achieve high contrast, we use a segmented polarizer. Furthermore, a mask with six holes blocks unwanted components in the spatial frequency spectrum of the illumination grating. Both these passive components serve their purpose in a simpler and almost as efficient way as active components. We demonstrate a lateral resolution of 114.2 ± 9.5 nm at a frame rate of 7.6 fps per reconstructed 2D slice.

  12. Formation of Three-Way Scanning Electron Microscope Moiré on Micro/Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-way scanning electron microscope (SEM moiré was first generated using a designed three-way electron beam (EB in an SEM. The spot-type three-way SEM moiré comes from the interference between the three-way EB and the specimen grating in which the periodic cells are arranged in a triangular manner. The deformation and the structure information of the specimen grating in three directions can be simultaneously obtained from the three-way SEM moiré. The design considerations of the three-way EB were discussed. As an illustration, the three-way SEM moiré spots produced on a silicon slide were presented. The proposed three-way SEM moiré method is expected to characterize micro/nanostructures in triangular or hexagonal arrangements in three directions at the same time.

  13. Development and applications of the positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Progress on the positron microscope during the past year has been steady, and we currently project that initial microscope images can be collected during mid to late summer of 1992. Work during the year has mainly been divided among four areas of effort: hardware construction; power supply and control system development; radioactive source fabrication; and planning of initial experimental projects. Details of progress in these areas will be given below. An initial optical design of the microscope was completed during 1990, but during the past year, significant improvements have been made to this design, and several limiting cases of microscope performance have been evaluated. The results of these evaluations have been extremely encouraging, giving us strong indications that the optical performance of the microscope will be better than originally anticipated. In particular, we should be able to explore ultimate performance capabilities of positron microscopy using our currently planned optical system, with improvements only in the image detector system, and the positron-source/moderator configuration. We should be able to study imaging reemission microscopy with resolutions approaching 10 Angstrom and be able to produce beam spots for rastered microscope work with diameters below the 1000 Angstrom diffusion limit. Because of these exciting new possibilities, we have decided to upgrade several microscope subsystems to levels consistent with ultimate performance earlier in our construction schedule than we had previously intended. In particular, alignment facilities in the optical system, vibration isolation, and power supply and control system flexibility have all been upgraded in their design over the past year

  14. Dark Matter Interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We study different patterns of interference in WIMP-nuclei elastic scattering that can accommodate the DAMA and CoGeNT experiments via an isospin violating ratio $f_n/f_p=-0.71$. We study interference between the following pairs of mediators: Z and Z', Z' and Higgs, and two Higgs fields. We show ...

  15. Coherent interference effects in SIEM and CBED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The coherent convergent incident beam produced by the field emission gun of a STEM instrument allows the observation of a number of unusual interference effects in the shadow images (SIEM) and convergent beam diffraction (CBED) patterns visible on the detector plane. Shadow images of thin crystals display the electron Ronchigrams having a form sensitive to the defocus and aberrations of the objective lens. For large crystal lattice spacings the Ronchigrams show characteristic ellipses of low contrast. CBED patterns of thin crystal show symmetries and intensities which vary with the position of the incident beam within the unit cell. Discontinuities in the specimen such as the edges of crystals show striking Fresnel diffraction effects in SIEM. In CBED patterns they give rise to the splitting of diffraction spots. If the incident beam is parallel to a smooth face of a small crystal the potential field outside the crystal gives rise to strong refraction effects. (orig.)

  16. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  17. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  18. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  19. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Guilu

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of the sub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer, the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer, it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented: the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  20. The Light Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the function of the various parts of the microscope and their integration in the formation of an optical image. Presents a procedure for setting up a microscope to obtain maximum resolution and contrast for each objective lens at all magnifications. (JRH)

  1. Mailing microscope slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  2. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  3. Understanding conoscopic interference patterns in anisotropic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunsola, Oluwatobi Gabriel

    The interference patterns observed in conoscopy are important in studying the optical and geometrical properties of anisotropic materials. They have also been used to identify minerals and to explore the structure of biological tissues. In a conoscopic interferometer, an optically anisotropic specimen is placed between two crossed linear polarizers and illuminated by a convergent light beam. The interference patterns are produced because in an anisotropic material an incident light is split into two eigenwaves, namely the ordinary and the extraordinary waves. We report our work on the theoretical simulation and experimental observation of the conoscopic interference patterns in anisotropic crystals. In our simulation, the interference patterns are decomposed into fringes of isogyres and isochromates. For each light propagation direction inside the crystal there exist two eigenwaves that have their own characteristic velocities and vibration directions. The isogyres are obtained by computing the angle between the polarization of the incident light and the vibration directions of the two eigenwaves. The isochromates are obtained by computing the phase retardance between the two eigenwaves inside the crystal. The interference patterns are experimentally observed in several crystals, with their optic axes either parallel or perpendicular to their surfaces. An external electric field is applied to deform the crystals from uniaxial to biaxial. The results of our experimental observation agree well with our computer simulation. In conventional interferometers the isochromatic interference fringes are observed by using a circular polarizer and a circular analyzer, both constructed by a linear polarizer and a quarter wave plate. However, due to the dispersion of the quarter wave plates, the phase-retardance between the two light waves inside the quarter wave plates is wavelength-dependent, which results in different conoscopic interference patterns for different colors of

  4. Collectivity from interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Boris; Jäkel, Christian D.; Strikman, Mark; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2017-12-01

    In hadronic collisions, interference between different production channels affects momentum distributions of multi-particle final states. As this QCD interference does not depend on the strong coupling constant α s , it is part of the no-interaction baseline that needs to be controlled prior to searching for other manifestations of collective dynamics, e.g., in the analysis of azimuthal anisostropy coefficients v n at the LHC. Here, we introduce a model that is based on the QCD theory of multi-parton interactions and that allows one to study interference effects in the production of m particles in hadronic collisions with N parton-parton interactions ("sources"). In an expansion in powers of 1/( N c 2 - 1) and to leading order in the number of sources N , we calculate interference effects in the m-particle spectra and we determine from them the second and fourth order cumulant momentum anisotropies v n {2} and v n {4}. Without invoking any azimuthal asymmetry and any density dependent non-linear dynamics in the incoming state, and without invoking any interaction in the final state, we find that QCD interference alone can give rise to values for v n {2} and v n {4}, n even, that persist unattenuated for increasing number of sources, that may increase with increasing multiplicity and that agree with measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions in terms of the order of magnitude of the signal and the approximate shape of the transverse momentum dependence. We further find that the non-abelian features of QCD interference can give rise to odd harmonic anisotropies. These findings indicate that the no-interaction baseline including QCD interference effects can make a sizeable if not dominant contribution to the measured v n coefficients in pp collisions. Prospects for analyzing QCD interference contributions further and their possible relevance for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed shortly.

  5. Large area fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure by conventional scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudheer,; Tiwari, P.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukharjee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structure of different periods has been fabricated by electron beam lithography using silver halide based transmission electron microscope film as a substrate. Conventional scanning electron microscope is used as a fabrication tool for electron beam lithography. Optical microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) have been used for its morphological and elemental characterization. Optical characterization is performed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique

  6. Atom beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion beam V etching may give rise to undesirable effects such as uneven erosion and ion migration in dielectrics, even when the surface is neutralized by electron flooding. The effects appear due to a remaining charge imbalance on a microscopic scale, which is absent when bombarding with an uncharged beam. Saddle field sources provide a convenient means of producing energetic neutral beams of inert and reactive gases (which may be dissociated into radicals). The construction and characteristics of the sources are described and a mechanism of internal neutralization proposed. Evidence is given that uncharged beams introduce less damage than equivalent ion beams. Disruptive effects may be initiated by charge accumulation or possibly by neutralization processes which occur when ions closely approach the target surface. (author)

  7. Nanoscale surface characterization using laser interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatyev, Pavel S.; Skrynnik, Andrey A.; Melnik, Yury A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale surface characterization is one of the most significant parts of modern materials development and application. The modern microscopes are expensive and complicated tools, and its use for industrial tasks is limited due to laborious sample preparation, measurement procedures, and low operation speed. The laser modulation interference microscopy method (MIM) for real-time quantitative and qualitative analysis of glass, metals, ceramics, and various coatings has a spatial resolution of 0.1 nm for vertical and up to 100 nm for lateral. It is proposed as an alternative to traditional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. It is demonstrated that in the cases of roughness metrology for super smooth (Ra >1 nm) surfaces the application of a laser interference microscopy techniques is more optimal than conventional SEM and AFM. The comparison of semiconductor test structure for lateral dimensions measurements obtained with SEM and AFM and white light interferometer also demonstrates the advantages of MIM technique.

  8. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  9. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  10. Interference and Sensitivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, Tyler J; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Halloran, M Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Causal inference with interference is a rapidly growing area. The literature has begun to relax the "no-interference" assumption that the treatment received by one individual does not affect the outcomes of other individuals. In this paper we briefly review the literature on causal inference in the presence of interference when treatments have been randomized. We then consider settings in which causal effects in the presence of interference are not identified, either because randomization alone does not suffice for identification, or because treatment is not randomized and there may be unmeasured confounders of the treatment-outcome relationship. We develop sensitivity analysis techniques for these settings. We describe several sensitivity analysis techniques for the infectiousness effect which, in a vaccine trial, captures the effect of the vaccine of one person on protecting a second person from infection even if the first is infected. We also develop two sensitivity analysis techniques for causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding which generalize analogous techniques when interference is absent. These two techniques for unmeasured confounding are compared and contrasted.

  11. Interference in immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Interfering factors are evident in both limited reagent (radioimmunoassay) and excess reagent (immunometric assay) technologies and should be suspected whenever there is a discrepancy between analytical results and clinical findings in the investigation of particular diseases. The overall effect of interference in immunoassay is analytical bias in result, either positive or negative of variable magnitude. The interference maybe caused by a wide spectrum of factors from poor sample collection and handling to physiological factors e.g. lipaemia, heparin treatment, binding protein abnormalities, autoimmunity and drug treatments. The range of interfering factors is extensive and difficult to discuss effectively in a short review

  12. Retroactive Interference and Forgetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinishaa Ankala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroactive interference is the amount of information that can be forgotten by a person over time due to newly learned material. In this paper we establish a relationship between the amount of information forgotten by college students while they read and watch television and the time taken to forget it. We equate these numerical equations to solve for the unknown constants. By doing so, we can find the exact equation and also the amount of forgetting information due to retroactive interference.

  13. Generalized Multiphoton Quantum Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Tillmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassical interference of photons lies at the heart of optical quantum information processing. Here, we exploit tunable distinguishability to reveal the full spectrum of multiphoton nonclassical interference. We investigate this in theory and experiment by controlling the delay times of three photons injected into an integrated interferometric network. We derive the entire coincidence landscape and identify transition matrix immanants as ideally suited functions to describe the generalized case of input photons with arbitrary distinguishability. We introduce a compact description by utilizing a natural basis that decouples the input state from the interferometric network, thereby providing a useful tool for even larger photon numbers.

  14. Optical alignment using the Point Source Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Robert E.; Kuhn, William P.

    2005-08-01

    We give an example of a Point Source Microscope (PSM) and describe its uses as an aid in the alignment of optical systems including the referencing of optical to mechanical datums. The PSM is a small package (about 100x150x30 mm), including a point source of light, beam splitter, microscope objective and digital CCD camera to detect the reflected light spot. A software package in conjunction with a computer video display locates the return image in three degrees of freedom relative to an electronic spatial reference point. The PSM also includes a Koehler illumination source so it may be used as a portable microscope for ordinary imaging and the microscope can be zoomed under computer control. For added convenience, the laser diode point source can be made quite bright to facilitate initial alignment under typical laboratory lighting conditions. The PSM is particularly useful in aligning optical systems that do not have circular symmetry or are distributed in space such as off-axis systems. The PSM is also useful for referencing the centers of curvatures of optical surfaces to mechanical datums of the structure in which the optics are mounted. By removing the microscope objective the PSM can be used as an electronic autocollimator because of the infinite conjugate optical design.

  15. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friets, E.M.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Hatch, J.F.; Roberts, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given

  16. Scanning differential polarization microscope: Its use to image linear and circular differential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Maestre, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope that couples the sensitivity of single-beam measurement of circular dichroism and circular differential scattering with the simultaneous measurement of linear dichroism and linear differential scattering has been developed. The microscope uses a scanning microscope stage and single-point illumination to give the very shallow depth of field found in confocal microscopy. This microscope can operate in the confocal mode as well as in the near confocal condition that can allow one to program the coherence and spatial resolution of the microscope. This microscope has been used to study the change in the structure of chromatin during the development of sperm in Drosophila

  17. Kvantová interference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2003), s. 99-103 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : interference * quantum cryptography * quantum computing * quantum teleportation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  18. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wave-like properties of particles for the first time discovery of radio waves by Heinrich Hertz in 1886. An experiment performed by Taylor in 1909 showed that .... Set- up for double- slit interference with single electrons. Akira Tonomura and colleagues at the. Hitachi Advanced. Research Laboratory in Japan reported.

  19. Digital Position Encoding Of Galvanometer Scanner In A Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeborg, Anders

    1988-09-01

    An account is given of a realization of a feedback method to digitize the analog position signal from a moving iron galvanometer. It is employed in a confocal scanning laser microscope for generating digital images. The photometric sampling has to be closely coupled to the position of a mirror that scans a focused laser beam across a microscope specimen. Pictures with low geometric distortion are obtained up to the size 1024 x 1024 pixels.

  20. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  1. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  2. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations

  3. Semiconductor laser using multimode interference principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zisu; Yin, Rui; Ji, Wei; Wu, Chonghao

    2018-01-01

    Multimode interference (MMI) structure is introduced in semiconductor laser used in optical communication system to realize higher power and better temperature tolerance. Using beam propagation method (BPM), Multimode interference laser diode (MMI-LD) is designed and fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based material. As a comparison, conventional semiconductor laser using straight single-mode waveguide is also fabricated in the same wafer. With a low injection current (about 230 mA), the output power of the implemented MMI-LD is up to 2.296 mW which is about four times higher than the output power of the conventional semiconductor laser. The implemented MMI-LD exhibits stable output operating at the wavelength of 1.52 μm and better temperature tolerance when the temperature varies from 283.15 K to 293.15 K.

  4. Light microscope alignment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Instructions for proper alignment for each of the most common wide field light microscopy contrast techniques are presented: bright field, polarization, dark field, phase contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence. These are then followed by methods on photomicrography, measurement, and cleaning. An extensive set of Notes provides practical tips for each of these methods.

  5. Designs for a quantum electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruit, P.; Hobbs, R.G.; Kim, C-S.; Yang, Y.; Manfrinato, V.R.; Hammer, J.; Thomas, S.; Weber, P.; Klopfer, B.; Kohstall, C.; Juffmann, T.; Kasevich, M.A.; Hommelhoff, P.; Berggren, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This ‘quantum weirdness’ could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or “quantum electron microscope”. A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. - Highlights: • Quantum electron microscopy has the potential of reducing radiation damage. • QEM requires a fraction of the electron wave to pass through the sample

  6. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  7. MICROSCOPIC, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND CHROMATOGRAPHIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peters

    MICROSCOPIC, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND CHROMATOGRAPHIC. FINGERPRINTS OF LEAVES OF NIGERIAN CASSIA TORA LINN. Fatokun Omolola T1*., EsievoKevwe B2., Ugbabe Grace E3. and Kunle Oluyemisi F4. Department of Medicinal Plant Research and Traditional Medicine, National Institute for.

  8. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  9. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  10. Making Art with Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  11. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  12. Quantum interference experiments with complex organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenberger, S. I.

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interference with complex particles is a thriving field in experimental quantum physics. The quest for testing the quantum superposition principle with highly complex molecules has motivated the development of the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI). This interferometer has enabled quantum interference with large organic molecules in an unprecedented mass regime. In this doctoral thesis I describe quantum superposition experiments which we were able to successfully realize with molecules of masses beyond 10 000 amu and consisting of more than 800 atoms. The typical de Broglie wavelengths of all particles in this thesis are in the order of 0.3-5 pm. This is significantly smaller than any molecular extension (nanometers) or the delocalization length in our interferometer (hundreds of nanometers). Many vibrational and rotational states are populated since the molecules are thermally highly excited (300-1000 K). And yet, high-contrast quantum interference patterns could be observed. The visibility and position of these matter-wave interference patterns is highly sensitive to external perturbations. This sensitivity has opened the path to extensive studies of the influence of internal molecular properties on the coherence of their associated matter waves. In addition, it enables a new approach to quantum-assisted metrology. Quantum interference imprints a high-contrast nano-structured density pattern onto the molecular beam which allows us to resolve tiny shifts and dephasing of the molecular beam. I describe how KDTL interferometry can be used to investigate a number of different molecular properties. We have studied vibrationally-induced conformational changes of floppy molecules and permanent electric dipole moments using matter-wave deflectometry in an external electric field. We have developed a new method for optical absorption spectroscopy which uses the recoil of the molecules upon absorption of individual photons. This allows us to

  13. Electromagnetic interference: a radiant future!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although Electromagnetic Interference and Electromagnetic Compatibility are well established domains, the introduction of new technologies results in new challenges. Changes in both measurement techniques, and technological trends resulting in new types of interference are described. These are the

  14. The Young-Feynman two-slits experiment with single electrons: Build-up of the interference pattern and arrival-time distribution using a fast-readout pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frabboni, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gabrielli, Alessandro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Carlo Gazzadi, Gian [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Giorgi, Filippo [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Matteucci, Giorgio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Pozzi, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.pozzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Cesari, Nicola Semprini; Villa, Mauro; Zoccoli, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    The two-slits experiment for single electrons has been carried out by inserting in a conventional transmission electron microscope a thick sample with two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique and a fast recording system able to measure the electron arrival-time. The detector, designed for experiments in future colliders, is based on a custom CMOS chip equipped with a fast readout chain able to manage up to 10{sup 6} frames per second. In this way, high statistic samples of single electron events can be collected within a time interval short enough to measure the distribution of the electron arrival-times and to observe the build-up of the interference pattern. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the first results obtained regarding the two-slits Young-Feynman experiment with single electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We insert in the transmission electron microscope a detector, designed for experiments in future colliders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We record the build-up of high statistic single electron interference patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measure the time distribution of electron arrivals.

  15. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  16. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  17. Microscopic approach to polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The interaction between excitons and light has been investigated in detail. The perturbational approach turns out to be invalid. However, an exact solution can be obtained directly from the Schrödinger equation for a fixed light field. This solution corresponds to a nonlinear optical response...... contrary to experimental experience. In order to remove this absurdity the semiclassical approach must be abandoned and the electromagnetic field quantized. A simple microscopic polariton model is then derived. From this the wave function for the interacting exciton-photon complex is obtained...... of light of the crystal. The introduction of damping smears out the excitonic spectra. The wave function of the polariton, however, turns out to be very independent of damping up to large damping values. Finally, this simplified microscopic polariton model is compared with the exact solutions obtained...

  18. Neuromorphic Data Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegle, John H.; Suppona, Roger A.; Aimone, James Bradley; James, Conrad D.; Follett, David R.; Townsend, Duncan C.M.; Follett, Pamela L.; Karpman, Gabe D.

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, Lewis Rhodes Labs, (LRL), shipped the first commercially viable Neuromorphic Processing Unit, (NPU), branded as a Neuromorphic Data Microscope (NDM). This product leverages architectural mechanisms derived from the sensory cortex of the human brain to efficiently implement pattern matching. LRL and Sandia National Labs have optimized this product for streaming analytics, and demonstrated a 1,000x power per operation reduction in an FPGA format. When reduced to an ASIC, the efficiency will improve to 1,000,000x. Additionally, the neuromorphic nature of the device gives it powerful computational attributes that are counterintuitive to those schooled in traditional von Neumann architectures. The Neuromorphic Data Microscope is the first of a broad class of brain-inspired, time domain processors that will profoundly alter the functionality and economics of data processing.

  19. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  20. Diboson interference resurrection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Panico

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy diboson processes at the LHC are potentially powerful indirect probes of heavy new physics, whose effects can be encapsulated in higher-dimensional operators or in modified Standard Model couplings. An obstruction however comes from the fact that leading new physics effects often emerge in diboson helicity amplitudes that are anomalously small in the Standard Model. As such, the formally leading Standard Model/New Physics interference contribution cancels in inclusive measurements. This paper describes a solution to this problem.

  1. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success...

  2. Microscopic optoelectronic defectoscopy of solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallaeva D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopes are powerful tool for micro- or nanoscale diagnostics of defects in crystalline silicon solar cells. Solar cell is a large p-n junction semiconductor device. Its quality is strongly damaged by the presence of defects. If the cell works under low reverse-biased voltage, defects emit a light in visible range. The suggested method combines three different measurements: electric noise measurement, local topography and near-field optical beam induced current and thus provides more complex information. To prove its feasibility, we have selected one defect (truncated pyramid in the sample, which emitted light under low reverse-biased voltage.

  3. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hong Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  4. Observation of an optical vortex beam from a helical undulator in the XUV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Fujimoto, Masaki; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Masahito; Shigemasa, Eiji; Katoh, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The observation of an optical vortex beam at 60 nm wavelength, produced as the second-harmonic radiation from a helical undulator, is reported. The helical wavefront of the optical vortex beam was verified by measuring the interference pattern between the vortex beam from a helical undulator and a normal beam from another undulator. Although the interference patterns were slightly blurred owing to the relatively large electron beam emittance, it was possible to observe the interference features thanks to the helical wavefront of the vortex beam. The experimental results were well reproduced by simulation.

