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Sample records for beam driven toroidal

  1. Predictive Simulations of ITER Including Neutral Beam Driven Toroidal Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Federico D.; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Budny, Robert V.; McCune, Douglas C.

    2008-06-16

    Predictive simulations of ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 2002] discharges are carried out for the 15 MA high confinement mode (H-mode) scenario using PTRANSP, the predictive version of the TRANSP code. The thermal and toroidal momentum transport equations are evolved using turbulent and neoclassical transport models. A predictive model is used to compute the temperature and width of the H-mode pedestal. The ITER simulations are carried out for neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas, for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas, and for plasmas heated with a mix of NBI and ICRF. It is shown that neutral beam injection drives toroidal rotation that improves the confinement and fusion power production in ITER. The scaling of fusion power with respect to the input power and to the pedestal temperature is studied. It is observed that, in simulations carried out using the momentum transport diffusivity computed using the GLF23 model [R.Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)], the fusion power increases with increasing injected beam power and central rotation frequency. It is found that the ITER target fusion power of 500 MW is produced with 20 MW of NBI power when the pedesta temperature is 3.5 keV. 2008 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.2931037

  2. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q. D.; Budny, R. V.

    2015-03-01

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (Ti,e) and toroidal velocity (Vϕ) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition.

  3. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Q. D., E-mail: qgao@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (T{sub i,e}) and toroidal velocity (V{sub ϕ}) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition.

  4. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  5. Efficiency of Wave-Driven Rigid Body Rotation Toroidal Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Rax, J -M; Fisch, N J

    2016-01-01

    The compensation of vertical drifts in toroidal magnetic fields through a wave-driven poloidal rotation is compared to compensation through the wave driven toroidal current generation to support the classical magnetic rotational transform. The advantages and drawbacks associated with the sustainment of a radial electric field are compared with those associated with the sustainment of a poloidal magnetic field both in terms of energy content and power dissipation. The energy content of a radial electric field is found to be smaller than the energy content of a poloidal magnetic field for a similar set of orbits. The wave driven radial electric field generation efficiency is similarly shown, at least in the limit of large aspect ratio, to be larger than the efficiency of wave-driven toroidal current generation.

  6. Toroidal equilibrium with low frequency wave driven currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    In the absence of an emf the parallel current, j/sub parallel/, in a steady state tokamak will consist of a neoclassical portion plus a wave-driven contribution. Using the drift kinetic equation, the quasilinear (wave-driven) current is computed for high phase speed waves in a torus, and this is combined with the neoclassical term to obtain the general expression for the flux surface average . For a given pressure profile this technique fully determines the MHD equilibrium, permitting the study of a new class of toroidal equilibria.

  7. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  8. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goumiri, I. R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Rowley, C. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Boyer, M. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Andre, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kolemen, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Taira, K. [Florida State Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tallahassee, FL USA.

    2016-02-19

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  9. Injection of electron beam into a toroidal trap using chaotic orbits near magnetic null.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, C; Yoshida, Z; Himura, H; Fukao, M; Morikawa, J; Saitoh, H

    2002-03-01

    Injection of charged particle beam into a toroidal magnetic trap enables a variety of interesting experiments on non-neutral plasmas. Stationary radial electric field has been produced in a toroidal geometry by injecting electrons continuously. When an electron gun is placed near an X point of magnetic separatrix, the electron beam spreads efficiently through chaotic orbits, and electrons distribute densely in the torus. The current returning back to the gun can be minimized less than 1% of the total emission.

  10. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities in general toroidal configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breizman, B.N. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas (United States); Brower, D.L.; Deng, C.B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); D' Azevedo, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Konies, A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); Todo, Y.; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Spong, D.A.

    2010-08-15

    Energetic-particle driven instabilities have been extensively observed in both tokamaks and stellarators. In order for such devices to ultimately succeed as D-T fusion reactors, the super-Alfvenic 3.5 Mev fusion-produced alpha particles must be sufficiently well confined. This requires the evaluation of losses from classical collisional transport processes as well as from energetic particle-driven instabilities. An important group of instabilities in this context are the discrete shear Alfven modes, which can readily be destabilized by energetic particles (with velocities of the order of v{sub Alfv'en}) through wave-particle resonances. While these modes in three-dimensional systems have many similarities to those in tokamaks, the detailed implementation of modeling tools has required development of new methods. Recent efforts in this direction will be described here, with an emphasis on reduced models (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Configuration Effects on Fast Ion Losses Induced by Fast Ion Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Watanabe, F. [Kyoto University, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sakakibara, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2012-01-01

    Beam-ion losses induced by fast-ion-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were measured with a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in the large helical device (LHD). The SLIP gave simultaneously the energy E and the pitch angle chi = arccos(v(parallel to)/v) distribution of the lost fast ions. The loss fluxes were investigated for three typical magnetic configurations of R{sub ax{_}vac} = 3.60 m, 3.75 m, and 3.90 m, where R{sub ax{_}vac} is the magnetic axis position of the vacuum field. Dominant losses induced by TAEs in these three configurations were observed in the E/chi regions of 50 similar to 190 keV/40 degrees, 40 similar to 170 keV/25 degrees, and 30 similar to 190 keV/30 degrees, respectively. Lost-ion fluxes induced by TAEs depend clearly on the amplitude of TAE magnetic fluctuations, R{sub ax{_}vac} and the toroidal field strength B{sub t}. The increment of the loss fluxes has the dependence of (b{sub TAE}/B{sub t}){sup s}. The power s increases from s = 1 to 3 with the increase of the magnetic axis position in finite beta plasmas.

  12. Experiments with low energy ion beam transport into toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The stellarator-type storage ring for accumulation of multi- Ampere proton and ion beams with energies in the range of $100~AkeV$ to $1~AMeV$ is designed at Frankfurt university. The main idea for beam confinement with high transversal momentum acceptance was presented in EPAC2006. This ring is typically suited for experiments in plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The accumulator ring with a closed longitudinal magnetic field is foreseen with a strength up to $6-8~T$. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed. The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnetic fields were first described in EPAC2008 within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system with two beam lines representing the main beam line and the injection line. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special diagnostics probe for \\textit{"in situ"} ion beam detection was installed.This...

  13. Structure of parallel-velocity-shear driven mode in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.Q.; Xu, W.B.; Zhang, Y.Z. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China); Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1998-09-15

    It is shown that the Fourier-ballooning representation is appropriate for the study of short wavelength drift-like perturbation in toroidal plasmas with a parallel velocity shear (PVS). The radial structure of the mode driven by a PVS is investigated in a torus. The Reynolds stress created by PVS turbulence and proposed as one of the sources for a sheared poloidal plasma rotation is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a finite ion temperature may strongly enhance the Reynolds stress creation ability from PVS driven turbulence. The correlation of this observation with the requirement that ion heating power be higher than a threshold value for the formation of an internal transport barrier is discussed.

  14. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  15. Energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode in a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haijun

    2017-01-01

    Energetic particle (EP) driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas are analytically investigated using the hybrid kinetic-fluid model and gyrokinetic equations. By ignoring high-order terms and ion Landau damping, the kinetic dispersion relation is reduced to the hybrid one in the large safety factor limit. There is one high-frequency branch with a frequency larger than {ωt0} , the transit frequency of EPs with initial energy, which is always stable. Two low-frequency solutions with a frequency smaller than {ωt0} are complex conjugates in the hybrid limit. In the presence of ion Landau damping, the growth rate of the unstable branch is decreased and the damping rate of the damped branch is increased. The toroidal Mach number is shown to increase {{ Ω }\\text{r}} , the normalized real frequency of both branches. Although not affecting the instability critical condition, the Mach number decreases the growth rate when {{ Ω }\\text{r}} is larger than a critical value Ω \\text{r}\\text{cri} and enlarges the growth rate when {{ Ω }\\text{r}}Landau damping effect is negligible for large M. But the discrepancy between the kinetic dispersion relation and the hybrid one becomes ignorable only for q≳ 7 .

  16. High Intensity Secondary Beams Driven by Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, John; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Intensity Frontier effort within the 2013 Community Summer Study, a workshop on the proton machine capabilities was held (High Intensity Secondary Beams Driven by Proton Beams) April 17-20, 2013 at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Primary aims of the workshop were to understand: 1) the beam requirements for proposed high intensity proton beam based measurements; 2) the capabilities of existing world-wide high power proton machines; 3) proton facility upgrade plans and proposals for new facilities; 4) and to document the R&D needs for proton accelerators and target systems needed to support proposed intensity frontier measurements. These questions are addressed in this summary.

  17. Heavy ion beam probing—diagnostics to study potential and turbulence in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Krupnik, L. I.; Eliseev, L. G.; Barcala, J. M.; Bravo, A.; Chmyga, A. A.; Deshko, G. N.; Drabinskij, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Khabanov, P. O.; Khrebtov, S. M.; Kharchev, N. K.; Komarov, A. D.; Kozachek, A. S.; Lopez, J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Martin, G.; Molinero, A.; de Pablos, J. L.; Soleto, A.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Zenin, V. N.; Zhezhera, A. I.; T-10 Team; TJ-II Team

    2017-07-01

    Heavy ion beam probing (HIBP) is a unique diagnostics to study the core plasma potential and turbulence. Advanced HIBPs operate in the T-10 tokamak and TJ-II flexible heliac with fine focused (magnetic configurations with ECR and neutral beam injection (NBI) heating at TJ-II. Time evolution of the radial profiles and/or local values of plasma parameters from high field side (HFS) to low field side (LFS), -1  magnetic field B pol (by the beam toroidal shift), poloidal electric filed E pol that allows one to derive the electrostatic turbulent particle flux ΓE×B. The cross-phase of density oscillations produces the phase velocity of their poloidal propagation or rotation; also it gives the poloidal mode number. Dual HIBP, consisting of two identical HIBPs located ¼ torus apart provide the long-range correlations of core plasma parameters. Low-noise high-gain electronics allows us to study broadband turbulence and quasi-coherent modes like geodesic acoustic modes and Alfvén eigenmodes.

  18. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  19. Magnetic Configuration Effects on Fast Ion Losses Induced by Fast Ion Driven Toroidal Alfv~n Eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. OGAWA; M. ISOBE; K. TOI; F. WATANABE; D. A. SPONG; A. SHIMIZU; M. OSAKABE; D. S. DARROW; S. OHDACHI; S. SAKAKIBARA; LHD Experiment -Group

    2012-01-01

    Beam-ion losses induced by fast-ion-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were measured with a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in the large helical device (LHD). The SLIP gave simultaneously the energy E and the pitch angle X=arccos(v///v) distribution of the lost fast ions. The loss fluxes were investigated for three typical magnetic configurations of Rax-vac=3.60 m, 3.75 m. and 3.90 m, where Rax-vac is the magnetic axis position of the vacuum field. Dominant losses induced by TAEs in these three configurations were observed in the E/X regions of 50-190 keV/40°, 40-170 keV/25°, and 30-190 keV/30°, respectively. Lost-ion fluxes induced by TAEs depend clearly on the amplitude of TAE magnetic fluctuations, Rax-vac and the toroidal field strength Bt. The increment of the loss fluxes has the dependence of (bTAE/Bt)s. The power s increases from s = 1 to 3 with the increase of the magnetic axis position in finite beta plasmas.

  20. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. 2D profile of poloidal magnetic field diagnosed by a laser-driven ion-beam trace probe (LITP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Chijie, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Chen, Yihang; Xu, Tianchao; Lin, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Long [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, Min [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yu, Yi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Based on large energy spread of laser-driven ion beam (LIB), a new method, the Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), was suggested recently to diagnose the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) in toroidal devices. Based on another property of LIB, a wide angular distribution, here we suggested that LITP could be extended to get 2D B{sub p} profile or 1D profile of both poloidal and radial magnetic fields at the same time. In this paper, we show the basic principle, some preliminary simulation results, and experimental preparation to test the basic principle of LITP.

  2. 2D profile of poloidal magnetic field diagnosed by a laser-driven ion-beam trace probe (LITP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Chijie; Chen, Yihang; Xu, Tianchao; Lin, Chen; Wang, Long; Xu, Min; Yu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on large energy spread of laser-driven ion beam (LIB), a new method, the Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), was suggested recently to diagnose the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in toroidal devices. Based on another property of LIB, a wide angular distribution, here we suggested that LITP could be extended to get 2D Bp profile or 1D profile of both poloidal and radial magnetic fields at the same time. In this paper, we show the basic principle, some preliminary simulation results, and experimental preparation to test the basic principle of LITP.

  3. Nonlinear simulations of beam-driven compressional Alfvén eigenmodes in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, E. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Crocker, N. A.; Lestz, J. B.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Tang, S.; Tritz, K.

    2017-04-01

    Results of 3D nonlinear simulations of neutral-beam-driven compressional Alfvén eigenmodes (CAEs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented. Hybrid MHD-particle simulations for the H-mode NSTX discharge (shot 141398) using the HYM code show unstable CAE modes for a range of toroidal mode numbers, n =4 -9 , and frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. It is found that the essential feature of CAEs is their coupling to kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) that occurs on the high-field side at the Alfvén resonance location. High-frequency Alfvén eigenmodes are frequently observed in beam-heated NSTX plasmas, and have been linked to flattening of the electron temperature profiles at high beam power. Coupling between CAE and KAW suggests an energy channeling mechanism to explain these observations, in which beam-driven CAEs dissipate their energy at the resonance location, therefore significantly modifying the energy deposition profile. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that CAEs can channel the energy of the beam ions from the injection region near the magnetic axis to the location of the resonant mode conversion at the edge of the beam density profile. A set of nonlinear simulations show that the CAE instability saturates due to nonlinear particle trapping, and a large fraction of beam energy can be transferred to several unstable CAEs of relatively large amplitudes and absorbed at the resonant location. Absorption rate shows a strong scaling with the beam power.

  4. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Crocker, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkova, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kubota, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Medley, S. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podestà, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shi, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); White, R. B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  5. Co-current toroidal rotation-driven and turbulent stresses with resonant magnetic perturbations in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, K. J.; Shi, Yuejiang; Liu, H.; Diamond, P. H.; Li, F. M.; Cheng, J.; Chen, Z. P.; Nie, L.; Ding, Y. H.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Rao, B.; Cheng, Z. F.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, N. C.; Wang, L.; Jin, W.; Xu, J. Q.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhuang, G.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The acceleration of the co-current toroidal rotations around resonant surfaces by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) through turbulence is presented. These experiments were performed using a Langmuir probe array in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak. This study aims at understanding the RMP effects on edge toroidal rotations and exploring its control method. With RMPs, the flat electron temperature T e profile, due to magnetic islands, appears around resonant surfaces (Zhao et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 073022). When the resonant surface is closer to the last closed flux surface, the flat T e profile vanishes with RMPs. In both cases, the toroidal rotations significantly increase in the direction of the plasma current around the resonant surfaces with RMPs. The characteristics of turbulence are significantly affected by RMPs around the resonant surfaces. The turbulence intensity profile changes and the poloidal wave vector k θ increases with RMPs. The power fraction of the turbulence components in the ion diamagnetic drift direction increases with RMPs. The measurements of turbulent Reynolds stresses are consistent with the toroidal flows that can be driven by turbulence. The estimations of the energy transfer between the turbulence and toroidal flows suggest that turbulence energy transfers into toroidal flows. The result has the implication of the intrinsic rotation being driven by RMPs via turbulence.

  6. Poloidal flow and toroidal particle ring formation in a sessile drop driven by megahertz order vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Amgad R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-09-23

    Poloidal flow is curiously formed in a microliter sessile water drop over 157-225 MHz because of acoustic streaming from three-dimensional standing Lamb waves in a lithium niobate substrate. The flow possesses radial symmetry with downwelling at the center and upwelling around the periphery of the drop. Outside this frequency range, the attenuation occurs over a length scale incompatible with the drop size and the poloidal flow vanishes. Remarkably, shear-induced migration was found to drive toroidal particle ring formation with diameters inversely proportional to the frequency of the acoustic irradiation.

  7. Calculation of prompt loss and toroidal field ripple loss under neutral beam injection on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Hao, Baolong; White, Roscoe; Wang, Jinfang; Zang, Qing; Han, Xiaofeng; Hu, Chundong

    2017-02-01

    Neutral beam injection is a major auxiliary heating method in the EAST experimental campaign. This paper gives detailed calculations of beam loss with different plasma equilibria using the guiding center code ORBIT and NUBEAM/TRANSP. Increasing plasma current can dramatically lower the beam ion prompt loss and ripple loss. Countercurrent beam injection gives a much larger prompt loss fraction than co-injection, and ripple-induced collisionless stochastic diffusion is the dominant loss channel.

  8. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Tala, T.; Ferreira, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power or by modu...

  9. Simultaneous feedback control of plasma rotation and stored energy on NSTX-U using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Gates, D. A.; Boyer, M. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kolemen, E.; Menard, J. E.

    2017-05-01

    A model-based feedback system is presented enabling the simultaneous control of the stored energy through βn and the toroidal rotation profile of the plasma in National Spherical Torus eXperiment Upgrade device. Actuation is obtained using the momentum from six injected neutral beams and the neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by applying three-dimensional magnetic fields. Based on a model of the momentum diffusion and torque balance, a feedback controller is designed and tested in closed-loop simulations using TRANSP, a time dependent transport analysis code, in predictive mode. Promising results for the ongoing experimental implementation of controllers are obtained.

  10. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-05-06

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities.

  11. Summary report of working group 4: Beam-driven acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litos, M.; Jing, C.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the urgent need for a TeV-class linear collider in High-Energy Physics (HEP), a clear path to buildable and affordable accelerator technologies has yet to be realized. Clearly, the identification and advancement of next generation accelerator technologies for a linear collider have been one of the main charges since the inception of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) workshop. The fundamental requirements of linear colliders for accelerator technologies are to demonstrate high wall-plug efficiency, high beam quality preservation, high effective gradient, scalability, etc. Within the AAC community, beam-driven wakefield acceleration schemes (the central subject of Working Group 4) are always promising and attractive approaches. Since the last AAC workshop, a few high profile experiments related to beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration have been conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's FACET facility. These experiments have successfully answered questions related to obtaining high beam energy transfer efficiency, demonstrating high gradient positron acceleration, and demonstrating high quality witness beam acceleration. Research on beam-driven structure-based wakefield acceleration has also demonstrated significant results for high gradient acceleration, including longitudinal bunch shaping for high efficiency and beam breakup control. As an important application or a stepping-stone facility, beam-driven plasma or structure-based wakefield accelerators for 5th generation FEL light sources have attracted broad attention. Studies have been undertaken on various aspects, ranging from the overall parameterizations to detailed beam generation and control technologies. Other related applications, such as high power RF and THz generation, beam modulation and energy chirp compensation, are also within the scope of our Working Group. In summary, WG4 examined the advancement of beam-driven wakefield accelerators (plasma and structure-based) in

  12. The effect of diamagnetic flows on turbulent driven ion toroidal rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. P. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Barnes, M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Parra, F. I. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Belli, E. A.; Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent momentum redistribution determines the radial profile of rotation in a tokamak. The momentum transport driven by diamagnetic flow effects is an important piece of the radial momentum transport for sub-sonic rotation, which is often observed in experiments. In a non-rotating state, the diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow must cancel. The diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow have different effects on the turbulent momentum flux, and this difference in behavior induces intrinsic rotation. The momentum flux is evaluated using gyrokinetic equations that are corrected to higher order in the ratio of the poloidal Larmor radius to the minor radius, which requires evaluation of the diamagnetic corrections to Maxwellian equilibria. To study the momentum transport due to diamagnetic flow effects, three experimental observations of ion rotation are examined. First, a strong pressure gradient at the plasma edge is shown to result in a significant inward momentum transport due to the diamagnetic effect, which may explain the observed peaking of rotation in a high confinement mode. Second, the direction of momentum transport is shown to change as collisionality increases, which is qualitatively consistent with the observed reversal of intrinsic rotation by varying plasma density and current. Last, the dependence of the intrinsic momentum flux on the magnetic shear is found, and it may explain the observed rotation changes in the presence of lower hybrid current drive.

  13. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  14. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  15. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  16. 电子束在弯曲螺线管中的运动%The motion of electron beam in toroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓东; 宋明涛; 夏佳文; 魏宝文; 王宜国

    2001-01-01

    为研究HIRFL-CSR电子冷却装置中电子束穿过电子冷却装置中弯曲螺线管后电子横向能量的变化,用Poisson程序计算出弯曲螺线管的磁场分布,考虑了空间电荷效应,用数值方法模拟计算了电子在弯曲螺线管中的运动情况,得到了电子束横向能量变化最小时磁场各分量与电子束能量和弯曲螺线管几何尺寸之间的关系,并获得了电子束横向能量在束流截面的空间分布。%he electron beam is deflected into and out interaction region by toroid in the electron cooling device for HIRFL-CSR. The magnetic field distribution in toroid and interface among toroid and solenoids is very complicated. The properties of the magnetic field in toroid give rise to a change in the transverse energy of the electron. A program is developed to study the spatial transverse energy distribution of electron in the beam as it moves through the toroid. The space charge effect is taken into account in the calculation. The simulation results show that the increase of the transverse energy can be minimized when the ratio of the central length of toroid and the cyclotron wavelength of electron is integer.

  17. Ion beam driven HEDP experiments on NDCX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition, with the capability to heat volumetric samples of any solid-phase target material to high energy density. The WDM conditions are achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator to heat foil targets such as Au, Pt, W, Al and Si. The NDCX-1 beam contains a low-intensity uncompressed pulse up to >10 μs of intensity ˜0.4 MW/cm^2, and a high-intensity compressed pulse (FWHM 2-3 ns and fluence ˜4 mJ). WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 2-3 MeV lithium ion beam.

  18. A Toroidal Charge Monitor for High-Energy Picosecond Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Robert H.; Ng, Johnny S.T.

    2007-03-28

    A monitor system suitable for the accurate measurement of the total charge of a 2-ps 28.5 GeV electron beam over a large dynamic range is described. Systematic uncertainties and results on absolute calibration, resolution, and long-term stability are presented.

  19. Summary Report of Working Group 4: Electron Beam Driven Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark J

    2003-04-07

    Although the title ''Electron Beam Driven Concepts'' can in principle cover a broad range of advanced accelerator schemes, in the context of this workshop and the various other working groups, working group 4 discussions centered primarily around the many active investigations of the electron or positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The past year has seen advances along three main fronts: experiment, simulation and theory. This paper will give a brief summary of the various talks presented to the group, summarize group discussions and conclude with a few comments on future directions.

  20. Ion sound instability driven by ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Koshkarov, O; Kaganovich, I D; Ilgisonis, V I

    2014-01-01

    In many natural and laboratory conditions, plasmas are often in the non-equilibrium state due to presence of stationary flows, when one particle species (or a special group, such as group of high energy particles, i.e. beam) is mowing with respect to the other plasma components. Such situations are common for a number of different plasma application such as diagnostics with emissive plasma probes, plasma electronics devices and electric propulsion devices. The presence of plasma flows often lead to the instabilities in such systems and subsequent development of large amplitude perturbations. The goal of this work is to develop physical insights and numerical tools for studies of stability of the excitation of the ion sound waves by the ion beam in the configuration similar to the plasma Pierce diode. This systems, in some limiting cases, reduce to mathematically similar equations originally proposed for Pierce instability. The finite length effect are crucial for this instability which generally belong to the...

  1. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  2. Instabilities in Beam-Plasma Waves in a Model of the Beam-Driven FRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, Bradley Scott; Necas, Ales; Tajima, Toshi; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2016-10-01

    Using a semi-analytic solver, the kinetic properties of plasma waves are analyzed in various regimes in the presence of a beam. This analysis is done to model the strong beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma kinetic instabilities in the neighborhood of the ion cyclotron frequency. As the frequency is relatively high, and wavelength small, the plasma is taken to be local and thus homogeneous, comprised of bulk ions, electrons, and beam ions, with a uniform background magnetic field. The beam ions are given an azimuthal drift velocity with respect to the magnetic field, but otherwise have various Maxwellian velocity distributions. First, the magnetic field is varied to create regimes of low and high β, and the mode structures are compared. The low- β case (corresponding to the scrape-off layer and near the separatrix) features primarily the beam-driven ion Bernstein instability. The high- β case (the core of FRC) is primarily electromagnetic and features the AIC instability when temperature anisotropy is included. The most unstable modes are incited by near-perpendicular beam injection with respect to the magnetic field. Finally, the results of the semi-analytic solver are compared with those from the EPOCH PIC code to evaluate the influence of nonlinear effects. This theoretical modeling was used in conjunction with EPOCH to investigate the beam driven instabilities in Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment.

  3. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich Heine Universität, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  4. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  5. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; Poder, K.; Cole, J.; Doria, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Romagnani, L.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yeung, M.; Zepf, M.

    2017-01-01

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. The results obtained indicate that current technology allows to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.

  6. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  7. Colliding ionization injection in a beam driven plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Y; Li, F; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    The proposal of generating high quality electron bunches via ionization injection triggered by an counter propagating laser pulse inside a beam driven plasma wake is examined via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that electron bunches obtained using this technique can have extremely small slice energy spread, because each slice is mainly composed of electrons ionized at the same time. Another remarkable advantage is that the injection distance is changeable. A bunch with normalized emittance of 3.3 nm, slice energy spread of 15 keV and brightness of 7.2 A m$^{-2}$ rad$^{-2}$ is obtained with an optimal injection length which is achieved by adjusting the launch time of the drive beam or by changing the laser focal position. This makes the scheme a promising approach to generate high quality electron bunches for the fifth generation light source.

  8. Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT (ERIS) at RIKEN RI beam factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyashita, Y.; Ogawara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Wakasugi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a radioactive isotope (RI) separator named ERIS (electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT) for the SCRIT (Self-Confinement RI Target) electron scattering facility at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). In ERIS, production rate of fission products in the photofission of uranium is estimated to be 2.2 ×1011 fissions/s with 30 g of uranium and a 1-kW electron beam. During the commissioning of ERIS, the mass resolution and overall efficiency, including ionization, extraction, and transmission, were found to be 1660 and 21%, respectively, using natural xenon gas. The preparation of uranium carbide (UC2) RI production targets is described from which a 132Sn beam was successfully separated in our first attempt at RI production.

  9. Theory of a beam-driven plasma antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Annenkov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a theory describing generation of electromagnetic waves in a thin beam-plasma system with a characteristic transverse size comparable with the radiation wavelength. In fact, a thin plasma column with a longitudinal density modulation works like a plasma antenna in which an electron beam can excite a superluminal wave of electric current. It has previously been shown that, if the period of this modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, radiation at a frequency slightly below the plasma frequency is emitted transversely to the plasma column and generated in thin boundary layers. For the plasma thickness comparable with the skin-depth, generation of the terahertz radiation can reach high efficiency ( ˜10 % ) in such a scheme, but the absolute power of this radiation cannot be increased by increasing the transverse plasma size. In this paper, we study whether the power of such an antenna can be increased in the regime of oblique emission when the magnetized plasma is transparent to the radiated electromagnetic waves and the whole plasma volume may be involved in their generation.

  10. Laser-driven generation of ultra-intense proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Kubkowska, M.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Wolowski, J. [EURATOM, Inst Plasma Phys and Laser Microfus, PL-00908 Warsaw (Poland); Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A. [UPMC, LULI, Ecole Polytech, CNRS, CEA, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Szydlowski, A. [Andrzej Soltan Inst Nucl Studies, Otwock (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    The results of experimental and numerical studies of high-intensity proton beam generation driven by a short laser pulse of relativistic intensity are reported. In the experiment, a 350 fs laser pulse of 1.06 or 0.53 m wavelength and intensity up to 2*10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} irradiated a thin (0.6-2{mu}m) plastic (PS) or Au/PS (plastic covered by 0.2{mu}m Au front layer) target along the target normal. The effect of laser intensity, the target structure and the laser wavelength on the proton beam parameters and laser-protons energy conversion efficiency were examined. Both the measurements and one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations showed that MeV proton beams of intensity 10{sup 18}Wcm{sup -2} and current density 10{sup 12}Acm{sup -2} at the source can be produced when the laser intensity-wavelength squared product I{sub L{lambda}}{sup 2} is 10{sup 19}Wcm{sup -2}m{sup 2} and the laser-target interaction conditions approach the skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (SLPA) requirements. The simulations also proved that at I{sub L{lambda}}{sup 2} {>=} 5*10{sup 19}Wcm{sup -2}m{sup 2} and {lambda} {<=} 0.53{mu}m, SLPA clearly prevails over other acceleration mechanisms and it can produce multi-MeV proton beams of extremely high intensities above 10{sup 20}Wcm{sup -2}. (authors)

  11. Magnetic Instabilities Driven by Sheared Toroidal and Poloidal Flows in the limit of B=0. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Cary B.

    2000-08-08

    The grant was used for startup activity in an experiment designed to address key questions related to the MHD dynamo, a process by which kinetic energy in flowing, conducting fluids can spontaneously be converted into magnetic energy. Dynamos have been invoked to explain the magnetic fields associated with the planets, stars and other astrophysical bodies. The experiment consists primarily of a 1 meter diameter sphere of liquid sodium with flows driven by mechanical propellers.

  12. submitter Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}$ of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the $\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{\\alpha}}={{\\alpha}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\alpha}_{\\text{ph}}}$ and ${{\\text{R}}_{\\beta}}={{\\beta}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\beta}_{\\text{ph}}}$ ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival ($\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{10}}$ ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlati...

  13. Quasiperiodic behavior in beam-driven strong Langmuir turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of unmagnetized beam-driven strong Langmuir turbulence is studied in two dimensions by numerically integrating the Zakharov equations for systems pumped by monochromatic and broadband negative-damping drivers with nonzero central wavenumber. Long-time statistically steady states are reached for which the dependence of the evolution on the driver wavenumber, growth rate, and bandwidth is examined in detail. For monochromatic drivers, a quasiperiodic cycle is found to develop if the driver wavenumber is sufficiently large. The characteristic frequency of the quasiperiodic cycle and the average system energy are both approximately proportional to the growth rate. Broadening of the driver in wavenumber tends to degrade the system-wide coherence of the cycle, but its main features appear to survive on the scale of the coherence length of the driver.

  14. Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT (ERIS) at RIKEN RI beam factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, T., E-mail: oonishi@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ichikawa, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K. [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Miyashita, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ogawara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M. [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Wakasugi, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We constructed a radioactive isotope separator, ERIS, for the SCRIT electron scattering facility at RIKEN RIBF. • ERIS uses a photofission of uranium to produce a radioactive isotope. • The commissioning of ERIS was perfromed using natural xenon gas. • A {sup 132}Sn beam was successfully separated in our first attempt at RI production. -- Abstract: We constructed a radioactive isotope (RI) separator named ERIS (electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT) for the SCRIT (Self-Confinement RI Target) electron scattering facility at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). In ERIS, production rate of fission products in the photofission of uranium is estimated to be 2.2 ×10{sup 11} fissions/s with 30 g of uranium and a 1-kW electron beam. During the commissioning of ERIS, the mass resolution and overall efficiency, including ionization, extraction, and transmission, were found to be 1660 and 21%, respectively, using natural xenon gas. The preparation of uranium carbide (UC{sub 2}) RI production targets is described from which a {sup 132}Sn beam was successfully separated in our first attempt at RI production.

  15. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  16. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbamonte, Peter M. [University of Illinois

    2013-04-24

    The original purpose of this award was to use low‐energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real‐time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low‐energy, inelastic electron scattering (EELS) instrument. Consistent with Flynn's original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low‐energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss

  17. Nonlinear simulations of Neutral-beam-driven Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes / Kinetic Alfvén Waves in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Elena; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Crocker, N. A.; Lestz, J. B.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Tang, S.

    2016-10-01

    Results of 3D nonlinear simulations of neutral-beam-driven compressional Alfvén eigenmodes (CAEs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented. Hybrid MHD-particle simulations for the H-mode NSTX discharge (shot 141398) using the HYM code show unstable CAE modes for a range of toroidal mode numbers, n =4-9, and frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. It is found that the essential feature of CAEs is their coupling to kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) that occurs on the high-field side at the Alfven resonance location. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that CAEs can channel the energy of the beam ions from the injection region near the magnetic axis to the location of the resonant mode conversion at the edge of the beam density profile. This mechanism provides an alternative explanation to the observed reduced heating of the plasma core in the NSTX. A set of nonlinear simulations show that the CAE instability saturates due to nonlinear particle trapping, and a large fraction of beam energy can be transferred to several unstable CAEs of relatively large amplitudes and absorbed at the resonant location. Absorption rate shows a strong scaling with the beam power. This research was supported by the U.S. DOE contract # DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  19. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  20. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experimentsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K+ beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  1. Warm Dense Matter Experiments Driven by Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.

    2009-11-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. We present results from warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at NDCX-I. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K^+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to a spot size ˜ 1 mm, and compressed pulse length ˜ 2 ns. The uncompressed beam flux is >=500 kW/cm^2, and the compressed pulse flux is > 5 MW/cm^2. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. Future plans include construction of the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-4 MeV lithium ion beam. We have developed a target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, and high-speed gated cameras. We compare measurements of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters with model predictions. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher flux on target.

  2. Design of the prototype of a beam transport line for handling and selection of low energy laser-driven beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Costa, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.

    2016-11-01

    A first prototype of transport beam-line for laser-driven ion beams to be used for the handling of particles accelerated by high-power laser interacting with solid targets has been realized at INFN. The goal is the production of a controlled and stable beam in terms of energy and angular spread. The beam-line consists of two elements: an Energy Selection System (ESS), already realized and characterized with both conventional and laser-accelerated beams, and a Permanent Magnet Quadrupole system (PMQ) designed, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI (Fr), to improve the ESS performances. In this work a description of the ESS system and some results of its characterization with conventional beams are reported, in order to provide a complete explanation of the acceptance calculation. Then, the matching with the PMQ system is presented and, finally, the results of preliminary simulations with a realistic laser-driven energy spectrum are discussed demonstrating the possibility to provide a good quality beam downstream the systems.

  3. Ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2010-08-01

    As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition to a relatively large sample. The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating and diagnosing warm dense matter (WDM) targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and a suite of target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher temperature and pressure in the WDM targets. Future experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  4. Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fiuza, F; Boella, E; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Haberberger, D; Tochitsky, S; Gong, C; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2012-01-01

    We show that monoenergetic ion beams can be accelerated by moderate Mach number collisionless, electrostatic shocks propagating in a long scale-length exponentially decaying plasma profile. Strong plasma heating and density steepening produced by an intense laser pulse near the critical density can launch such shocks that propagate in the extended plasma at high velocities. The generation of a monoenergetic ion beam is possible due to the small and constant sheath electric field associated with the slowly decreasing density profile. The conditions for the acceleration of high-quality, energetic ion beams are identified through theory and multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The scaling of the ion energy with laser intensity shows that it is possible to generate $\\sim 200$ MeV proton beams with state-of-the-art 100 TW class laser systems.

  5. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  6. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Hu, Z.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Mehrling, T. J.; Kononenko, O.; Sheeran, B.; Osterhoff, J.

    2017-09-01

    Density down-ramp (DDR) injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (˜140 pC ), low normalized emittance (˜200 nm ) and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3%) in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (˜2.5 kA ).

  7. Sensing with toroidal metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Manjappa, Manukumara; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    Localized electromagnetic excitation in the form of toroidal dipoles has recently been observed in metamaterial systems. The origin of the toroidal dipole lies in the currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Thus, the exotic toroidal excitations play an important role in determining the optical properties of a system. Toroidal dipoles also contribute towards enabling high quality factor subwavelength resonances in metamaterial systems which could be an excellent platform for probing the light matter interaction. Here, we demonstrate sensing with toroidal resonance in a two-dimensional terahertz metamaterial in which a pair of mirrored asymmetric Fano resonators possesses anti-aligned magnetic moments at an electromagnetic resonance that gives rise to a toroidal dipole. Our proof of concept demonstration opens up an avenue to explore the interaction of matter with toroidal multipoles that could have strong applications in the sensing of dielectrics and biomolecules.

  8. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  9. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  10. Generation of powerful terahertz emission in a beam-driven strong plasma turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2012-01-01

    Generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation due to coalescence of upper-hybrid waves in the long-wavelength region of strong plasma turbulence driven by a high-current relativistic electron beam in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The width of frequency spectrum as well as angular characteristics of this radiation for various values of plasma density and turbulence energy are calculated using the simple theoretical model adequately describing beam-plasma experiments at mirror traps....

  11. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  12. Imaging characteristics of distance-driven method in a prototype cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has widely been used and studied in both medical imaging and radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate our newly developed CBCT system by implementing a distance-driven system modeling technique in order to produce excellent and accurate cross-sectional images. For the purpose of comparing the performance of the distance-driven methods, we also performed pixel-driven and ray-driven techniques when conducting forward- and back-projection schemes. We conducted the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) to retrieve a volumetric information of scanned chest phantom. The results indicated that contrast-to-noise (CNR) of the reconstructed images by using FDK and SART showed 8.02 and 15.78 for distance-driven, whereas 4.02 and 5.16 for pixel-driven scheme and 7.81 and 13.01 for ray-driven scheme, respectively. This could demonstrate that distance-driven method described more closely the chest phantom compared to pixel- and ray-driven. However, both elapsed time for modeling a system matrix and reconstruction time took longer time when performing the distance-driven scheme. Therefore, future works will be directed toward reducing computational time to acceptable limits for real applications.

  13. 3D weighting in cone beam image reconstruction algorithms: ray-driven vs. pixel-driven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Nilsen, Roy A; Smolin, Alex; Lifland, Ilya; Samsonov, Dmitry; Taha, Basel

    2008-01-01

    A 3D weighting scheme have been proposed previously to reconstruct images at both helical and axial scans in stat-of-the-art volumetric CT scanners for diagnostic imaging. Such a 3D weighting can be implemented in the manner of either ray-driven or pixel-drive, depending on the available computation resources. An experimental study is conducted in this paper to evaluate the difference between the ray-driven and pixel-driven implementations of the 3D weighting from the perspective of image quality, while their computational complexity is analyzed theoretically. Computer simulated data and several phantoms, such as the helical body phantom and humanoid chest phantom, are employed in the experimental study, showing that both the ray-driven and pixel-driven 3D weighting provides superior image quality for diagnostic imaging in clinical applications. With the availability of image reconstruction engine at increasing computational power, it is believed that the pixel-driven 3D weighting will be dominantly employed in state-of-the-art volumetric CT scanners over clinical applications.

  14. Ablation Pressure Driven by an Energetic Electron Beam in a Dense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2012-12-01

    An intense beam of high energy electrons may create extremely high pressures in solid density materials. An analytical model of ablation pressure formation and shock wave propagation driven by an energetic electron beam is developed and confirmed with numerical simulations. In application to the shock-ignition approach in inertial confinement fusion, the energy transfer by fast electrons may be a dominant mechanism of creation of the igniting shock wave. An electron beam with an energy of 30 keV and energy flux 2-5PW/cm2 can create a pressure amplitude more than 300 Mbar for a duration of 200-300 ps in a precompressed solid material.

  15. Effects of ultra-intense laser driven proton beam on the hydriding property of palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroshi, E-mail: abe.hiroshi10@jaea.go.jp [Environment and Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Orimo, Satoshi [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto-fu 619-0215 (Japan); Kishimoto, Masahiko; Aone, Shigeo; Uchida, Hirohisa [Course of Applied Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto-fu 619-0215 (Japan); Applied Laser Technology Institute, Tsuruga Head Office, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizaki, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken 914-8585 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Environment and Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    We investigated the effect of ion irradiation using an ultra-intense laser driven proton beam (UILDPB) method, by which proton beams with energy spectra can be created, on the hydrogen absorption rate of palladium (Pd). The Pd samples were irradiated with proton beams with the maximum energy of 2 MeV and 4 MeV at room temperature. The initial hydrogen absorption rate of Pd was measured before and after proton irradiation. The improvement of the initial hydrogen absorption by the UILDPB irradiation was confirmed.

  16. Z-petawatt driven ion beam radiography development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schollmeier, Marius; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.

    2013-09-01

    Laser-driven proton radiography provides electromagnetic field mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution, and has been applied to many laser-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments. Our report addresses key questions about the feasibility of ion radiography at the Z-Accelerator (%E2%80%9CZ%E2%80%9D), concerning laser configuration, hardware, and radiation background. Charged particle tracking revealed that radiography at Z requires GeV scale protons, which is out of reach for existing and near-future laser systems. However, it might be possible to perform proton deflectometry to detect magnetic flux compression in the fringe field region of a magnetized liner inertial fusion experiment. Experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser to enhance proton yield and energy showed an unexpected scaling with target thickness. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, coupled to fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell simulations running for over 10 ps, explain the scaling by a complex interplay of laser prepulse, preplasma, and ps-scale temporal rising edge of the laser.

  17. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  18. Illumination uniformity of capsules directly driven by a facility with thousands of laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temporal M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The uniformity of the illumination of a spherical capsule directly driven by laser beams has been assessed numerically. Different schemes characterized by ND = 12, 20, 32, 48 and 60 directions of irradiation associated to a single laser beam or a bundle of NB laser beams have been considered. The laser beams intensity profile is assumed super-Gaussian and the calculations take into account for beam imperfections as power imbalance and pointing errors. These facilities are characterized by a large number of laser beams Ntot = NDxNB. Assuming relatively small laser beams with an energy of a few hundred of J (200 J–500 J it turn out that a few thousand of beamlets (1000–5000 are needed in order to provide a total energy of 0.5–1 MJ. A large parametric study has been performed showing that the optimum laser intensity profile, which minimizes the root-mean-square deviation of the capsule illumination, depends on the values of the power imbalance and pointing error. Moreover, when beams imperfections are taken into account it is found that the uniformity of the illumination is almost the same for all facilities and only depends on the total number of laser beams Ntot.

  19. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  20. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  1. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  2. Main-Ion Intrinsic Toroidal Rotation Profile Driven by Residual Stress Torque from Ion Temperature Gradient Turbulence in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, B. A.; Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Staebler, G. M.; Battaglia, D. J.; Boedo, J. A.; deGrassie, J. S.; Solomon, W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic toroidal rotation of the deuterium main ions in the core of the DIII-D tokamak is observed to transition from flat to hollow, forming an off-axis peak, above a threshold level of direct electron heating. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations show that the residual stress associated with electrostatic ion temperature gradient turbulence possesses the correct radial location and stress structure to cause the observed hollow rotation profile. Residual stress momentum flux in the gyrokinetic simulations is balanced by turbulent momentum diffusion, with negligible contributions from turbulent pinch. The prediction of the velocity profile by integrating the momentum balance equation produces a rotation profile that qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the measured main-ion profile, demonstrating that fluctuation-induced residual stress can drive the observed intrinsic velocity profile.

  3. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  4. Chaotic dynamics of flexible beams driven by external white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awrejcewicz, J.; Krysko, A. V.; Papkova, I. V.; Zakharov, V. M.; Erofeev, N. P.; Krylova, E. Yu.; Mrozowski, J.; Krysko, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Mathematical models of continuous structural members (beams, plates and shells) subjected to an external additive white noise are studied. The structural members are considered as systems with infinite number of degrees of freedom. We show that in mechanical structural systems external noise can not only lead to quantitative changes in the system dynamics (that is obvious), but also cause the qualitative, and sometimes surprising changes in the vibration regimes. Furthermore, we show that scenarios of the transition from regular to chaotic regimes quantified by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) can lead to erroneous conclusions, and a support of the wavelet analysis is needed. We have detected and illustrated the modifications of classical three scenarios of transition from regular vibrations to deterministic chaos. The carried out numerical experiment shows that the white noise lowers the threshold for transition into spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics. A transition into chaos via the proposed modified scenarios developed in this work is sensitive to small noise and significantly reduces occurrence of periodic vibrations. Increase of noise intensity yields decrease of the duration of the laminar signal range, i.e., time between two successive turbulent bursts decreases. Scenario of transition into chaos of the studied mechanical structures essentially depends on the control parameters, and it can be different in different zones of the constructed charts (control parameter planes). Furthermore, we found an interesting phenomenon, when increase of the noise intensity yields surprisingly the vibrational characteristics with a lack of noisy effect (chaos is destroyed by noise and windows of periodicity appear).