  5. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  6. Molecular interference and nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deachapunya, S.; Goldfarb, F.; Major, A.; Arndt, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The experiments in Vienna prove and investigate the quantum behavior, such as quantum interference and quantum decoherence with big molecules such as meso-tetraphenylporphyrins , fullerenes, and large derivative thereof. The main goal is to test up to which mass and complexity which one can still observe quantum interference. One of the major challenges in recent experiments with high mass molecules is the low detection efficiency, for example 0.01 percent or even below for masses above 2000 Dalton. To improve the detection system, lithography and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods are being explored since they promise of 100 percent detection efficiency in principle. Moreover, we investigate the potential use of molecule interferometry for molecular nanolithography, i.e. for the deposition of nanometer-sized particles in nanosized patterns. In the first results, we have studied physical properties of tetraphenylporphyrin, C44H30N4 (TPP) such as photobleaching and molecular mobility on several surfaces i.e. quartz, mica, Si, aldehyde biochip surface under high vacuum conditions. We have investigated their properties by using fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. (author)

  7. Neutron microscope with refractive wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masalovich, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of applying a refractive element in a mirror-neutron microscope using ultracold neutrons to reduce neutron aberrations is considered. Application of a refractive element in a neutron microscope with horizontal optical axis is studied. A scheme of neutron microscope with a refractive wedge is presented, evaluation of quartz wedge parameters is made. It is stressed that application of refractive elements in neutron microscopes facilitates aberration reduction in neutron-optical systems

  8. Epoxy replication for Wolter x-ray microscope fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priedhorsky, W.

    1981-01-01

    An epoxy replica of a test piece designed to simulate a Wolter x-ray microscope geometry showed no loss of x-ray reflectivity or resolution, compared to the original. The test piece was a diamond-turned cone with 1.5 0 half angle. A flat was fly-cut on one side, then super- and conventionally polished. The replica was separated at the 1.5 0 -draft angle, simulating a shallow angle Wolter microscope geometry. A test with 8.34 A x rays at 0.9 0 grazing angle showed a reflectivity of 67% for the replica flat surface, and 70% for the original. No spread of the reflected beam was observed with a 20-arc second wide test beam. This test verifies the epoxy replication technique for production of Wolter x-ray microscopes

  9. Three dimensional refractive index imaging with differential interference contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Htet; Buckley, Jared; Kostyk, Piotr; Rodriguez, Braulio; Phelan, Shelley; Xu, M.

    2012-03-01

    We report here a new approach based on an extension of the transport of the intensity equation for three dimensional refractive index imaging of a weak phase object from a series of images recorded by a differential interference contrast microscope at different focus (z-stack). Our method is first validated by imaging polystyrene spheres. We then apply this method to monitor in vivo apoptosis of human breast MCF7 epithelial cells. The potential applications are discussed at the end.

  10. A Survey on Interference Networks: Interference Alignment and Neutralization

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Sang-Woon; Gastpar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapid progress on understanding Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections, and new coding techniques have emerged. The essence of multi-source networks is how to efficiently manage interference that arises from the transmission of other sessions. Classically, interference is removed by orthogonalization (in time or frequency). This means that the rate per session drops inversely proportional to the number of sessions, suggesting that interference is a...

  11. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, A L; Mikula, S; Schalek, R; Lichtman, J; Knothe Tate, M L; Zeidler, D

    2015-08-01

    Electron-electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  14. Solid state optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  15. Photography with a Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fred; Oldfield, Ron

    2000-03-01

    This beautifully illustrated book describes the methods used to record images viewed through a microscope. The text describes the principles and practices of photomicrography, and is written for all who take photomicrographs, beginners and/or experienced practitioners. The authors describe techniques that may be applied to many disciplines for teaching, research, archives, or pleasure. The book includes chapters on standard photography, modern digital techniques, methods for improving contrast, and a short chapter on drawing. In addition to its value as a work of reference, the authors' clear, didactic style makes this book suitable as a textbook for courses in photomicrography and/or elementary light microscopy.

  16. A Survey on Interference Networks: Interference Alignment and Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woon Jeon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been rapid progress on understanding Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections, and new coding techniques have emerged. The essence of multi-source networks is how to efficiently manage interference that arises from the transmission of other sessions. Classically, interference is removed by orthogonalization (in time or frequency. This means that the rate per session drops inversely proportional to the number of sessions, suggesting that interference is a strong limiting factor in such networks. However, recently discovered interference management techniques have led to a paradigm shift that interference might not be quite as detrimental after all. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of these new coding techniques as they apply to the case of time-varying Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections. Specifically, we review interference alignment and ergodic interference alignment for multi-source single-hop networks and interference neutralization and ergodic interference neutralization for multi-source multi-hop networks. We mainly focus on the “degrees of freedom” perspective and also discuss an approximate capacity characterization.

  17. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  18. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI, which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector, low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  19. Observations of the interference of neutrons reflected from thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.; Penfold, J.; Williams, W.G.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that during interferometric measurements of the reflection of neutrons from thin metallic films an interference effect analogous to the interference of light reflected from plane parallel plates was observed. A simple application of Snell's law (Phys. Rev. B 7: 4142 (1973)) predicts the essential features of the effect; and this is mathematically discussed. In experimental work interference fringes were observed on reflecting a narrow well collimated neutron beam from thin metallic films evaporated on to glass substrates. The film materials used were Be and a magnetized CoFe alloy; these have critical glancing angles greater than that of glass, thus ensuring that substrate reflections did not contribute to the interference peaks. A polychromatic neutron beam of wavelength 0.7 nm was reflected at a fixed angle and the wavelength spectrum of the reflected beam was analysed by the neutron time-of-flight method; the measurements were carried out at the High Flux Reactor, Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. Results for the CoFe alloy, film thickness about 100 nm, are shown graphically. (U.K.)

  20. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  1. Study of thin film thickness measurement based on white light interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanbo; Chu, Chunxiao; Wang, Xia

    2017-02-01

    One method for measuring thin film thickness was proposed in this paper, which based on white light interference. One parallel flat crystal was used to be the standard glass, and put another glass on it, to form one air wedge between them. The reflectance spectrum of two beams interference was measured by one spectrometer. By fitting the reflectance spectrum, wave numbers corresponding to every peak can be found, then using two beam interference theory, the air gap thickness at light incident point can be fitted. By measuring the air gap thickness at different positions, the flatness of measured surface also can be analyzed.

  2. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  3. An introduction to beam physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berz, Martin; Wan, Weishi

    2015-01-01

    The field of beam physics touches many areas of physics, engineering, and the sciences. In general terms, beams describe ensembles of particles with initial conditions similar enough to be treated together as a group so that the motion is a weakly nonlinear perturbation of a chosen reference particle. Particle beams are used in a variety of areas, ranging from electron microscopes, particle spectrometers, medical radiation facilities, powerful light sources, and astrophysics to large synchrotrons and storage rings such as the LHC at CERN. An Introduction to Beam Physics is based on lectures given at Michigan State University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, the online VUBeam program, the U.S. Particle Accelerator School, the CERN Academic Training Programme, and various other venues. It is accessible to beginning graduate and upper-division undergraduate students in physics, mathematics, and engineering. The book begins with a historical overview of methods for generating and accelerating beams, high...

  4. Interference in ballistic motor learning - is motor interference really sensory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C

    not require learning. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below ankle movement threshold did not cause interference, whereas suprathreshold rTMS did. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerve to the plantarflexors (but not extensors......Skill gained after a short period of practice in one motor task can be abolished if a second task is learned shortly afterwards. We hypothesised that interference requires the same circuits to be engaged in the two tasks and provoke competing processes of synaptic plasticity. To test this, subjects......) caused interference. We conclude that interference is remarkably specific for circuits involved in a specific movement direction / activation of individual muscles and depends crucially on sensory error signals. One possible mechanism of interference may be disruption of early motor memory consolidation....

  5. Optical trapping with Bessel beams generated from semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskii, G S; Dudelev, V V; Losev, S N; Soboleva, K K; Deryagin, A G; Kuchinskii, V I; Sibbett, W; Rafailov, E U

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study generation of Bessel beams from semiconductor lasers with high beam propagation parameter M 2 and their utilization for optical trapping and manipulation of microscopic particles including living cells. The demonstrated optical tweezing with diodegenerated Bessel beams paves the way to replace their vibronic-generated counterparts for a range of applications towards novel lab-on-a-chip configurations

  6. Microscopic entropy and nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, E.; Ordonets, G.; Petroskij, T.; Prigozhin, I.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained a microscopic expression for entropy in terms of H function based on nonunitary Λ transformation which leads from the time evolution as a unitary group to a Markovian dynamics and unifies the reversible and irreversible aspects of quantum mechanics. This requires a new representation outside the Hilbert space. In terms of H, we show the entropy production and the entropy flow during the emission and absorption of radiation by an atom. Analyzing the time inversion experiment, we emphasize the importance of pre- and postcollisional correlations, which break the symmetry between incoming and outgoing waves. We consider the angle dependence of the H function in a three-dimensional situation. A model including virtual transitions is discussed in a subsequent paper

  7. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  9. Microscopic Theory of Transconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jauho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of momentum transfer between two closely spaced mesoscopic electronic systems, which couple via Coulomb interaction but where tunneling is inhibited, have proven to be a fruitful method of extracting information about interactions in mesoscopic systems. We report a fully microscopic theory for transconductivity σ12, or, equivalently, momentum transfer rate between the system constituents. Our main formal result expresses the transconductivity in terms of two fluctuation diagrams, which are topologically related, but not equivalent to, the Azlamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson diagrams known for superconductivity. In the present paper the magnetic field dependence of σ12 is discussed, and we find that σ12(B is strongly enhanced over its zero field value, and it displays strong features, which can be understood in terms of a competition between density-of-states and screening effects.

  10. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  11. Many-particle interference beyond many-boson and many-fermion statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Tiersch, Markus; Mintert, Florian

    2012-01-01

    that the collective interference of three or more particles leads to much more diverse behavior than expected from the boson–fermion dichotomy known from quantum statistical mechanics. The emerging complexity of many-particle interference is tamed by a simple law for the strict suppression of events in the Bell...... multiport beam splitter. The law shows that counting events are governed by widely species-independent interference, such that bosons and fermions can even exhibit identical interference signatures, while their statistical character remains subordinate. Recent progress in the preparation of tailored many...

  12. On the interference rejection capabilities of triangular antenna array for cellular base stations

    KAUST Repository

    Atat, Rachad

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present the performance analysis of the triangular antenna arrays in terms of the interference rejection capability. In this context, we derive an expression to calculate the spatial interference suppression coefficient for the triangular antenna array with variable number of antenna elements. The performance of the triangular antenna array has been compared with the circular antenna array with respect to interference suppression performance, steering beam pattern, beamwidth and directivity. Simulation results show that the triangular array with large number of elements produces a sharper beamwidth and better interference suppression performance than the circular antenna array. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. The RNA interference revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lenz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing.

  14. Industrial interference and radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessner, A.

    2013-07-01

    The interferer - victim scenario is described for the case of industrial interference affecting radio astronomical observatories. The sensitivity of radio astronomical receivers and their interference limits are outlined. EMC above 30 MHz is a serious problem for Radio Astronomy. Interferer (CISPR) and victim (ITU-R RA 769) standards are not harmonised. The emissions from the interferer and their spectral characteristics are not defined sufficiently well by CISPR standards. The required minimum coupling losses (MCL) between an industrial device and radio astronomical antenna depends on device properties but is shown to exceed 140 dB in most cases. Spatial separation of a few km is insufficient on its own, the terrain must shield > 30-40 dB, additional mitigations such as extra shielding or suppression of high frequency emissions may be necessary. A case by case compatibility analysis and tailored EMC measures are required for individual installations. Aggregation of many weak rfi emitters can become serious problem. If deployment densities are high enough, the emission constraints can even exceed those for a single interferer at a short distance from the radio observatory. Compatibility studies must account not only for the single interferer but also for many widely distributed interference sources.

  15. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-01-01

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect

  16. On-axis microscopes for the inelastic x-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gofron, K. J., E-mail: kgofron@bnl.gov; Cai, Y. Q.; Coburn, D. S.; Antonelli, S.; Suvorov, A. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Flores, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, NY 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    A novel on-axis X-ray microscope with 3 µm resolution, 3x magnification, and a working distance of 600 mm for in-situ sample alignment and X-ray beam visualization for the Inelastic X-ray Scattering (IXS) beamline at NSLS-II is presented. The microscope uses reflective optics, which minimizes dispersion, and allows imaging from Ultraviolet (UV) to Infrared (IR) with specifically chosen objective components (coatings, etc.). Additionally, a portable high resolution X-ray microscope for KB mirror alignment and X-ray beam characterization was developed.

  17. Communications in interference limited networks

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book offers means to handle interference as a central problem of operating wireless networks. It investigates centralized and decentralized methods to avoid and handle interference as well as approaches that resolve interference constructively. The latter type of approach tries to solve the joint detection and estimation problem of several data streams that share a common medium. In fact, an exciting insight into the operation of networks is that it may be beneficial, in terms of an overall throughput, to actively create and manage interference. Thus, when handled properly, "mixing" of data in networks becomes a useful tool of operation rather than the nuisance as which it has been treated traditionally. With the development of mobile, robust, ubiquitous, reliable and instantaneous communication being a driving and enabling factor of an information centric economy, the understanding, mitigation and exploitation of interference in networks must be seen as a centrally important task.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  19. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  20. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, T.; Chen, X.; Mohan, P.; Lao, B. Q.

    2017-09-01

    The observational facilities of radio astronomy keep constant upgrades and developments to achieve better capabilities including increasing the time of the data recording and frequency resolutions, and increasing the receiving and recording bandwidth. However in contrast, only a limited spectrum resource has been allocated to radio astronomy by the International Telecommunication Union, resulting in that the radio observational instrumentations are inevitably exposed to undesirable radio frequency interference (RFI) signals which originate mainly from the terrestrial human activity and are becoming stronger with time. RFIs degrade the quality of data and even lead to invalid data. The impact of RFIs on scientific outcome becomes more and more serious. In this article, the requirement for RFI mitigation is motivated, and the RFI characteristics, mitigation techniques, and strategies are reviewed. The mitigation strategies adopted at some representative observatories, telescopes, and arrays are also introduced. The advantages and shortcomings of the four classes of RFI mitigation strategies are discussed and presented, applicable at the connected causal stages: preventive, pre-detection, pre-correlation, and post-correlation. The proper identification and flagging of RFI is the key to the reduction of data loss and improvement in data quality, and is also the ultimate goal of developing RFI mitigation technique. This can be achieved through a strategy involving a combination of the discussed techniques in stages. The recent advances in the high speed digital signal processing and high performance computing allow for performing RFI excision of the large data volumes generated from large telescopes or arrays in both real time and offline modes, aiding the proposed strategy.

  1. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  2. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  3. Interference in motor learning - is motor interference sensory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C

    learning of the primary task, no interference was observed. Previous studies have suggested that primary motor cortex (M1) may be involved in early motor memory consolidation. 1Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below ankle movement threshold......Skill gained after a short period of practice in one motor task can be abolished if a second task is learned shortly afterwards, but not all motor activities cause interference. After all it is not necessary to remain completely still after practicing a task for learning to occur. Here we ask which...... mechanisms determine whether or not interference occurs. We hypothesised that interference requires the same neural circuits to be engaged in the two tasks and provoke competing processes of synaptic plasticity. To test this, subjects learned a ballistic ankle plantarflexion task. Early motor memory...

  4. Interference in motor learning - is motor interference sensory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C

    mechanisms determine whether or not interference occurs. We hypothesised that interference requires the same neural circuits to be engaged in the two tasks and provoke competing processes of synaptic plasticity. To test this, subjects learned a ballistic ankle plantarflexion task. Early motor memory...... learning of the primary task, no interference was observed. Previous studies have suggested that primary motor cortex (M1) may be involved in early motor memory consolidation. 1Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below ankle movement threshold......Skill gained after a short period of practice in one motor task can be abolished if a second task is learned shortly afterwards, but not all motor activities cause interference. After all it is not necessary to remain completely still after practicing a task for learning to occur. Here we ask which...

  5. Beam-profile measurement on the magnetoelastic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A proof-of-principle magnetoelastic lens has been shown to behave much as expected. Calibration of its behavior has been achieved in a relatively simple and repeatable way. The relatively good agreement with the magnetoelastic optics model gives rise to the hope that focusing of the internal field will ultimately give rise to diffraction limited operation; that is, to about 4 μm for shear wave operation at 1.0 GHz

  6. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  7. Midfield microscope : Exploring the extraordinary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Docter, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the development of the midfield microscope is presented. This is a microscope in which the extraordinary transmission (EOT) through sub-wavelength hole-arrays is applied. Before trying to combine microscopy and EOT, we look at them separately. In chapter 1 an overview is given of the

  8. Compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Yasuo; Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta; Suga, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and performance of a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope developed at the Photon Factory. Piezo-driven linear stages are used as coarse stages of the microscope to realize excellent compactness, mobility, and vibrational and thermal stability. An X-ray beam with an intensity of ∼10 7 photons/s was focused to a diameter of ∼40 nm at the sample. At the soft X-ray undulator beamline used with the microscope, a wide range of photon energies (250–1600 eV) is available. The microscope has been used to research energy materials and in environmental sciences

  9. Adaptive limited feedback for interference alignment in MIMO interference channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Chenglin; Meng, Juan; Li, Shibao; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    It is very important that the radar sensor network has autonomous capabilities such as self-managing, etc. Quite often, MIMO interference channels are applied to radar sensor networks, and for self-managing purpose, interference management in MIMO interference channels is critical. Interference alignment (IA) has the potential to dramatically improve system throughput by effectively mitigating interference in multi-user networks at high signal-to-noise (SNR). However, the implementation of IA predominantly relays on perfect and global channel state information (CSI) at all transceivers. A large amount of CSI has to be fed back to all transmitters, resulting in a proliferation of feedback bits. Thus, IA with limited feedback has been introduced to reduce the sum feedback overhead. In this paper, by exploiting the advantage of heterogeneous path loss, we first investigate the throughput of IA with limited feedback in interference channels while each user transmits multi-streams simultaneously, then we get the upper bound of sum rate in terms of the transmit power and feedback bits. Moreover, we propose a dynamic feedback scheme via bit allocation to reduce the throughput loss due to limited feedback. Simulation results demonstrate that the dynamic feedback scheme achieves better performance in terms of sum rate.

  10. Beam current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  11. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-01-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  12. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  13. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  14. Use of a scanning electron microscope for characterizing semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, J.; Bresse, J.F.; Carme, H.; Monnier, J.

    1974-01-01

    The electron beam from the scanning microscope had three different uses: 1) in induced mode for characterizing the substrate of a P + N junction by measuring the diffusion length and in controlling surface recombination velocities; 2) for controlling Si/SiO 2 interface degradation by measuring very low frequency capacitance and for evaluating the oxide quality by measuring μ/tau: application to the fast control of any device, in this case the evolution of the current of an avalanche photodiode; 3) in using the beam as a Castaing probe for determining features of the generation volume, Si thickness on Al 2 O 3 , or Si thickness [fr

  15. Evaluate interference in digital channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, F.; Sumida, J.

    1985-01-01

    Any future mobile satellite service (MSS) which is to provide simultaneous mobile communications for a large number of users will have to make very efficient use of the spectrum. As the spectrum available for an MSS is limited, the system's channels should be packed as closely together as possible, with minimum-width guard bands. In addition the employment of frequency reuse schemes is an important factor. Difficulties regarding these solutions are related to the introduction of interference in the link. A balance must be achieved between the competing aims of spectrum conservation and low interference. While the interference phenomenon in narrowband FM voice channels is reasonably well understood, very little effort, however, has been devoted to the problem in digital radios. Attention is given to work, which illuminates the effects of cochannel and adjacent channel interference on digital FM (FSK) radios.

  16. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  17. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratory has made significant progress this year in devising improved electron-optical systems, in studying invertebrate hemoglobins with the STEM, and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. Our goal in electron optics is to improve resolution by producing spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients with signs opposite those of magnetic lenses. We have progressed toward this goal through calculations that explore the addition of electrodes to electron mirrors to reduce these two geometric aberrations and by devising a beam separation system that won't introduce asymmetrical aberrations. Some promising new designs of magnetic lenses for SEM applications have also been investigated. We have continued our exploration of the quaternary structure of the invertebrate hemoglobins and are now among the top laboratories in this area of expertise. In addition, we have overcome many of our electronic difficulties on the sub-angstrom STEM and have made significant progress toward achieving an operational system. The addition of an IBM RISC-6000 workstation to our lab has significantly increased our image processing capabilities

  18. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Roy; Tsur, Yuval; Remez, Roei; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2015-03-06

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy, and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here, we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or nonstandard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation.

  19. The transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttmann, P.; Niemann, B.; Rehbein, S.; Knochel, C.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2002-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at BESSY II is the first one using soft X-rays in the water window region at an undulator beamline. For this, the condenser monochromator has been adapted to the highly collimated X-ray beam of the undulator U41. This is done by using a rotating condenser (RK) which can match the numerical aperture of any micro objective zone plate. The actual setup of the TXM is given in this report. Several beam diagnostic instruments have been incorporated into the beamline and the microscope to adjust the optical elements and to study the behaviour of the complete system. The results of the characterization done so far will be presented as well as first images of applications will be shown. (authors)

  20. Nanometer-scale lithography on microscopically clean graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Zhang, X.; Feringa, B. L.