  5. Diagnostics for heavy ion beam driven Warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pavel; Bieniosek, Frank; Lidia, Steve; Seidl, Peter; Waldron, Will

    2009-11-01

    A set of diagnostic has been developed for the WDM experiments at Berkeley. The diagnostics are aimed at the in-situ measurement of temperature, expansion velocity and pressure of a WDM sample.A specially developed two-channel pyrometer probes color temperatures at 750 nm,1000 nm and 1400 nm, with 75 ps temporal resolution. The system has a broad dynamic range with a lower limit ˜2000 K and upper limit ˜100000 K. The pyrometer design is based on custom spectrally selective beam splitters and can be upgraded up to seven channels. Continuous target emission from 450 nm to 850 nm is recorder by a custom spectrometer, consisting of a high dynamic range Hamamatsu streak camera and a holographic grating. The system is calibrated absolutely with a tungsten ribbon lamp (NIST traceable). The various sweeping times of the streak unit allows for temporal resolution varying from 1 ps to 1 us. The spectrometer has a lower sensitivity than the pyrometer and applied in experiments with higher temperatures. Hydrodynamic expansion velocity of a target's free surface is measured by a commercially available all- fiber Doppler shift laser interferometer (VISAR). The installed delay etalon allows for velocity detection with 2 m/s precision and 0.5 ns resolution.

  6. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  7. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  8. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. G. Akkermans

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High gain free electron lasers (FELs driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ∼20  m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  9. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  10. Simulation and observation of driven beam oscillations with space charge in the CERN PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    McAteer, M; Benedetto, E; Carli, C; Findlay, A; Mikulec, B; Tomás, R

    2014-01-01

    As part of the LHC Injector Upgrade project, the CERN PS Booster will be required to operate at nearly doubled intensity with little allowable increase in emittance growth or beam loss. A campaign of nonlinear optics measurements from turn-by-turn trajectory measurements, with the goal of characterizing and then compensating for higher-order resonances, is planned for after Long Shutdown 1. The trajectory measurement system is expected initially to require high intensity beam in order to have good position measurement resolution, so understanding space charge effects will be important for optics analysis. We present the results of simulations of driven beam oscillations with space charge effects, and comparison with trial beam trajectory measurements.

  11. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertazzi, B., E-mail: bruno.albertazzi@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); D' Humières, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lancia, L.; Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: Julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Böcker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Bonlie, J.; Cauble, B.; Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Chen, S. N. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sentoku, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  12. A compact terahertz free-electron laser with two gratings driven by two electron-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihao; Lu, Yalin; Wang, Lin; Jia, Qika

    2017-02-01

    We proposed and investigated a novel terahertz free-electron laser, which is based on two gratings driven by two electron-beams. Two gratings are symmetrically arranged to form an open-cavity. Two electron-beams generate special Smith-Purcell radiations, respectively, from two gratings. When radiation interferes constructively, operation modes of the open-cavity are excited and then amplified by beam-wave interactions. By means of particle-in-cell simulations, we have shown that, with compact equipments and available electron-beams, this scheme can generate radiation with power and efficiency being higher than those of majority radiation sources in the vicinity region of 1 THz. It can promisingly be developed as a high-power, high-efficiency, and compact terahertz source for practice.

  13. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  14. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F., E-mail: francesco.romano@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Universita' di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Korn, G. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Larosa, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Leanza, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Universita' di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Manna, R.; Marchese, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Margarone, D. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  15. Propagation of whistler waves driven by fine structured ion beams in the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burinskaya, T.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, which examined the propagation of low-frequency whistler waves generated by ion beams in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL), it was found that whistler waves driven in the PSBL are focused toward the central plasma sheet due to the global magnetotail inhomogeneities; this finding may help explain the observations of magnetic noise bursts in the tail (Burinskaya et al., 1993). In this paper the same phenomenon is examined, but this time a much more realistic model is used for the ion beam in the PSBL. While the PSBL has been modeled as a solid, homogeneous ion beams with a width of one Earth radius, observations and theoretical considerations have shown that PSBL ion beams actually have a decreasing velocity profile toward the plasma sheet and that the density of the beams within the PSBL can vary locally. We consider again the propagation and generation of electromagnetic waves but in the presence of fine structured ion beams in the PSBL. Our results show that whistler waves, generated quasi-parallel to the background magnetic field, can be trapped locally within small spatial regions where the ion beam density is enhanced compared to the density of the adjacent PSBL region. Wave spectra and nonlinear saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Toroidal optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Raybould, T A; Papasimakis, N; Kuprov, I; Youngs, I; Chen, W T; Tsai, D P; Zheludev, N I

    2015-01-01

    Optical activity is ubiquitous across natural and artificial media and is conventionally understood in terms of scattering from electric and magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate experimentally and confirm numerically a type of optical activity that cannot be attributed to electric and magnetic multipoles. We show that our observations can only be accounted for by the inclusion of the toroidal dipole moment, the first term of the recently established peculiar family of toroidal multipoles.

  17. New aspects of whistler waves driven by an electron beam studied by a 3-D electromagnetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    1994-01-01

    We have restudied electron beam driven whistler waves with a 3-D electromagnetic particle code. The simulation results show electromagnetic whistler wave emissions and electrostatic beam modes like those observed in the Spacelab 2 electron beam experiment. It has been suggested in the past that the spatial bunching of beam electrons associated with the beam mode may directly generate whistler waves. However, the simulation results indicate several inconsistencies with this picture: (1) whistler waves continue to be generated even after the beam mode space charge modulation looses its coherence, (2) the parallel (to the background magnetic field) wavelength of the whistler wave is longer than that of the beam instability, and (3) the parallel phase velocity of the whistler wave is smaller than that of the beam mode. The complex structure of the whistler waves in the vicinity of the beam suggest that the transverse motion (gyration) of the beam and background electrons is also involved in the generation of whistler waves.

  18. New aspects of whistler waves driven by an electron beam studied by a 3-D electromagnetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    1994-01-01

    We have restudied electron beam driven whistler waves with a 3-D electromagnetic particle code. The simulation results show electromagnetic whistler wave emissions and electrostatic beam modes like those observed in the Spacelab 2 electron beam experiment. It has been suggested in the past that the spatial bunching of beam electrons associated with the beam mode may directly generate whistler waves. However, the simulation results indicate several inconsistencies with this picture: (1) whistler waves continue to be generated even after the beam mode space charge modulation looses its coherence, (2) the parallel (to the background magnetic field) wavelength of the whistler wave is longer than that of the beam instability, and (3) the parallel phase velocity of the whistler wave is smaller than that of the beam mode. The complex structure of the whistler waves in the vicinity of the beam suggest that the transverse motion (gyration) of the beam and background electrons is also involved in the generation of whistler waves.

  19. Effect of negative gases admixture on the stability of beam-driven discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of negative gas SF6 admixture on the stability of low-pressure beam-driven discharge is studied by self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model. We find that the plasma parameters as well as its stability are changed drastically when SF6 is added to argon gas. In an electropositive plasma we obtain the excitation of both fast and slow electrostatic plasma waves which is explained by the propagation of electron beam through the non-homogeneous bounded plasma. These waves lead to the heating of plasma electrons and ions. On the other hand, in electronegative plasma we also obtain a decay of the electron beam. However, since in electronegative beam-generated plasma the electron plasma density is homogeneous the beam is more stable. As a consequence, we obtain only the excitation of two fast electrostatic waves. One wave is excited due to two-stream instability and another wave is excited due to beam decay. The excitation of these fast waves does not influence the plasma homogeneity but influences the heating of plasma electrons.

  20. Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

  1. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  2. High quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangmei; Lotov, Konstantin V; Sosedkin, Alexander P; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have numerically demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the intrinsic strong and radially varying transverse fields, the beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we propose a new accelerating region which is free from both plasma electrons and ions in the proton-driven hollow plasma channel. The high quality electron beam is therefore generated with this scheme without transverse plasma fields. The results show that a 1 TeV proton driver can propagate and accelerate an electron beam to 0.62 TeV with correlated energy spread of 4.6% and well-preserved normalized emittance below 2.4 mm mrad in a single hollow plasma channel of 700 m. More importantly, the beam loading tolerance is significantly improved compared to the uniform plasma case. This high quality an...

  3. Relativistic electron beam driven longitudinal wake-wave breaking in a cold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Sengupta, Sudip; Das, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Space-time evolution of relativistic electron beam driven wake-field in a cold, homogeneous plasma, is studied using 1D-fluid simulation techniques. It is observed that the wake wave gradu- ally evolves and eventually breaks, exhibiting sharp spikes in the density profile and sawtooth like features in the electric field profile [1]. It is shown here that the excited wakefield is a longitudi- nal Akhiezer-Polovin mode [2] and its steepening (breaking) can be understood in terms of phase mixing of this mode, which arises because of relativistic mass variation effects. Further the phase mixing time (breaking time) is studied as a function of beam density and beam velocity and is found to follow the well known scaling presented in ref.[3].

  4. Generation of powerful terahertz emission in a beam-driven strong plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Arzhannikov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation due to coalescence of upper-hybrid waves in the long-wavelength region of strong plasma turbulence driven by a high-current relativistic electron beam in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The width of frequency spectrum as well as angular characteristics of this radiation for various values of plasma density and turbulence energy are calculated using the simple theoretical model adequately describing beam-plasma experiments at mirror traps. It is shown that the power density of electromagnetic emission at the second harmonic of plasma frequency in the terahertz range for these laboratory experiments can reach the level of 1 ${MW/cm}^3$ with 1% conversion efficiency of beam energy losses to electromagnetic emission.

  5. Effects of long-wavelength dissipation on beam-driven Langmuir turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-wavelength dissipation on beam-driven Langmuir turbulence are investigated using numerical simulations that include both weak and strong turbulence effects. Strong-turbulence wave collapses occur concurrently with weak-turbulence energy cascades if the long-wavelength damping is sufficiently small relative to the growth rate of the beam-unstable waves. Above a threshold damping level, only the weak-turbulence backscatter cascade is observed, and it becomes increasingly truncated as the damping increases, eventually consisting of only a single backscatter. A simple Lotka-Volterra model gives an excellent description of the periodic evolution observed in the weak-turbulence regime. Suppression of the usual backscatter cascade by long-wavelength damping enables intense beam-aligned density troughs to form, which trap and duct Langmuir waves.

  6. Fast Filtered Imaging of the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven Field-Reversed Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, E. M.; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the C-2U program is to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) for 5+ ms using neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques. Three high-speed, filtered cameras are used to observe visible light emission from deuterium pellet ablation and compact-toroid injection which are used for auxiliary particle fueling. The instruments are also used to view the dynamics of the macroscopic plasma evolution, identify regions of strong plasma-material interactions, and visualize non-axisymmetric perturbations. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses are mounted in re-entrant viewports, two of which are mounted on bellows for retraction during gettering and removal if cleaning is necessary. Images are coupled from the imaging lens to the camera via custom lens-based optical periscopes. Each instrument contains a remote-controlled filter wheel which is set between shots to select a particular emission line from neutral D or various charge states of He, C, O, or Ti. Measurements of absolute emissivity and estimates of neutral and impurity density will be presented.

  7. Self-consistent long-time simulation of chirping energetic particle modes and abrupt large events in beam-driven JT-60U tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwage, A.; Shinohara, K.; Todo, Y.; Aiba, N.; Ishikawa, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Takechi, M.; Yagi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Recurring bursts of chirping Alfvén modes as well as so-called Abrupt Large Events (ALE) that were observed in JT-60U tokamak plasmas driven by negative-ion-based neutral beams (N-NB) are reproduced in first-principle simulations performed with an extended version of the hybrid code MEGA. This code simulates the interactions between gyrokinetic fast ions and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in the presence of a realistic fast ion source and collisions, so that it self-consistently captures dynamics across a wide range of time scales (0.01-100 ms). Detailed comparisons with experimental measurements are performed. On the long time scale (10-100 ms) the simulation reproduces ALEs with the associated avalanche-like transport of fast ions. ALEs are shown to occur when multiple modes with toroidal mode numbers n = 1 , 2 , 3 are excited to large amplitudes. On the meso time scale (1-10 ms), bursts of chirping modes are reproduced, which are shown to be n = 1 energetic particle modes (EPM). On the short time scale (0.01-0.1 ms), pulsations and phase jumps are reproduced, which we interpret as the result of beating between multiple resonant wave packets. JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 25820443, 16K18341). NIFS Collaborative Research Program (NIFS12KNTT016).

  8. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, Erik; Gessner, Spencer J; Hogan, Mark J; Raubenheimer, Tor; An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) holds much promise for advancing the energy frontier because it can potentially provide a 1000-fold or more increase in acceleration gradient with excellent power efficiency in respect with standard technologies. Most of the advances in beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration were obtained by a UCLA/USC/SLAC collaboration working at the SLAC FFTB[ ]. These experiments have shown that plasmas can accelerate and focus both electron and positron high energy beams, and an accelerating gradient in excess of 50 GeV/m can be sustained in an 85 cm-long plasma. The FFTB experiments were essentially proof-of-principle experiments that showed the great potential of plasma accelerators. The FACET[ ] test facility at SLAC will in the period 2012-2016 further study several issues that are directly related to the applicability of PWFA to a high-energy collider, in particular two-beam acceleration where the witness beam experiences high beam loading (required for high efficiency), small...

  9. Target design for the cylindrical compression of matter driven by heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es; Temporal, M. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez Cela, J.J. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Grandjouan, N. [LULI, UMR 7605, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Tahir, N.A. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Serna Moreno, M.C. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Portugues, R.F. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-21

    The compression of a cylindrical sample of hydrogen contained in a hollow shell of Pb or Au has been analyzed in the framework of the experiments to be performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 to be constructed at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. The target implosion is driven by an intense beam of heavy ions with a ring-shaped focal spot. We report the results of a parametric study of the final state of the compressed hydrogen in terms of the target and beam parameters. We consider the generation of the annular heated region by means of a radio-frequency wobbler that rotates the beam at extremely high frequencies in order to accommodate symmetry constraints. We have also studied the hydrogen conditions that can be achieved with a non-rotating beam with Gaussian focal spot and the possibility to use a beam stopper as an alternative way to avoid the direct heating of the sample. Finally, we report the analysis of the hydrodynamic instabilities that affect the implosion and the mitigating effects of the elastoplastic properties of the shell.

  10. Simulations of a beam-driven plasma antenna in the regime of plasma transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the theoretically predicted possibility to increase the efficiency of electromagnetic radiation generated by a thin beam-plasma system in the regime of oblique emission, when a plasma column becomes transparent to radiation near the plasma frequency, is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. If a finite-size plasma column has a longitudinal density modulation, such a system is able to radiate electromagnetic waves as a dipole antenna. This radiation mechanism is based on the conversion of an electron beam-driven potential plasma wave on the periodic perturbation of plasma density. In this case, the frequency of radiated waves appears to be slightly lower than the plasma frequency. That is why their fields enable the penetration into the plasma only to the skin-depth. This case is realized when the period of density modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, and the produced radiation escapes from the plasma in the purely transverse direction. In the recent theoretical paper [I. V. Timofeev et al. Phys. Plasmas 23, 083119 (2016)], however, it has been found that the magnetized plasma can be transparent to this radiation at certain emission angles. It means that the beam-to-radiation power conversion can be highly efficient even in a relatively thick plasma since not only boundary layers but also the whole plasma volume can be involved in the generation of electromagnetic waves. Simulations of steady-state beam injection into a pre-modulated plasma channel confirm the existence of this effect and show limits of validity for the simplified theoretical model.

  11. Beam transient analyses of Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors based on neutron transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingtao; Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Wang, Kunpeng [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, PO Box 8088, Beijing 100082 (China); Li, Xunzhao; Zhou, Shengcheng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A transport-based kinetics code for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors is developed. • The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated. • The impacts of neutronic parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are investigated. - Abstract: The Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) is almost external source dominated since there is no additional reactivity control mechanism in most designs. This paper focuses on beam-induced transients with an in-house developed dynamic analysis code. The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated, including the point kinetics approximation and space–time kinetics methods. Then, the transient responds of beam trip and beam overpower are calculated and analyzed for an ADSR design dedicated for minor actinides transmutation. The impacts of some safety-related neutronics parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are also investigated. The results show that the power distribution varying with burnup leads to large differences in temperature responds during transients, while the impacts of kinetic parameters and feedback coefficients are not very obvious. Classification: Core physic.

  12. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  13. Alternative Shapes and Shaping Techniques for Enhanced Transformer Ratios in Beam Driven Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, F. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The transformer ration of collinear beam-driven techniques can be significantly improved by shaping the current profile of the drive bunch. To date, several current shapes have been proposed to increase the transformer ratio and produce quasi-uniform energy loss within the drive bunch. Some of these tailoring techniques are possible as a results of recent beam-dynamics advances, e.g., transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchanger. In ths paper, we propose an alternative class of longitudinal shapes that enable high transformer ratio and uniform energy loss across the drive bunch. We also suggest a simple method based on photocathode-laser shaping and passive shaping in wakefield structure to realize shape close to the theoretically optimized current profiles.

  14. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A.; Abanades, A.; Leon, P.T.; Sordo, F. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, J. Gutierrez Abascal, 2-28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Val, J.M. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, J. Gutierrez Abascal, 2-28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mval@etsii.upm.es

    2008-06-21

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 {mu}s repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity.

  15. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, A.; Abanades, A.; Leon, P. T.; Sordo, F.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    2008-06-01

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 μs repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity.

  16. Small radio frequency driven multicusp ion source for positive hydrogen ion beam production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L.T.; Herz, P.R.; Leung, K.N.; Pickard, D.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A compact, 2.5 cm diam rf-driven multicusp ion source has been developed and tested for H[sup +] ion production in pulse mode operation. The source is optimized for atomic hydrogen ion species and extractable current. It is found that hydrogen ion beam current densities in excess of 650 mA/cm[sup 2] can be achieved with H[sup +] species above 80%. The geometry and position of the porcelain-coated copper antenna were found to be of great significance in relation to the efficiency of the ion source.

  17. Degradation of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Structures through Light and Electron Beam Driven Ion Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haifeng; Debroye, Elke; Janssen, Kris; Naiki, Hiroyuki; Steuwe, Christian; Lu, Gang; Moris, Michèle; Orgiu, Emanuele; Uji-I, Hiroshi; De Schryver, Frans; Samorì, Paolo; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten

    2016-02-04

    Organometal halide perovskites show promising features for cost-effective application in photovoltaics. The material instability remains a major obstacle to broad application because of the poorly understood degradation pathways. Here, we apply simultaneous luminescence and electron microscopy on perovskites for the first time, allowing us to monitor in situ morphology evolution and optical properties upon perovskite degradation. Interestingly, morphology, photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence of perovskite samples evolve differently upon degradation driven by electron beam (e-beam) or by light. A transversal electric current generated by a scanning electron beam leads to dramatic changes in PL and tunes the energy band gaps continuously alongside film thinning. In contrast, light-induced degradation results in material decomposition to scattered particles and shows little PL spectral shifts. The differences in degradation can be ascribed to different electric currents that drive ion migration. Moreover, solution-processed perovskite cuboids show heterogeneity in stability which is likely related to crystallinity and morphology. Our results reveal the essential role of ion migration in perovskite degradation and provide potential avenues to rationally enhance the stability of perovskite materials by reducing ion migration while improving morphology and crystallinity. It is worth noting that even moderate e-beam currents (86 pA) and acceleration voltages (10 kV) readily induce significant perovskite degradation and alter their optical properties. Therefore, attention has to be paid while characterizing such materials using scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  18. Intense laser-driven proton beam energy deposition in compressed and uncompressed Cu foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, Christopher; Krauland, C. M.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Habara, H.; Noma, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tsujii, A.; Yahata, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Uematsu, Y.; Nakaguchi, S.; Morace, A.; Yogo, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Tanaka, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated transport of intense proton beams from a petawatt laser in uncompressed or compressed Cu foam. The LFEX laser (1 kJ on target, 1.5 ps, 1053 nm, I >2×1019 W/cm2) irradiated a curved C foil to generate the protons. The foil was in an open cone 500 μm from the tip where the focused proton beam source was delivered to either of two Cu foam sample types: an uncompressed cylinder (1 mm L, 250 µm ϕ) , and a plastic-coated sphere (250 µm ϕ) that was first driven by GXII (9 beams, 330 J/beam, 1.3 ns, 527 nm) to achieve similar ρϕ to the cylinder sample's ρL as predicted by 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Using magnetic spectrometers and a Thomson parabola, the proton spectra were measured with and without the Cu samples. When included, they were observed using Cu K-shell x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. This paper will present comparison of the experimentally measured Cu emission shape and proton spectrum changes due to deposition in the Cu with particle-in-cell simulations incorporating new stopping models. This work was made possible by laser time Awarded by the Japanese NIFS collaboration NIFS16KUGK107 and performed under the auspices of the US AFOSR YIP Award FA9550-14-1-0346.

  19. Fundamental Studies on the Use of Laser-Driven Proton Beams for Fast Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, C.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Theobald, W.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Foord, M. E.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. S.; Roth, M.; McKenna, P.

    2015-11-01

    A short-pulse-laser-driven intense proton beam remains a candidate for Fast Ignition heater due to its focusability and high current. However, the proton current density necessary for FI in practice has never been produced in the laboratory and there are many physics issues that should be addressed using current and near-term facilities. For example, the extraction of sufficient proton charge from the short-pulse laser target could be evaluated with the multi-kilojoule NIF ARC laser. Transport of the beam through matter, such as a cone tip, and deposition in the fuel must be considered carefully as it will isochorically heat any material it enters and produce a rapidly-evolving, warm dense matter state with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we share experimental measurements of the proton spectra after passing through metal cones and foils taken with the kilojoule-class, multi-picosecond OMEGA EP and LFEX lasers. We also present complementary PIC simulations of beam generation and transport to and in the foils. Upcoming experiments to further evaluate proton beam performance in proton FI will also be outlined. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA NLUF program, Contract DE-NA0002034 and by the AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  20. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Bradley, P A; Vold, E L; Boettger, J C; Fernández, J C

    2015-01-01

    In a recent experiment on the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 eV and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable on Trident, with a finite energy spread of (delta E)/E ~ 20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140 MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  1. Characterization of the ELIMED Permanent Magnets Quadrupole system prototype with laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, F.; Pommarel, L.; Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Costa, M.; Giove, D.; Maggiore, M.; Russo, A. D.; Scuderi, V.; Malka, V.; Vauzour, B.; Flacco, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser-based accelerators are gaining interest in recent years as an alternative to conventional machines [1]. In the actual ion acceleration scheme, energy and angular spread of the laser-driven beams are the main limiting factors for beam applications and different solutions for dedicated beam-transport lines have been proposed [2,3]. In this context a system of Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) has been realized [2] by INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) researchers, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI company in France, to be used as a collection and pre-selection system for laser driven proton beams. This system is meant to be a prototype to a more performing one [3] to be installed at ELI-Beamlines for the collection of ions. The final system is designed for protons and carbons up to 60 MeV/u. In order to validate the design and the performances of this large bore, compact, high gradient magnetic system prototype an experimental campaign have been carried out, in collaboration with the group of the SAPHIR experimental facility at LOA (Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée) in Paris using a 200 TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. During this campaign a deep study of the quadrupole system optics has been performed, comparing the results with the simulation codes used to determine the setup of the PMQ system and to track protons with realistic TNSA-like divergence and spectrum. Experimental and simulation results are good agreement, demonstrating the possibility to have a good control on the magnet optics. The procedure used during the experimental campaign and the most relevant results are reported here.

  2. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Ehtiati, Tina; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2015-04-21

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d') is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ± 30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d' for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d' by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the tilt

  3. Tearing Mode Stability with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ryan; Coppi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma flow induced by neutral beam heating has been found to increase the stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. The need to extrapolate current (experimentally-based) knowledge of tearing mode onset to future machines, requiresa better understanding of the essential physics. We consider the physics of flow near the rational surfaces. For realistic flow profiles, the velocity shear near the rational surface can be treated as a perturbation, and is found to amplify the dominant stabilizing effect of magnetic curvature. This effect can be seen using a cylindrical model if large-aspect-ratio corrections to the magnetic curvature are incorporated. On the other hand, the physical effects of toroidal rotation are completely absent in a cylinder, and require a fully-toroidal calculation to study. The toroidal rotation near the rational surface is found to couple to a geometrical parameter which vanishes for up-down symmetric profiles. Physically, the dominant effects of rotation arise from a Coriolis force, leading to flow directional dependence. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k{sub {tau}}{rho}{sub bi} {much_lt} 1, where {rho}{sub bi} is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented.

  5. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, G S; Ivanov, V V; Leblanc, P; Sentoku, Y; Yates, K; Wiewior, P; Chalyy, O; Astanovitskiy, A; Bychenkov, V Yu; Jobe, D; Spielman, R B

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ∼2 × 10(18) W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ∼2 × 10(19) cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ∼0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ∼15 kG and ∼1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ∼0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the "fountain effect", a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale.

  6. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  7. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q.; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations,...

  8. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., PALS Centre, Prague (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Messina University (Italy); Picciotto, A.; Serra, E. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler - IRST, Trento (Italy); Giuffrida, L. [CELIA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (France); Mangione, A. [ITA - Istituto Tecnologie Avanzate, Trapani (Italy); Rosinski, M.; Parys, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  9. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven accelerationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Torrisi, L.; Picciotto, A.; Giuffrida, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Serra, E.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; Ryc, L.; Limpouch, J.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 1016-1019 W/cm2. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  10. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  11. Toward high-energy laser-driven ion beams: Nanostructured double-layer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, M.; Sgattoni, A.; Prencipe, I.; Fedeli, L.; Dellasega, D.; Cialfi, L.; Choi, Il Woo; Kim, I. Jong; Janulewicz, K. A.; Lee, Hwang Woon; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-06-01

    The development of novel target concepts is crucial to make laser-driven acceleration of ion beams suitable for applications. We tested double-layer targets formed of an ultralow density nanostructured carbon layer (˜7 mg/cm 3 , 8 - 12 μ m -thick) deposited on a μ m -thick solid Al foil. A systematic increase in the total number of the accelerated ions (protons and C6 + ) as well as enhancement of both their maximum and average energies was observed with respect to bare solid foil targets. Maximum proton energies up to 30 MeV were recorded. Dedicated three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations were in remarkable agreement with the experimental results, giving clear indication of the role played by the target nanostructures in the interaction process.

  12. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  13. On the dynamic toroidal multipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Toroidal multipoles are attracting research attention, particularly in the field of metamaterials. They are often understood as a multipolar family in its own right. The dynamic toroidal multipoles emerge from the separation of one of the two transverse multipoles into two parts, referred to as electric and toroidal. Here, we establish that the dynamic toroidal multipolar components of an electric current distribution cannot be determined by measuring the radiation from the source or its coupling to external electromagnetic waves. We analytically show how the split into electric and toroidal parts causes the appearance of non-radiative components in each of the two parts, which cancel when summed back together. The toroidal multipoles do not have an independent meaning with respect to their interaction with the radiation field. Their formal meaning is clear, however. They are the higher order terms of an expansion of the multipolar coefficients of electric parity with respect to the electromagnetic size of th...

  14. ELIMED: a new hadron therapy concept based on laser driven ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Anzalone, Antonello; Borghesi, Marco; Jia, S. Bijan; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Bulanov, Sergei; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Cuttone, Giacomo; Favetta, Marco; Gammino, Santo; Klimo, Ondrej; Manti, Lorenzo; Korn, Georg; La Malfa, Giuseppe; Limpouch, Jiri; Musumarra, Agatino; Petrovic, Ivan; Prokupek, Jan; Psikal, Jan; Ristic-Fira, Aleksandra; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco P.; Romano, Francesco; Schettino, Giuseppe; Schillaci, Francesco; Scuderi, Valentina; Stancampiano, Concetta; Tramontana, Antonella; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tudisco, Salvo; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-05-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams have been proposed to be used in different research fields. A great interest has risen for the potential replacement of conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators, and in particular for the development of new concepts of more compact and cheaper hadrontherapy centers. In this context the ELIMED (ELI MEDical applications) research project has been launched by INFN-LNS and ASCR-FZU researchers within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. The ELIMED project aims to demonstrate the potential clinical applicability of optically accelerated proton beams and to realize a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multi-disciplinary user applications. In this framework the eye melanoma, as for instance the uveal melanoma normally treated with 62 MeV proton beams produced by standard accelerators, will be considered as a model system to demonstrate the potential clinical use of laser-driven protons in hadrontherapy, especially because of the limited constraints in terms of proton energy and irradiation geometry for this particular tumour treatment. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development up to dosimetry and radiobiology, need to be overcome in order to reach the ELIMED final goals. A crucial role will be played by the final design and realization of a transport beamline capable to provide ion beams with proper characteristics in terms of energy spectrum and angular distribution which will allow performing dosimetric tests and biological cell irradiation. A first prototype of the transport beamline has been already designed and other transport elements are under construction in order to perform a first experimental test with the TARANIS laser system by the end of 2013. A wide international collaboration among specialists of different disciplines like Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Medicine and medical doctors coming from Europe, Japan, and the US is growing up

  15. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  16. Relativistic electron beams driven by kHz single-cycle light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Guénot, D; Vernier, A; Beaurepaire, B; Böhle, F; Bocoum, M; Lozano, M; Jullien, A; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is an emerging technique for accelerating electrons to high energies over very short distances. The accelerated electron bunches have femtosecond duration, making them particularly relevant for applications such as ultrafast imaging or femtosecond X-ray generation. Current laser-plasma accelerators are typically driven by Joule-class laser systems that have two main drawbacks: their relatively large scale and their low repetition-rate, with a few shots per second at best. The accelerated electron beams have energies ranging from 100 MeV to multi-GeV, however a MeV electron source would be more suited to many societal and scientific applications. Here, we demonstrate a compact and reliable laser-plasma accelerator producing high-quality few-MeV electron beams at kilohertz repetition rate. This breakthrough was made possible by using near-single-cycle light pulses, which lowered the required laser energy for driving the accelerator by three orders of magnitude, thus enabling high repet...

  17. Influence of phase separation for surfactant driven pattern formation during ion beam erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsaess, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Vetter, Ulrich; Bobes, Omar; Pape, Andre; Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Broetzmann, Marc [II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We will present results on metal surfactant driven self-organized pattern formation on surfaces by ion beam erosion, with a focus on the role of phase separation for the initial steps of pattern formation. Si substrates were irradiated with 5 keV Xe ions at normal incidence and ion fluences up to 5.10{sup 17} Xe/cm{sup 2} under continuous deposition of surfactant atoms. In the absence of such surfactants uniform flat surfaces are obtained, while in the presence of Fe and Mo surfactants pronounced patterns like dots, combinations of dots and ripples with wavelengths around 100 nm are generated. The surfactant coverage and deposition direction determine the pattern type and the pattern orientation, respectively. A critical steady-state coverage for onset of dot formation and onset of ripple formation is in the range of 10{sup 15} and 5.10{sup 15} Xe/cm{sup 2}. The steady-state surface region consists of a thin amorphous metal silicide layer with high metal concentration in the ripple and dot regions. Pattern formation is explained by ion induced diffusion and phase separation of the initially flat amorphous silicide layer and subsequent ion beam erosion with composition dependent sputter yield. To investigate the role of initial phase separation we additionally compare the pattern formation for different other metal surfactants.

  18. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  19. Wall-impedance-driven collective instability in intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the wall-impedance-driven instability for a long charge bunch (bunch   length   ℓ_{b}≫bunch   radius   r_{b} propagating through a cylindrical pipe with radius r_{w} and wall impedance Z[over ˜](ω. The stability analysis is carried out for perturbations about a cylindrical Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij beam equilibrium with a flattop density profile in the smooth-focusing approximation. The perturbations are assumed to be of the form δψ(x,t=δψ^{ℓ}(rexp⁡(iℓθ+ik_{z}z-iωt, where (r,θ are the radial and azimuthal coordinates in the transverse direction, and z is the coordinate in the longitudinal direction. Here, ℓ=1,2,… is the azimuthal mode number of the perturbation in the transverse direction, k_{z} is the wave number in the longitudinal direction, and ω is the oscillation frequency. As an example, detailed stability properties are determined for dipole-mode perturbations (ℓ=1 assuming negligibly small axial momentum spread of the beam particles. The stability analysis is valid for a general value of the normalized beam intensity s_{b}=ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/2γ_{b}^{2}ω_{β⊥}^{2} in the interval 0

  20. The comparative analysis of the different mechanisms of toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabot, R. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Parail, V. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    The toroidal plasma rotation appears as one the possible mechanism for suppression of plasma turbulence. Several mechanisms are believed to contribute to the toroidal plasma rotation. The results of numerical simulation of the toroidal rotation on JET are presented, where are taken into consideration the following effects: the neoclassical viscosity due to banana and ripple trapped particles, the anomalous viscosity due to plasma turbulence, the momentum input by NBI (neutron beam injection) and ion momentum loss near the separatrix due to prompt ion losses. The NBI appeared to be the principal source of toroidal plasma rotation. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. On the Toroidal Leibniz Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong LIU; Lei LIN

    2008-01-01

    Toroidal Leibniz algebras are the universal central extensions of the iterated loop algebras gOC[t±11 ,...,t±v1] in the category of Leibniz algebras. In this paper, some properties and representations of toroidal Leibniz algebras are studied. Some general theories of central extensions of Leibniz algebras are also obtained.

  2. EPOCH code simulation of a non-thermal distribution driven by neutral beam injection in a high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necas, A.; Tajima, T.; Nicks, S.; Magee, R.; Clary, R.; Roche, T.; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2016-10-01

    In Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment, advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas were sustained via tangential neutral beam injection. The dominant fast ion population made a dramatic impact on the overall plasma performance. To explain an experimentally observed anomalous neutron signal (100x thermonuclear), we use EPOCH PIC code to simulate possible beam driven non-destructive instabilities that transfer energy from fast ions to the plasma, causing phase space bunching. We propose that the hydrogen beam ion population drives collective modes in the deuterium target plasma, giving rise to the instability and increased fusion rate. The instability changes character from electrostatic in the low beta edge to fully electromagnetic in the core, with an associated reduction in growth rates. The DD reactivity enhancement is calculated using a two-body correlation function and compared to the experimentally observed neutron yield. The high-energy tails in the distributions of the plasma deuterons and beam protons are observed via a mass-resolving Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic. This observation is qualitatively consistent with EPOCH simulation of the beam-plasma instability.

  3. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  4. Theoretical studies of non inductive current drive in compact toroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Lifschitz, AF; Caputi, KI; Arista, NR; Clemente, RA

    2002-01-01

    Three non inductive current drive methods that can be applied to compact toroids axe studied. The use of neutral beams to drive current in field reversed configurations and spheromaks is studied using a Monte Carlo code that includes a complete ionization package and follows the exact particle orbit

  5. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  6. Measurements of beam-driven instabilities with the upgraded MST interferometer-polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2016-10-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) in MST produces a core-localized fast ion population that modifies the plasma equilibrium and drives a rich variety of instabilities. These instabilities include energetic particle modes (EPMs) and Alfvénic modes that can produce an avalanche process leading to significantly enhanced fast ion transport, as well as chirping modes. The MST FIR interferometer-polarimeter system has high-bandwidth and low phase noise and has previously been used to characterize density fluctuations correlated with many of these instabilities, as well as internal magnetic fluctuations associated with the dominant, n = 5 EPM. However, many of the Alfvénic and chirping modes were too weak to observe in polarimetry measurements in previous studies. Recent upgrades to the interferometer-polarimeter have further reduced the noise floor and extended the accessible bandwidth for fluctuation measurements. Initial measurements of fast ion driven instabilities with the upgraded system will be presented. Improved measurements of internal structure may be important for understanding mode dynamics and particle transport. Work supported by U.S. D.O.E.

  7. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  8. Physical Mechanisms and Feedback Control of Beam Halo-Chaos for Accelerator-driven Radioactive-clean Nuclear Power Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    High-current proton beams have attractive features for possible breakthrough applications, especially for accelerator-driven radioactive-clean nuclear power systems (ADS), which make nuclear energy systems safer, cleaner, cheaper, and therefore more practical. However, beam halo-chaos in ADS has become one of the key technical issues because it can cause excessive radio-activation from the accelerators and significantly limits the industrial applications of the new accelerators.Some general engineering methods for chaos control have been developed, but they generally

  9. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  10. Energetic electrons driven in the polarization direction of an intense laser beam incident normal to a solid target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Pereira, N.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J.

    2016-06-01

    Experiments were performed at the LLNL Titan laser to measure the propagation direction of the energetic electrons that were generated during the interaction of the polarized laser beam with solid targets in the case of normal incidence. The energetic electrons propagated through vacuum to spectator metal wires in the polarization direction and in the perpendicular direction, and the K shell spectra from the different wire materials were recorded as functions of the distance from the laser focal spot. It was found that the fluence of the energetic electrons driven into the spectator wires in the polarization direction compared to the perpendicular direction was larger and increased with the distance from the focal spot. This indicates that energetic electrons are preferentially driven in the direction of the intense oscillating electric field of the incident laser beam in agreement with the multiphoton inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process.

  11. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  12. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T., E-mail: cstd14003@g.nihon-u.ac.jp; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T. [Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ∼1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  13. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  14. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that the collimated jets can achieve much higher density, temperature and velocity when multiple laser beams are focused to form a hollow ring pattern at the target, instead of focused onto a single spot. We carried out simulations with different ring radii and studied their effects on the jet properties. Implications for laboratory collisionless shock experiments are discussed.

  15. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  16. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Feist, Armin; da Silva, Nara Rubiano; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the G\\"ottingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 {\\AA} focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free electron beams.

  17. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plettner, Tomas [San Ramon, CA; Byer, Robert L [Stanford, CA

    2011-08-09

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  18. Steering, Splitting and Cloning of Optical Beam in a Coherently Driven Raman Gain System

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Onkar N.; Dey, Tarak N.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an all-optical anti-waveguide mechanism for steering, splitting, and cloning of an optical beam beyond the diffraction-limit. We use a spatially inhomogeneous pump beam to create an anti-waveguide structure in a Doppler broadened N -type four-level Raman gain medium for a co-propagating weak probe beam. We show that a transverse modulated index of refraction and gain due to the spatially dependent pump beam hold the keys to steering, splitting and cloning of an optical beam. We hav...

  19. Effect of Energetic-Ion-Driven MHD Instabilities on Energetic-Ion-Transport in Compact Helical System and Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Okumura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and 2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma.

  20. Effect of energetic-ion-driven MHD instabilities on energetic-ion-transport in compact helical system and large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Ogawa, K. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes (1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and (2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Dynamics of laser-driven proton beam focusing and transport into solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F.; Wei, M.; Mariscal, D.; Chen, S.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric heating and local energy deposition capabilities make intense proton beams appealing for studying high energy density physics and the Fast Ignition of inertial confinement fusion. To study proton beam focusing that results in high beam density, experiments have been conducted using different target geometries irradiated by a kilojoule, 10 ps pulse of the OMEGA EP laser. The beam focus was measured by imaging beam-induced Cu K-alpha emission on a Cu foil that was positioned at a fixed distance. Compared to a free target, structured targets having shapes of wedge and cone show a brighter and narrower K-alpha radiation emission spot on a Cu foil indicating higher beam focusability. Experimentally observed images with proton radiography demonstrate the existence of transverse fields on the structures. Full-scale simulations including the contribution of a long pulse duration of the laser confirm that such fields can be caused by hot electrons moving through the structures. The simulated fields are strong enough to reflect the diverging main proton beam and pinch a transverse probe beam. Detailed simulation results including the beam focusing and transport of the focused intense proton beam in Cu foil will be presented. This work was supported by the National Laser User Facility Program through Award DE-NA0002034.

  2. Nonlinear Control of Beam Halo-Chaos in Accelerator-Driven Clean Nuclear Power System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG JinQing; CHEN GuanRong; ZHOU LiuLai; WENG JiaQiang

    2002-01-01

    Beam halo-chaos in high-current accelerators has become a key concerned issue because it can cause excessive radioactivity from the accelerators therefore significantly limits their applications in industry, medicine, and national defense. Some general engineering methods for chaos control have been developed in recent years, but they generally are unsuccessful for beam halo-chaos suppression due to many technical constraints. Beam halo-chaos is essentially a spatiotemporal chaotic motion within a high power proton accelerator. In this paper, some efficient nonlinear control methods, including wavelet function feedback control as a special nonlinear control method, are proposed for controlling beam halo-chaos under five kinds of the initial proton beam distributions (i.e., Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky, full Gauss,3-sigma Gauss, water-bag, and parabola distributions) respectively. Particles-in-cell simulations show that after control of beam halo-chaos, the beam halo strength factor is reduced to zero, and other statistical physical quantities of beam halo-chaos are doubly reduced. The methods we developed is very effective for suppression of proton beam halo-chaos in a periodic focusing channel of accelerator. Some potential application of the beam halo-chaos control in experiments is finally pointed out.

  3. Positron acceleration by plasma wake fields driven by a hollow electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, J P

    2014-01-01

    A scheme of wake field generation for positron acceleration using hollow or donut shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular shaped, electron free region forms around a hollow driver beam creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing and radially linear) for positron acceleration. Accelerating gradients of the order of 10 GV/m are produced by a hollow electron beam driver with FACET like parameters. The peak accelerating field increases linearly with the total charge in the beam driver while the axial size of the favorable region ($\\sim$ one plasma wavelength) remains approximately fixed. The radial size drops with the total charge but remains large enough for the placement of a witness positron beam. We simulate an efficient acceleration of a 23 GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4\\% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm.

  4. Measurement of stability of electron beam generated by laser-driven plasma-based accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, S; Miura, E; Koyama, K; Kato, S [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: shi-masuda@aist.go.jp

    2008-05-01

    Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with the energy of 30-80 MeV and large number of electrons more than 10{sup 8} were produced by focusing a 8TW, 50 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse onto 1.6-1.9 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas. Stability of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generation was evaluated using an in-situ observation system for the electron beam diagnostics.

  5. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  6. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-01

    The LHeC is envisioned as a natural upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multipass superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) operating in a continuous wave mode. The unprecedently high energy of the multipass ERL combined with a stringent emittance dilution budget poses new challenges for the beam optics. Here, we investigate the performances of a novel arc architecture based on a flexible momentum compaction lattice that mitigates the effects of synchrotron radiation while containing the bunch lengthening. Extensive beam-dynamics investigations have been performed with placet2, a recently developed tracking code for recirculating machines. They include the first end-to-end tracking and a simulation of the machine operation with a continuous beam. This paper briefly describes the Conceptual Design Report lattice, with an emphasis on possible and proposed improvements that emerged from the beam-dynamics studies. The detector bypass section has been integrated in the lattice, and its design choices are presented here. The stable operation of the ERL with a current up to ˜150 mA in the linacs has been validated in the presence of single- and multibunch wakefields, synchrotron radiation, and beam-beam effects.