    2011-01-01

    Focused-electron-beam-induced deposition, or FEBID, enables the fabrication of patterns with sub-10 nm resolution. The initial stages of metal deposition by FEBID are still not fundamentally well understood. For these investigations, graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal...... lattice, is ideal as the substrate for FEBID writing. In this paper, we have used exfoliated few-layer graphene as a support to study the early growth phase of focused-electron-beam-induced deposition and to write patterns with dimensions between 0.6 and 5 nm. The results obtained here are compared...... to the deposition behavior on amorphous materials. Prior to the deposition experiment, the few-layer graphene was cleaned. Typically, it is observed in electron microscope images that areas of microscopically clean graphene are surrounded by areas with amorphous material. We present a method to remove the amorphous...

  1. System for optical sorting of microscopic objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for optical sorting of microscopic objects and corresponding method. An optical detection system (52) is capable of determining the positions of said first and/or said second objects. One or more force transfer units (200, 205, 210, 215) are placed...... in a first reservoir, the one or more force units being suitable for optical momentum transfer. An electromagnetic radiation source (42) yields a radiation beam (31, 32) capable of optically displacing the force transfer units from one position to another within the first reservoir (1R). The force transfer...... units are displaced from positions away from the first objects to positions close to the first objects, and then displacing the first objects via a contact force (300) between the first objects and the force transfer units facilitates an optical sorting of the first objects and the second objects....

  2. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Apparatus and methods for controlling electron microscope stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duden, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for generating an image of a specimen with a microscope (e.g., TEM) are disclosed. In one aspect, the microscope may generally include a beam generator, a stage, a detector, and an image generator. A plurality of crystal parameters, which describe a plurality of properties of a crystal sample, are received. In a display associated with the microscope, an interactive control sphere based at least in part on the received crystal parameters and that is rotatable by a user to different sphere orientations is presented. The sphere includes a plurality of stage coordinates that correspond to a plurality of positions of the stage and a plurality of crystallographic pole coordinates that correspond to a plurality of polar orientations of the crystal sample. Movement of the sphere causes movement of the stage, wherein the stage coordinates move in conjunction with the crystallographic coordinates represented by pole positions so as to show a relationship between stage positions and the pole positions.

  4. Topology Control in Aerial Multi-Beam Directional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Topology Control in Aerial Multi-Beam Directional Networks Brian Proulx, Nathaniel M. Jones, Jennifer Madiedo, Greg Kuperman {brian.proulx, njones...significant interference. Topology control (i.e., selecting a subset of neighbors to communicate with) is vital to reduce the interference. Good topology ...underlying challenges to topology control in multi-beam direction networks. Two topology control algorithms are developed: a centralized algorithm

  5. Interference suppression capabilities of smart cognitive-femto networks (SCFN)

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive Radios are considered a standard part of future heterogeneous mobile network architectures. In this chapter, a two tier heterogeneous network with multiple Radio Access Technologies (RATs) is considered, namely (1) the secondary network, which comprises of Cognitive-Femto BS (CFBS), and (2) the macrocell network, which is considered a primary network. By exploiting the cooperation among the CFBS, the multiple CFBS can be considered a single base station with multiple geographically dispersed antennas, which can reduce the interference levels by directing the main beam toward the desired femtocell mobile user. The resultant network is referred to as Smart Cognitive-Femto Network (SCFN). In order to determine the effectiveness of the proposed smart network, the interference rejection capabilities of the SCFN is studied. It has been shown that the smart network offers significant performance improvements in interference suppression and Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) and may be considered a promising solution to the interference management problems in future heterogeneous networks. © 2013, IGI Global.

  6. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-01-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the ''linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices

  7. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  8. The poor man's scanning force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2002-01-01

    The Macroscope (Zypman F R and Guerra-Vela C 2001 Eur. J. Phys. 22 17-30), an educational large-scale version of a scanning force microscope's cantilever-tip system, is used in the presence of nonlinear forces. This paper presents quantitative experimental evidence confirming the validity of the beam model (BM) (Eppel S J, Todd B A and Zypman F R 2000 Materials Issues and Modeling for Device Nanofabrication ed L Merhari et al (Pittsburgh, PA: Materials Research Society) pp 584, 189) as a proper reconstruction algorithm. As a teaching laboratory experiment, the force measurements are first done directly with a variety of dynamometer-like setups. Subsequently, the measurements are performed indirectly with the Macroscope from the cantilever resonant frequency shifts and the BM algorithm. Two central results of this work lie in its ability to compare forces obtained by traditional algorithms with known forces, and to illustrate in a hands-on fashion the principles behind the working of a scanning force microscope. (author)

  9. Mobile microscope complex GIB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, A.V.; Gorbachev, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    To study microstructure in operating pipelines of power units a mobile microscope system is developed and successfully used. The system includes a portable microscope, a monitor, power supply and a portable computer. The monitor is used for surveying images from a video camera mounted on the microscope. The magnification on visual examination constitutes x 100 and x 500. Diameters of pipelines examined should not be less than 130 mm. Surface preparation for microstructural studies includes routine mechanical rough grinding and polishing with subsequent etching [ru

  10. Interference in ballistic motor learning - is motor interference really sensory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C

    Skill gained after a short period of practice in one motor task can be abolished if a second task is learned shortly afterwards. We hypothesised that interference requires the same circuits to be engaged in the two tasks and provoke competing processes of synaptic plasticity. To test this, subjects...... learned a ballistic ankle plantarflexion task. Interference was observed following subsequent learning of a precision tracking task with the same movement direction and agonist muscles, but not by learning involving the opposite movement and antagonist muscles or by voluntary agonist contractions that did...... not require learning. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below ankle movement threshold did not cause interference, whereas suprathreshold rTMS did. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerve to the plantarflexors (but not extensors...

  11. Microscopic examination of deteriorated concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Concrete petrography is the integrated microscopic and mesoscale (hand specimen size) investigation of hardened concrete, that can provide information on the composition of concrete, the original relationships between the concrete's various constituents, and any changes therein, whether as a result

  12. Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R. H.

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  13. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  14. Interference due to coherence swapping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pinhole arrangement in a diaphragm behind the crystal and/or with the use of filters. 4.2 Proposed observation of coherence swapping. We take two separate down conversion crystals, A, B, however pumped by the same pulsed laser (see figure 2). The pump beam is beam-split in such a way that the pulses enter both. 398.

  15. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2011-01-01

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa

  16. Nitrogen implantation with a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S; Raatz, N; Jankuhn, St; John, R; Meijer, J

    2018-01-08

    Established techniques for ion implantation rely on technically advanced and costly machines like particle accelerators that only few research groups possess. We report here about a new and surprisingly simple ion implantation method that is based upon a widespread laboratory instrument: The scanning electron microscope. We show that it can be utilized to ionize atoms and molecules from the restgas by collisions with electrons of the beam and subsequently accelerate and implant them into an insulating sample by the effect of a potential building up at the sample surface. Our method is demonstrated by the implantation of nitrogen ions into diamond and their subsequent conversion to nitrogen vacancy centres which can be easily measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy. To provide evidence that the observed centres are truly generated in the way we describe, we supplied a 98% isotopically enriched 15 N gas to the chamber, whose natural abundance is very low. By employing the method of optically detected magnetic resonance, we were thus able to verify that the investigated centres are actually created from the 15 N isotopes. We also show that this method is compatible with lithography techniques using e-beam resist, as demonstrated by the implantation of lines using PMMA.

  17. Enhanced Transmission of Light and Particle Waves through Subwavelength Nanoapertures by Far-Field Interference

    OpenAIRE

    Kukhlevsky, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    Subwavelength aperture arrays in thin metal films can enable enhanced transmission of light and matter (atom) waves. The phenomenon relies on resonant excitation and interference of the plasmon or matter waves on the metal surface. We show a new mechanism that could provide a great resonant and nonresonant transmission enhancement of the light or de Broglie particle waves passed through the apertures not by the surface waves, but by the constructive interference of diffracted waves (beams gen...

  18. Digital phase-shifting atomic force microscope Moire method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chiaming; Chen Lienwen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the digital atomic force microscope (AFM) Moire method with phase-shifting technology is established to measure the in-plane displacement and strain fields. The Moire pattern is generated by the interference between the specimen grating and the virtual reference grating formed by digital image processes. The overlapped image is filtered by two-dimensional wavelet transformation to obtain the clear interference Moire patterns. The four-step phase-shifting method is realized by translating the phase of the virtual reference grating from 0 to 2π. The principle of the digital AFM Moire method and the phase-shifting technology are described in detail. Experimental results show that this method is convenient to use and efficient in realizing the microscale measurement

  19. Demonstrations of Beats as Moving Interference Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a ripple tank demonstration that displays interference patterns responsible for producing beats and provides photographs of computer simulations of various beat interference patterns. Includes programs for the computer simulation and equations of constructive interference paths in beat interference patterns. (Author/SK)

  20. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  2. Analysis of the Interference Modulation Depth in the Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle of the Michelson interferometer, the paper briefly describes the theoretical significance and calculates and deduces three expressions of the interference modulation depth. The influence of the surface shape error of plane mirror on modulation depth is analyzed, and the tolerance of error is also pointed out. Moreover, the dependence of modulation depth on the reflectance change of beam splitter interface is also analyzed, and the curve is given. It is concluded that this paper is of general significance for the Fourier transform spectrometer based on the principle of the Michelson two-beam interference.

  3. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  4. Fully low voltage and large area searching scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Zongqiang; Wang, Jihui; Lu, Qingyou

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which allows the tip to travel a large distance (millimeters) on the sample and take images (to find microscopic targets) anywhere it reaches without losing atomic resolution. This broad range searching capability, together with the coarse approach and scan motion, is all done with only one single piezoelectric tube scanner as well as with only low voltages (<15 V). Simple structure, low interference and high precision are thus achieved. To this end, a pillar and a tube scanner are mounted in parallel on a base with one ball glued on the pillar top and two balls glued on the scanner top. These three balls form a narrow triangle, which supports a triangular slider piece. By inertial stepping, the scanner can move the slider toward the pillar (coarse approach) or rotate the slider about the pillar (travel along sample surface). Since all the stepping motions are driven by the scanner's lateral bending which is large per unit voltage, high voltages are unnecessary. The technology is also applicable to scanning force microscopes (SFM) such as atomic force microscopes (AFM), etc

  5. The Practical Challenges of Interference Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Ayach, Omar El; Peters, Steven W.; Heath Jr, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a revolutionary wireless transmission strategy that reduces the impact of interference. The idea of interference alignment is to coordinate multiple transmitters so that their mutual interference aligns at the receivers, facilitating simple interference cancellation techniques. Since IA's inception, researchers have investigated its performance and proposed improvements, verifying IA's ability to achieve the maximum degrees of freedom (an approximation of sum ca...

  6. Axiomatic electrodynamics and microscopic mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1981-04-01

    A new approach to theoretical physics, along with the basic formulation of a new MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS for the motion of small charged particles is described in this set of lecture notes. Starting with the classical (Newtonian) mechanics and classical fields, the important but well known properties of Classical Electromagnetic field are discussed up to section 4. The next nection describes the usual radiation damping theory and its difficulties. It is argued that the usual treatment of radiation damping is not valid for small space and time intervals and the true description of motion requires a new type of mechanics - the MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS: Section 6 and 7 are devoted to showing that not only the new microscopic mechanics goes over to Newtonian mechanics in the proper limit, but also it is closely connected with Quantum Mechanics. All the known results of the Schroedinger theory can be reproduced by microscopic mechanics which also gives a clear physical picture. It removes Einstein's famous objections against Quantum Theory and provides a clear distinction between classical and Quantum behavior. Seven Axioms (three on Classical Mechanics, two for Maxwell's theory, one for Relativity and a new Axiom on Radiation damping) are shown to combine Classical Mechanics, Maxwellian Electrodynamics, Relativity and Schroedinger's Quantum Theory within a single theoretical framework under Microscopic Mechanics which awaits further development at the present time. (orig.)

  7. Interference Mitigation in Cognitive Femtocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Costa, Gustavo Wagner Oliveira; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Alvarez Roig, Victor

    2010-01-01

    , management and optimization can be prohibitive. Instead, self-optimization of an uncoordinated deployment should be considered. Cognitive Radio enabled femtocells are considered to be a promising solution to enable self-optimizing femtocells to effectively manage the inter-cell interference, especially...

  8. Conducted interference on smart meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyer, Cornelis H.A.; Leferink, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The increasing conducted interference caused by modern electronic equipment is causing more problems for electronic, or static, energy meters. These meters are called smart meters when equipped with a communication link, and are replacing the conventional electromechanical meters. It is known that

  9. Electromagnetic Interference in Smart Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank; Keyer, Cees

    2017-01-01

    The increasing conducted interference caused by modern electronic equipment is causing more problems for electronic, or static, energy meters. If equipped with a communication link they are called smart meter. Because the smart meter is a key device in smart grids, any deviation has huge impact on

  10. The design and test of ellipsoidal glass capillaries as condensers for X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jinping; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Gang; Xiong Ying; Liu Longhua; Huang Xinlong; Tian Yangchao

    2008-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray microscope endstation was constructed on a wiggler beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Parameters of the ellipsoidal glass capillaries as condensers were calculated and designed based on the illumination requests in the X-ray microscope system. Performance of the ellipsoidal glass capillaries was tested. The results indicate that the beam size agrees with the designed parameters and focus efficiencies of the ellipsoidal glass capillary condensers are better than 85%. (authors)

  11. Performance and LHC beam stability issue related to Q/Q' diagnostics and feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, Ralph J

    2010-01-01

    The baseline tune (Q) and chromaticity (Q’) diagnostics and associated feedback systems played a crucial role during the LHC commissioning, in establishing circulating beam, the first ramps and their fill-to-fill feed-forward correction. Early on, they also allowed to identify issues such as the residual tune stability, beam spectrum interferences and beam-beam effects – all of which may impact beam lifetimes and thus need to be addressed in view of nominal LHC operation.

  12. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  13. Microscope and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  14. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  15. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...

  16. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  17. Polystyrene as a zwitter resist in electron beam lithography based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The resist action of polystyrene (w, 2,600,000) towards electroless deposition of gold on Si(100) surface following cross-linking by exposing to a 10 kV electron beam, has been investigated employing a scanning electron microscope equipped with electron beam lithography tool. With a low dose of electrons (21 C/cm2), ...

  18. Manipulation of dielectric particles with nondiffracting parabolic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C; Petrov, Dmitri

    2014-12-01

    The trapping and manipulation of microscopic particles embedded in the structure of nondiffracting parabolic beams is reported. The particles acquire orbital angular momentum and exhibit an open trajectory following the parabolic fringes of the beam. We observe an asymmetry in the terminal velocity of the particles caused by the counteracting gradient and scattering forces.

  19. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  20. Metrological large range scanning probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Gaoliang; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Xu Min; Hasche, Klaus; Wilkening, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    We describe a metrological large range scanning probe microscope (LR-SPM) with an Abbe error free design and direct interferometric position measurement capability, aimed at versatile traceable topographic measurements that require nanometer accuracy. A dual-stage positioning system was designed to achieve both a large measurement range and a high measurement speed. This dual-stage system consists of a commercially available stage, referred to as nanomeasuring machine (NMM), with a motion range of 25 mmx25 mmx5 mm along x, y, and z axes, and a compact z-axis piezoelectric positioning stage (compact z stage) with an extension range of 2 μm. The metrological LR-SPM described here senses the surface using a stationary fixed scanning force microscope (SFM) head working in contact mode. During operation, lateral scanning of the sample is performed solely by the NMM. Whereas the z motion, controlled by the SFM signal, is carried out by a combination of the NMM and the compact z stage. In this case the compact z stage, with its high mechanical resonance frequency (greater than 20 kHz), is responsible for the rapid motion while the NMM simultaneously makes slower movements over a larger motion range. To reduce the Abbe offset to a minimum the SFM tip is located at the intersection of three interferometer measurement beams orientated in x, y, and z directions. To improve real time performance two high-end digital signal processing (DSP) systems are used for NMM positioning and SFM servocontrol. Comprehensive DSP firmware and Windows XP-based software are implemented, providing a flexible and user-friendly interface. The instrument is able to perform large area imaging or profile scanning directly without stitching small scanned images. Several measurements on different samples such as flatness standards, nanostep height standards, roughness standards as well as sharp nanoedge samples and 1D gratings demonstrate the outstanding metrological capabilities of the instrument

  1. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  2. Nanometer-scale lithography on microscopically clean graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorp, W F; De Hosson, J Th M; Zhang, X; Feringa, B L; Wagner, J B; Hansen, T W

    2011-01-01

    Focused-electron-beam-induced deposition, or FEBID, enables the fabrication of patterns with sub-10 nm resolution. The initial stages of metal deposition by FEBID are still not fundamentally well understood. For these investigations, graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice, is ideal as the substrate for FEBID writing. In this paper, we have used exfoliated few-layer graphene as a support to study the early growth phase of focused-electron-beam-induced deposition and to write patterns with dimensions between 0.6 and 5 nm. The results obtained here are compared to the deposition behavior on amorphous materials. Prior to the deposition experiment, the few-layer graphene was cleaned. Typically, it is observed in electron microscope images that areas of microscopically clean graphene are surrounded by areas with amorphous material. We present a method to remove the amorphous material in order to obtain large areas of microscopically clean graphene flakes. After cleaning, W(CO) 6 was used as the precursor to study the early growth phase of FEBID deposits. It was observed that preferential adsorption of the precursor molecules on step edges and adsorbates plays a key role in the deposition on cleaned few-layer graphene.

  3. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  4. The electron beam damage of synthetic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, D.

    1977-01-01

    Beam damage is a severe limitation when the electron microscope is applied to the study of microstructures of synthetic polymers. There is no practical method for increasing significantly the critical dose required to damage a specimen. It is therefore necessary to utilize fully the information present in the electron beam by efficient recording and by eliminating unnecessary accumulation of irradiation damage. The STEM technique provides a unique facility for this type of work mainly because of localized and well controlled beam damage in both the image and microdiffraction modes. Examples are given. (author)

  5. Quantum mechanics of charged particle beam optics

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Theory of charged particle beam optics is basic to the design and working of charged particle beam devices from electron microscopes to accelerator machines. Traditionally, the optical elements of the devices are designed and operated based on classical mechanics and classical electromagnetism, and only certain specific quantum mechanical aspects are dealt with separately using quantum theory. This book provides a systematic approach to quantum theory of charged particle beam optics, particularly in the high energy cases such as accelerators or high energy electron microscopy.

  6. Research on improving performance to metallographic microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Socaciu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Precision optical components from an old optical microscope can be improved and emphasized with a dedicated digital microscope camera. This is an affordable way to obtain a high performance metallographic or biological microscope, with minimum of spending. This paper study those ways and adapts a camera to existing microscopes for researchers use, Optimizing visualization by projecting the image and improving the microscope use by different options of capture and image processing.

  7. Performance verification of focus variation and confocal microscopes measuring tilted ultra-fine surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Baruffi, Federico; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of two optical instruments, scilicet a laser scanning confocal microscope and a focus-variation microscope, was investigated considering measurements of tilted surfaces. The measured samples were twelve steel artefacts for mould surface finish reference, covering Sa roughness...... parameter in the range (101—103) nm. The 3D surface texture parameters considered were Sa, Sq and Sdq. The small working distance of the confocal microscope objectives influenced the measurement setup, preventing from selecting a high tilting angle. The investigation was carried out comparing measurements...... of flat surfaces (0° tilt) with measurements of 12.5° tilted surfaces. The confocal microscope results showed a high sensitivity to tilting due to the laser beam reflection on the metal surfaces. The focus variation microscope results were more robust with respect to the considered angular variation...

  8. Intra-operative application of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, T; Lankenau, E; Hüttmann, G; Pau, H W

    2009-09-01

    To introduce the use of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope for intra-operative evaluation of the human larynx. A specially equipped operating microscope with integrated spectral domain optical coherence tomography apparatus was used during microlaryngoscopy. Technical improvements in optical coherence tomography equipment (e.g. pilot beam, variable focal distance, improved image quality and integration into an operating microscope) have enabled greater sensitivity and imaging speed and a non-contact approach. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography now enables a better correlation between optical coherence tomography images and histological findings. With this new technology, the precision of biopsy can be improved during microlaryngoscopy. Use of this new optical coherence tomography technology, integrated into an operating microscope, enables the surgeon to define the biopsy site location and resection plane precisely, while the optical zoom of the operating microscope can be used over the complete range.

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  10. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF 91 (France); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, PO Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  11. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.; Goriely, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations.While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  12. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  13. HOMER: the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luviano, Anali

    Holography was invented in 1948 by Dennis Gabor and has undergone major advancements since the 2000s leading to the development of commercial digital holographic microscopes (DHM). This noninvasive form of microscopy produces a three-dimensional (3-D) digital model of a sample without altering or destroying the sample, thus allowing the same sample to be studied multiple times. HOMER-the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research-produces a 3-D image from a two-dimensional (2-D) interference pattern captured by a camera that is then put through reconstruction software. This 2-D pattern is created when a reference wave interacts with the sample to produce a secondary wave that interferes with the unaltered part of the reference wave. I constructed HOMER to be an efficient, portable in-line DHM using inexpensive material and free reconstruction software. HOMER uses three different-colored LEDs as light sources. I am testing the performance of HOMER with the goal of producing tri-color images of samples. I'm using small basic biological samples to test the effectiveness of HOMER and plan to transition to complex cellular and biological specimens as I pursue my interest in biophysics. Norwich University.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility and interference metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M. T.; Kanda, M.