  7. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Transport and dosimetric solutions for the ELIMED laser-driven beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Amato, A. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Giove, D. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano (Italy); Korn, G.; Krasa, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Leanza, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Manna, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell' Universitá 2 - 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Marchese, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Margarone, D. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Milluzzo, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Petringa, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Via Messina 829 - 95100 Catania (Italy); Schillaci, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); and others

    2015-10-01

    Within 2017, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) transport beam-line and dosimetric systems for laser-generated beams will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (CZ), inside the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser–Ion Acceleration) interaction room. The beam-line will be composed of two sections: one in vacuum, devoted to the collecting, focusing and energy selection of the primary beam and the second in air, where the ELIMED beam-line dosimetric devices will be located. This paper briefly describes the transport solutions that will be adopted together with the main dosimetric approaches. In particular, the description of an innovative Faraday Cup detector with its preliminary experimental tests will be reported.

  10. Prandtl number of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi; Azumi, Masafumi

    1993-12-01

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The Prandtl number, the ratio between the ion viscosity and the thermal conductivity is obtained for the anomalous transport process which is caused by the self-sustained turbulence in the toroidal plasma. It is found that the Prandtl number is of order unity both for the ballooning mode turbulence in tokamaks and for the interchange mode turbulence in helical system. The influence on the anomalous transport and fluctuation level is evaluated. Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number are also discussed. (author).

  11. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick...... and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  12. An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source and a low energy beam injection system for RFQ operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; Chan, C.F.; McDonald, D.S.

    1992-12-31

    An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source has been developed at LBL for use in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). To date, an H{sup {minus}} current of {approx}40 mA can be obtained from a 5.6-cm-diam aperture with the source operated at a pressure of about 12 m Torr and 50 kW of RF power. In order to match the accelerated H{sup {minus}} beam into the SSC RFQ, a low-energy H{sup {minus}} injection system has been designed. This injector produces an outgoing H{sup {minus}} beam free of electron contamination, with small radius, large convergent angle and small projectional emittance.

  13. Genetic algorithm based active vibration control for a moving flexible smart beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Shi, Ming-li; Wang, Bin; Xie, Zhuo-wei

    2012-05-01

    A rod cylinder based pneumatic driving scheme is proposed to suppress the vibration of a flexible smart beam. Pulse code modulation (PCM) method is employed to control the motion of the cylinder's piston rod for simultaneous positioning and vibration suppression. Firstly, the system dynamics model is derived using Hamilton principle. Its standard state-space representation is obtained for characteristic analysis, controller design, and simulation. Secondly, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize and tune the control gain parameters adaptively based on the specific performance index. Numerical simulations are performed on the pneumatic driving elastic beam system, using the established model and controller with tuned gains by GA optimization process. Finally, an experimental setup for the flexible beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder is constructed. Experiments for suppressing vibrations of the flexible beam are conducted. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pneumatic drive scheme and the adopted control algorithms are feasible. The large amplitude vibration of the first bending mode can be suppressed effectively.

  14. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110 068 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India); Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110 036 (India)

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  15. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  16. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanjia, F., E-mail: tanjia.fatema@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universià di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Fedele, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universià di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); De Nicola, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universià di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S' Angelo, Napoli (Italy); Akhter, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universià di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Jovanović, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-09-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure. - Highlights: • A novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential driven by the ultra-short bunch density is derived in the context of PWF theory. • The spatiotemporal evolution of another externally injected electron beam in the presence plasma wake field is numerically investigated. • A channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field. • A relatively stable axially symmetric hollow beam structure is formed through the evolution.

  17. Design and implementation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Archmiller, M. C.; Goforth, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    The Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment is investigating the avoidance of disruptions in ohmically driven torsaton plasmas as the ratio of vacuum transform to the total transform is changed. To better characterize these plasmas under this wide range of magnetic configurations, a new Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented to measure electron temperature and density profiles. These important internal profile measurements will be incorporated into the V3FIT code to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstruction. The Thomson scattering system uses a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YaG laser. The incident beam is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a baffle system to minimize stray laser light. The beam exits through another Brewster window to an external beam dump. Polarization optics are planned to maximize the scattered light directed to the collection system for the specific scattering geometry of CTH. This work is supported by the USDoE under grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  18. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  19. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golian, Y.; Aslaninejad, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-01-01

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  20. Generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation by a beam-driven plasma antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study how efficiently electromagnetic radiation can be generated by a relativistic electron beam with a gigawatt power level during its injection into a thin magnetized plasma. It is shown that, if the transverse beam and plasma size is compared with the radiation wavelength and the plasma density is modulated along the magnetic field, such a beam-plasma system can radiate electromagnetic waves via the antenna mechanism. We propose a theoretical model describing generation of electromagnetic waves by this plasma antenna and calculate its main radiation characteristics. In the two-dimensional case theoretical predictions on the radiation efficiency are shown to be confirmed by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, and the three-dimensional variant of this theory is used to estimate the peak power of sub-terahertz radiation that can be achieved in beam-plasma experiments in mirror traps.

  1. Performance of a solenoid-driven pulsed molecular-beam source

    OpenAIRE

    Abad, Luis; Bermejo, Dionisio; Herrero, Víctor J.; Santos, J.; Tanarro, Isabel

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of a commonly used pulsed valve for the production of free jets and molecular beams are analyzed in detail. Special attention is paid to the formation of gas pulses providing a quasisteady flow during a certain time interval within the pulse duration, and to the estimation of a scaling parameter (effective diameter) for the description of the flow field. The adequacy of this effective diameter is checked by performing time-of-flight measurements on molecular beams of Ne, N...

  2. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  3. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  4. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  5. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  6. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick and placem...

  7. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  8. Beam extraction from a laser-driven multicharged ion source (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. A.; Logan, B. Grant

    1998-02-01

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source has several potential advantages over existing types and a number of useful applications. The basic principle is that multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity (Ref. Reference 1). Thus, charge state separation downstream is simplified or made unnecessary. Another advantage is that large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted. This type of source could be used for heavy-ion fusion drivers (see Ref. Reference 1) or storage rings. There are also industrial application such as materials processing. We describe conceptual design studies for several specific cases. For example, we discuss extraction and focusing of a 4.1 MV, 144 A beam of Xe16+ ions from an expanding plasma created by an intense laser. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is determined by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The initially diverging beam can be refocused to a small radius or made parallel by a combination of electrostatic and solenoid focusing. Our design studies are carried out first with an envelope code to determine the proper focusing parameters and then with a self-consistent particle code to optimize the beam quality. We present results from both codes and discuss several applications of this type of ion source.

  9. Laser-driven ultraintense proton beams for high energy-density physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Slawomir; Badziak, Jan; Parys, Piotr; Rosinski, Marcin; Wolowski, Jerzy; Szydlowski, Adam; Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A.

    2008-04-01

    The results of studies of high-intensity proton beam generation from thin (1 -- 3μm) solid targets irradiated by 0.35-ps laser pulse of energy up to 15J and intensity up to 2x10^19 W/cm^2 are reported. It is shown that the proton beams of multi-TW power and intensity above 10^18 W/cm^2 at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the Skin-Layer Ponderomotive Acceleration requirements. The laser-protons energy conversion efficiency and proton beam parameters remarkably depend on the target structure. In particular, using a double-layer Au/PS target (plastic covered by 0.1 -- 0.2μm Au front layer) results in two-fold higher conversion efficiency and proton beam intensity than in the case of a plastic target. The values of proton beam intensities attained in our experiment are the highest among the ones measured so far.

  10. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum.

  11. A fast GPU-based approach to branchless distance-driven projection and back-projection in cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlifske, Daniel; Medeiros, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Modern CT image reconstruction algorithms rely on projection and back-projection operations to refine an image estimate in iterative image reconstruction. A widely-used state-of-the-art technique is distance-driven projection and back-projection. While the distance-driven technique yields superior image quality in iterative algorithms, it is a computationally demanding process. This has a detrimental effect on the relevance of the algorithms in clinical settings. A few methods have been proposed for enhancing the distance-driven technique in order to take advantage of modern computer hardware. This paper explores a two-dimensional extension of the branchless method proposed by Samit Basu and Bruno De Man. The extension of the branchless method is named "pre-integration" because it achieves a significant performance boost by integrating the data before the projection and back-projection operations. It was written with Nvidia's CUDA platform and carefully designed for massively parallel GPUs. The performance and the image quality of the pre-integration method were analyzed. Both projection and back-projection are significantly faster with preintegration. The image quality was analyzed using cone beam image reconstruction algorithms within Jeffrey Fessler's Image Reconstruction Toolbox. Images produced from regularized, iterative image reconstruction algorithms using the pre-integration method show no significant impact to image quality.

  12. Intense laser-driven ion beams in the relativistic-transparency regime: acceleration, control and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan C.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically-induced transparency have been harnessed to generate efficiently intense ion beams with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at ``table-top'' scales. We have discovered and utilized a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric ( 0.1 TV/m) and magnetic ( 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion-energy (Ei) spread after the laser exits the plasma, thus separating acceleration from spread reduction. In this way we routinely generate aluminum and carbon beams with narrow spectral peaks at Ei up to 310 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, with high efficiency ( 5%). The experimental demonstration has been done at the LANL Trident laser with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.65 ps Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick. In this regime, Ei scales empirically with laser intensity (I) as I 1 / 2. Our progress is enabled by high-fidelity, massive computer simulations of the experiments. This work advances next-generation compact accelerators suitable for new applications. E . g ., a carbon beam with Ei 400 MeV and 10% energy spread is suitable for fast ignition (FI) of compressed DT. The observed scaling suggests that is feasible with existing target fabrication and PW-laser technologies, using a sub-ps laser pulse with I 2.5 ×1021 W/cm2. These beams have been used on Trident to generate warm-dense matter at solid-densities, enabling us to investigate its equation of state and mixing of heterogeneous interfaces purely by plasma effects distinct from hydrodynamics. They also drive an intense neutron-beam source with great promise for important applications such as active interrogation of shielded nuclear materials. Considerations on controlling ion-beam divergence for their increased utility are discussed. Funded by the LANL LDRD program.

  13. Reduction of angular divergence of laser-driven ion beams during their acceleration and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakova, M.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma physics is a field of big interest because of its implications in basic science, fast ignition, medicine (i.e. hadrontherapy), astrophysics, material science, particle acceleration etc. 100-MeV class protons accelerated from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin target have been demonstrated. With continuing development of laser technology, greater and greater energies are expected, therefore projects focusing on various applications are being formed, e.g. ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration). One of the main characteristic and crucial disadvantage of ion beams accelerated by ultra-short intense laser pulses is their large divergence, not suitable for the most of applications. In this paper two ways how to decrease beam divergence are proposed. Firstly, impact of different design of targets on beam divergence is studied by using 2D Particlein-cell simulations (PIC). Namely, various types of targets include at foils, curved foil and foils with diverse microstructures. Obtained results show that well-designed microstructures, i.e. a hole in the center of the target, can produce proton beam with the lowest divergence. Moreover, the particle beam accelerated from a curved foil has lower divergence compared to the beam from a flat foil. Secondly, another proposed method for the divergence reduction is using of a magnetic solenoid. The trajectories of the laser accelerated particles passing through the solenoid are modeled in a simple Matlab program. Results from PIC simulations are used as input in the program. The divergence is controlled by optimizing the magnetic field inside the solenoid and installing an aperture in front of the device.

  14. Analysis of longitudinal bunching in an FEL driven two-beam accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidia, S.; Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Donohue, J.T.; Gouard, P.; Rullier, J.L.; Vermare, C.

    2000-08-01

    Recent experiments have explored the use of a free-electron laser (FEL) as a buncher for a microwave two-beam accelerator, and the subsequent driving of a standing-wave rf output cavity. Here the authors present a deeper analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of the electron bunches as they are transported from the end of the FEL and through the output cavity. In particular, the authors examine the effect of the transport region and cavity aperture to filter the bunched portion of the beam.

  15. Photonic-based laser driven electron beam deflection and focusing structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Plettner

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dielectric photonic structure for ultrafast deflection and focusing of relativistic charged particle beams. The structure is designed to transform a free-space laser beam into a deflection force that acts on the free particles with the same optical phase over a distance of travel that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The proposed structure has a two-dimensional geometry and is compatible with existing nanofabrication methods. Deflection fields of GV/m magnitude and subfemtosecond switching speeds are expected to be possible from these dielectric structures. With these elements a submeter scale extreme ultraviolet synchrotron source seems feasible.

  16. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  17. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roth, Markus [Technische Universitaet, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  18. Position indicating split toroid for the RACE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, B. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)]. E-mail: bhurst@mail.utexas.edu; Folkman, K. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Aspects of the recent reactor accelerator coupled experiments (RACE) carried out at University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory will be discussed. In particular, a compact instrument that allowed a continuous non-invasive means of determining the relative electron beam position was developed. The operation of the instrument is similar to an inductive current pick up toroid except that the core is sectioned radially, which allows spatial information to be derived from the induced voltages. Results of initial tests, both in beam and with a pulser, will be presented along with plans to optimize future designs.

  19. Isochoric heating of solid gold targets with the PW-laser-driven ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Sven; Ji, Qing; Bulanov, Stepan; Barnard, John; Schenkel, Thomas; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-01

    We present an end-to-end simulation for isochoric heating of solid gold targets using ion beams produced with the BELLA PW laser at LBNL: (i) 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are applied to study the ion source characteristics of the PW laser-target interaction at the long focal length (f/#65) beamline at laser intensities of 5x1019W/cm2 at spot size of ω0 = 52 μm on a CH target. (ii) In order to transport the ion beams to an EMP-free environment, an active plasma lens will be used. This was modeled by calculating the Twiss parameters of the ion beam from the appropriate transport matrixes using the source parameters obtained from the PIC simulation. Space charge effects were considered as well. (iii) Hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these ion beams can isochorically heat a 1 mm3 gold target to the Warm Dense Matter state. This work was supported by Fusion Energy Science, and LDRD funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, provided by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  1. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  2. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  3. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    CERN Document Server

    Tanjia, F; De Nicola, S; Akhter, T; Jovanovic, D

    2015-01-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure.

  4. Ultrasmall divergence of laser-driven ion beams from nanometer thick foils

    CERN Document Server

    Bin, J H; Allinger, K; Wang, H Y; Kiefer, D; Reinhardt, S; Hilz, P; Khrennikov, K; Karsch, S; Yan, X Q; Krausz, F; Tajima, T; Habs, D; Schreiber, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on experimental studies of divergence of proton beams from nanometer thick diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils irradiated by an intense laser with high contrast. Proton beams with extremely small divergence (half angle) of 2 degree are observed in addition with a remarkably well-collimated feature over the whole energy range, showing one order of magnitude reduction of the divergence angle in comparison to the results from micrometer thick targets. We demonstrate that this reduction arises from a steep longitudinal electron density gradient and an exponentially decaying transverse profile at the rear side of the ultrathin foils. Agreements are found both in an analytical model and in particle-in-cell simulations. Those novel features make nm foils an attractive alternative for high flux experiments relevant for fundamental research in nuclear and warm dense matter physics.

  5. On the small divergence of laser-driven ion beams from nanometer thick foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin, J. H.; Ma, W. J.; Allinger, K.; Kiefer, D.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Krausz, F.; Habs, D.; Schreiber, J. [Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wang, H. Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Reinhardt, S.; Hilz, P.; Tajima, T. [Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Yan, X. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-07-15

    We report on experimental studies of divergence of proton beams from nanometer thick diamond-like carbon foils irradiated by a linearly polarized intense laser with high contrast. Proton beams with extremely small divergence (half angle) of 2° are observed in addition with a remarkably well-collimated feature over the whole energy range, showing one order of magnitude reduction of the divergence angle in comparison to the results from μm thick targets. Similar features are reproduced in two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with parameters representing our experiments, indicating a strong influence from the electron density distribution on the divergence of protons. Our comprehensive experimental study reveals grand opportunities for using nm foils in experiments that require high ion flux and small divergence.

  6. Laser-driven electron beam generation for secondary photon sources with few terawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohacek, K.; Chaulagain, U.; Horny, V.; Kozlova, M.; Krus, M.; Nejdl, J.

    2017-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams accelerated by laser wakefield have the ability to serve as sources of collimated, point-like and femtosecond X-ray radiation. Experimental conditions for generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches using a femtosecond few-terawatt laser pulse (600 mJ, 50 fs) were investigated as they are crucial for generation of stable betatron radiation and X-ray pulses from inverse Compton scattering. A mixture of helium with argon, and helium with an admixture of synthetic air were tested for this purpose using different backing pressures and the obtained results are compared. The approach to use synthetic air was previously proven to stabilize the energy and energy spread of the generated electron beams at the given laser power. The accelerator was operated in nonlinear regime with forced self-injection and resulted in the generation of stable relativistic electron beams with an energy of tens of MeV and betatron X-ray radiation was generated in the keV range. A razor blade was tested to create a steep density gradient in order to improve the stability of electron injection and to increase the total electron bunch charge. It was proven that the stable electron and X-ray source can be built at small-scale facilities, which readily opens possibilities for various applications due to availability of such few-terawatt laser systems in many laboratories around the world.

  7. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, E. L.; Hartemann, F.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Divol, L.; Robey, H. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Döppner, T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10 × higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma.

  8. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  9. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H., E-mail: bdeng@trialphaenergy.com; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  10. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B. H.; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 1016 m-2 at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  11. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  12. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  13. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinigardi, Stefano, E-mail: sinigardi@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Bolton, Paul R. [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), Umemidai 8-1-7, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2014-03-11

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15M€. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  14. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  15. Second harmonic electromagnetic emission of a turbulent magnetized plasma driven by a powerful electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2012-01-01

    The power of second harmonic electromagnetic emission is calculated for the case when strong plasma turbulence is excited by a powerful electron beam in a magnetized plasma. It is shown that the simple analytical model of strong plasma turbulence with the assumption of a constant pump power is able to explain experimentally observed bursts of electromagnetic radiation as a consequence of separate collapse events. It is also found that the electromagnetic emission power calculated for three-wave interaction processes occurring in the long-wavelength part of turbulent spectrum is in order-of-magnitude agreement with experimental results.

  16. Experiments on current-driven three-dimensional ion sound turbulence. I - Return-current limited electron beam injection. II - Wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed electron beam injection into a weakly collisional magnetized background plasma is investigated experimentally; properties of the electron beam and background plasma, as well as the low-frequency instabilities and wave dynamics, are discussed. The current of the injected beam closes via a field-aligned return current of background electrons. Through study of the frequency and wavenumber distribution, together with the electron distribution function, the low-frequency instabilities associated with the pulsed injection are identified as ion acoustic waves driven unstable by the return current. The frequency cut-off of the instabilities predicted from renormalized plasma turbulence theory, has been verified experimentally.

  17. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, C. A.; Lin, L.

    2016-05-01

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  18. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Johnson, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, Auburn University 206 Allison Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q{sub 0} by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  19. Numerical simulations of generation of high-energy ion beams driven by a petawatt femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domański Jarosław

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents results of a Particle-in-Cell simulation of ion beam acceleration via the interaction of a petawatt 25 fs laser pulse of high intensity (up to ~1021 W/cm2 with thin hydrocarbon (CH and erbium hydride (ErH3 targets of equal areal mass density (of 0.6 g/m2. A special attention is paid to the effect that the laser pulse polarization and the material composition of the target have on the maximum ion energies and the number of high energy (>10 MeV protons. It is shown that both the mean and the maximum ion energies are higher for the linear polarization than for the circular one. A comparison of the maximum proton energies and the total number of protons generated from the CH and ErH3 targets using a linearly polarized beam is presented. For the ErH3 targets the maximum proton energies are higher and they reach 50 MeV for the laser pulse intensity of 1021 W/cm2. The number of protons with energies higher than 10 MeV is an order of magnitude higher for the ErH3 targets than that for the CH targets.

  20. Relativistic electron beams driven by single-cycle laser pulses at kHz repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Jérôme; Guénot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Böhle, Frederik; López-Martens, Rodrigo; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators are usually driven by 100-TW class laser systems with rather low repetition rates. However, recent years have seen the emergence of laser-plasma accelerators operating with kHz lasers and energies lower than 10 mJ. The high repetition-rate is particularly interesting for applications requiring high stability and high signal-to-noise ratio but lower energy electrons. For example, our group recently demonstrated that kHz laser-driven electron beams could be used to capture ultrafast structural dynamics in Silicon nano-membranes via electron diffraction with picosecond resolution. In these first experiments, electrons were injected in the density gradients located at the plasma exit, resulting in rather low energies in the 100 keV range. The electrons being nonrelativistic, the bunch duration quickly becomes picosecond long. Relativistic energies are required to mitigate space charge effects and maintain femtosecond bunches. In this paper, we will show very recent results where electrons are accelerated in laser-driven wakefields to relativistic energies, reaching up to 5 MeV at kHz repetition rate. The electron energy was increased by nearly two orders of magnitude by using single-cycle laser pulses of 3.5 fs, with only 2.5 mJ of energy. Using such short pulses of light allowed us to resonantly excite high amplitude and nonlinear plasma waves at high plasma density, ne=1.5-2×1020 cm-3, in a regime close to the blow-out regime. Electrons had a peaked distribution around 5 MeV, with a relative energy spread of 30 %. Charges in the 100's fC/shot and up to pC/shot where measured depending on plasma density. The electron beam was fairly collimated, 20 mrad divergence at Full Width Half Maximum. The results show remarkable stability of the beam parameters in terms of beam pointing and electron distribution. 3D PIC simulations reproduce the results very well and indicate that electrons are injected by the ionization of Nitrogen atoms, N5+ to N6

  1. Electron-beam-ignited, high-frequency-driven vacuum ultraviolet excimer light source

    CERN Document Server

    Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Krücken, R; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    Transformation of a table-top electron beam sustained 2.45 GHz RF discharge in rare gases into a self burning discharge has been observed for increasing RF-amplitude. Thereby, the emission spectrum undergoes significant changes in a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared. A strong increase of VUV excimer emission is observed for the self burning discharge. The so called first excimer continuum, in particular, shows a drastic increase in intensity. For argon this effect results in a brilliant light source emitting near the 105 nm short wavelength cutoff of LiF windows. The appearance of a broad-band continuum in the UV and visible range as well as effects of RF excitation on the atomic line radiation and the so called third excimer continuum are briefly described.