    1986-07-01

    The material included in the report is intended for a short course on electromagnetic compatibility/interference (EMC/EM) metrology. The entire course is presented in nine chapters with the introductory part given as Chapter 1. The particular measurement topics to be covered are: (1) open sites (Chapters 2 and 6), (2) transverse electromagnetic cells (Chapter 3), (3) techniques for measuring the electromagnetic shielding of materials (Chapter 4), (4) anechoic chambers (Chapter 5), and (5) reverberating chambers (Chapter 8). In addition, since small probe antennas play an important role in some of the EMC/EMI measurements discussed, a separate chapter on various probe systems developed at NBS is given in Chapter 7. Selected contemporary EMI topics such as the characterization and measurement of a complex EM environment, interferences in the form of out-of-band receptions to an antenna, and some conducted EMI problems are also briefly discussed (Chapter 9).

  15. REM sleep rescues learning from interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Duggan, Katherine A; Mednick, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A compact combined ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV STM) and near-field optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R A J; Hayton, J A; Cavill, S; Ma, Jin; Beton, P H; Moriarty, P

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a hybrid scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM)–scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) instrument which operates under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated fibre-optic tips capable of high quality STM imaging and tunnelling spectroscopy are fabricated using a simple and reliable method which foregoes the electroless plating strategy previously employed by other groups. The fabrication process is reproducible, producing robust tips which may be exchanged under UHV conditions. We show that controlled contact with metal surfaces considerably enhances the STM imaging capabilities of fibre-optic tips. Light collection (from the cleaved back face of the ITO-coated fibre-optic tip) and optical alignment are facilitated by a simple two-lens arrangement where the in-vacuum collimation/collection lens may be adjusted using a slip-stick motor. A second in-air lens focuses the light (which emerges from the UHV system as a parallel beam) onto a cooled CCD spectrograph or photomultiplier tube. The application of the instrument to combined optical and electronic spectroscopy of Au and GaAs surfaces is discussed

  17. A high-resolution multimode digital microscope system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Edward D; Shaw, Sidney L; Waters, Jennifer C; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Maddox, Paul S; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of a high-resolution, multimode digital imaging system based on a wide-field epifluorescent and transmitted light microscope, and a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The three main parts of this imaging system are Nikon FXA microscope, Hamamatsu C4880 cooled CCD camera, and MetaMorph digital imaging system. This chapter presents various design criteria for the instrument and describes the major features of the microscope components-the cooled CCD camera and the MetaMorph digital imaging system. The Nikon FXA upright microscope can produce high resolution images for both epifluorescent and transmitted light illumination without switching the objective or moving the specimen. The functional aspects of the microscope set-up can be considered in terms of the imaging optics, the epi-illumination optics, the transillumination optics, the focus control, and the vibration isolation table. This instrument is somewhat specialized for microtubule and mitosis studies, and it is also applicable to a variety of problems in cellular imaging, including tracking proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein in live cells. The instrument is also valuable for correlating the assembly dynamics of individual cytoplasmic microtubules (labeled by conjugating X-rhodamine to tubulin) with the dynamics of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (labeled with DiOC6) and the dynamics of the cell cortex (by differential interference contrast) in migrating vertebrate epithelial cells. This imaging system also plays an important role in the analysis of mitotic mutants in the powerful yeast genetic system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  19. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  20. Single-photon interference experiment for high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondani, Maria

    2014-07-01

    We follow the reductio ad absurdum reasoning described in the book "Sneaking a Look at God's Cards" by Giancarlo Ghirardi to demonstrate the wave-particle duality of light in a Mach-Zehnder interferometric setup analog to the conventional Young double-slit experiment. We aim at showing the double nature of light by measuring the existence of interference fringes down to the single-photon level. The setup includes a strongly attenuated laser, polarizing beam splitters, half-waveplates, polarizers and single-photon detectors.

  1. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-01-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope

  2. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  3. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori [Olympus Corporation, 2-3 Kuboyama-cho, Hachioji 192-8512 (Japan); Kitagawa, Katsuichi [Toray Engineering Co. Ltd., 1-1-45 Oe, Otsu 520-2141 (Japan); Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira [Ceratech Japan Co., Ltd., 500 Okada, Shinonoi, Nagano 381-2295 (Japan); Bokor, Nandor [Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest 1111 (Hungary)

    2014-07-15

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  4. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  5. Design and operation of an inexpensive far-field laser scanning microscope suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, Arthur; Hawk, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Scanning microscope applications span the science disciplines yet their costs limit their use at educational institutions. The basic concepts of scanning microscopy are simple. The microscope probe - whether it produces a photon, electron or ion beam - moves relative to the surface of the sample object. The beam interacts with the sample to produce a detected signal that depends on the desired property to be measured at the probe location on the sample. The microscope transforms the signal for output in a form desired by the user. Undergraduate students can easily construct a far-field laser scanning microscope that illustrates each of these principles from parts available at local electronics and hardware stores and use the microscope to explore properties of devices such as light dependent resistors and biological samples such as leaves. Students can record, analyze and interpret results using a computer and free software.

  6. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-30

    based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference.

  7. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  8. Distributed Interference Alignment with Low Overhead

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yanjun; Li, Jiandong; Chen, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Based on closed-form interference alignment (IA) solutions, a low overhead distributed interference alignment (LOIA) scheme is proposed in this paper for the $K$-user SISO interference channel, and extension to multiple antenna scenario is also considered. Compared with the iterative interference alignment (IIA) algorithm proposed by Gomadam et al., the overhead is greatly reduced. Simulation results show that the IIA algorithm is strictly suboptimal compared with our LOIA algorithm in the ov...

  9. Dependence of AeroMACS Interference on Airport Radiation Pattern Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at the 497 major airports in the contiguous United States was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on the number of antenna beams per airport, gain patterns, and beam direction orientations was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  10. The Development of a Scanning Soft X-Ray Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarback, Harvey Miles

    We have developed a scanning soft X-ray microscope, which can be used to image natural biological specimens at high resolution and with less damage than electron microscopy. The microscope focuses a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot with the aid of a high resolution Fresnel zone plate, specially fabricated for us at the IBM Watson Research Center. The specimen at one atmosphere is mechanically scanned through the spot and the transmitted radiation is efficiently detected with a flow proportional counter. A computer forms a realtime transmission image of the specimen which is displayed on a color monitor. Our first generation optics have produced images of natural wet specimens at a resolution of 300 nm.

  11. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  12. Confocal Microscope Alignment of Nanocrystals for Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitra, Loren; Watari, Moyu; Matsuura, Takashi; Shimamoto, Naonobu; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    We have installed and tested an Olympus LEXT confocal microscope at the 34-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The beamline is for Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXD) experiments in which a nanometre-sized crystal is aligned inside a focussed X-ray beam. The microscope was required for three-dimensional (3D) sample alignment to get around sphere-of-confusion issues when locating Bragg peaks in reciprocal space. In this way, and by use of strategic sample preparations, we have succeeded in measuring six Bragg peaks from a single 200 nm gold crystal and obtained six projections of its internal displacement field. This enables the clear identification of stacking-fault bands within the crystal. The confocal alignment method will allow a full determination of the strain tensor provided three or more Bragg reflections from the same crystal are found.

  13. The phase interrogation method for optical fiber sensor by analyzing the fork interference pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Riqing; Qiu, Liqiang; Hu, Haifeng; Meng, Lu; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The phase interrogation method for optical fiber sensor is proposed based on the fork interference pattern between the orbital angular momentum beam and plane wave. The variation of interference pattern with phase difference between the two light beams is investigated to realize the phase interrogation. By employing principal component analysis method, the features of the interference pattern can be extracted. Moreover, the experimental system is designed to verify the theoretical analysis, as well as feasibility of phase interrogation. In this work, the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was employed to convert the strain applied on sensing fiber to the phase difference between the reference and measuring paths. This interrogation method is also applicable for the measurements of other physical parameters, which can produce the phase delay in optical fiber. The performance of the system can be further improved by employing highlysensitive materials and fiber structures.

  14. Ergodic Interference Alignment with Delayed Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Myung Gil; Choi, Wan

    2013-01-01

    We propose new ergodic interference alignment techniques for $K$-user interference channels with delayed feedback. Two delayed feedback scenarios are considered -- delayed channel information at transmitter (CIT) and delayed output feedback. It is proved that the proposed techniques achieve total $2K/(K+2)$ DoF which is higher than that by the retrospective interference alignment for the delayed feedback scenarios.

  15. An accumulator model of semantic interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, Leendert; van Rijn, Hedderik

    To explain latency effects in picture-word interference tasks, cognitive models need to account for both interference and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) effects. As opposed to most models of picture-word interference, which model the time course during the task in a ballistic manner, the RACE model

  16. Interference mitigation techniques in wireless communications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-Channel Interference, Intersymbol interference and fading are major impairment to the high-capacity transmission in power- and band-limited wireless communication channel. This paper presents an overview of interference mitigation techniques in wireless communications systems. Linear filtering, equalization, and ...

  17. Impact of MIMO Co-Channel Interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahman, Muhammad Imadur; De Carvalho, Elisabeth; Prasad, Ramjee

    2007-01-01

    to cellular interference of some specific Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) schemes on the same and other MIMO schemes. The goal is to study the impact of interference from MIMO schemes at a user located in the cell edge. Semi-Analytical evaluations of Signal to Interference and Noise Ratio (SINR) is done...

  18. Quantum eraser for three-slit interference

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveed Ahmad Shah

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... Abstract. It is well known that in a two-slit interference experiment, if the information, on which of the two paths the particle followed, is stored in a quantum path detector, the interference is destroyed. However, in a set-up where this path information is 'erased', the interference can reappear. Such a set-up is ...

  19. Integrated single- and two-photon light sheet microscopy using accelerating beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the first light sheet microscope using propagation invariant, accelerating Airy beams that operates both in single- and two-photon modes. The use of the Airy beam permits us to develop an ultra compact, high resolution light sheet system without beam scanning. In two-photon mode, a...

  20. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of gametes...

  1. Molecular beam kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    The design of a crossed molecular beam ''supermachine'' for neutral--neutral collisions is discussed. The universal electron bombardment ionizer, mass filter, and ion detection system of the detector, the supersonic nozzle sources, the differential pumping arrangement for the sources and detector, the time-of-flight detection of scattered products, and the overall configuration of the apparatus are described. The elastic scattering of two systems, CH 4 + Ar and NH 3 + Ar, has been measured using the supermachine with two supersonic nozzle sources. The rainbow structure and the interference oscillations are seen in each system. The best fit to the data was found using a Morse--Spline--Van der Waals (MSV) potential. The three potential parameters epsilon, r/sub m/, and β were found to be 2.20(+-0.04) x 10 -14 ergs, 3.82(+-0.04)A, and 7.05 +- 0.20 for CH 4 + Ar, and 2.21(+-0.04) x 10 -14 ergs 3.93 (+-0.05)A, and 8.45 +- 0.30 for NH 3 + Ar. A new phenomenon in crossed molecular beams of condensation of a molecule on a cluster to form a complex was observed. A bromine molecule condensed on clusters of chlorine (Cl 2 )/sub chi/ and ammonia (NH 3 )/sub chi/. The value of chi for measurements in these experiments ranges from 7 to 40 for chlorine clusters and from 10 to 70 ammonia clusters

  2. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  4. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, E.I. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: rau@phys.msu.ru; Fakhfakh, S. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences, Route Soukra km 3, BP 802, CP 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology of Russian Academy of Science, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation); Jbara, O. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: omar.jbara@univ-reims.fr; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D. [UTAP/LASSI, EA 3802, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves {sigma} = f(E{sub 0}) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E{sub 2C} under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E{sub 2} the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E{sub 2} for E{sub 2C}. The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E{sub L} at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E{sub 2C}, for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E{sub 2C}. The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO{sub 2}), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  5. Second crossover energy of insulating materials using stationary electron beam under normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, E.I.; Fakhfakh, S.; Andrianov, M.V.; Evstafeva, E.N.; Jbara, O.; Rondot, S.; Mouze, D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give some aspects of charging effects on dielectric materials submitted to continuous electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the dielectric is irradiated continuously, the so-called total yield approach (TYA) used to predict the sign of the charge appeared on electron irradiated insulators fails because the charge accumulated in the dielectric interferes with the electrons emission processes. Based on previous experimental and theoretical works found in the literature, an analysis of the evolution of the electron yield curves σ = f(E 0 ) of insulators during irradiation is given. The aim of this work is firstly to determine experimentally the second crossover energy E 2C under continuous electron irradiation (charging conditions) and secondly to demonstrate that the charge balance occurs at this beam energy and not at E 2 the energy deduced from non-charging conditions (pulse primary electron beam experiments) as commonly asserted. It is however possible to apply the TYA by substituting the critical energy E 2 for E 2C . The experimental procedure is based on simultaneous time dependent measurements of surface potential, leakage current and displacement current. The study underlines the difference between the landing energy of primary electrons E L at the steady state and the second crossover energy, E 2C , for charged samples. Some preliminary results are also obtained concerning the influence of the incident beam density on the energy E 2C . The samples used for this study are PMMA, polycrystalline silicone dioxide (p-SiO 2 ), polycrystalline alumina (p-Al 2 O 3 ) and soda lime glass (SLG)

  6. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution.

  7. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...... at the plane of the 10 external image) which is denominated D2 and wherein D1 is larger than a second diameter D2....

  8. Cleft Lip and Palate Repair Using a Surgical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Motoi; Watanabe, Azusa; Watanabe, Shoji; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Ogishima, Shinya

    2017-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate repair requires a deep and small surgical field and is usually performed by surgeons wearing surgical loupes. Surgeons with loupes can obtain a wider surgical view, although headlights are required for the deepest procedures. Surgical microscopes offer comfort and a clear and magnification-adjustable surgical site that can be shared with the whole team, including observers, and easily recorded to further the education of junior surgeons. Magnification adjustments are convenient for precise procedures such as muscle dissection of the soft palate. We performed a comparative investigation of 18 cleft operations that utilized either surgical loupes or microscopy. Paper-based questionnaires were completed by staff nurses to evaluate what went well and what could be improved in each procedure. The operating time, complication rate, and scores of the questionnaire responses were statistically analyzed. The operating time when microscopy was used was not significantly longer than when surgical loupes were utilized. The surgical field was clearly shared with surgical assistants, nurses, anesthesiologists, and students via microscope-linked monitors. Passing surgical equipment was easier when sharing the surgical view, and preoperative microscope preparation did not interfere with the duties of the staff nurses. Surgical microscopy was demonstrated to be useful during cleft operations.

  9. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  10. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of loW--frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters

  11. Beam-Beam Simulations for Double-Gaussian Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two Gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-Gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-Gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular Gaussian beams and identical tuneshift parameters.

  12. Codebook-based interference alignment for uplink MIMO interference channels

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Hyun Ho

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a codebook-based interference alignment (IA) scheme in the constant multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) interference channel especially for the uplink scenario. In our proposed scheme, we assume cooperation among base stations (BSs) through reliable backhaul links so that global channel knowledge is available for all BSs, which enables BS to compute the transmit precoder and inform its quantized index to the associated user via limited rate feedback link.We present an upper bound on the rate loss of the proposed scheme and derive the scaling law of the feedback load tomaintain a constant rate loss relative to IA with perfect channel knowledge. Considering the impact of overhead due to training, cooperation, and feedback, we address the effective degrees of freedom (DOF) of the proposed scheme and derive the maximization of the effective DOF. From simulation results, we verify our analysis on the scaling law to preserve the multiplexing gain and confirm that the proposed scheme is more effective than the conventional IA scheme in terms of the effective DOF. © 2014 KICS.

  13. Scanning SQUID microscope with an in-situ magnetization/demagnetization field for geological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Liu, Xiaohong; Qin, Huafeng; Wei, Zhao; Kong, Xiangyang; Liu, Qingsong; Song, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic properties of rocks are crucial for paleo-, rock-, environmental-magnetism, and magnetic material sciences. Conventional rock magnetometers deal with bulk properties of samples, whereas scanning microscope can map the distribution of remanent magnetization. In this study, a new scanning microscope based on a low-temperature DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) equipped with an in-situ magnetization/demagnetization device was developed. To realize the combination of sensitive instrument as SQUID with high magnetizing/demagnetizing fields, the pick-up coil, the magnetization/demagnetization coils and the measurement mode of the system were optimized. The new microscope has a field sensitivity of 250 pT/√Hz at a coil-to-sample spacing of ∼350 μm, and high magnetization (0-1 T)/ demagnetization (0-300 mT, 400 Hz) functions. With this microscope, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition and the according alternating field (AF) demagnetization curves can be obtained for each point without transferring samples between different procedures, which could result in position deviation, waste of time, and other interferences. The newly-designed SQUID microscope, thus, can be used to investigate the rock magnetic properties of samples at a micro-area scale, and has a great potential to be an efficient tool in paleomagnetism, rock magnetism, and magnetic material studies.

  14. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  15. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  16. Cathodoluminescence studies of phosphors in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Paul; Den Engelsen, Daniel; Ireland, Terry; Fern, George; Silver, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence studies are reported of phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). A number of phosphor materials have been studied and exhibited a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates, because the particle continued to emit light after the beam had moved onto subsequent pixels. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. This technique provides a simple and convenient way to study the decay times of individual particles. (paper)

  17. A fast iterative technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Kenji, E-mail: kenji.nakahira.kp@hitachi.com; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Honda, Toshifumi

    2014-12-21

    This paper proposes a fast new technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images to improve their sharpness. The images with our approach are sharpened by deconvolution with the point spread function modeled as the intensity distribution of the electron beam at the specimen's surface. We propose an iterative technique that employs a modified cost function based on the Richardson–Lucy method to achieve faster processing. The empirical results indicate significant improvements in image quality. The proposed approach speeds up deconvolution by about 10–50 times faster than that with the conventional Richardson–Lucy method.

  18. Quantum Interference and Coherence Theory and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew; Rhodes, William T; Asakura, Toshimitsu; Brenner, Karl-Heinz; Hänsch, Theodor W; Kamiya, Takeshi; Krausz, Ferenc; Monemar, Bo; Venghaus, Herbert; Weber, Horst; Weinfurter, Harald

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, this book assembles in a single volume accounts of many phenomena involving quantum interference in optical fields and atomic systems. It provides detailed theoretical treatments and experimental analyses of such phenomena as quantum erasure, quantum lithography, multi-atom entanglement, quantum beats, control of decoherence, phase control of quantum interference, coherent population trapping, electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, lasing without inversion, subluminal and superluminal light propagation, storage of photons, quantum interference in phase space, interference and diffraction of cold atoms, and interference between Bose-Einstein condensates. This book fills a gap in the literature and will be useful to both experimentalists and theoreticians.

  19. Embracing interference in wireless systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gollakota, Shyamnath

    2014-01-01

    The wireless medium is a shared resource. If nearby devices transmit at thesame time, their signals interfere, resulting in a collision. In traditionalnetworks, collisions cause the loss of the transmitted information. For thisreason, wireless networks have been designed with the assumption thatinterference is intrinsically harmful and must be avoided.This book, a revised version of the author's award-winning Ph.D.dissertation, takes an alternate approach: Instead of viewing interferenceas an inherently counterproductive phenomenon that should to be avoided, wedesign practical systems that tra

  20. [Authentication of Trace Material Evidence in Forensic Science Field with Infrared Microscopic Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-quan; Hu, Ke-liang

    2016-03-01

    In the field of forensic science, conventional infrared spectral analysis technique is usually unable to meet the detection requirements, because only very a few trace material evidence with diverse shapes and complex compositions, can be extracted from the crime scene. Infrared microscopic technique is developed based on a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic technique and microscopic technique. Infrared microscopic technique has a lot of advantages over conventional infrared spectroscopic technique, such as high detection sensitivity, micro-area analysisand nondestructive examination. It has effectively solved the problem of authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science. Additionally, almost no external interference is introduced during measurements by infrared microscopic technique. It can satisfy the special need that the trace material evidence must be reserved for witness in court. It is illustrated in detail through real case analysis in this experimental center that, infrared microscopic technique has advantages in authentication of trace material evidence in forensic science field. In this paper, the vibration features in infrared spectra of material evidences, including paints, plastics, rubbers, fibers, drugs and toxicants, can be comparatively analyzed by means of infrared microscopic technique, in an attempt to provide powerful spectroscopic evidence for qualitative diagnosis of various criminal and traffic accident cases. The experimental results clearly suggest that infrared microscopic technique has an incomparable advantage and it has become an effective method for authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science.

  1. Moiré method for nanometer instability investigation of scanning hard x-ray microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Ulrich; Köhler, Daniel; Dickmann, Jannis; Rahomäki, Jussi; Parfeniukas, Karolis; Kubsky, Stefan; Alves, Filipe; Langlois, Florent; Engblom, Christer; Stankevič, Tomaš

    2017-05-29

    We present a Moiré method that can be used to investigate positional instabilities in a scanning hard x-ray microscope with nanometer precision. The development of diffraction-limited storage rings offering highly-brilliant synchrotron radiation and improvements of nanofocusing x-ray optics paves the way towards 3D nanotomography with 10 nm resolution or below. However, this trend demands improved designs of x-ray microscope instruments which should offer few-nm beam stabilities with respect to the sample. Our technique can measure the position of optics and sample stage relative to each other in the two directions perpendicular to the beam propagation in a scanning x-ray microscope using simple optical components and visible light. The usefulness of the method was proven by measuring short and long term instabilities of a zone-plate-optics-based prototype microscope. We think it can become an important tool for the characterization of scanning x-ray microscopes, especially prior to experiments with an actual x-ray beam.

  2. Survey and analysis of line-frequency interference in the CEBAF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiefenback, M.G.; Li, Rui.

    1995-01-01

    Feedthrough of interference from the AC power line into accelerator components is a problem which in pulsed accelerators can be reduced by operation synchronous with the AC line. This means of avoiding line-frequency effects is ineffective for continuous wave machines such as the CEBAF accelerator. We have measured line-frequency perturbations at CEBAF both in beam position and energy by using the beam position monitor system as a multiple-channel sampling oscilloscope. Comparing these data against the measured static optics (taken synchronously with the AC line) we have been able to identify point sources of interference, and resolve line-synchronous variations in the beam energy at a level near 0.001%. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. A simple but precise method for quantitative measurement of the quality of the laser focus in a scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trägårdh, J; Macrae, K; Travis, C; Amor, R; Norris, G; Wilson, S H; Oppo, G-L; McConnell, G

    2015-07-01

    We report a method for characterizing the focussing laser beam exiting the objective in a laser scanning microscope. This method provides the size of the optical focus, the divergence of the beam, the ellipticity and the astigmatism. We use a microscopic-scale knife edge in the form of a simple transmission electron microscopy grid attached to a glass microscope slide, and a light-collecting optical fibre and photodiode underneath the specimen. By scanning the laser spot from a reflective to a transmitting part of the grid, a beam profile in the form of an error function can be obtained and by repeating this with the knife edge at different axial positions relative to the beam waist, the divergence and astigmatism of the postobjective laser beam can be obtained. The measured divergence can be used to quantify how much of the full numerical aperture of the lens is used in practice. We present data of the beam radius, beam divergence, ellipticity and astigmatism obtained with low (0.15, 0.7) and high (1.3) numerical aperture lenses and lasers commonly used in confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Our knife-edge method has several advantages over alternative knife-edge methods used in microscopy including that the knife edge is easy to prepare, that the beam can be characterized also directly under a cover slip, as necessary to reduce spherical aberrations for objectives designed to be used with a cover slip, and it is suitable for use with commercial laser scanning microscopes where access to the laser beam can be limited. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Assessment of life interference in anxious children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapee, Ronald; Thastum, Mikael; Chavira, Denise

    . This imbalance has particularly characterised research on child anxiety where few studies have examined either the impact of anxiety disorders on children's lives or the effects of treatments on life interference. To some extent this lack of attention has come from a lack of well developed measures to assess...... life interference derived from symptoms of anxiety. Broader and more general life interference measures tend to have minimal relevance for children with anxiety disorders. The current paper will describe two measures of life interference that have been developed at the Centre for Emotional Health...... directed at children and adolescents. One measure, the Children's Anxiety Life Interference Scale (CALIS) was developed to assess interference directly associated with symptoms of anxiety in children and adolescents, while the other, the Adolescent Life Interference Scale (ALIS) is a broader measure...

  5. Resizing metal-coated nanopores using a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansin, Guillaume A T; Hong, Jongin; Dusting, Jonathan; deMello, Andrew J; Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B

    2011-10-04

    Electron beam-induced shrinkage provides a convenient way of resizing solid-state nanopores in Si(3) N(4) membranes. Here, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to resize a range of different focussed ion beam-milled nanopores in Al-coated Si(3) N(4) membranes. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra and SEM images acquired during resizing highlight that a time-variant carbon deposition process is the dominant mechanism of pore shrinkage, although granular structures on the membrane surface in the vicinity of the pores suggest that competing processes may occur. Shrinkage is observed on the Al side of the pore as well as on the Si(3) N(4) side, while the shrinkage rate is observed to be dependent on a variety of factors. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We use a photoconductively gated ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve laser-induced transients on transmission lines and photoconductors. The photoconductive switch on the tunneling probe is illuminated through a rigidly attached fiber. The use of the fiber enables us to scan across...... the transmission line while the change in delay time between pump beam (on the sample) and probe beam (on the probe) provides the temporal information. The investigated photoconductor sample is a low-temperature-grown GaAs layer placed on a sapphire substrate with a thin, semitransparent gold layer. In tunneling...... mode the probe is sensitive to laser-induced field changes in the semiconductor layer. Laser-induced transient signals of 2.2 ps widths are detected. As for the transmission lines, the signals can be explained by a capacitive coupling across the tunneling gap....

  7. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  8. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...

  9. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  10. LHCB: A LHCb-VELO module as beam quality monitor for proton therapy beam at the Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology

    CERN Multimedia

    Casse, G; Patel, G D; Smith, N A; Kacperek, A; Marsland, B

    2010-01-01

    The progress in detector technology, driven by the needs of particle tracking and vertexing in the present LHC and its upgrade (sLHC), has led to the design of silicon sensors with low mass, high granularity, high speed and unprecedented radiation hardness. The sensors designed for such a harsh environment can be profitably used for instrumenting the control systems of therapeutic hadron beams. The high granularity and readout clock speed are well suited for monitoring continuous beam currents. The low mass allows reduced interference with the beam whilst monitoring its profile with high precision. The high resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionising particles allows monitoring of the beam spot position by measurement of the halo in real time, without any interference with the beam spot used in therapy.

  11. Electron irradiation-induced destruction of carbon nanotubes in electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molhave, Kristian; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Horsewell, Andy; Boggild, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Observations of carbon nanotubes under exposure to electron beam irradiation in standard transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems show that such treatment in some cases can cause severe damage of the nanotube structure, even at electron energies far below the approximate 100 keV threshold for knock-on damage displacing carbon atoms in the graphene structure. We find that the damage we observe in one TEM can be avoided by use of a cold finger. This and the morphology of the damage imply that water vapour, which is present as a background gas in many vacuum chambers, can damage the nanotube structure through electron beam-induced chemical reactions. Though, the dependence on the background gas makes these observations specific for the presently used systems, the results demonstrate the importance of careful assessment of the level of subtle structural damage that the individual electron microscope system can do to nanostructures during standard use

  12. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, V., E-mail: morandi@bo.imm.cnr.it; Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A. [CNR-IMM Sezione di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P. [ASSING S.P.A., via E. Amaldi 14, 00016 Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M. [Dip.to di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l’Ingegneria and Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all’Ingegneria (CNIS), Università degli Studi di Roma “Sapienza”, Via A. Scarpa, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sberveglieri, G. [SENSOR Lab, Dip.to di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Brescia and CNR-INO, Via Valotti 9, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Vittori-Antisari, M. [Unità Tecnica Tecnologie dei Materiali, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  13. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  14. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  15. Photothermal camera port accessory for microscopic thermal diffusivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escola, Facundo Zaldívar; Kunik, Darío; Mingolo, Nelly; Martínez, Oscar Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The design of a scanning photothermal accessory is presented, which can be attached to the camera port of commercial microscopes to measure thermal diffusivity maps with micrometer resolution. The device is based on the thermal expansion recovery technique, which measures the defocusing of a probe beam due to the curvature induced by the local heat delivered by a focused pump beam. The beam delivery and collecting optics are built using optical fiber technology, resulting in a robust optical system that provides collinear pump and probe beams without any alignment adjustment necessary. The quasiconfocal configuration for the signal collection using the same optical fiber sets very restrictive conditions on the positioning and alignment of the optical components of the scanning unit, and a detailed discussion of the design equations is presented. The alignment procedure is carefully described, resulting in a system so robust and stable that no further alignment is necessary for the day-to-day use, becoming a tool that can be used for routine quality control, operated by a trained technician.

  16. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R; Russell, Aidan N; Wheeler, Richard J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M

    2016-02-08

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  17. Two-Photon Ghost Image and Interference-Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Y. H.; Sergienko, A. V.; Pittman, T. B.; Strekalov, D. V.; Klyshko, D. N.

    1996-01-01

    convex lens. Surprisingly, an image of this aperture is observed in the idler beam, by scanning the idler photon detector in the transverse plane of the idler beam, if we are sure that the idler photon detector 'catches' the 'twin brother' of the signal, which can be easily performed by a coincidence measurement. This effect is even more striking when we found that the object-lens-image relationship satisfies the Gaussian thin lens equation. The second experiment demonstrates two-photon 'ghost' interference-diffraction. The experimental set up is similar to the image experiment, except that rather than a lens and an aperture it is a Young's double-slit (or a single-slit) inserted into the path of the signal beam. We could not find any interference (or diffraction) pattern behind the slit. Surprisingly, an interference (or diffraction) pattern is observed when scanning the detector in the idler beam, if we are sure that the idler photon detector 'catches' the 'twin brother' of the signal.

  18. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Microscopic structure of liquid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen makes the simplest molecular liquid. Nonetheless, due to several different reasons, measuring its microscopic structure has been one of the most challenging tasks in neutron diffraction experiments. The recent development of modern pulsed neutron sources triggered a renewed experimental interest which, in turn, led to new knowledge and also to a more effective use of the classic reactor-based experimental data. The contemporary development of quantum mechanical computer simulation techniques, and a critical comparison among the results of different experiments using steady and pulsed neutron sources, resulted in a quantitatively reliable solution of the problem. (topical review)

  20. 2 TeV HEB beam abort at the SSCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schailey, R.; Bull, J.; Clayton, T.; Kocur, P.; Mokhov, N.

    1993-05-01

    The High Energy Booster (HEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) will require a full aperture beam abort over a dynamic energy range of 200 GeV to 2 TeV. Since the HEB is a bi-polar machine, both clockwise (CW) and the counter-clockwise (CCW) beam aborts are required. Also, the stored beam energy of 6.55 MJ in the superconducting HEB imposes upon the full aperture requirement. In this report, we describe the abort channels in the HEB utility straight sections, aperture restrictions, mechanical interferences and solutions, kicker misfires, and a 1 TeV beam absorber

  1. 2 TeV HEB beam abort at the SSCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schailey, R.; Bull, J.; Clayton, T.; Kocur, P.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Booster (HEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) will require a full aperture beam abort over a dynamic energy range of 200 GeV to 2 TeV. Since the HEB is a bi-polar machine, both clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW) beam aborts are required. Also, the stored beam energy of 6.55 MJ in the superconducting HEB imposes the full aperture requirement. In this report, the authors describe the abort channels in the HEB utility straight sections, aperture restrictions, mechanical interferences and solutions, kicker misfires, and a 2 TeV beam absorber

  2. Digital DC beam current measurement on SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Liang; Yin Chongxian; Liu Ming; Chen Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Both DC current transformer (DCCT) and integrating current transformer (ICT) can be used in DC beam current measurement. The ICT has strong capability of resisting electromagnetic interference, but its measurement accuracy cannot satisfy the DC beam current measurement requirement when using traditional high speed A/D. With high resolution A/D and equivalent sampling system, DC beam current measuring system based on ICT can reach high accuracy compared with DCCT system. In this paper, the ICT-based DC beam current measurement, equivalent sampling method and testing results at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility(SSRF) is described. (authors)

  3. X-ray microscopes at BESSY II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttmann, P.; Niemann, B.; Thieme, J.; Wiesemann, U.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2000-01-01

    The undulator U41 at BESSY II will be used as source for X-ray microscopes. An overview of the X-ray microscopy area is presented. After finishing the construction phase a transmission X-ray microscope, a scanning transmission X-ray microscope and an X-ray test chamber will be available. The transmission X-ray microscope will allow investigations with high lateral resolution at moderate energy resolution while the scanning transmission X-ray microscope will allow high energy resolution at moderate lateral resolution of the same specimen

  4. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-01-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1-4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  5. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-06-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1 to 4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  6. Frequency dependent detection in a STED microscope using modulated excitation light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzitti, Emiliano; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-14

    We present a novel concept adaptable to any kind of STED microscope in order to expand the limited number of compatible dyes for performing super resolution imaging. The approach is based on an intensity modulated excitation beam in combination with a frequency dependent detection in the form of a standard lock-in amplifier. This enables to unmix fluorescence signal originated by the excitation beam from the fluorescence caused by the STED beam. The benefit of this concept is demonstrated by imaging biological samples as well as fluorescent spheres, whose spectrum does not allow STED imaging in the conventional way. Our concept is suitable with CW or pulsed STED microscope and can thereby be seen as a general improvement adaptable to any existing setup.

  7. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  8. The illumination characteristics of operative microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Christopher A; Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui; Michaelides, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Modern operative microscopes use light sources which possess the power to severely damage underlying tissue. Currently, manufacturers provide a safety warning of this possibility. However, they are unable to suggest specific settings due to a stated "lack of scientific publications on this topic". We aim to radiometrically evaluate multiple otologic microscopes at variables which effect irradiance in order to determine reference emissions levels and provide guidelines for improved intraoperative safety. The optical radiance of four otologic microscopes was evaluated at variable field illumination sizes (spot size), intensity settings and working distances. The spectral emission of each microscope was separately measured. The energy absorbed in skin with representative properties was then calculated as a function of time for each microscope by accounting for the emission spectrum of the microscope and the absorption spectrum of skin. Microscopes showed a wide range of optical radiance based on model, spots size, intensity setting and working distances. Spectral emission of all four microscopes was centered in the visible spectrum with minimal ultraviolet or infrared contribution. A large amount of energy is absorbed by skin during usage of operative microscopes. The highest calculated absorption at 200 min of use was 736.26 J/cm(2). Operative microscopes have the ability to cause patient morbidity secondary to the energy they impart. In an effort to decrease potential injury we recommend that physicians be aware of their microscopes properties and how to control variables which effect irradiance of the skin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Robotic autopositioning of the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Merkl, Brandon; Hattendorf, Guido M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Use of the operating microscope has become pervasive since its introduction to the neurosurgical world. Neuronavigation fused with the operating microscope has allowed accurate correlation of the focal point of the microscope and its location on the downloaded imaging study. However, the robotic ability of the Pentero microscope has not been utilized to orient the angle of the microscope or to change its focal length to hone in on a predefined target. To report a novel technology that allows automatic positioning of the operating microscope onto a set target and utilization of a planned trajectory, either determined with the StealthStation S7 by using preoperative imaging or intraoperatively with the microscope. By utilizing the current motorized capabilities of the Zeiss OPMI Pentero microscope, a robotic autopositioning feature was developed in collaboration with Surgical Technologies, Medtronic, Inc. (StealthStation S7). The system is currently being tested at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Three options were developed for automatically positioning the microscope: AutoLock Current Point, Align Parallel to Plan, and Point to Plan Target. These options allow the microscope to pivot around the lesion, hover in a set plane parallel to the determined trajectory, or rotate and point to a set target point, respectively. Integration of automatic microscope positioning into the operative workflow has potential to increase operative efficacy and safety. This technology is best suited for precise trajectories and entry points into deep-seated lesions.

  10. Filtering algorithm for dotted interferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterloh, K., E-mail: kurt.osterloh@bam.de [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Bock, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    An algorithm has been developed to remove reliably dotted interferences impairing the perceptibility of objects within a radiographic image. This particularly is a major challenge encountered with neutron radiographs collected at the NECTAR facility, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II): the resulting images are dominated by features resembling a snow flurry. These artefacts are caused by scattered neutrons, gamma radiation, cosmic radiation, etc. all hitting the detector CCD directly in spite of a sophisticated shielding. This makes such images rather useless for further direct evaluations. One approach to resolve this problem of these random effects would be to collect a vast number of single images, to combine them appropriately and to process them with common image filtering procedures. However, it has been shown that, e.g. median filtering, depending on the kernel size in the plane and/or the number of single shots to be combined, is either insufficient or tends to blur sharp lined structures. This inevitably makes a visually controlled processing image by image unavoidable. Particularly in tomographic studies, it would be by far too tedious to treat each single projection by this way. Alternatively, it would be not only more comfortable but also in many cases the only reasonable approach to filter a stack of images in a batch procedure to get rid of the disturbing interferences. The algorithm presented here meets all these requirements. It reliably frees the images from the snowy pattern described above without the loss of fine structures and without a general blurring of the image. It consists of an iterative, within a batch procedure parameter free filtering algorithm aiming to eliminate the often complex interfering artefacts while leaving the original information untouched as far as possible.

  11. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  12. Microscopical advances in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, B

    2004-01-01

    In a series of papers carried out by this laboratory it was demonstrated that the quality of sterile males sperm, assessed submicroscopically and mathematically, is closely correlated with the success of the various procedures of assisted reproduction. If we attempt to select hypothetically optimal spermatozoa destined to the ICSI by light inverted microscopy, a considerable amount of ultrastructural information is lost and our selection is merely based on the motility. In this study we apply polarization microscopy to the ICSI technique, introducing polarizing and analyzing lenses in an inverted microscope model, operating in a transparent container. The retardation of the birefringence in the various organelles is evaluated by compensators, and the images are transmitted to a video system, and stored in a computer. Spermatozoa are maintained alive and perfectly motile in this polarizing inverted microscope, and the character of the birefringence is the same as in fixed and sectioned biological material examined by polarization microscopy. The birefringence of the sperm structures allows a sperm analysis closer to TEM than to phase contrast light microscopy analysis.

  13. Laser-based refractive-index detection for capillary electrophoresis: ray-tracing interference theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattiger, B; Bruno, A E; Widmer, H M; Geiser, M; Dändliker, R

    1993-02-20

    The fringe pattern observed in a far field after a laser beam illuminates a fused silica capillary immersed in a refractive-index matching material and filled with an analyte fluid is exploited to develop a sensitive optical detector for capillary chemical analysis. The inner capillary interface splits the laser beam into a reflected beam fan and a refracted beam fan, which, on overlapping in the far field, lead to interferences. The intensity and the position of the fringes for capillaries with 250 microm >/= i.d. (inner diameter) >/= 25 microm are well reproduced by the presented model. The calculation predicts the fringe pattern for various beam/i.d. geometric configurations and is used to optimize the performance of the nanoliter-picoliter refractive-index on-column detection studied. It is found that the best contrast corresponds to a capillary that is illuminated with a beam waist of omega(0) ~ i.d./12, which is off-center focused with an offset of s ~ i.d./2. For a given interference pattern, the fringes that are found to be more sensitive to Deltan are those that appear near the optical axis but still retain high intensity and contrast. The sensitivity increases approximately linearly with the fringe number, and the maximal fringe number increases proportionally with the i.d.

  14. 3D-Mössbauer spectroscopic microscope for mc-Si solar cell evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Y., E-mail: y-ino@ob.sist.ac.jp; Soejima, H.; Hayakawa, K.; Yukihira, K.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, H.; Watanabe, T. [Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (Japan); Ogai, K.; Moriguchi, K.; Harada, Y. [APCO. Ltd. (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    A 3D-Mössbauer Spectroscopic Microscope is developed to evaluate Fe impurities in multi-crystalline Si solar cells, which combines the Mössbauer spectroscopic microscope with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), an electron beam induced current (EBIC), an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and an electron energy analyzer (HV-CSA). In addition, a new moving-coil-actuator with a liner encoder of 100 nm-resolution is incorporated for the operations with both a constant velocity and a constant acceleration mode successfully with the same precision as that obtained by the conventional transducers. Furthermore, a new multi-capillary X-ray lens is designed to achieve a γ-ray spot size less than 100 μm in diameter. The new microscope provides us to investigate the space correlation between Fe impurities and the lattice defects such as grain boundaries in multi-crystalline Si solar cells.

  15. Electron beam damage in oxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes a variety of beam damage phenomena relating to oxides in (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, and underlines the shortcomings of currently popular mechanisms. These phenomena include mass loss, valence state reduction, phase decomposition, precipitation, gas bubble formation, phase transformation, amorphization and crystallization. Moreover, beam damage is also dependent on specimen thickness, specimen orientation, beam voltage, beam current density and beam size. This article incorporates all of these damage phenomena and experimental dependences into a general description, interpreted by a unified mechanism of damage by induced electric field. The induced electric field is produced by positive charges, which are generated from excitation and ionization. The distribution of the induced electric fields inside a specimen is beam-illumination- and specimen-shape- dependent, and associated with the experimental dependence of beam damage. Broadly speaking, the mechanism operates differently in two types of material. In type I, damage increases the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus divergent, resulting in phase separation. In type II, damage reduces the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus convergent, resulting in phase transformation. Damage by this mechanism is dependent on electron-beam current density. The two experimental thresholds are current density and irradiation time. The mechanism comes into effect when these thresholds are exceeded, below which the conventional mechanisms of knock-on and radiolysis still dominate.

  16. Generation of Nondiffracting Electron Bessel Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Grillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 30 years ago, Durnin discovered that an optical beam with a transverse intensity profile in the form of a Bessel function of the first order is immune to the effects of diffraction. Unlike most laser beams, which spread upon propagation, the transverse distribution of these Bessel beams remains constant. Electrons also obey a wave equation (the Schrödinger equation, and therefore Bessel beams also exist for electron waves. We generate an electron Bessel beam by diffracting electrons from a nanoscale phase hologram. The hologram imposes a conical phase structure on the electron wave-packet spectrum, thus transforming it into a conical superposition of infinite plane waves, that is, a Bessel beam. We verify experimentally that these beams can propagate for 0.6 m without measurable spreading and can also reconstruct their intensity distributions after being partially obstructed by an obstacle. Finally, we show by numerical calculations that the performance of an electron microscope can be increased dramatically through use of these beams.