  2. Breakdown Limits on Gigavolt-per-Meter Electron-Beam-Driven Wakefields in Dielectric Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A. M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    First measurements of the breakdown threshold in a dielectric subjected to GV/m wakefields produced by short (30 330 fs), 28.5 GeV electron bunches have been made. Fused silica tubes of 100μm inner diameter were exposed to a range of bunch lengths, allowing surface dielectric fields up to 27GV/m to be generated. The onset of breakdown, detected through light emission from the tube ends, is observed to occur when the peak electric field at the dielectric surface reaches 13.8±0.7GV/m. The correlation of structure damage to beam-induced breakdown is established using an array of postexposure inspection techniques.

  3. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...... implementation is simulated using finite element modeling and the DC and AC resistance of the inductors are verified with experimental measurements on prototypes. It is found that commercial available layer thickness of printed circuit boards is a bottleneck for high power applications. Furthermore, the winding...

  4. rf breakdown measurements in electron beam driven 200 GHz copper and copper-silver accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; O'Shea, Brendan; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in subterahertz high-gradient traveling-wave accelerating structures. We present the experimental results of rf tests of 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, made of copper and copper-silver. These experiments were carried out at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. The traveling-wave structure is an open geometry, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated by a gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 160 to 235 GHz. When the beam travels off axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the longitudinal field. We measure the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and use this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. Furthermore, we present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures. The breakdown rate of the copper structure is 10-2 per pulse, with a peak surface electric field of 500 MV /m and a rf pulse length of 0.3 ns, which at a relatively large gap of 1.5 mm, or one wavelength, corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 56 MV /m . For the same breakdown rate, the copper-silver structure has a peak electric field of 320 MV /m at a pulse length of 0.5 ns. For a gap of 1.1 mm, or 0.74 wavelengths, this corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 50 MV /m .

  5. Generation of High Brightness Electron Beams via Ionization Induced Injection by Transverse Colliding Lasers in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F; Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Cheng, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2013-01-01

    The production of ultra-bright electron bunches using ionization injection triggered by two transversely colliding laser pulses inside a beam-driven plasma wake is examined via three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The relatively low intensity lasers are polarized along the wake axis and overlap with the wake for a very short time. The result is that the residual momentum of the ionized electrons in the transverse plane of the wake is much reduced and the injection is localized along the propagation axis of the wake. This minimizes both the initial 'thermal' emittance and the emittance growth due to transverse phase mixing. 3D PIC simulations show that ultra-short (around 8 fs) high-current (0.4 kA) electron bunches with a normalized emittance of 8.5 and 6 nm in the two planes respectively and a brightness greater than 1.7*10e19 A rad-2 m-2 can be obtained for realistic parameters.

  6. Instability of Non-uniform Toroidal Magnetic Fields in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Kota

    2016-01-01

    A new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk is presented. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to a magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of this growing eigenmode, to which we give a name "magneto-gradient driven instability", is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to...

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic calculations with a nonmonotonic q profile and equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, E.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Center for Plasma Theory and Computation; Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Fusion Energy Div.

    1998-07-01

    The linear and nonlinear stability of a nonmonotonic q profile is examined using a reduced set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with an equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow. The reversed shear profile is shown to be unstable to a rich variety of resistive MHD modes including pressure-driven instabilities and tearing instabilities possessing a tearing/interchange character at low Lundquist number, S, and taking on a double/triple tearing structure at high S. Linear calculations show that the destabilizing effect of toroidal velocity shear on tearing modes is enhanced at finite pressure seen previously for tearing modes at high S. Nonlinear calculations show the generation of a large, m = 1, n = 0, Reynolds-stress-driven poloidal flow in the absence of significant flow damping. Calculations in which the poloidal flow was heavily damped show that sub-Alfvenic, sheared toroidal flows have a minimal effect on weakly-coupled, localized instabilities.

  8. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  9. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaohui; Liu, Yifang; Li, Anlin; Zhou, Zhou; Sun, Daoheng; Wang, Lingyun

    2016-01-26

    A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE) simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale) in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  10. Diffusion-driven growth of nanowires by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda-Fonseca, P.; Orrù, M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Bellet-Amalric, E.; Robin, E. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Den Hertog, M.; Genuist, Y.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Cibert, J., E-mail: joel.cibert@neel.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-28

    With ZnTe as an example, we use two different methods to unravel the characteristics of the growth of nanowires (NWs) by gold-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature. In the first approach, CdTe insertions have been used as markers, and the nanowires have been characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy, including geometrical phase analysis and energy dispersive electron spectrometry; the second approach uses scanning electron microscopy and the statistics of the relationship between the length of the tapered nanowires and their base diameter. Axial and radial growth are quantified using a diffusion-limited model adapted to the growth conditions; analytical expressions describe well the relationship between the NW length and the total molecular flux (taking into account the orientation of the effusion cells), and the catalyst-nanowire contact area. A long incubation time is observed. This analysis allows us to assess the evolution of the diffusion lengths on the substrate and along the nanowire sidewalls, as a function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometric flux.

  11. Irradiation facility for boron neutron capture therapy application based on a rf-driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Leung, K. N.

    2002-02-01

    Selecting the best neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires optimizing neutron beam parameters. This involves solving many complex problems. Safety issues related to the use of nuclear reactor in hospital environments, as well as lower costs have led to interest in the development of accelerator-driven neutron sources. The BNCT research programs at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC) focus on studies of new concepts for accelerator-based DT neutron sources. Simple and compact accelerator designs using relatively low deuteron beam energy, ˜100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New studies have been started for optimization of moderator materials for the 14.1 MeV DT neutrons. Our aim is to obtain an epithermal neutron beam for therapeutic application at the exit end, with minimal beam intensity losses, the specific goal is to achieve an epithermal neutron flux of at least of 1×109 n/cm2 s at the beam port, with low gamma and fast neutron dose contamination. According to the most recent neutron BNCT beam parameters some moderating and spectrum shifter materials and geometrical configurations have thus far been tested, and neutron and gamma beam data at beam port have been computed. A possible beam shaping assembly model has been designed. This research demonstrates that a DT neutron source could be successfully implemented for BNCT application, with performance surpassing the minimum requirements stated above, using DT neutron sources with yields in the range 1013-1014 n/s. The latest Monte Carlo simulation results of an accelerator based facility which relies on a rf-driven DT fusion neutron generator will be presented.

  12. MHD stability of configurations with distorted toroidal coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.A.; Ardela, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-06-01

    We have investigated the local ideal MHD stability properties of a compact tokamak/torsatron configuration that models the proposed EPEIUS device. The {beta} limits imposed by the Mercier criterion and ballooning modes approach 1% in 50 kA peaked toroidal current and in current-free cases. A sequence at {beta}=6.75% is demonstrated to become marginally stable to local modes when the 180 kA toroidal current prescribed becomes sufficiently hollow that the maximum value of the inverse rotational transform q{sub max} exceeds 5 and the minimum value q{sub min} near the plasma edge approaches 2. The stabilisation mechanism is associated with the shape of the flux surface average of the parallel current density {sigma}>. A {sigma}> profile that increases in magnitude radially exercises a strong stabilizing influence on the energy principle. In the outer half of the plasma volume, the Mercier criterion (and to a lesser extent the ballooning eigenvalue) displays very local unstable spikes that align with rational values of 1/(qL). We interpret this as a potential for pressure-driven island formation rather than a strict stability limit. This phenomenon requires more detailed investigation using equilibrium codes that can study magnetic island structures. Global internal and external mode stability properties must also be examined, particularly for hollow current profile cases where the large toroidal plasma current concentrated near the plasma edge could destabilize external modes. (author) 1 fig., 5 refs.

  13. Ballooning mode spectrum in general toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R.L.; Glasser, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    A WKB formalism for constructing normal modes of short-wavelength ideal hydromagnetic, pressure-driven instabilities (ballooning modes) in general toroidal magnetic containment devices with sheared magnetic fields is developed. No incompressibility approximation is made. A dispersion relation is obtained from the eigenvalues of a fourth order system of ordinary differential equations to be solved by integrating along a line of force. Higher order calculations are performed to find the amplitude equation and the phase change at a caustic. These conform to typical WKB results. In axisymmetric systems, the ray equations are integrable, and semiclassical quantization leads to a growth rate spectrum consisting of an infinity of discrete eigenvalues, bounded above by an accumulation point. However, each eigenvalue is infinitely degenerate. In the nonaxisymmetric case, the rays are unbounded in a four dimensional phase space, and semiclassical quantization breaks down, leading to broadening of the discrete eigenvalues and accumulation point of the axisymmetric case into continuum bands. Analysis of a model problem indicates that the broadening of the discrete eigenvalues is numerically very small, the dominant effect being broadening of the accumulation point.

  14. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  15. Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pincha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2008-05-01

    The mode-independent part of the magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TurCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007)], which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmiU∥R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms that exist in a simpler geometry.

  16. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  17. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    In this paper we study the simple case of the dynamics of a density perturbation localized in the edge region of a medium sized tokamak in a full 3D geometry. The 2D evolution of such a perturbation has been studied in details on the low-field side, where the gradient of the magnetic field always...... dynamics in a full 3D tokamak geometry including the edge and SOL region as well. Previous studies with the ATTEMPT code proved that density blobs appear for typical parameters in the TEXTOR tokamak. The code has been prepared for flux driven simulations with detailed control of the blob initial state....... The DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak...

  18. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  19. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  20. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Jochen, E-mail: wilms@physik.uni-kiel.de; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Reichstein, Torben [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); DME, Kiel University of Applied Sciences, Grenzstr. 3, D-24147 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  1. Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

  2. High-Quality-Factor Mid-Infrared Toroidal Excitation in Folded 3D Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Du, Shuo; Cui, Ajuan; Li, Zhancheng; Fan, Yuancheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2017-05-01

    With unusual electromagnetic radiation properties and great application potentials, optical toroidal moments have received increasing interest in recent years. 3D metamaterials composed of split ring resonators with specific orientations in micro-/nanoscale are a perfect choice for toroidal moment realization in optical frequency considering the excellent magnetic confinement and quality factor, which, unfortunately, are currently beyond the reach of existing micro-/nanofabrication techniques. Here, a 3D toroidal metamaterial operating in mid-infrared region constructed by metal patterns and dielectric frameworks is designed, by which high-quality-factor toroidal resonance is observed experimentally. The toroidal dipole excitation is confirmed numerically and further demonstrated by phase analysis. Furthermore, the far-field radiation intensity of the excited toroidal dipoles can be adjusted to be predominant among other multipoles by just tuning the incident angle. The related processing method expands the capability of focused ion beam folding technologies greatly, especially in 3D metamaterial fabrication, showing great flexibility and nanoscale controllability on structure size, position, and orientation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, Francisco [New York Univ. (NYU), Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  4. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  5. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T.

    2016-11-01

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  6. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T., E-mail: dosin@trialphaenergy.com [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  7. Investigation of a radio frequency-driven multicusp ion source of the diagnostic neutral beam for the Hanbit device at Korea Basic Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. L.; Yoo, S. J.; Hwang, S. M.; Chung, K. H.

    2000-02-01

    A radio frequency-driven multicusp ion source has been fabricated and tested as a part of the development of a diagnostic neutral beam for the Hanbit magnetic mirror device [S. M. Hwang et al., Trans. Fusion Technol. 35, 99 (1999)]. Hydrogen plasma produced by a three-and-one-half turn antenna and rf power system with 2.5 kW, continuous wave (cw) 1.874 MHz was extracted through a single-aperture accel-decel system. The first results of the ion beam extraction experiments are described in this article.

  8. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  9. Design and implementation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The initial system takes a single point measurement and will be used to assess options for an upgrade to a multi-point system providing electron temperature and density profiles. This single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both ohmically driven, current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. A principle design goal is to minimize stray laser light, geometrically on the machine side and spectrally on the collection side, to allow measurements of both full and half Thomson scattered spectral profiles. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize stray light. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f / # ~ 1 aspheric lens, a Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. The estimated number of scattered photons per channel will be of the order of 5 ×103 with a signal to noise ratio of S / N = 19 This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Slow-Wave Instabilities in Oversized Sinusoidaly Corrugated Waveguide Driven by Finitely Thick Annular Electron Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Otubo, Kosuke; Ogura, Kazuo; Yamakawa, Mitsuhisa; Takashima, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    Three kinds of models are used for beam instability analyses: those based on a solid beam, an infinitesimally thin annular beam, and a finitely thick annular beam. In high-power experiments, the electron beam is an annulus of finite thickness. In this paper, a numerical code for a sinusoidally corrugated waveguide with a finitely thick annular beam is presented and compared with other models. Our analysis is based on a new version of the self-consistent linear theory that takes into account t...

  11. Nondiffusive toroidal-momentum-transport in the JFT-2M tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae; Matsuda, Toshiaki

    1998-12-01

    A nondiffusive term in the toroidal-momentum-transport equation is evaluated by the analysis of the transport of toroidal rotation in the transient phase, where the direction of neutral beam injection is changed from parallel to the plasma current to antiparallel. The ratio of nondiffusive viscosity coefficient to diffusive viscosity coefficient is evaluated to be 0.1 to 0.3, which increases as the plasma current is decreased. Nondiffusive momentum transport is found to be in proportion to {nabla}T{sub i}. (author)

  12. Experiments on a relativistic magnetron driven by a microsecond electron beam accelerator with a ceramic insulating stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mike Rodriguez

    2003-10-01

    Relativistic magnetron experiments with a 6-vane, Titan tube have generated over 300 MW total microwave output power near 1 GHz. These experiments were driven by a long-pulse, e-beam accelerator. Parameters of the device were voltage = -0.3 to -0.4 MV, current = 1--10 kA, and pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. This body of work investigated pulse-shortening in the relativistic magnetron. Microwave generation with a conventional plastic insulator was compared to that with a new ceramic insulator. The ceramic insulator improved the vacuum by an order of magnitude (1 x 10-7 Torr) and increased voltage stability of the accelerator. The effect of RF breakdown in the waveguide on the intensity and duration of high power microwaves were also investigated. These experiments found that when SF6 gas was introduced into the waveguide, the measured efficiency, power, and pulselength of microwaves increased. Two different microwave extraction mechanisms were used. In the first system, two waveguides were connected to the magnetron pi-radians from each other. The second system used three waveguides to connect to the magnetron's extraction ports at 2pi/3 radians from each other. Microwaves were extracted into and measured from the waveguide. Pulselengths were found to be in the range of 10--200 ns. The theoretical investigation calculates the maximum injected current for a time-independent cycloidal flow in a relativistic, magnetically insulated diode. The analytical theory of Lovelace-Ott was extended by relaxing the space charge limited (SCL) assumption. This theory reduced to Christenson's results in the deeply non-relativistic regime, and to Lovelace-Ott under SCL. This theory has been successfully tested against relativistic PIC code simulations.

  13. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  14. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  15. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  16. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  17. Toroidal eigenmodes in all-dielectric metamolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Tsilipakos, Odysseas; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2016-11-01

    We present a thorough investigation of the electromagnetic resonant modes supported by systems of polaritonic rods placed at the vertices of canonical polygons. The study is conducted with rigorous finite-element eigenvalue simulations. To provide physical insight, the simulations are complemented with coupled mode theory (the analog of LCAO in molecular and solid state physics) and a lumped wire model capturing the coupling-caused reorganizations of the currents in each rod. The systems of rods, which form all-dielectric cyclic metamolecules, are found to support the unconventional toroidal dipole mode, consisting of the magnetic dipole mode in each rod. Besides the toroidal modes, the spectrally adjacent collective modes are identified. The evolution of all resonant frequencies with rod separation is examined. They are found to oscillate about the single-rod magnetic dipole resonance, a feature attributed to the leaky nature of the constituent modes. Importantly, we observe that ensembles of an odd number of rods produce larger frequency separation between the toroidal mode and its neighbor than the ones with an even number of rods. This increased spectral isolation, along with the low quality factor exhibited by the toroidal mode, favors the coupling of the commonly silent toroidal dipole to the outside world, rendering the proposed structure a prime candidate for controlling the observation of toroidal excitations and their interaction with the usually present electric dipole.

  18. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Acceleration and evolution of a hollow electron beam in wakefields driven by a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Chen, Min, E-mail: minchen@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanyunma@126.com; Luo, Ji; Zeng, Ming; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Li, Fei-Yu [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Ma, Yan-Yun, E-mail: minchen@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanyunma@126.com; Yu, Tong-Pu [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Sheng, Zheng-Ming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    We show that a ring-shaped hollow electron beam can be injected and accelerated by using a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse and ionization-induced injection in a laser wakefield accelerator. The acceleration and evolution of such a hollow, relativistic electron beam are investigated through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that both the ring size and the beam thickness oscillate during the acceleration. The beam azimuthal shape is angularly dependent and evolves during the acceleration. The beam ellipticity changes resulting from the electron angular momenta obtained from the drive laser pulse and the focusing forces from the wakefield. The dependence of beam ring radius on the laser-plasma parameters (e.g., laser intensity, focal size, and plasma density) is studied. Such a hollow electron beam may have potential applications for accelerating and collimating positively charged particles.

  20. Optical force on toroidal nanostructures: toroidal dipole versus renormalized electric dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xu-Lin; Lin, Zhifang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical forces acting on toroidal nanostructures. A great enhancement of optical force is unambiguously identified as originating from the toroidal dipole resonance based on the source-representation, where the distribution of the induced charges and currents is characterized by the three families of electric, magnetic, and toroidal multipoles. On the other hand, the resonant optical force can also be completely attributed to an electric dipole resonance in the alternative field-representation, where the electromagnetic fields in the source-free region are expressed by two sets of electric and magnetic multipole fields based on symmetry. The confusion is resolved by conceptually introducing the irreducible electric dipole, toroidal dipole, and renormalized electric dipole. We demonstrate that the optical force is a powerful tool to identify toroidal response even when its scattering intensity is dwarfed by the conventional electric and magnetic multipoles.

  1. Effects of energetic particles on zonal flow generation by toroidal Alfven eigenmode

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Generation of zonal ow (ZF) by energetic particle (EP) driven toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that, nonlinear resonant EP contri- bution dominates over the usual Reynolds and Maxwell stresses due to thermal plasma nonlinear response. ZF can be forced driven in the linear growth stage of TAE, with the growth rate being twice the TAE growth rate. The ZF generation mechanism is shown to be related to polarization induced by resonant EP nonlinearity. The generated ZF has both the usual meso-scale and micro- scale radial structures. Possible consequences of this forced driven ZF on the nonlinear dynamics of TAE are also discussed.

  2. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavy ion beams via staged shock wave acceleration driven by intense laser pulses in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Huang, T. W.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration potentially offers a compact, cost-effective alternative to conventional accelerators for scientific, technological, and health-care applications. A novel scheme for heavy ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas via staged shock waves driven by intense laser pulses is proposed, where, in front of the heavy ion target, a light ion layer is used for launching a high-speed electrostatic shock wave. This shock is enhanced at the interface before it is transmitted into the heavy ion plasmas. Monoenergetic heavy ion beam with much higher energy can be generated by the transmitted shock, comparing to the shock wave acceleration in pure heavy ion target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic {{{C}}}6+ ion beams with peak energy 168 MeV and considerable particle number 2.1 × {10}11 are obtained by laser pulses at intensity of 1.66 × {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2 in such staged shock wave acceleration scheme. Similarly a high-quality {{Al}}10+ ion beam with a well-defined peak with energy 250 MeV and spread δ E/{E}0=30 % can also be obtained in this scheme.

  3. Generation of rotational flows in toroidally confined visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the generation of rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid. A current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described. Two different toroidal geometries are considered, one with an up-down symmetric and the other with an asymmetric cross section. We show that there exists a fundamental difference between both studied cases: the volume-averaged angular momentum is zero for the symmetric case, while for the asymmetric cross section a finite volume-averaged angular momentum appears. We observe a breaking in the up-down symmetry of the flow and a toroidal preferred direction emerges.

  4. Controllability of driven current profile in ECCD on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamatsu, K.; Fukuyama, A

    2001-01-01

    The controllability of current profile driven by the fundamental resonance of the O-mode wave is examined for the parameters of the Intermediate Aspect ratio Machine option of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The driven current is numerically evaluated by using the full relativistic adjoint method which we have extended from the non-relativistic one. By changing both the toroidal and poloidal injection angles, the optimum direction to drive a current with maximum current density at the aimed position is obtained. The position of wave launching affects the optimum injection angles and the driven current profile. The dependence of driven current profile on beam divergence is also examined. When the beam is injected from the equatorial plane, the maximum current density is reduced and the width of current profile becomes wide in the outer region of r{>=}0.5a. The localized current profile is kept well within the region of r{>=}0.4a by injection from a location away from the equatorial plane.

  5. Predicted Performance of a Dc Beam Driven Fem Oscillator Designed for Fusion Applications at 200-250 Ghz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caplan, M.; Best, R. W. B.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Urbanus, W. H.; Bratman, V. L.; Denisov, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    At the FOM Institute (The Netherlands) a free electron laser using a dc beam with depressed collector is being developed for plasma heating, which will be capable of producing 1 MW cw output over an adjustable tuning range of 200-250 GHz. The basic design parameters for the electron beam, undulator

  6. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order.

  7. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  8. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2013-01-01

    We study a strongly adsorbed flexible polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In this generalized Thomson problem, the patterns of the adsorbed chain are analyzed in the space of the toroidal coordinates and in terms of the orientation of each chain segment. Various patterns are found, including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori, and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry is quantitatively characterized by introducing an order parameter, an integral of the torsion. The uniform packing, which breaks the mirror symmetry the least, has the lowest value of the order parameter. In addition, it is found that the electrostatic energy of confined chains on tori conforms to a power law regardless of the screening effect in some typical cases studied. Furthermore, we study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations in the large screening limit or at large thermal fluctuation; some features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed.