  17. Partial interference subspace rejection in CDMA systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Affes, Sofiene; Mewelstein, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Previously presented interference subspace rejection (ISR) proposed a family of new efficient multiuser detectors for CDMA. We reconsider in this paper the modes of ISR using decision feedback (DF). DF modes share similarities with parallel interference cancellation (PIC) but attempt to cancel...... interference by nulling rather than subtraction. However like the PIC they are prone to wrong tentative decisions. We propose a modification to DF modes that performs partial ISR instead of complete interference cancellation. When tentative decisions are correct, interference is therefore not perfectly...... rejected anymore. This drawback is compensated by improved robustness to wrong tentative decisions. We show that in hard handoff systems, partial ISR can only provide negligible performance improvements in high loaded systems outside the region of interest due to out-sector interference. In situations...

  18. Robust Satellite Communications Under Hostile Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    or elimination of required feedback signals, jammer herding, multi-source signalling, and interference alignment . In the case of the replace with...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0079 TR-2016-0079 ROBUST SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS UNDER HOSTILE INTERFERENCE Marc Lichtman and Jeffrey Reed...FA9453-14-1-0222 Robust Satellite Communications Under Hostile Interference 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  19. X-ray interference by nanocrystalline domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelisio, Luca; Scardi, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    Regular arrangement of nanocrystalline domains can introduce interference effects which alter considerably the powder diffraction pattern. Role of nanocrystal alignment (local texture) and mutual positioning are different, with the latter much more effective in controlling the interference effect. While it is demonstrated that these effects are unlikely to be observed on a conventional laboratory instrument, coherence conditions available at modern synchrotron radiation beamlines might support further investigations of interference in systems made of very fine nanocrystals.

  20. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R; Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J

    2009-01-01

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca + and Ba + . Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  1. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  2. Active beam integrator for high power coherent lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguarta, F.; Armengol, J.; Vega, F.; Lupon, N. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Terrassa (Spain). Dept. d`Optica i Optometria

    1996-12-31

    In laser materials processing applications it is often necessary to work with uniform intensity distributions. This goal is quite difficult to achieve when dealing with high power laser beams, and becomes critical for a successful application involving surface heat treatment of non-metallic materials. The authors have designed and tested a very simple beam shaper for transforming the initial intensity distribution of a CO{sub 2} laser beam mode into a more uniform intensity profile. The beam shaper is a two-faceted mirror for active integration of high power coherent laser beams. After reflection in the faceted mirror, a TEM00 or TEM01 CO{sub 2} laser beam is divided into two beamlets that overlap to give a more uniform intensity distribution. A sharp interference pattern due to the high spatial coherence of the incident beam appears. This interference pattern is actively integrated by a high-frequency longitudinal displacement of one of the facets. This provides a change in the relative phase of the two beamlets, and consequently the interference pattern vibrates and its contribution to the intensity distribution averages out. When sweeping this distribution over a sample, a uniform amount of energy is deposited at every point of its surface. It must be emphasized that unlike multifaceted mirrors, the two-facet integrator may provide uniform intensity profiles over any working distance. Finally, as in other integration devices an imaging system may be used to obtain a spot of the shape and the size desired for a particular application.

  3. Phase zone plate based scanning x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnini, D.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Chrzas, J.

    1992-01-01

    A scanning microscope capable of investigating materials in the x-ray region from 5-25 keV with a spatial resolution on the order of 1 μm has been constructed and experimentally demonstrated. A phase zone plate is used as a focusing element concentrating photons at a series of diffraction orders spaced along the optical axis. A sample is positioned at one of these focal planes and raster scanned across the small focal spot for imaging or micro-analysis. Use and characterization of the microscope requires precise alignment of the zone plate and its optical axis along the x-ray beam direction. Also needed are accurate, reproducible positioning of an order selection aperture and sample. Operation at different focal orders involves large translations of sample and aperture along the optical axis as well as adjustment of the aperture to sample distance. A motion control, data acquisition, and display system has been developed to meet these requirements of sample and detector positioning. Design considerations and results obtained from use of the microscope for imaging at first through fourth order focal planes are discussed

  4. Interference Alignment Using Variational Mean Field Annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badiu, Mihai Alin; Guillaud, Maxime; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    We study the problem of interference alignment in the multiple-input multiple- output interference channel. Aiming at minimizing the interference leakage power relative to the receiver noise level, we use the deterministic annealing approach to solve the optimization problem. In the corresponding...... for interference alignment. We also show that the iterative leakage minimization algorithm by Gomadam et al. and the alternating minimization algorithm by Peters and Heath, Jr. are instances of our method. Finally, we assess the performance of the proposed algorithm through computer simulations....

  5. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and TEMPEST Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and TEMPEST testing are conducted at EPG's Blacktail Canyon Test Facility in one of its two...

  6. Chlorinated Cyanurates: Method Interferences and Application Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted to investigate method interferences, residual stability, regulated DBP formation, and a water chemistry model associated with the use of Dichlor & Trichlor in drinking water.

  7. Using Interference to Block RFID Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Rasmus; Popovski, Petar; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag.......We propose a novel method to block RFID tags from responding, using intentional interference. We focus on the experimental evaluation, where we impose interference on the download and uplink, respectively. The results are positive, where modulated CCI shows most effective to block a tag....

  8. Cross-limb Interference during motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauber, Benedikt; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Keller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    the training, after the training and in an immediate retention test after the practice of the interference task for both the trained and the untrained hand. After training, subjects showed not only significant learning and interference effects for the trained limb but also for the contralateral untrained limb...... to the trained hand following ballistic training and decreased during accuracy training of the ipsilateral hand. The results demonstrate that contralateral interference effects may occur, and that interference depends on the level of skill acquisition in the interfering motor task. This finding might...... be particularly relevant for rehabilitation....

  9. Ion beam pulse radiolysis system at HIMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitose, N.; Katsumura, Y.; Domae, M.; Ishigure, K. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Murakami, T.

    1997-03-01

    An ion beam pulse radiolysis system has been constructed at HIMAC facility. Ion beam of 24MeV He{sup 2+} with the duration longer than 1 {mu}s is available for irradiation. Three kinds of aqueous solutions, (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO, NaHCO{sub 3}, and KSCN, were irradiated and the absorption signals corresponding to (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup -}, and (SCN){sub 2}{sup -} respectively were observed. Ghost signals which interfere with the measurement are also discussed. (author)

  10. One-Photon and Two-Photon Double-Slit Interferences in Spontaneous and Stimulated Parametric Down-Conversions

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, De-Zhong; Li, Zhuan; Zhai, Yan-Hua; Wang, Kaige

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically discuss one-photon and two-photon double-slit interferences for spontaneous and stimulated parametric down-conversions. We show that the two-photon sub-wavelength interference can exist in a general spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) for both type I and type II crystals. We propose an alternative way to observe sub-wavelength interference by a joint-intensity measurement which occurs for only type I crystal in a higher gain of SPDC. When a signal beam injects into ...

  11. Beam-charge azimuthal asymmetry and deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; de Leo, R.; Demey, M.; de Nardo, L.; de Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; di Nezza, P.; Dreschler, J.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Funel, A.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gaskell, D.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Masoli, F.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Michler, T.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P. B.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler process and the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to generalized parton distributions.

  12. Method to fabricate orthogonal crossed gratings by an interference fringe based alignment technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hengyan; Zeng, Lijiang

    2016-10-01

    In order to fabricate orthogonal crossed gratings, we propose an interference fringe based alignment technique to adjust the angle between the two Lloyd's mirrors to be 90° in the dual Lloyd's mirror interferometer. An exposed crossed grating is put back to the exposure system and rotated about 90° around its normal direction. By observing the fringe spacing of the interference fringes generated by the diffracted beams of different orders, we can adjust the angle between the two Lloyd's mirrors to be 90°. Simulation results indicate an orthogonality error smaller than 4″ can be obtained by this method. We fabricated a crossed grating with 0.30″ orthogonality error.

  13. Interference-based optical measurement of fluidic flow in a hollow-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Hwang, In-Kag

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we present speed and displacement measurements of micro-fluid in a hollow-core optical fiber, where an optical interference signal is created by two guided beams reflected at a fixed facet and a moving fluid end. By counting the number of intensity oscillations of the signal, the movement of the fluid end is successfully traced with high accuracy. Furthermore, we could detect the change in curvature diameters of the fluid end depending on the flow direction by monitoring the visibility of the interference signal.

  14. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  15. A multi-modal stereo microscope based on a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M P; Gibson, G M; Bowman, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M; Phillips, D B; Padgett, M J

    2013-07-15

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) can emulate the classic microscopy techniques, including differential interference (DIC) contrast and (spiral) phase contrast. Their programmability entails the benefit of flexibility or the option to multiplex images, for single-shot quantitative imaging or for simultaneous multi-plane imaging (depth-of-field multiplexing). We report the development of a microscope sharing many of the previously demonstrated capabilities, within a holographic implementation of a stereo microscope. Furthermore, we use the SLM to combine stereo microscopy with a refocusing filter and with a darkfield filter. The instrument is built around a custom inverted microscope and equipped with an SLM which gives various imaging modes laterally displaced on the same camera chip. In addition, there is a wide angle camera for visualisation of a larger region of the sample.

  16. Quantitative surface topography determination by Nomarski reflection microscopy. 2: Microscope modification, calibration, and planar sample experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, J.S.; Gordon, R.L.; Lessor, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The application of reflective Nomarski differential interference contrast microscopy for the determination of quantitative sample topography data is presented. The discussion includes a review of key theoretical results presented previously plus the experimental implementation of the concepts using a commercial Momarski microscope. The experimental work included the modification and characterization of a commercial microscope to allow its use for obtaining quantitative sample topography data. System usage for the measurement of slopes on flat planar samples is also discussed. The discussion has been designed to provide the theoretical basis, a physical insight, and a cookbook procedure for implementation to allow these results to be of value to both those interested in the microscope theory and its practical usage in the metallography laboratory

  17. A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope tested on Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope with a spatial resolution of less than 5 µm has been designed for on-chip in situ investigations of the working properties of normal and superconducting circuits and devices. The instrument relies on the detection of the electrical response of the circuit...... to a very localized heating induced by irradiation with 675 nm wavelength light from a semiconductor laser. The hot spot is moved by a specially designed piezoelectric scanner sweeping the tip of a single-mode optical fiber a few µm above the circuit. Depending on the scanner design the scanning area can...... be as large as 50×500 µm2 at 4.2 K. The microscope can be operated in the temperature range 2–300 K using a standard temperature controller. The central microscope body is mounted inside the vacuum can of a dip-stick-type cryoprobe. A damped spring system is used to reduce interference from extraneous...

  18. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  19. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    -dynamic discontinuities, the intensities corresponding to the transition from regular to irregular interference were described. Numerical calculations of the shock-wave structure transformation in the conditions of hysteresis were performed. The results were compared with the experiments carried out by hydraulic analogy method. Practical significance. Results of the work complement well the theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities interference and can be used at designing of perspective images of supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  20. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  1. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Bøggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit...... of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50 x 50 pm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 run. We demonstrate how the EBL system can...

  2. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Richard A; Brezovich, Ivan A; Fiveash, John B

    2014-05-01

    The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular

  3. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  4. Direct laser interference patterning of magnetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktag, Aliekber

    Recently, patterned magnetic thin films have attracted much attention for a variety of applications such as high density magnetic recording, magnetoresistive sensing, and magnetic random access memories. In the case of magnetic recording, one scheme calls for the films to be patterned into single domain "dots", where every dot represents a thermally stable bit. In this thesis, we extended a technique called direct laser interference patterning (DLIP), originally developed by Polushkin and co-workers, to pattern and locally modify the materials properties of magnetic thin films. In this technique, a high-intensity Nd:YAG pulse laser beam was split into two, three, or four beams, which are then recombined to interfere on a sample surface. The interference intensity maxima can modify the local materials properties of the film through local "annealing" or, more drastically, by ablation. We carried out some preliminary investigations of the DLIP process in several films including co-sputtered Co-C, amorphous Dy/Co:SiO2 multilayers, and Co/SiO2 multilayers in order to refine our techniques. We successfully produced regular arrays of lines, dots, or antidots formed by ablation of the thin film. The preliminary studies also showed that, in the regime of more modest pulse energies, it is possible to modify the magnetic properties of the films without noticeably changing the film topography. We then prepared perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Co/Pt multilayers with a SiO x passivation layer and applied DLIP at fairly modest intensities to pattern the film. We then studied the structural and magnetic changes that occurred in some detail. X-ray diffraction scans showed the Co/Pt:SiO x multilayer films to be nanocrystalline before and after patterning. Atomic force microscopy images showed no evidence for topographic changes of the Co/Pt:SiOx during patterning. In contrast, magnetic force microscopy showed regular periodic dot arrays, indicating that the local magnetic

  5. Adjustable magnification anamorphic beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, S. R.

    1990-08-01

    A visible laser diode package is proposed to substitute a Krpton-Ion laser for alignment purposes. The proposed system uses 5 Melles Griot AR coated stock lenses. Tests performed to the optics reveal some undesirable properties, such as, astigmatism and spherical aberration; however, the interference pattern and star test reveals what seems to be a good quality wavefront. The interference fringes seem to be very good, but there still is a small presence of a comalike aberration at the fringes extreme. The star test revealed the system to be about 3 times diffraction limited. The system has yet to be tested in an alignment situation. As for now, it is ready to be tested with some minor alignment adjustments necessary for a good wavefront quality. A safety memo was written for testing the prototype system at the alignment lab. The initial laser diode system alignment method suggested, uses a reverse alignment procedure. In this procedure, the expected output (30 mm diameter beam) is input into the system output and alignment is performed by moving the components until the desired system input is found; an elliptical beam with 1 mm in the horizontal axis and 4 mm in the vertical axis. Once this reverse alignment procedure is completed the laser diode is placed at the system input. Fine alignment is done with the help of shear plate interference patterns in both, the 1 mm axis and 4 mm axis. The proposed final opto-mechanical packaging of this system is formed with squared adapter plates that are connected by means of four support rods where the center of the plate becomes the optical axis. These components are commercially available and provide high mechanical stability.

  6. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; DuChene, Joseph S; Roberts, Alan D; Wei, Wei David; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-11-01

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO 2 indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Elastic scattering of light neutron rich exotic beams on a proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chartier, M.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Barrette, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; and others.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic scattering of 6 He, 10,11 Be secondary beams on a (CH 2 ) 3 target has been measured. A microscopic optical potential was used to reproduce the proton-nucleus elastic scattering data. (author)

  8. Minimal exposure technique in the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, J.R.; Cleaver, J.R.A.; Smith, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage due to the incident electron beam imposes a fundamental limitation on the information obtainable by electron microscopy about organic materials; it is desirable therefore that exposure of the specimen to the electron beam should be restricted to the actual period during which the image is being recorded. A description is given of methods employed in the observation of the organic aromatic hydrocarbons quaterrylene, ovalene and coronene with the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope (HREM). In particular, the condenser-objective mode of operation of this microscope lends itself to the use of an area-defining aperture below the second condenser lens conjugate with the specimen. Furthermore, operation at the higher accelerating voltage of this instrument could be anticipated to reduce the rate of damage, depending on the dominant beam-specimen interaction, whilst the increased width of the first broad band of the contrast transfer function of this microscope at the optimum defocus may overcome the reported resolution limitation of current 100kV microscopes for the observation of related materials. (author)

  9. Interference Cancellation trough Interference Alignment for Downlink of Cognitive Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, May; Foukalas, Fotis; Khattab, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, we propose the interference cancellation through interference alignment at the downlink of cognitive cellular networks. Interference alignment helps the spatial resources to be shared among primary and secondary cells and thus, it can provide higher degrees of freedom through interference cancellation. We derive and depict the achievable degrees of freedom. We also analyse and calculate the achievable sum rates applying water-filling optimal power allocation.

  10. Low Complexity Opportunistic Interference Alignment in $K$-Transmitter MIMO Interference Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Atul Kumar; Chaturvedi, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose low complexity opportunistic methods for interference alignment in $K$-transmitter MIMO interference channels by exploiting multiuser diversity. We do not assume availability of channel state information (CSI) at the transmitters. Receivers are required to feed back analog values indicating the extent to which the received interference subspaces are aligned. The proposed opportunistic interference alignment (OIA) achieves sum-rate comparable to conventional OIA schem...

  11. Stroop interference and reverse Stroop interference as potential measures of cognitive ability during exposure to stress

    OpenAIRE

    景山, 望; 箱田, 裕司; Kageyama, Nozomu; Hakoda, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Stroop interference and reverse-Stroop interference are one of the easiest and most powerful effects to demonstrate in a classroom. Therefore, they have been studied not only through basic research in the laboratory but also through applied research in extreme environments. First, we reviewed studies tha investigated Stroop interference and reverse-Stroop interference as hallmark measures of selective at attention and conflict resolution. Second, we reviewed studies that examined the effects ...

  12. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  13. Beam Phase Detection for Proton Therapy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Getta, Markus; Kolesov, Sergej; Pupeter, Nico; Stephani, Thomas; Timmer, J

    2005-01-01

    The industrial application of proton cyclotrons for medical applications has become one of the important contributions of accelerator physics during the last years. This paper describes an advanced vector demodulating technique used for non-destructive measurements of beam intensity and beam phase over 360°. A computer controlled I/Q-based phase detector with a very large dynamic range of 70 dB permits the monitoring of beam intensity, phase and eventually energy for wide range of beam currents down to -130 dBm. In order to avoid interference from the fundamental cyclotron frequency the phase detection is performed at the second harmonic frequency. A digital low pass filter with adjustable bandwidth and steepness is implemented to improve accuracy. With a sensitivity of the capacitive pickup in the beam line of 30 nV per nA of proton beam current at 250 MeV, accurate phase and intensity measurements can be performed with beam currents down to 3.3 nA.

  14. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more elec- tronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference.

  15. Interference and the Law of Energy Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosd, Robert; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Introductory physics textbooks consider interference to be a process of redistribution of energy from the wave sources in the surrounding space resulting in constructive and destructive interferences. As one can expect, the total energy flux is conserved. However, one case of apparent non-conservation energy attracts great attention. Imagine that…

  16. Interference of conoscopic pictures of optical crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syuy, A. V.; Stroganov, V. I.

    2008-12-01

    Nonconventional conoscopic pictures in poorly passing bunches of light, localized in a plane of uni-axial optical crystal are received. At usage of two crystal slabs with the optical axes oriented at angle to the plane of slab the interference conoscopic pictures are observed. The model explaining interference of conoscopic pictures is presented.

  17. Electron quantum interferences and universal conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Pichard, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Quantum interferences yield corrections to the classical ohmic behaviour predicted by Boltzmann theory in electronic transport: for instance the well-known ''weak localization'' effects. Furthermore, very recently, quantum interference effects have been proved to be responsible for statistically different phenomena, associated with Universal Conductance Fluctuations and observed on very small devices [fr

  18. Is There Semantic Interference in Delayed Naming?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mädebach, A.; Oppermann, F.; Hantsch, A.; Curda, C.; Jescheniak, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The semantic interference effect in the picture-word interference task is interpreted as an index of lexical competition in prominent speech production models. Janssen, Schirm, Mahon, and Caramazza (2008) challenged this interpretation on the basis of experiments with a novel version of this task,

  19. Optimal interference code based on machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ye; Chen, Qian; Hu, Xiaobo; Cao, Ercong; Qian, Weixian; Gu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of pseudo-random code, by the case of m sequence. Depending on the description of coding theory, we introduce the jamming methods. We simulate the interference effect or probability model by the means of MATLAB to consolidate. In accordance with the length of decoding time the adversary spends, we find out the optimal formula and optimal coefficients based on machine learning, then we get the new optimal interference code. First, when it comes to the phase of recognition, this study judges the effect of interference by the way of simulating the length of time over the decoding period of laser seeker. Then, we use laser active deception jamming simulate interference process in the tracking phase in the next block. In this study we choose the method of laser active deception jamming. In order to improve the performance of the interference, this paper simulates the model by MATLAB software. We find out the least number of pulse intervals which must be received, then we can make the conclusion that the precise interval number of the laser pointer for m sequence encoding. In order to find the shortest space, we make the choice of the greatest common divisor method. Then, combining with the coding regularity that has been found before, we restore pulse interval of pseudo-random code, which has been already received. Finally, we can control the time period of laser interference, get the optimal interference code, and also increase the probability of interference as well.

  20. Testing microscopes between market and scientific strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ratcliff, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper claims that the testing of microscopes during the eighteenth century reveals specific types of interaction between makers and users and links between scientific and economic interests. Basic procedures for the comparison and test of microscopes existed already in the Enlightenment although many historians thought that these were invented during the nineteenth century. The paper discusses three kinds of tests, advertising, the admission of a microscope in the laboratory, and finally...

  1. Interference of Apoptosis by Hepatitis B Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoli; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2017-08-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes liver diseases that have been a consistent problem for human health, leading to more than one million deaths every year worldwide. A large proportion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases across the world are closely associated with chronic HBV infection. Apoptosis is a programmed cell death and is frequently altered in cancer development. HBV infection interferes with the apoptosis signaling to promote HCC progression and viral proliferation. The HBV-mediated alteration of apoptosis is achieved via interference with cellular signaling pathways and regulation of epigenetics. HBV X protein (HBX) plays a major role in the interference of apoptosis. There are conflicting reports on the HBV interference of apoptosis with the majority showing inhibition of and the rest reporting induction of apoptosis. In this review, we described recent studies on the mechanisms of the HBV interference with the apoptosis signaling during the virus infection and provided perspective.

  2. Interference of Apoptosis by Hepatitis B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes liver diseases that have been a consistent problem for human health, leading to more than one million deaths every year worldwide. A large proportion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases across the world are closely associated with chronic HBV infection. Apoptosis is a programmed cell death and is frequently altered in cancer development. HBV infection interferes with the apoptosis signaling to promote HCC progression and viral proliferation. The HBV-mediated alteration of apoptosis is achieved via interference with cellular signaling pathways and regulation of epigenetics. HBV X protein (HBX) plays a major role in the interference of apoptosis. There are conflicting reports on the HBV interference of apoptosis with the majority showing inhibition of and the rest reporting induction of apoptosis. In this review, we described recent studies on the mechanisms of the HBV interference with the apoptosis signaling during the virus infection and provided perspective. PMID:28820498

  3. A novel interference fringes software counting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhao; Chen, Benyong; Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Dacheng

    2005-02-01

    Conventional interference fringes counting methods often process two sinusoidal interference signals with a phase difference of π/2 to realize fringe-counting. But when the signals fluctuate in half a period of the signal, the conventional fringe-counting method sometimes produces direction-distinguishing mistakes, then resulting in counting errors. To address the problem, this paper presents a novel interference fringes counting method that uses software to distinguish the forward or backward direction of interference fringe and to count. This fringe-counting method can accurately distinguish the moving direction induced by the fluctuation of interference fringes, so it has the advantages of exact counting, intelligence and reliability. An experimental setup based on a Michelson interferometer is constructed to demonstrate the utility of this fringe-counting method for displacement measurement, and experimental results with a range of 1036mm is presented.

  4. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  5. Recent improvements of the JET lithium beam diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, M; Dodt, D; Dunai, D; Lupelli, I; Marsen, S; Melson, T F; Meszaros, B; Morgan, P; Petravich, G; Refy, D I; Silva, C; Stamp, M; Szabolics, T; Zastrow, K-D; Zoletnik, S

    2012-10-01

    A 60 kV neutral lithium diagnostic beam probes the edge plasma of JET for the measurement of electron density profiles. This paper describes recent enhancements of the diagnostic setup, new procedures for calibration and protection measures for the lithium ion gun during massive gas puffs for disruption mitigation. New light splitting optics allow in parallel beam emission measurements with a new double entrance slit CCD spectrometer (spectrally resolved) and a new interference filter avalanche photodiode camera (fast density and fluctuation studies).

  6. Microscopic description of magnetized plasma: quasiparticle concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.; Decyk, V.K.

    1993-01-01

    A quasiparticle concept is developed systematically, from first principles, within the context of microscopic description of magnetized plasma. It is argued that the zeroth velocity-gyroangle harmonic of the microscopic particle distribution function under the gyrokinetic change of variables can be taken as a microscopic quasi-particle density in a reduced phase space. The nature of quasiparticles is discussed and equations of their motion are derived within both exact and reduced microscopic descriptions. The reduced one employs explicitly the separation of interesting time scales. (orig.)

  7. Foldscope: origami-based paper microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Cybulski

    Full Text Available Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education.

  8. A 4096-pixel MAPS detector used to investigate the single-electron distribution in a Young–Feynman two-slit interference experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Giorgi, F.M., E-mail: giorgi@bo.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Semprini, N.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); Frabboni, S. [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Modena (Italy); Gazzadi, G.C. [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Modena (Italy)

    2013-01-21

    A monolithic CMOS detector, made of 4096 active pixels developed for HEP collider experiments, has been used in the Young–Feynman two-slit experiment with single electrons. The experiment has been carried out by inserting two nanometric slits in a transmission electron microscope that provided the electron beam source and the electro-optical lenses for projecting and focusing the interference pattern on the sensor. The fast readout of the sensor, in principle capable to manage up to 10{sup 6} frames per second, allowed to record single-electron frames spaced by several empty frames. In this way, for the first time in a single-electron two-slit experiment, the time distribution of electron arrivals has been measured with a resolution of 165μs. In addition, high statistics samples of single-electron events were collected within a time interval short enough to be compatible with the stability of the system and coherence conditions of the illumination.

  9. Convergent beam thickness determination of thin foil zirconium specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cann, C.D.

    1978-07-01

    The use of convergent beam patterns to determine the thickness of zirconium foils observed in the electron microscope has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. On the basis of many-beam dynamical theory calculations, the [1012], [1013], and [1120] reflections at an accelerating voltage of 100 kV and the [1013], [1120], and [1122] reflections at 200 kV were found most suitable for convergent beam thickness determinations. Experimental convergent beam patterns were obtained in the JEOL-200B electron microscope under two different sets of conditions based on the size of the pattern desired. Computer assisted analysis of the patterns obtained gave foil thicknesses in good agreement with those determined from thickness extinction contours. (author)

  10. Radiation and thermal induced transformation in glassy chalcogenides using electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maged, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscope is used to characterize the types of thermally induced transformations which occur in the chalcogenide glasses Si 20 Te 40 As 30 Ge 10 Si 12 Te 48 As 30 Ge 10 and Si 10 Te 50 As 30 Ge 10 . Beam heating in the electron microscope was used to observe directly the thermally induced transformations in amorphous thin films. A solid-fluid transition (softening) was observed in all compositions. Experimental evidence indicated that crystallization can be induced in the three compositions. No response to gamma radiation (up to 500 KGy) was observed in the structure of these compositions. 8 figs

  11. A microscope for Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on a novel quantum gas microscope to investigate many-body systems of fermionic atoms in optical lattices. Single-site resolved imaging of ultracold lattice gases has enabled powerful studies of bosonic quantum many-body systems. The extension of this capability to Fermi gases offers new prospects to studying complex phenomena of strongly correlated systems, for which numerical simulations are often out of reach. Using standard techniques of laser cooling, optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li are prepared and loaded into a large-scale 2D optical lattice of flexible geometry. The atomic distribution is frozen using a second, short-scaled lattice, where we perform Raman sideband cooling to induce fluorescence on each atom while maintaining its position. Together with high-resolution imaging, the fluorescence signals allow for reconstructing the initial atom distribution with single-site sensitivity and high fidelity. Magnetically driven evaporative cooling in the plane allows for producing degenerate Fermi gases with almost unity filling in the initial lattice, allowing for the first microscopic studies of ultracold gases with clear signatures of Fermi statistics. By preparing an ensemble of spin-polarised Fermi gases, we detect a flattening of the density profile towards the centre of the cloud, which is a characteristic of a band-insulating state. In one set of experiments, we demonstrate that losses of atom pairs on a single lattice site due to light-assisted collisions are circumvented. The oversampling of the second lattice allows for deterministic separation of the atom pairs into different sites. Compressing a high-density sample in a trap before loading into the lattice leads to many double occupancies of atoms populating different bands, which we can image with no evidence for pairwise losses. We therefore gain direct access to the true number statistics on each lattice site. Using this feature, we can

  12. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  13. Influence of electron beam exposure on crystallization of phase-change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Kooi, Bart J.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Pauza, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal crystallization of amorphous SbxTe films capped with ZnS-SiO2 or GeCrN layers was performed using in situ heating within a transmission electron microscope. The effect of the electron beam of the microscope on the crystallization process was investigated. It was found that electron

  14. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  15. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning–imaging X-ray microscope optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic micro-imaging system which enables simultaneous measurement of differential phase contrast and absorption contrast has been developed. The optical system consists of a scanning microscope with one-dimensional focusing device and an imaging microscope with one-dimensional objective. A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning–imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown

  16. Focal Molography: Coherent Microscopic Detection of Biomolecular Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Fattinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and theoretically investigate here a novel analytical method that we have called focal molography, in which molecular interactions are made visible through scattering of coherent light by a coherent pattern of molecules. The scattered light quantifies the presence of molecules at molecular interaction sites. It is separated from noncoherent background scatter by a combination of local dark-field illumination, interference enhancement, and spatial filtering. The latter is achieved by holographic focusing of the wave field generated by the coherently assembled molecules onto an Airy disk and by subtraction of the noncoherent irradiance in the focal plane outside the disk from the irradiance in the disk. This new microscopic method allows distinct detection of low-refractive-index contrast in the nanoenvironment of biomolecules from which information on the interaction of the coherently assembled molecules with molecules in a liquid or gaseous sample may be deduced. The noncoherent surroundings of the coherently assembled molecules consist of freely diffusing solvent and solute molecules. The surroundings, as well as changes in temperature, do not contribute to the coherent signal in the diffraction focus. Interference lithography or high-resolution-imaging lithography can be used to synthesize the coherent pattern of molecules on a monolithic substrate. The coherent pattern of molecules constitutes a synthetic phase hologram that creates a diffraction-limited light wave. We suggest the term “mologram” for the coherent assembly of functional nanostructures and the term “focal molography” for label-free or labeled analysis of molecular interactions through the measurement of the properties of light in the focus of the mologram. We derive analytical formulas that express the detection signal and the sensitivity of focal molography on the surface of a high-refractive-index thin-film optical waveguide in terms of known parameters

  17. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  18. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  19. Mice embryology: a microscopic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maria Letícia Baptista; Lessa, Thais Borges; Russo, Fabiele Baldino; Fernandes, Renata Avancini; Kfoury, José Roberto; Braga, Patricia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we studied the embryology of mice of 12, 14, and 18 days of gestation by gross observation, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Grossly, the embryos of 12 days were observed in C-shaped region of the brain, eye pigmentation of the retina, first, second, and third pharyngeal arches gill pit nasal region on the fourth ventricle brain, cervical curvature, heart, liver, limb bud thoracic, spinal cord, tail, umbilical cord, and place of the mesonephric ridge. Microscopically, the liver, cardiovascular system and spinal cord were observed. In the embryo of 14 days, we observed structures that make up the liver and heart. At 18 days of gestation fetuses, it was noted the presence of eyes, mouth, and nose in the cephalic region, chest and pelvic region with the presence of well-developed limbs, umbilical cord, and placenta. Scanning electron microscopy in 18 days of gestation fetuses evidenced head, eyes closed eyelids, nose, vibrissae, forelimb, heart, lung, kidney, liver, small bowel, diaphragm, and part of the spine. The results obtained in this work describe the internal and external morphology of mice, provided by an integration of techniques and review of the morphological knowledge of the embryonic development of this species, as this animal is of great importance to scientific studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Moxidectin interference on motor activity of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Sá e Benevides Rodrigues-Alves

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of t moxidectin (MXD in some parameters of rat motor function and neurochemical. The general activity in the open field and the motor coordination in the wooden beam were employed to evaluate the MXD effects. The results showed that, in the open field, even at high doses (2.0 and 20.0 mg/kg, the MXD did not alter the locomotion and the rearing frequencies. However, MXD was able to impair the motor coordination of the animals at wooden beam. Neurochemical studies of striatal GABA and dopamine neurotransmitters showed a reduced levels of dopamine and its metabolite, homovanillic acid, without interference on striatal GABA levels. Since GABAergic receptor stimulation had an inhibitory effect on dopaminergic striatal system, the decreased motor coordination could be attributed to an action of MXD on dopamine system via GABA activation.A moxidectina (MXD é uma droga antiparasitária amplamente empregada em animais domésticos; seu mecanismo de ação, em mamíferos, envolve o neurotransmissor ácido gama-aminobutírico (GABA. Esse neurotransmissor tem papel importante na função motora. Assim, no presente trabalho estudaram-se os efeitos da MXD em alguns parâmetros comportamentais ligados a função motora de ratos e também em sistemas de neurotransmissão central. A atividade geral no campo aberto e a coordenação motora na trave elevada foram empregadas para avaliar os efeitos de diferentes doses de MXD. Os resultados mostraram que: no campo aberto, mesmo as doses maiores (2.0 e 20.0 mg/kg de MXD não alteraram as freqüências de locomoção e levantar. Por outro lado, a MXD foi capaz de prejudicar a coordenação motora dos animais avaliada na trave elevada. Estudos neuroquímicos dos níveis estriatais de GABA e dopamina mostraram redução dos níveis de dopamina e seu metabólito, ácido homavanílico, sem interferência nos níveis de GABA estriatal. Considerando que a estimulação de

  1. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  2. Major Components of the Light Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The light microscope is a basic tool for the cell biologist, who should have a thorough understanding of how it works, how it should be aligned for different applications, and how it should be maintained as required to obtain maximum image-forming capacity and resolution. The components of the microscope are described in detail here.

  3. Major components of the light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-07-30

    The light microscope is a basic tool for the cell biologist, who should have a thorough understanding of how it works, how it should be aligned for different applications, and how it should be maintained as required to obtain maximum image-forming capacity and resolution. The components of the microscope are described in detail here.

  4. Microscopic colitis : an unfamiliar but treatable disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, E. J.; Karrenbeld, A.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    Chronic diarrhoea is a frequent complaint in clinical practice. Microscopic colitis is the cause of this symptom in 10% of these cases and the prevalence is rising. To exclude microscopic colitis a colonoscopy with multiple biopsies of different regions of the colon is mandatory. A sigmoidoscopy

  5. A microscopic model of triangular arbitrage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yukihiro; Hatano, Naomichi

    2006-11-01

    We introduce a microscopic model which describes the dynamics of each dealer in multiple foreign exchange markets, taking account of the triangular arbitrage transaction. The model reproduces the interaction among the markets well. We explore the relation between the parameters of the present microscopic model and the spring constant of a macroscopic model that we proposed previously.

  6. Quantum theory and microscopic mechanics. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1984-08-01

    The need for theoretical descriptions and experimental observations on 'small' individual systems is emphasized. It is shown that the mathematical basis for microscopic mechanics is very simple in one dimension. The square well problem is discussed to clarify general points about stationary states and the continuity of (p'/p) across potential boundaries in the applications of microscopic mechanics. (author)

  7. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  8. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  9. Interference of Fano-Rashba conductance dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelabert, M M; Renart, A; Serra, L, E-mail: llorens.serra@uib.es [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-03-23

    We study the interference of two tunable Rashba regions in a quantum wire with one propagating mode. The transmission dips (Fano-Rashba dips) of the two regions either cross or anti-cross, depending on the distance between the two regions. For large separations we find Fabry-Perot oscillations due to the interference of forwards and backwards propagating modes. At small separations overlapping evanescent modes play a prominent role, leading to an enhanced transmission and destroying the conductance dip. Analytical expressions in scattering matrix theory are given and the relevance of the interference effect in a device is discussed.

  10. Imaging Slit Pores Under Delaminated Splats by White Light Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gao, Li-li; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-01-01

    The slit pores under delaminated films significantly contribute to the properties of the film and the coating. In the present study, a novel and practical technique, the white light interference method, is proposed to characterize the slit pores covered by the 8YSZ and LZ splats. In this method, only an ordinary optical microscopy (OM) is used. Interestingly, colorful Newton's rings and parabolic shapes of the slit pores were clearly observed by OM. The crack spacing and the shapes of the slit pores captured by OM were in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy and focus ion beam. Moreover, this is the first time when successful quantitative imaging of the slit pores under the thermal spray splats is achieved. Besides, mechanical analyses were carried out, and the results were consistent with those obtained by OM. In addition, the essential fact that the slit pores were mainly caused by transverse cracking/delamination in the thermal spray coatings was clarified. These results indicate that white light interference is an excellent method to characterize the slit pores under smooth and transparent films.

  11. Imaging Slit Pores Under Delaminated Splats by White Light Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gao, Li-li; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-02-01

    The slit pores under delaminated films significantly contribute to the properties of the film and the coating. In the present study, a novel and practical technique, the white light interference method, is proposed to characterize the slit pores covered by the 8YSZ and LZ splats. In this method, only an ordinary optical microscopy (OM) is used. Interestingly, colorful Newton's rings and parabolic shapes of the slit pores were clearly observed by OM. The crack spacing and the shapes of the slit pores captured by OM were in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy and focus ion beam. Moreover, this is the first time when successful quantitative imaging of the slit pores under the thermal spray splats is achieved. Besides, mechanical analyses were carried out, and the results were consistent with those obtained by OM. In addition, the essential fact that the slit pores were mainly caused by transverse cracking/delamination in the thermal spray coatings was clarified. These results indicate that white light interference is an excellent method to characterize the slit pores under smooth and transparent films.

  12. All-fiber maskless lithographic technology to form microcircular interference pattern on Azo polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junki; Jung, Yongmin; Oh, Kyunghwan; Chun, Chaemin; Hong, Jeachul; Kim, Dongyu

    2005-03-01

    We report a novel all-fiber, maskless lithograpic technology to form various concentric grating patterns for micro zone plate on azo polymer film. The proposed technology is based on the interference pattern out of the cleaved end of a coreless silica fiber (CSF)-single mode fiber (SMF) composite. The light guided along SMF expands into the CSF segment to generate various circular interference patterns depending on the length of CSF. Interference patterns are experimentally observed when the CSF length is over a certain length and the finer spacing between the concentric rings are obtained for a longer CSF. By using beam propagation method (BPM) package, we could further investigated the concentric interference patterns in terms of intensity distribution and fringe spacing as a function of CSF length. These intereference patterns are directly projected over azo polymer film and their intensity distrubution formed surface relief grating (SRG) patterns. Compared to photoresist films azo polymer layers produce surface relief grating (SRG), where the actual mass of layer is modulated rather than refractive index. The geometric parameters of the CSF length as well as diameter and the spacing between the cleaved end of a CSF and azo polymer film, were found to play a major role to generate various concentric structures. With the demonstration of the circular SRG patterns, we confirmed that the proposed technique do have an ample potential to fabricate micro fresnel zone plate, that could find applications in lens arrays for optical beam formings as well as compact photonic devices.

  13. Landscaping Crossover Interference Across a Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lidan; Wang, Jing; Sang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Libo; Zhao, Bingyu; Cheng, Tangran; Zhang, Qixiang; Wu, Rongling

    2017-10-01

    The evolutionary success of eukaryotic organisms crucially depends on the capacity to produce genetic diversity through reciprocal exchanges of each chromosome pair, or crossovers (COs), during meiosis. It has been recognized that COs arise more evenly across a given chromosome than at random. This phenomenon, termed CO interference, occurs pervasively in eukaryotes and may confer a selective advantage. We describe here a multipoint linkage analysis procedure for segregating families to quantify the strength of CO interference over the genome, and extend this procedure to illustrate the landscape of CO interference in natural populations. We further discuss the crucial role of CO interference in amplifying and maintaining genetic diversity through sex-, stress-, and age-induced differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive interference management in heterogeneous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Marabissi, Dania

    2015-01-01

    This brief investigates the role of interference management in Heterogeneous Networks (Het Nets), focusing on cognitive approaches and the use of beamforming. Key concepts of Het Nets are introduced and different deployment strategies are examined, such as sharing the same frequency band of the macro cells or using new high frequency bands. Particular attention is devoted to co-channel deployment and to the problem of interference management, addressing various strategies that can be adopted to handle the interference between the cells. In addition, the brief explores cognitive small cells which are able to avoid or limit interference by using suitable beamforming and resource allocation schemes. The suggested solutions are supported by numerical results in terms of performance evaluations and comparisons.

  15. Conducted Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) in Smart Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Smolenski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As power systems develop to incorporate renewable energy sources, the delivery systems may be disrupted by the changes involved. The grid’s technology and management must be developed to form Smart Grids between consumers, suppliers and producers. Conducted Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) in Smart Grids considers the specific side effects related to electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by the application of these Smart Grids. Conducted Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) in Smart Grids presents specific EMI conducted phenomena as well as effective methods to filter and handle them once identified. After introduction to Smart Grids, the following sections cover dedicated methods for EMI reduction and potential avenues for future development including chapters dedicated to: •potential system services, •descriptions of the EMI spectra shaping methods, •methods of interference voltage compensation, and theoretical analysis of experimental results.  By focusing on these key aspects, Conducted El...

  16. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moelhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Noergaard; Boeggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50x50 μm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 nm. We demonstrate how the EBL system can be used to write three-dimensional nanostructures by electron-beam deposition

  17. Interference Management with Successive Cancellation for Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Steiner, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Network-Assisted Interference Cancellation and Suppression (NAICS) receivers have appeared as a promising way to curb inter-cell interference in future dense network deployments. This investigation compares the performance of a NAICS receiver with successive interference cancellation capabilities...

  18. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the results of SEM and TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a BPRML (WSi2/Si with fundamental layer thickness of 3 nm) with a Dual Beam FIB (focused ion beam)/SEM technique. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  19. Fading and interference mitigation in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Panic, Stefan; Anastasov, Jelena; Spalevic, Petar

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advancement of various wireless communication system services has created the need to analyze the possibility of their performance improvement. Introducing the basic principles of digital communications performance analysis and its mathematical formalization, Fading and Interference Mitigation in Wireless Communications will help you stay up to date with recent developments in the performance analysis of space diversity reception over fading channels in the presence of cochannel interference.The book presents a unified method for computing the performance of digital communication sys

  20. Quantum eraser for three-slit interference

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveed Ahmad Shah

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... Figure 2. Recovered interference pattern, given by. |ψ↑(x, t)|2 (solid line) and the original 3-slit interfer- ence pattern, given by (10) (dashed line). The two are clearly different. The dotted line represents the lost interference in the presence of which-way information, given by (12). +e−(d2−2xd)/. 2 cos(2xd/a − ...