  9. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftman, D.; Gupta, D.; Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Marsili, P.; Moreno, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation via Wavelength Detuning in Directly Driven Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Marozas, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Radha, P. B.; Cao, D.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) affects directly driven, inertial confinement fusion implosions by reducing the absorbed light and the coupling of driver energy to the target. A mitigation strategy is to detune the laser wavelength of interacting beams (Δλ ≠ 0 ) to reduce the CBET interaction volume. In polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the CBET-imposed energy losses occur predominantly in the equatorial region. The NIF does not support a hemispheric wavelength detuning but does have Δλ capabilities between inner and outer quads. Using a north-south asymmetric beam pointing, it is therefore possible to introduce a hemispheric wavelength difference of up to Δλ = 4.6 Å in the UV. We report on experiments to test this CBET mitigation scheme in PDD experiments on the NIF. Using this asymmetric beam pointing, we have completed experiments with both Δλ = 0 and 4.6 Å. The effect of CBET on the driver-target coupling is diagnosed via implosion velocities, implosion shape, and scattered-light spectra and by comparing experimental data to 2-D DRACO simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Quench modeling of the ATLAS superconducting toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilin, A V; ten Kate, H H J

    2001-01-01

    Details of the normal zone propagation and the temperature distribution in the coils of ATLAS toroids under quench are presented. A tailor-made mathematical model and corresponding computer code enable obtainment of computational results for the propagation process over the coils in transverse (turn-to-turn) and longitudinal directions. The slow electromagnetic diffusion into the pure aluminum stabilizer of the toroid's conductor, as well as the essentially transient heat transfer through inter-turn insulation, is appropriately included in the model. The effect of nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field and the thermal links to the coil casing on the temperature gradients within the coils is analyzed in full. (5 refs).

  12. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  13. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  14. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  15. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  16. Ion temperature and toroidal rotation in JET's low torque plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Giroud, C.; Reyes Cortes, S.; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure developed as the best method to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of the ion temperature Ti and the toroidal velocity vϕ from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) data from intrinsic rotation experiments at the Joint European Torus with the carbon wall. The low impurity content observed in such plasmas, resulting in low active CXRS signal, alongside low Doppler shifts makes the determination of Ti and vϕ particularly difficult. The beam modulation method will be discussed along with the measures taken to increase photon statistics and minimise errors from the absolute calibration and magneto-hydro-dynamics effects that may impact the CXRS passive emission.

  17. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  18. Neutral-beam current-driven high-poloidal-beta operation of the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonen, T. C.; Matsuoka, M.; Bhadra, D. K.; Burrell, K. H.; Callis, R. W.; Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Greene, J. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Hill, D. N.; Kim, J.; Lao, L.; Petersen, P. I.; Porter, G. D.; St. John, H.; Stallard, B. W.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Strait, E. J.; Taylor, T. S.

    1988-10-01

    Neutral-beam current-drive experiments in the DIII-D tokamak with a single null poloidal divertor are described. A plasma current of 0.34 MA has been sustained by neutral beams alone, and the energy confinement is of H-mode quality. Poloidal β values reach 3.5 without disruption or coherent magnetic activity suggesting that these plasmas may be entering the second stability regime.

  19. An overview of intrinsic torque and momentum transport bifurcations in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, P. H.; Kosuga, Y.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; McDevitt, C. J.; Hahm, T. S.; Fedorczak, N.; Rice, J. E.; Wang, W. X.; Ku, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Abiteboul, J.; Wang, L.; Ko, W. H.; Shi, Y. J.; Ida, K.; Solomon, W.; Jhang, H.; Kim, S. S.; Yi, S.; Ko, S. H.; Sarazin, Y.; Singh, R.; Chang, C. S.

    2013-10-01

    An overview of the physics of intrinsic torque is presented, with special emphasis on the phenomenology of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks, its theoretical understanding, and the variety of momentum transport bifurcation dynamics. Ohmic reversals and electron cyclotron heating-driven counter torque are discussed in some detail. Symmetry breaking by lower single null versus upper single null asymmetry is related to the origin of intrinsic torque at the separatrix.

  20. Pyroelectric-field driven defects diffusion along c-axis in ZnO nanobelts under high-energy electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yong, E-mail: yong.ding@mse.gatech.edu; Liu, Ying; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    When ZnO nanobelts are exposed to a high-dose electron probe of several nanometers to hundred nanometers in diameter inside a transmission electron microscope, due to the radiolysis effect, part of oxygen atoms will be ejected into the vacuum and leaving a Zn-ion rich surface with a pit appearance at both the electron-entrance and electron-exit surfaces. At the same time, a temperature distribution is created around the electron probe due to local beam heating effect, which generates a unidirectional pyroelectric field. This pyroelectric field is strong enough to drive Zn ions moving along its positive c-axis direction as interstitial ions. In the first case, for the ZnO nanobelts with c-axis lie in their large surfaces, defects due to the aggregation of Zn interstitial ions will be formed at some distances of 30–50 nm approximately along the c-axis direction from the electron beam illuminated area. Alternatively, for the ZnO nanobelts with ±(0001) planes as their large surfaces, the incident electron beam is along its c-axis and the generated pyroelectric field will drive the interstitial Zn-ions to aggregate at the Zn terminated (0001) surface where the local electrical potential is the lowest. Such electron beam induced damage in ZnO nanostructures is suggested as a result of Zn ion diffusion driven by the temperature gradient induced pyroelectric field along c-axis. Our study shows a radiation damage caused by electron beam in transmission electron microscopy, especially when the electron energy is high.

  1. Toroidal Automorphic Forms for Function Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorscheid, O.

    2008-01-01

    The definition of a toroidal automorphic form is due to Don Zagier, who showed in a paper in 1979 that the vanishing of certain integrals of Eisenstein series over tori in GL(2) is related to the vanishing of the Riemann zeta function at the weight of the Eisenstein series; and thus a relation betwe

  2. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  3. Quantum toroidal algebras and their vertex representations

    CERN Document Server

    Saitô, Y

    1996-01-01

    We construct the vertex representations of the quantum toroidal algebras $U_q({\\frak {sl}}_{n+1,tor})$. In the classical case the vertex representations are not irreducible. However in the quantum case they are irreducible. For n=1, we construct a set of finitely many generators of $U_q({\\frak {sl}}_{2,tor})$.

  4. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  5. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  6. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  7. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  8. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Mantha; A K Mohanty; P Satyamurthy

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically ∼ 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth-eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of ∼ 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  9. Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Peter; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The system takes a single point measurement at the magnetic axis to both calibrate the two- color soft x-ray Te system and serve as an additional diagnostic for the V3FIT 3D equilibrium reconstruction code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line propagates 8 m to the CTH device mid-plane with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. Thomson scattered light is collected by two adjacent f/2 plano-convex condenser lenses and focused onto a custom fiber bundle. The fiber is then re-bundled and routed to a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 535-565 nm. The system has been designed to measure plasmas with core Te of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. Work supported by USDOE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  10. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  11. Beam Distribution Modification By Alfven Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-01-25

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  12. Beam Distribution Modification by Alfven Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-04-03

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  13. Transport of Parallel Momentum by Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability near Marginality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Yoon and T.S. Hahm

    2009-10-20

    The turbulent angular momentum flux carried by ions resonant with toroidal ion temperature gradient(ITG) instability is calculated via quasilinear calculation using the phase-space conserving gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame. The results near ITG marginality indicate that the inward turbulent equipartition (TEP) momentum pinch [Hahm T.S. et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302] remains as the most robust part of pinch. In addition, ion temperature gradient driven momentum flux is inward for typical parameters, while density gradient driven momentum flux is outward as in the previous kinetic result in slab geometry [Diamond P.H. et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 012303].

  14. Toroidal dipole excitations in metamolecules formed by interacting plasmonic nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Derek W; Ruostekoski, Janne; Fedotov, Vassili A; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    We show how the elusive toroidal dipole moment appears as a radiative excitation eigenmode in a metamolecule resonator that is formed by pairs of plasmonic nanorods. We analyze one such nanorod configuration - a toroidal metamolecule. We find that the radiative interactions in the toroidal metamolecule can be qualitatively represented by a theoretical model based on an electric point dipole arrangement. Both a finite-size rod model and the point dipole approximation demonstrate how the toroidal dipole moment is subradiant and difficult to excite by incident light. By means of breaking the geometric symmetry of the metamolecule, the toroidal mode can be excited by linearly polarized light and we provide simple optimization protocols for maximizing the toroidal dipole mode excitation. This opens up possibilities for simplified control and driving of metamaterial arrays consisting of toroidal dipole unit-cell resonators.

  15. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  16. Improving the quality of proton beams via double targets driven by an intense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme is proposed to improve the quality of proton beams via ultra-intense laser pulse interacting with double plasma targets, which consist of a pre-target with relatively low density and a main target with high density. Both one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that, the using of an appropriate pre-target can help to obtain a much stronger longitudinal charge separation field in contrast to using only the main target. And proton beam with lower momentum divergence, better monochromaticity and collimation, as well as higher current density is generated. Moreover, due to the strengthened coupling between the laser pulse and targets, the energy conversion from laser pulse to protons is also increased.

  17. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a few-terawatt laser driven plasma acceleration using a nitrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the laser plasma acceleration of electrons has been carried out using 3 TW, 45 fs duration titanium sapphire laser pulse interaction with a nitrogen gas jet at an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2. We have observed the stable generation of a well collimated electron beam with divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad from nitrogen gas jet plasma at an optimum plasma density around 3 × 1019 cm-3. The energy spectrum of the electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with an average peak energy and a charge around 25 MeV and 30 pC respectively. The results will be useful for better understanding and control of ionization injection and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in high-Z gases and also towards the development of practical LWFA for various applications including injectors for high energy accelerators.

  18. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  19. Tailoring the multipoles in THz toroidal metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    The multipoles play a significant role in determining the resonant behavior of subwavelength resonators that form the basis of metamaterial and plasmonic systems. Here, we study the impact of multipoles including toroidal dipole on the resonance intensity and linewidth of the fundamental inductive-capacitance (LC) resonance of a metamaterial array. The dominant multipoles that strongly contribute to the resonances are tailored by spatial rearrangement of the neighboring resonators such that the mutual interactions between the magnetic, electric, and toroidal configurations lead to enormous change in the linewidth as well as the resonance intensity of the LC mode. Manipulation of the multipoles in a metamaterial array provides a general strategy for the optimization of the quality factor of metamaterial resonances, which is fundamental to its applications in broad areas of sensing, lasing and nonlinear optics where stronger field confinement plays a significant role.

  20. Reynolds stress of localized toroidal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.Z. [International Center for Theoretical Studies, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies

    1995-02-01

    An investigation of the 2D toroidal eigenmode problem reveals the possibility of a new consistent 2D structure, the dissipative BM-II mode. In contrast to the conventional ballooning mode, the new mode is poloidally localized at {pi}/2 (or -{pi}/2), and possesses significant radial asymmetry. The radial asymmetry, in turn, allows the dissipative BM-II to generate considerably larger Reynolds stress as compared to the standard slab drift type modes. It is also shown that a wide class of localized dissipative toroidal modes are likely to be of the dissipative BM-II nature, suggesting that at the tokamak edge, the fluctuation generated Reynolds stress (a possible source of poloidal flow) can be significant.

  1. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°.

  2. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  3. A size-dependent model for beam-like MEMS driven by electrostatic and piezoelectric forces: A variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tenghao; Wang, Binglei; Zhou, Shenjie; Zhao, Moli

    2016-10-01

    A size-dependent model of a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) actuated by both electrostatic and piezoelectric forces is proposed based on the modified couple stress. The governing equation and boundary conditions are derived with the help of the Hamilton principle and solved numerically by employing the Galerkin method and Newton downhill method. A material length scale parameter (MLSP) is incorporated in the model to capture the size effect in microstructures. An excellent agreement is found between the results of the present model and the experimental data, providing the validity of this model. The results reveal that the introduction of the MLSP stiffens the system and increases the pull-in voltage. The size-effect is significant when the dimension of the beam is comparable to the MLSP but it becomes smaller as the beam size increases. Besides, the static characteristic of the micro-switch is studied. It is found that the piezoelectric material attached on the beam can reduce the pull-in voltage remarkably, which may guide the design of the micro-structure when the system is on the order of micron or submicron.

  4. Multi-Kiloampere, Electron-Beam Generation from Bare Aluminum Photo-Cathodes Driven by an ArF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. L.; Ridlon, R. N.; Seitz, G. J.; Shurter, R. P.

    1997-05-01

    An electron-beam-pumped laser operating at ArF (193 nm) and 3.5 joules in a 150-ns pulse has been used to illuminate a bare aluminum cathode. The cathode was pulsed to 2.75 MV with fields up to 185 kV/cm using the REX (a 4-MeV, 5-kA, 100-ns pulsed diode) accelerator. Extracted current versus laser power gives a quantum efficiency of 0.1 %. The background vacuum pressure needed for this type of cathode is in the mid 10-6 torr range and 100-ns-long electron beams of several kA have been produced. Both emission limited (current follows laser pulse) and space-charge-limited (current follows pulsed power) regimes have been studied up to 100 Amps/cm^2 by varying the cathode diameter and A-K gap distance. A small-scale test stand has demonstrated a quantum efficiency increase of 2.5 times by thermally augmentating the surface temperature to about 150^0 C. Beam temperature from present velvet based cathodes has been extensively measured to be about 100 eV; measurements of the ArF laser irradiated aluminum cathode indicate a reduction in source temperature of greater than an order of magnitude.

  5. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with 44 beam-lines of Nike KrF Laser^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Phillips, L. S.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Manka, C. K.

    2009-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (˜1 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique opportunities of LPI research for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous experiments at intensities (10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2) exceeded two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability threshold using 12 beam-lines of Nike laser.^a,b For further experiments to study LPI excitation in bigger plasma volumes, 44 Nike main beams have been used to produce plasmas with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 psec FWHM pulses. This talk will present results of the recent LPI experiment focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)φ0 and a streak camera near 0.5φ0. Blackbody temperature and expansion speed measurements of the plasmas were also made. The experiment was conducted at laser intensities of (1˜4)x10^15 W/cm^2 on solid planar CH targets. ^a J. L. Weaver, et al, NO4.14, APS DPP (2008) ^b J. Oh, et al, NO4.15, APS DPP (2008) * Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Task-driven orbit design and implementation on a robotic C-arm system for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Jacobson, M.; Stayman, J. W.; Ehtiati, T.; Weiss, C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: This work applies task-driven optimization to the design of non-circular orbits that maximize imaging performance for a particular imaging task. First implementation of task-driven imaging on a clinical robotic C-arm system is demonstrated, and a framework for orbit calculation is described and evaluated. Methods: We implemented a task-driven imaging framework to optimize orbit parameters that maximize detectability index d'. This framework utilizes a specified Fourier domain task function and an analytical model for system spatial resolution and noise. Two experiments were conducted to test the framework. First, a simple task was considered consisting of frequencies lying entirely on the fz-axis (e.g., discrimination of structures oriented parallel to the central axial plane), and a "circle + arc" orbit was incorporated into the framework as a means to improve sampling of these frequencies, and thereby increase task-based detectability. The orbit was implemented on a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare). A second task considered visualization of a cochlear implant simulated within a head phantom, with spatial frequency response emphasizing high-frequency content in the (fy, fz) plane of the cochlea. An optimal orbit was computed using the task-driven framework, and the resulting image was compared to that for a circular orbit. Results: For the fz-axis task, the circle + arc orbit was shown to increase d' by a factor of 1.20, with an improvement of 0.71 mm in a 3D edge-spread measurement for edges located far from the central plane and a decrease in streak artifacts compared to a circular orbit. For the cochlear implant task, the resulting orbit favored complementary views of high tilt angles in a 360° orbit, and d' was increased by a factor of 1.83. Conclusions: This work shows that a prospective definition of imaging task can be used to optimize source-detector orbit and improve imaging performance. The method was implemented for execution of

  7. METHODS TO DEVELOP A TOROIDAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANAILA Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper work presents two practical methods to draw the development of a surface unable to be developed applying classical methods of Descriptive Geometry, the toroidal surface, frequently met in technical practice. The described methods are approximate ones; the development is obtained with the help of points. The accuracy of the methods is given by the number of points used when drawing. As for any other approximate method, when practically manufactured the development may need to be adjusted on site.

  8. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  9. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  10. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  11. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  12. WE-EF-207-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION and BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Task-Driven Imaging for Cone-Beam CT in Interventional Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, G; Stayman, J; Ouadah, S; Siewerdsen, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ehtiati, T [Siemens Healthcare AX Division, Erlangen, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that utilizes a patient-specific anatomical model, mathematical definition of the imaging task, and a model of the imaging system to prospectively design acquisition and reconstruction techniques that maximize task-based imaging performance. Utility of the framework is demonstrated in the joint optimization of tube current modulation and view-dependent reconstruction kernel in filtered-backprojection reconstruction and non-circular orbit design in model-based reconstruction. Methods: The system model is based on a cascaded systems analysis of cone-beam CT capable of predicting the spatially varying noise and resolution characteristics as a function of the anatomical model and a wide range of imaging parameters. Detectability index for a non-prewhitening observer model is used as the objective function in a task-driven optimization. The combination of tube current and reconstruction kernel modulation profiles were identified through an alternating optimization algorithm where tube current was updated analytically followed by a gradient-based optimization of reconstruction kernel. The non-circular orbit is first parameterized as a linear combination of bases functions and the coefficients were then optimized using an evolutionary algorithm. The task-driven strategy was compared with conventional acquisitions without modulation, using automatic exposure control, and in a circular orbit. Results: The task-driven strategy outperformed conventional techniques in all tasks investigated, improving the detectability of a spherical lesion detection task by an average of 50% in the interior of a pelvis phantom. The non-circular orbit design successfully mitigated photon starvation effects arising from a dense embolization coil in a head phantom, improving the conspicuity of an intracranial hemorrhage proximal to the coil. Conclusion: The task-driven imaging framework leverages a knowledge of the imaging task within

  13. Design of a Vertically Comb-Driven Micromirror with V-Shaped Beams%一种垂直梳齿驱动V型梁微镜设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓莹; 孙瑞康; 燕斌; 乔大勇

    2011-01-01

    A scanning micromirror suspended by a pair of V-shaped beams, driven by vertically electrostatic comb actuators, was designed and modeled. The static and dynamic analysis was carried out by both theory calculation and FEM simulation. The static characteristic shows that a torsion angle of 0.7° can be achieved at 100V DC voltage,which is sufficient for the startup of the mirror scanning operation. Moreover, modal analysis of three types of torsion beams were performed with ANSYS, and the comparison of results reveals that the mirror with V-shaped beams has the most stable torsional mode. The torsional stress are also investigated.%设计了一种垂直梳齿驱动的V型扭转梁支撑的微镜器件.采用有限元仿真和解析方法对该器件进行了静态和动态分析.在100V直流电压下,镜面转角可达0.7°,能够满足镜而扫描所需要的起始角.同时对比了不同支撑梁结构下的前五阶模态频率以及前两阶频率比,并分析了不同梁间距以及V型梁夹角下各个参数的变化趋势,得出了使微扭转镜工作在最稳定振型的V型梁倾斜角度,确定了所设计结构的优化尺寸.最后对V型梁的扭转应力进行了分析.

  14. The radiobiology of laser-driven particle beams: focus on sub-lethal responses of normal human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Borghesi, M.; Candiano, G.; Chaudhary, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Leanza, R.; Prise, K. M.; Romagnani, L.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.

    2017-03-01

    Accelerated proton beams have become increasingly common for treating cancer. The need for cost and size reduction of particle accelerating machines has led to the pioneering investigation of optical ion acceleration techniques based on laser-plasma interactions as a possible alternative. Laser-matter interaction can produce extremely pulsed particle bursts of ultra-high dose rates (>= 109 Gy/s), largely exceeding those currently used in conventional proton therapy. Since biological effects of ionizing radiation are strongly affected by the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA-damaging events, the unprecedented physical features of such beams may modify cellular and tissue radiosensitivity to unexplored extents. Hence, clinical applications of laser-generated particles need thorough assessment of their radiobiological effectiveness. To date, the majority of studies have either used rodent cell lines or have focussed on cancer cell killing being local tumour control the main objective of radiotherapy. Conversely, very little data exist on sub-lethal cellular effects, of relevance to normal tissue integrity and secondary cancers, such as premature cellular senescence. Here, we discuss ultra-high dose rate radiobiology and present preliminary data obtained in normal human cells following irradiation by laser-accelerated protons at the LULI PICO2000 facility at Laser Lab Europe, France.

  15. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  16. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Savinov, V; Zheludev, N I

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving toroidal multipoles have been predicted to produce vector potential in the absence of electromagnetic fields. Existence of the toroidal response in metamaterials was recently demonstrated and is now a growing field of research. However, no direct analytical link has yet been established between the transmission and reflection of macroscopic electromagnetic media and toroidal dipole excitations. To address this essential gap in electromagnetic theory we have developed an analytical approach linking microscopic and macrosc...

  17. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  18. Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Haijun, E-mail: hjren@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, The Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Science, and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cao, Jintao [Bejing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using modified gyro-kinetic (MGK) equation applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. Dispersion relation of GAM in the presence of arbitrary toroidal Mach number is analytically derived. The effects of toroidal rotation on the GAM frequency and damping rate do not depend on the orientation of equilibrium flow. It is shown that the toroidal Mach number M increases the GAM frequency and dramatically decreases the Landau damping rate.

  19. Strain Driven Phase Decomposition in Ion-Beam Sputtered Pr1−XCaXMnO3 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Ifland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of heteroepitaxial thin films on single crystalline substrates by means of physical deposition methods is commonly accompanied by mechanical strain due to lattice mismatch and defect generation. Here we present a detailed analysis of the influence of strain on the Mn solubility of Pr1-XCaXMnO3 thin films prepared by ion-beam sputtering. Combining results from X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and in situ hot-stage stress measurements, we give strong evidence that large tensile strain during deposition limits the Mn solubility range of the Perovskite phase to near-stoichiometric composition. Mn excess gives rise to MnOz precipitates and the precipitation seems to represent a stress relaxation path. With respect to size and density of the precipitates, the relaxation process can be affected by the choice of substrate and the deposition parameters, that is, the deposition temperature and the used sputter gas.