  1. Gene expression: RNA interference in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Anton P.; Meuse, Leonard; Pham, Thu-Thao T.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Kay, Mark A.

    2002-07-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved surveillance mechanism that responds to double-stranded RNA by sequence-specific silencing of homologous genes. Here we show that transgene expression can be suppressed in adult mice by synthetic small interfering RNAs and by small-hairpin RNAs transcribed in vivo from DNA templates. We also show the therapeutic potential of this technique by demonstrating effective targeting of a sequence from hepatitis C virus by RNA interference in vivo.

  2. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz.

  3. Role of scanning electron microscope )SEM) in metal failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaiful Rizam Shamsudin; Hafizal Yazid; Mohd Harun; Siti Selina Abd Hamid; Nadira Kamarudin; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamad Jalil

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a scientific instrument that uses a beam of highly energetic electrons to examine the surface and phase distribution of specimens on a micro scale through the live imaging of secondary electrons (SE) and back-scattered electrons (BSE) images. One of the main activities of SEM Laboratory at MINT is for failure analysis on metal part and components. The capability of SEM is excellent for determining the root cause of metal failures such as ductility or brittleness, stress corrosion, fatigue and other types of failures. Most of our customers that request for failure analysis are from local petrochemical plants, manufacturers of automotive components, pipeline maintenance personnel and engineers who involved in the development of metal parts and component. This paper intends to discuss some of the technical concepts in failure analysis associated with SEM. (Author)

  4. Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Alan V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Hamza, Alex V.; Schneider, Dieter H.; Doyle, Barney

    2001-01-01

    A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

  5. Investigation of Interference Models for RFID Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linchao Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The reader-to-reader collision in an RFID system is a challenging problem for communications technology. In order to model the interference between RFID readers, different interference models have been proposed, mainly based on two approaches: single and additive interference. The former only considers the interference from one reader within a certain range, whereas the latter takes into account the sum of all of the simultaneous interferences in order to emulate a more realistic behavior. Although the difference between the two approaches has been theoretically analyzed in previous research, their effects on the estimated performance of the reader-to-reader anti-collision protocols have not yet been investigated. In this paper, the influence of the interference model on the anti-collision protocols is studied by simulating a representative state-of-the-art protocol. The results presented in this paper highlight that the use of additive models, although more computationally intensive, is mandatory to improve the performance of anti-collision protocols.

  6. Understanding quantum interference in general nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to give a new understanding of quantum double-slit interference of fermions in the framework of general nonlocality (GN) [J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] by studying the self-(inter)action of matter wave. From the metric of the GN, we derive a special formalism to interpret the interference contrast when the self-action is perturbative. According to the formalism, the characteristic of interference pattern is in agreement with experiment qualitatively. As examples, we apply the formalism to the cases governed by Schroedinger current and Dirac current, respectively, both of which are relevant to topology. The gap between these two cases corresponds to the fermion magnetic moment, which is possible to test in the near future. In addition, a general interference formalism for both perturbative and nonperturbative self-actions is presented. By analyzing the general formalism we predict that in the nonperturbative limit there is no interference at all. And by comparison with the special formalism of Schroedinger current, the coupling strength of self-action in the limit is found to be ∞. In the perturbative case, the interference from self-action turns out to be the same as that from the standard approach of quantum theory. Then comparing the corresponding coefficients quantitatively we conclude that the coupling strength of self-action in this case falls in the interval [0, 1].

  7. Cross-limb interference during motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Lauber

    Full Text Available It is well known that following skill learning, improvements in motor performance may transfer to the untrained contralateral limb. It is also well known that retention of a newly learned task A can be degraded when learning a competing task B that takes place directly after learning A. Here we investigate if this interference effect can also be observed in the limb contralateral to the trained one. Therefore, five different groups practiced a ballistic finger flexion task followed by an interfering visuomotor accuracy task with the same limb. Performance in the ballistic task was tested before the training, after the training and in an immediate retention test after the practice of the interference task for both the trained and the untrained hand. After training, subjects showed not only significant learning and interference effects for the trained limb but also for the contralateral untrained limb. Importantly, the interference effect in the untrained limb was dependent on the level of skill acquisition in the interfering motor task. These behavioural results of the untrained limb were accompanied by training specific changes in corticospinal excitability, which increased for the hemisphere ipsilateral to the trained hand following ballistic training and decreased during accuracy training of the ipsilateral hand. The results demonstrate that contralateral interference effects may occur, and that interference depends on the level of skill acquisition in the interfering motor task. This finding might be particularly relevant for rehabilitation.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  9. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  10. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  11. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  12. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Ball, B.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Bowles, J.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; Leo, R. De; Nardo, L. De; Sanctis, E. De; Diefenthaler, M.; Nezza, P. Di; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gabbert, D.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Guler, H.; Guzey, V.; Haan, S.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hill, G.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Lagamba, L.; Lamb, R.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, X.-G.; Lu, X.-R.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Manfré, L.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; de La Ossa, A. Martinez; Marukyan, H.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Raithel, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Shanidze, R.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Taroian, S.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Haarlem, Y. Van; Hulse, C. Van; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, H.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.; sHERMES Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross-section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and the deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  13. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  14. A Non-Interfering Beam Radius Diagnostic Suitable For Induction Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W E

    2005-01-01

    High current electron induction linacs operate in a parameter regime that allows the use of a diamagnetic loop (DML) to measure the beam magnetic moment. Under certain easily met conditions the beam radius can be derived from the moment measurement. The DML has the advantage over the present methods of measuring beam radius in that it is an electrical measurement with good time resolution that does not interfere with the beam transport. I describe experiments on the LLNL accelerators, ETA-II and FXR that give confidence in the use of a DML as a beam diagnostic

  15. Modernization of the REHMP-2 scanning electron microscope to study semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarkin, V.N.; Korob, E.B.

    1977-01-01

    The REMP-2 raster microscope has been modernized in order to adjust it for investigations of semiconductors by diode current signal (DCS) technique. The changes in the secondary electronic image circuit provided for its higher reliability. Presentation of DCS on the screen of the electron beam tube of the microscope display involved either modulations of the screen brightness or modulations of deviation on the screen and at the recorder. With the use of a recorder it was possible to study objects of an essentially greater area. A sensitive amplifier of DCS provides for working with weak signals and for quantitative investigations. Investigations of semiconductors at low temperatures is carried out with the help of an objective table cooled by liquid nitrogen. The illustrations show some capacities of the modernized REMP-2 microscope for DCS investigations of semiconductors

  16. Development of hard X-ray dark-field microscope using full-field optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hidekazu; Azuma, Hiroaki; Shimomura, Sho; Tsuji, Takuya; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a dark-field X-ray microscope using full-field optics based on a synchrotron beamline. Our setup consists of a condenser system and a microscope objective with an angular acceptance larger than that of the condenser. The condenser system is moved downstream from its regular position such that the focus of the condenser is behind the objective. The dark-field microscope optics are configured by excluding the converging beam from the condenser at the focal point. The image properties of the system are evaluated by observing and calculating a Siemens star test chart with 10 keV X-rays. Our setup allows easy switching to bright-field imaging. (author)

  17. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 A). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 A) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1x10 6 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons

  18. Distortion Correction for a Brewster Angle Microscope Using an Optical Grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhe; Zheng, Desheng; Baldelli, Steven

    2017-02-21

    A distortion-corrected Brewster angle microscope (DC-BAM) is designed, constructed, and tested based on the combination of an optical grating and a relay lens. Avoiding the drawbacks of most conventional BAM instruments, this configuration corrects the image propagation direction and consequently provides an image in focus over the entire field of view without any beam scanning or imaging reconstruction. This new BAM can be applied to both liquid and solid subphases with good spatial resolution in static and dynamic studies.

  19. Optimizing the performance of dual-axis confocal microscopes via Monte-Carlo scattering simulations and diffraction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Liu, Jonathan T C

    2013-06-01

    Dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy has been found to exhibit superior rejection of out-of-focus and multiply scattered background light compared to conventional single-axis confocal microscopy. DAC microscopes rely on the use of separated illumination and collection beam paths that focus and intersect at a single focal volume (voxel) within tissue. While it is generally recognized that the resolution and contrast of a DAC microscope depends on both the crossing angle of the DAC beams, 2θ, and the focusing numerical aperture of the individual beams, α, a detailed study to investigate these dependencies has not been performed. Contrast and resolution are considered as two main criteria to assess the performance of a point-scanned DAC microscope (DAC-PS) and a line-scanned DAC microscope (DAC-LS) as a function of θ and α. The contrast and resolution of these designs are evaluated by Monte-Carlo scattering simulations and diffraction theory calculations, respectively. These results can be used for guiding the optimal designs of DAC-PS and DAC-LS microscopes.

  20. Operating microscopes: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluç, Kutluay; Kujoth, Gregory C; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2009-09-01

    The operating microscope is a fixture of modern surgical facilities, and it is a critically important factor in the success of many of the most complex and difficult surgical interventions used in medicine today. The rise of this key surgical tool reflects advances in understanding the principles of optics and vision that have occurred over centuries. The development of reading spectacles in the late 13th century led to the construction of early compound microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries by Lippershey, Janssen, Galileo, Hooke, and others. Perhaps surprisingly, Leeuwenhoek's simple microscopes of this era offered improved performance over his contemporaries' designs. The intervening years saw improvements that reduced the spherical and chromatic aberrations present in compound microscopes. By the late 19th century, Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe ushered the compound microscope into the beginnings of the modern era of commercial design and production. The introduction of the microscope into the operating room by Nylén in 1921 initiated a revolution in surgical practice that gained momentum throughout the 1950s with multiple refinements, the introduction of the Zeiss OPMI series, and Kurze's application of the microscope to neurosurgery in 1957. Many of the refinements of the last 50 years have greatly improved the handling and practical operation of the surgical microscope, considerations which are equally important to its optical performance. Today's sophisticated operating microscopes allow for advanced real-time angiographic and tumor imaging. In this paper the authors discuss what might be found in the operating rooms of tomorrow.

  1. An atomic force microscope nanoscalpel for nanolithography and biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Burbridge, D J; Moskalenko, A V; Dudko, O; Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Yarova, P L; Smirnov, S V, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.u [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-04

    We present the fabrication of specialized nanotools, termed nanoscalpels, and their application for nanolithography and nanomechanical manipulation of biological objects. Fabricated nanoscalpels have the shape of a thin blade with the controlled thickness of 20-30 nm and width of 100-200 nm. They were fabricated using electron beam induced deposition at the apex of atomic force microscope probes and are hard enough for a single cut to penetrate a {approx}45 nm thick gold layer; and thus can be used for making narrow electrode gaps required for fabrication of nanoelectronic devices. As an atomic force microscope-based technique the nanoscalpel provides simultaneous control of the applied cutting force and the depth of the cut. Using mammalian cells as an example, we demonstrated their ability to make narrow incisions and measurements of local elastic and inelastic characteristics of a cell, making nanoscalpels also useful as a nanosurgical tool in cell biology. Therefore, we believe that the nanoscalpel could serve as an important tool for nanofabrication and nanosurgery on biological objects.

  2. Lensless microscope based on iterative in-line holographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jigang

    2014-11-01

    We propose a lensless microscopic imaging technique based on iteration algorithm with known constraint for image reconstruction in digital in-line holography. In our method, we introduce a constraint on the sample plane as known part in the lensless microscopy for iteration algorithm in order to eliminate the twin-image effect of holography and thus lead to better performance on microscopic imaging. We evaluate our method by numerical simulation and built a prototype in-line holographic imaging system and demonstrated its capability by preliminary experiments. In our proposed setup, a carefully designed photomask used to hold the sample is under illumination of a coherent light source. The in-line hologram is then recorded by a CMOS sensor. In the reconstruction, the known information of the illumination beam and the photomask is used as constraints in the iteration process. The improvement of image quality because of suppression of twin-images can be clearly seen by comparing the images obtained by direct holographic reconstruction and our iterative method.

  3. The Mathematical Microscope - Making the inaccessible accessible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

      In this chapter we introduce a new term, the "Mathematical Microscope", as a method of using mathematics in accessing information about reality when this information is otherwise inaccessible. Furthermore, we discuss how models and experiments are related: none of which are important without...... the other. In the sciences and medicine, a link that is often missing in the chain of a system can be made visible with the aid of the mathematical microscope. The mathematical microscope serves not only as a lens to clarify a blurred picture but more important as a tool to unveil profound truths...

  4. Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    One part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer instrument for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is a pair of telescopes with a special wheel (on the right in this photograph) for presenting samples to be inspected with the microscopes. A horizontally mounted optical microscope (on the left in this photograph) and an atomic force microscope will examine soil particles and possibly ice particles. The shapes and the size distributions of soil particles may tell scientists about environmental conditions the material has experienced. Tumbling rounds the edges. Repeated wetting and freezing causes cracking. Clay minerals formed during long exposure to water have distinctive, platy particles shapes.

  5. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  6. Coherent electron emission from H2 and Young type interference in swift ion and electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, D.; Chatterjee, S.; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai (India)

    2009-07-01

    The coherent electron emission from the inversion-symmetric homonuclear diatomic molecule H{sub 2}, carry the signature of the Young type electron interference. In a new approach we have shown that instead of taking H{sub 2}-to-2H DDCS ratios one can use the forward backward asymmetry in electron emission to obtain the oscillation due to interference. Bare fast C and F available from Pelletron accelerator at TIFR and 8 keV electron beam was used for these experiments. The frequency in 160 {sup circle} was found to be a factor of two higher w.r.t. 20 {sup circle}. The difference in the oscillation frequency for the forward and backward angles causes the oscillation in the asymmetry parameter. A model calculation based on Cohen-Fano model joined together with the frequency difference in forward-backward angles, fits the spectrum well. Since this study does not need any atomic target, can be applied for other diatomic molecular targets: a step forward towards the study of Young type interference in ionizations of molecule. Besides first order interference our data provides a strong support for the evidence of a double frequency component in interference oscillations.

  7. Patterned electrochemical deposition of copper using an electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark den Heijer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for patterning clusters of metal using electrochemical deposition. By operating an electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope, we deposit Cu on Au under potentiostatic conditions. For acidified copper sulphate electrolytes, nucleation occurs uniformly over the electrode. However, when chloride ions are added there is a range of applied potentials over which nucleation occurs only in areas irradiated by the electron beam. By scanning the beam we control nucleation to form patterns of deposited copper. We discuss the mechanism for this effect in terms of electron beam-induced reactions with copper chloride, and consider possible applications.

  8. ISR beam scrapers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Beam scrapers seen in the direction of the beam. The two horizontal scraper foils are near the centre of the beam pipe andthe two scrapers for protection of the vacuum chamber are further outside. In the lower part of the beam pipe is the vertical halo scraping blade.

  9. Telecommunication using muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location

  10. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  11. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  12. Controllable rotation of microsphere chain in dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinlin; Xiao, Guangzong; Han, Xiang; Xiong, Wei; Luo, Hui; Yang, Kaiyong

    2017-08-01

    Controllable rotation of the trapped microscopic objects has traditionally been thought of one of the most valuable optical manipulation techniques. The controllable rotation of a microsphere chain was achieved by the dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset. The experimental device was made up of a PDMS chip housing two counter-propagating fibers across a microfluidic flow channel. Each fiber was coupled with different laser diode source to avoid the generation of coherent interference, both operating at a wavelength of 980 nm. Each fiber was attached to a translation stage to adjust the transverse offset distance. The polystyrene microspheres with diameter of 10 μm were chosen as the trapped particles. The microfluidic flow channel of the device was flushed with the polystyrene microspheres solution by the mechanical fluid pump. At the beginning, the two fibers were strictly aligned to each other. Five microspheres were captured as a chain parallel to the axis of the fibers. When introducing a transverse offset to the counter-propagating fibers by adjusting the translation stages, the microsphere chain was observed to rotating in the trap center. When the offset distance was set as 9 μm, the rotation period is approximately 1.2s. A comprehensive analysis has been presented of the characteristics of the rotation. The functionality of rotated chain could be extended to applications requiring microfluidic mixing or to improving the reaction speed in a localized environment, and is generally applicable to biological and medical research.

  13. On the interference suppression capabilities of cognitive enabled femto cellular networks

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    Cognitive Radios are considered as a standard part of future Heterogeneous mobile network architecture. In this paper, we consider a two tier Heterogeneous network with multiple radio access technologies (RATS) namely; (i) the secondary network which comprises of cognitive enabled femto base stations which are referred to as cognitive-femto BS (CFBS) such that each of the BS are equipped with a single antenna and (ii) the macrocell network which is considered as a primary network. The effectiveness of the cognitive transmission is based on the efficient spectrum sensing algorithms which determine the availability of the spectrum holes. However, it is equally important for the cognitive network to minimize the cross-tier interference particularly during (i) the spectrum sensing and (ii) the cognitive transmission if spectrum is available. By exploiting the cooperation among the CFBS, the multiple CFBS can be considered as a single base station with multiple geographically dispersed antennas. In this context, we proposed a smart network where CFBS collaborates to reduce the cross-tier interference level by directing the main beam toward the desired femtocell mobile user and creating toward the cross-tier interference. The resultant network is referred to as Smart cognitive-femto network (SCFN) which requires the CFBS to be self-aware such that the CFBS are aware of their surroundings and adapt accordingly to maintain a reliable and efficient communication link. In order to determine the effectiveness of the proposed smart network, we study the interference rejection (or suppression) capabilities of the SCFN. It has been shown that the proposed smart network offers significant performance improvements in interference suppression and signal to interference ratio (SIR) and may be considered as a promising solution to the interference management problems in Heterogeneous network. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  15. Optics of beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. J.; Yu, Y.; Chen, R.; Lyu, B.; Wu, Y. F.; Yuan, B. D.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2018-01-01

    128-channel Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic basing on neutral beam injection (NBI) has recently been developed on EAST tokamak. It can diagnose plasma density fluctuation with a sample rate of 1 MHz and a spatial resolution of 1–3 cm, according to the diagnosing spatial positions. The Doppler-shifted beam emission line is led through prisms, lens groups and mirrors, and finally divided into two detection branches. By means of rotating the rotation mirror in the optical path, the viewing area, which is a 20 cm × 10 cm rectangle, can be moved from plasma core to edge. Three-cavity-interference filter with a center frequency of 659 nm and a bandwidth of 1.59 nm is used to eliminate the interference background Dα signal and carbon radiation. First experimental results show high performance of this diagnostic.

  16. Experimental demonstration of 3D accelerating beam arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianghua; Li, Runze; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Gao, Peng; Han, Guoxia; Lei, Ming

    2016-04-10

    Accelerating beams have attracted much attention in the frontiers of optical physics and technology owing to their unique propagation dynamics of nondiffracting, self-healing, and freely accelerating along curved trajectories. Such behaviors essentially arise from the particular phase factor occurring in their spatial frequency spectrum, e.g., the cubic phase associated to the spectrum of Airy beam. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a sort of accelerating beam arrays, which are composed of spatially separated accelerating beams. By superimposing kinoforms of multifocal patterns into the spatial frequency spectrum of accelerating beams, different types of beam arrays, e.g., Airy beam arrays and two-main-lobe accelerating beam arrays, are generated and measured by scanning a reflection mirror near the focal region along the optical axis. The 3D intensity patterns reconstructed from the experimental data present good agreement with the theoretical counterparts. The combination of accelerating beams with optical beam arrays proposed here may find potential applications in various fields such as optical microscopes, optical micromachining, optical trapping, and so on.

  17. phytochemical and microscopical evaluation of desmodium velutinum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-06-01

    , transverse and longitudinal sections of the leaves of .... quantity for preliminary screening and biological studies. Microscopical Examination .... subnitrate dissolved in 20ml acetic acid, made up to 100ml with distilled water).

  18. Feedback regulation of microscopes by image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2013-05-01

    Computational microscope systems are becoming a major part of imaging biological phenomena, and the development of such systems requires the design of automated regulation of microscopes. An important aspect of automated regulation is feedback regulation, which is the focus of this review. As modern microscope systems become more complex, often with many independent components that must work together, computer control is inevitable since the exact orchestration of parameters and timings for these multiple components is critical to acquire proper images. A number of techniques have been developed for biological imaging to accomplish this. Here, we summarize the basics of computational microscopy for the purpose of building automatically regulated microscopes focus on feedback regulation by image processing. These techniques allow high throughput data acquisition while monitoring both short- and long-term dynamic phenomena, which cannot be achieved without an automated system. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nucleon relativistic phenomenological and microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qingbiao; Feng Dachun; Zhuo Yizhong

    1991-01-01

    In this talk, both the phenomenological and microscopic nucleon relativistic optical potentials are presented. The global neutron relativistic phenomenological optical potential (RPOP) based on the available experimental data for various nuclei ranging from C to U with incident energies En=20-1000 MeV has been obtained through automatic search of the best parameters by computer. Then the nucleon relativistic microscopic optical potential (RMOP) is studied by utilizing effective lagrangian based on popular Walecka model. Through comparison between the theoretical results and experimental data we have shed some insight into both the RMOP and RPOP. We have concluded that both the phenomenological and microscopic relativistic optical potentials proposed here can be extensively used for intermediate energy nucleon data evaluation. Further improvement concerning how to combine the phenomenological potential with the microscopic one in order to reduce the number of free parameters appearing in RPOP is suggested. (author). 33 refs, 24 figs