  20. A low energy optimization of the CERN-NGS neutrino beam for a $\\theta_{13}$ driven neutrino oscillation search

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2002-01-01

    The possibility to improve the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam performances for $\\theta_{13}$ searches is investigated. We show that by an appropriate optimization of the target and focusing optics of the present CNGS design, we can increase the flux of low energy neutrinos by about a factor 5 compared to the current $\\tau$ optimized focalisation. With the ICARUS 2.35 kton detector at LNGS and in case of negative result, this would allow to improve the limit to $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by an order of magnitude better than the current limit of CHOOZ at $\\Delta m^2\\approx 3\\times 10^{-3} \\rm eV^2$ within 5 years of nominal CNGS running. This is by far the most sensitive setup of the currently approved long-baseline experiments and is competitive with the proposed JHF superbeam.

  1. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. C.; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  2. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M. C., E-mail: mthompson@trialphaenergy.com; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  3. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.; Belenkiy, V. Ya.; Koleva, E. G.; Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 1016 m-3, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A.m-2, i.e. 8 mA for a 3-10 cm2 collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  4. Permanent magnetic toroidal drive with half stator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhong Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A permanent magnetic toroidal drive with a half stator is proposed that avoids noise and mechanical vibrations. The effects of the system parameters on the output torque of the drive were investigated. A model machine was designed and produced. The output torque and speed fluctuation of the drive system were measured, and the calculated and measured output torque were compared. The tests demonstrated that the drive system could operate continuously without noise, and the system achieved a given speed ratio. The drive system had high load-carrying ability and a maximum output torque of 0.15 N m when certain parameter values were used.

  5. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  6. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  7. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  8. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  9. Fast imaging diagnostics on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, E. M.; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. As part of the diagnostic suite, two fast imaging instruments with radial and nearly axial plasma views were developed using a common camera platform. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses were mounted behind re-entrant viewports attached to welded bellows. During gettering, the vacuum optics were retracted and isolated behind a gate valve permitting their removal if cleaning was necessary. The axial view incorporated a stainless-steel mirror in a protective cap assembly attached to the vacuum-side of the viewport. For each system, a custom lens-based, high-throughput optical periscope was designed to relay the plasma image about half a meter to a high-speed camera. Each instrument also contained a remote-controlled filter wheel, set between shots to isolate a particular hydrogen or impurity emission line. The design of the camera platform, imaging performance, and sample data for each view is presented.

  10. Ion beam driven high energy density physics studies at FAIR at darmstadt: the HEDgeHOB collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A.; Spiller, P. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Shutov, A.; Zharkov, A.P. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A.R.; Rodriguez Prietoc, G. [LPGP, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Deutsch, C. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain); Stoehlker, T. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (Germany); Helmholz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    High Energy Density (HED) physics spans over numerous areas of basic and applied physics, for example, astrophysics, planetary physics, geophysics, inertial fusion and many others. Due to this reason, it has been a subject of very active research over the past many decades. Static as well as dynamic methods have been applied to generate samples of HED matter in the laboratory. The most commonly used tool in the static techniques is the diamond anvil cell while the dynamic methods involve shock compression of matter. During the past fifteen years, great progress has been made on the development of bunched intense particle beams that have emerged as an additional new tool for studying HED physics. In this paper we present two experiment designs that have been worked out for HED physics studies at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. This facility has entered into construction phase and will provide one of the largest and most powerful particle accelerators in the world. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Fast imaging diagnostics on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E. M., E-mail: egranstedt@trialphaenergy.com; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. As part of the diagnostic suite, two fast imaging instruments with radial and nearly axial plasma views were developed using a common camera platform. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses were mounted behind re-entrant viewports attached to welded bellows. During gettering, the vacuum optics were retracted and isolated behind a gate valve permitting their removal if cleaning was necessary. The axial view incorporated a stainless-steel mirror in a protective cap assembly attached to the vacuum-side of the viewport. For each system, a custom lens-based, high-throughput optical periscope was designed to relay the plasma image about half a meter to a high-speed camera. Each instrument also contained a remote-controlled filter wheel, set between shots to isolate a particular hydrogen or impurity emission line. The design of the camera platform, imaging performance, and sample data for each view is presented.

  12. Absence of toroidal moments in 'aromagnetic' anthracene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborghetti, S.; Puppin, E.; Brenna, M.; Pinotti, E.; Zanni, P.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of anthracene and other aromatic compounds have been shown to respond to a magnetic field as if they possessed a permanent magnetic moment. This phenomenon was named 'aromagnetism' by Spartakov and Tolstoi, and it was subsequently attributed to the interaction of an electric toroidal moment with a time-varying magnetic field. However, there has been no independent confirmation of the original work. Here, we have selected purified anthracene crystallites which respond to a low magnetic field and investigate how this response depends on the gradient and the time derivative of the field. We conclude that the anomaly cannot be attributed to a toroidal interaction but is due to a constant magnetic moment of the particles. Close examinations using magnetometry and scanning electron microscopy reveal metallic clusters of Fe and Ni up to a few hundred nanometres in size embedded in the anomalous crystallites. These inclusions represent 1.8 ppm by weight of the sample. The observed presence of ferromagnetic inclusions in the ppm range is sufficient to explain the anomalous magnetic properties of micron-sized anthracene crystals, including the reported optical properties of the colloidal suspensions.

  13. Effects of energetic particles on zonal flow generation by toroidal Alfvén eigenmode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2016-09-01

    Generation of zonal flow (ZF) by energetic particle (EP) driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that nonlinear resonant EP contribution dominates over the usual Reynolds and Maxwell stresses due to thermal plasma nonlinear response. ZF can be forced driven in the linear growth stage of TAE, with the growth rate being twice the TAE growth rate. The ZF generation mechanism is shown to be related to polarization induced by resonant EP nonlinearity. The generated ZF has both the usual meso-scale and micro-scale radial structures. Possible consequences of this forced driven ZF on the nonlinear dynamics of TAE are also discussed.

  14. Deconfinement in Yang-Mills Theory through Toroidal Compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Dusan; Unsal, Mithat; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We introduce field theory techniques through which the deconfinement transition of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory can be moved to a semi-classical domain where it becomes calculable using two-dimensional field theory. We achieve this through a double-trace deformation of toroidally compactified Yang-Mills theory on R{sup 2} x S{sub L}{sup 1} x S{sub {beta}}{sup 1}. At large N, fixed-L, and arbitrary {beta}, the thermodynamics of the deformed theory is equivalent to that of ordinary Yang-Mills theory at leading order in the large N expansion. At fixed-N, small L and a range of {beta}, the deformed theory maps to a two-dimensional theory with electric and magnetic (order and disorder) perturbations, analogs of which appear in planar spin-systems and statistical physics. We show that in this regime the deconfinement transition is driven by the competition between electric and magnetic perturbations in this two-dimensional theory. This appears to support the scenario proposed by Liao and Shuryak regarding the magnetic component of the quark-gluon plasma at RHIC.

  15. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields at Venus. Venus Express observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic field and plasma measurements carried out onboard Venus Express during solar minimum conditions suggest the existence of two kinds of magnetic field configuration in the Venusian ionosphere. We interpret these as the manifestation of two different types of generation mechanisms for the induced magnetosphere. A different magnetic field topology (toroidal and poloidal) arises if the induced currents are driven either by the solar wind motional electric field or by the Faraday electric field—a conducting ionosphere sees the magnetic field carried by solar wind as a time-varying field. At the dayside, both driving agents produce a similar draping pattern of the magnetic field. However, different magnetic field signatures inherent to both induction mechanisms appear at lower altitudes in the terminator region. The conditions at low solar EUV flux when the ionosphere of Venus becomes magnetized seem to be favorable to distinguish between two different types of the induced fields. We present cases of both types of the magnetic field topology. The cases when the effects of the Faraday induction become well noticeable are especially interesting since they provide us with an example of solar wind interaction with a tiny induced dipole field immersed into the ionosphere. Another interesting case when poloidal magnetic fields are evidently displayed is observed when the IMF vector is almost aligned with the solar wind velocity. In general case, both mechanisms of induction probably complement each other.

  16. The effect of toroidal field on the rotating magnetic field current drive in rotamak plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Fang-Chuan; Huang Tian-Sen; Petrov Yuri

    2007-01-01

    A rotamak is one kind of compact spherically shaped magnetic-confinement device. In a rotamak the plasma current is driven by means of rotating magnetic field (RMF). The driven current can reverse the original equilibrium field and generate a field-reversed-configuration. In a conventional rotamak, a toroidal field (TF) is not necessary for the RMF to drive plasma current, but it was found that the present of an additional TF can influence the RMF current drive. In this paper the effect of TF on the RMF current drive in a rotamak are investigated in some detail.The experimental results show that addition of TF increases the RMF driven current greatly and enhances the RMF penetration dramatically. Without TF, the RMF can only penetrate into plasma in the edge region. When a TF is added, the RMF can reach almost the whole plasma region. This is an optimal strength of toroidal magnetic field for getting maximum plasma current when Bv and radio frequency generator power are fixed. Besides driving current,the RMF generates high harmonic fields in rotamak plasma. The effect of TF on the harmonic field spectra are also reported.

  17. Toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar THz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song; Gupta, Manoj; Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-09-01

    The toroidal dipole moment, a localized electromagnetic excitation of torus magnetic fields, has been observed experimentally in metamaterials. However, the metamaterial based toroidal moment was restricted at higher frequencies by the complex three-dimensional structure. Recently, it has been shown that toroidal moment could also be excited in a planar metamaterial structure. Here, we use asymmetric Fano resonators to illustrate theoretically and experimentally the underlying physics of the toroidal coupling in an array of planar metamaterials. It is observed that the anti-parallel magnetic moment configuration shows toroidal excitation with higher quality (Q) factor Fano resonance, while the parallel magnetic moment shows relatively lower Q factor resonance. Moreover, the electric and toroidal dipole interferes destructively to give rise to an anapole excitation. The magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is employed to understand the differences between the toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances. We further study the impact of intra unit-cell coupling between the Fano resonator pairs in the mirrored and non-mirrored arrangements. The numerical and theoretical approach for modelling the near-field effects and experimental demonstration of toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar systems are particularly promising for tailoring the loss in metamaterials across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  18. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially...

  19. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  20. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  1. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  2. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  3. Design of plasmonic toroidal metamaterials at optical frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Wu, Pin Chieh; Fedotov, Vassili; Savinov, Vassili; Ho, You Zhe; Chau, Yuan-Fong; Zheludev, Nikolay I; Tsai, Din Ping

    2012-01-16

    Toroidal multipoles are the subject of growing interest because of their unusual electromagnetic properties different from the electric and magnetic multipoles. In this paper, we present two new related classes of plasmonic metamaterial composed of purposely arranged of four U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) that show profound resonant toroidal responses at optical frequencies. The toroidal and magnetic responses were investigated by the finite-element simulations. A phenomenon of reversed toroidal responses at higher and lower resonant frequencies has also been reported between this two related metamaterials which results from the electric and magnetic dipoles interaction. Finally, we propose a physical model based on coupled LC circuits to quantitatively analyze the coupled system of the plasmonic toroidal metamaterials.

  4. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  5. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, John B.

    The dynamics and relaxation of magnetic flux ropes produced during non-inductive startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment are simulated with nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic and two-fluid plasma models. A current filament is produced by a single injector and directed along multiple passes by toroidal and vertical vacuum magnetic field components. Adjacent passes of the current filament merge and reconnect, releasing an axisymmetric current ring from the driven channel. Squashing degree analysis indicates the presence of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) during ring formation, but the QSL does not solely correspond to magnetic reconnection. Chaotic scattering is also apparent from the distribution of magnetic field-line lengths. The merging of adjacent passes constitutes coherent dynamo action that affects the toroidally-averaged magnetic-field distribution. The MHD dynamo--primarily from the vertical displacement of the current channel--concentrates symmetric poloidal flux and transfers significant energy to the forming flux-rope ring. Accumulation of poloidal flux over many reconnection events contributes to the development of a poloidal magnetic field null near the central column that redirects the driven current filament, such that its path traces a toroidal surface. After cessation of the simulated current drive, temperature and current profiles broaden and closed flux surfaces form rapidly and encompass a large plasma volume. High toroidal-mode number harmonics of the magnetic energy decay preferentially, leaving a tokamak-like plasma suitable for transition to other forms of current drive. Computations with the two-fluid terms in Ohm's Law produce qualitatively similar plasma evolution to the MHD computations. However, for the computations with the two-fluid plasma model, the ion fluid significantly decouples from the electron fluid, weakening the dynamics during magnetic reconnection. This effect is quantified by comparing global and local plasma parameters in

  6. Far-infrared laser scattering in the ACT-I toroidal device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goree, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    A far-infrared laser scattering diagnostic has been built for the ACT-I toroidal device. The optical system uses a passively stabilized 447-..mu..m CH/sub 3/I laser. A polyethylene etalon is the beam splitter. The vacuum windows are plastic (TPX), which we found has the vacuum property Q 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ torr-liter/sec/cm/sup 2/. Using paraboloidal and ellipsoidal mirrors for detection optics improves the signal strength and allows a better rf enclosure design for the detector. The diagnostic was tested by scattering from an ion Bernstein wave, a technique which can be used for ion temperature diagnostics.

  7. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  8. Shear-dependant toroidal vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani, Nariman Ashrafi; Haghighi, Habib Karimi [Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Pseudoplastic circular Couette flow in annulus is investigated. The flow viscosity is dependent on the shear rate, which directly affects the conservation equations that are solved in the present study by the spectral method in the present study. The pseudoplastic model adopted here is shown to be a suitable representative of nonlinear fluids. Unlike the previous studies, where only the square of shear rate term in the viscosity expression was considered to ease the numerical manipulations, in the present study takes the term containing the quadratic power into account. The curved streamlines of the circular Couette flow can cause a centrifugal instability leading to toroidal vortices, known as Taylor vortices. It is further found that the critical Taylor number becomes lower as the pseudoplastic effect increases. Comparison with existing measurements on pseudoplastic circular Couette flow results in good agreement.

  9. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  10. Concept design of the cassette toroidal mover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, H., E-mail: harri.makinen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Jaervenpaeae, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valkama, P.; Vaeyrynen, J.; Amjad, F. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Mattila, J. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Semeraro, L.; Esque, S. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    A full scale physical development and test facility, Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2), has been established in Finland for the purpose of demonstrating and developing the remote handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER using prototypes and virtual models. The major objective of the DTP2 environment is to verify and develop ITER divertor RH devices and operations. In practice this means various test trials and measurements of performance characteristics. This paper describes the design process of the Cassette Toroidal Mover (CTM). The main purpose of this design task was the development of the CTM concept. The goal of the design process was to achieve compatibility between CTM and the latest ITER divertor design. The design process was based on using a variety of tools, i.e. Catia V5, Delmia, Ansys, Mathcad and project management tools. Applicable European Standards were applied to the concept design. CTM is the cassette transporter, which carries divertor cassettes on the toroidal rails inside the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) during the divertor maintenance. The operation environment differs from a common industrial environment. Radiation level is 100 Gy/h. The temperature during RH operations can be 50 {sup o}C. Clearances are less than 20 mm and the loads carried weigh 9000 kg. These conditions require special solutions during the product development process. The design process consisted of defining and developing of the CTM operational sequence. This sequence includes the procedure of how the CTM - with it is onboard manipulator - prepares for and handles the divertor cassettes during RH operations. RH operations are essential part when defining CTM functions. High reliability is required in order to carry out RH tasks successfully. The recoverability of CTM is also an important design criteria. This paper describes the design process and the structure of the CTM concept.

  11. Damping of toroidal ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The temporal evolution of linear toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes is studied based on a kinetic integral equation including an initial condition. It is shown how to evaluate the analytic continuation of the integral kernel as a function of a complex-valued frequency, which is useful for analytical and numerical calculations of the asymptotic damping behavior of the ITG mode. In the presence of the toroidal {nabla}B-curvature drift, the temporal dependence of the density and potential perturbations consists of normal modes and a continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from poles and from an integral along a branch cut, respectively, of the Laplace-transformed potential function of the complex-valued frequency. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with frequencies and growth rates determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode, which has a ballooning structure, shows a power law decay {proportional_to} t{sup -2} in the asymptotic limit, where t is the time variable. Therefore, the continuum mode dominantly describes the long-time asymptotic behavior of the density and potential perturbations for the stable system where all normal modes have negative growth rates. By performing proper analytic continuation for the homogeneous version of the kinetic integral equation, dependences of the normal modes` growth rate, real frequency, and eigenfunction on {eta}{sub i} (the ratio of the ion temperature gradient to the density gradient), k{sub {theta}} (the poloidal wavenumber), s (the magnetic shear parameter), and {theta}{sub k} (the ballooning angle corresponding to the minimum radial wavenumber) are numerically obtained for both stable and unstable cases. (author)

  12. Petascale Parallelization of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, Stephane; Adams, Mark; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) is a global, three-dimensional particle-in-cell application developed to study microturbulence in tokamak fusion devices. The global capability of GTC is unique, allowing researchers to systematically analyze important dynamics such as turbulence spreading. In this work we examine a new radial domain decomposition approach to allow scalability onto the latest generation of petascale systems. Extensive performance evaluation is conducted on three high performance computing systems: the IBM BG/P, the Cray XT4, and an Intel Xeon Cluster. Overall results show that the radial decomposition approach dramatically increases scalability, while reducing the memory footprint - allowing for fusion device simulations at an unprecedented scale. After a decade where high-end computing (HEC) was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to processor frequencies, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. In this work, we examine a new parallelization scheme for the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [?] micro-turbulence fusion application. Extensive scalability results and analysis are presented on three HEC systems: the IBM BlueGene/P (BG/P) at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cray XT4 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and an Intel Xeon cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall results indicate that the new radial decomposition approach successfully attains unprecedented scalability to 131,072 BG/P cores by overcoming the memory limitations of the previous approach. The new version is well suited to utilize emerging petascale resources to access new regimes of physical phenomena.

  13. Basic investigations of electrostatic turbulence and its interaction with plasma and suprathermal ions in a simple magnetized toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Furno, I.; Gustafson, K.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Malinverni, D.; Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Theiler, C.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.

    2013-06-01

    Progress in basic understanding of turbulence and its influence on the transport both of the plasma bulk and of suprathermal components is achieved in the TORPEX simple magnetized torus. This configuration combines a microwave plasma production scheme with a quasi-equilibrium generated by a toroidal magnetic field, onto which a small vertical component is superimposed, simulating a simplified form of tokamak scrape-off layers. After having clarified the formation of blobs in ideal interchange turbulence, TORPEX experiments elucidated the mechanisms behind the blob motion, with a general scaling law relating their size and speed. The parallel currents associated with the blobs, responsible for the damping of the charge separation that develops inside them, hence determining their cross-field velocity, have been measured. The blob dynamics is influenced by creating convective cells with biased electrodes, arranged in an array on a metal limiter. Depending on the biasing scheme, radial and vertical blob velocities can be varied. Suprathermal ion transport in small-scale turbulence is also investigated on TORPEX. Suprathermal ions are generated by a miniaturized lithium source, and are detected using a movable double-gridded energy analyser. We characterize vertical and radial spreading of the ion beam, associated with the ideal interchange-dominated plasma turbulence, as a function of the suprathermal ion energy and the plasma temperature. Experimental results are in good agreement with global fluid simulations, including in cases of non-diffusive behaviour. To investigate the interaction of plasma and suprathermal particles with instabilities and turbulence in magnetic configurations of increasing complexity, a closed field line configuration has recently been implemented on TORPEX, based on a current-carrying wire suspended in the vacuum chamber. First measurements indicate the creation of circular symmetric profiles centred on the magnetic axis, and instabilities

  14. Metamaterials with toroidal fano-response (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhokar, Maria V.; Basharin, Alexey A.

    2017-05-01

    The static toroidal dipole was predicted by Zeldovich, which appears due to the static currents in atomic nuclei and explain disturbance of parity in the weak interaction. Physically, toroidal dipole is separated element of multipole expansion that corresponds to electrical currents circulating on a surface of gedanken torus along its meridians. Recently, the demonstration of dynamic toroidal dipolar response became possible in metamaterials composed of metamolecules of toroidal topology. Metamaterials with toroidal dipolar response allow to demonstrate a number of special properties such as novel type of EIT, optical activity, extremely strongly localized fields and anapole. We are interested in another property of toroidal metamaterials - magnetic Fano-type response caused by toroidal and magnetic moments in a particular metamolecule. In this paper we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally in microwave at the first time Fano-excitation in toroidal metamaterials. We suggested metamaterials based on a special structure of two types of planar metamolecules separated by dielectric layer. One of them "Electric" type metamolecule is a planar conductive structure consisting of two symmetric split loops. The incident plane wave excites circular currents along the loops leading to a circulating magnetic moment and, as a result, to a toroidal moment. Moreover, due to the central gap electric moment can be excited in metamolecule. At the same time, destructive/constructive interference between toroidal and electric dipolar moments gives us unique effect as very strong E- field localization inside the central gap and anapole mode. "Magnetic" type metamolecule is the inverted and rotated variant of the first structure. In contrast to the first case, here we expect very strong localization of magnetic field instead electric field. The magnetic field lines are whirling around the central junction of the metamolecule due to interference between toroidal and magnetic

  15. Plasmastatic model of toroidal trap “Galatea-belt”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Goldich, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic galatea-traps for thermonuclear plasma confinement with current carrying conductors immersed into the plasma volume, are represented by an example of the toroidal trap “The Belt” with two circular conductors. Numerical models of equilibrium plasma and field configurations are investigated in straightened into cylinder analogues of some toroidal galateas in a series of works by the authors. This paper presents a plasmastatic model of configurations in the toroidal variant of “The Belt” in terms of a boundary problem with the Grad-Shafranov equation. Distinctions of their geometry and quantitative characteristics from the cylindrical analogues and their dependence of parameters are determined in computation.

  16. Magnetar-Driven Magnetic Tower as a Model for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Asymmetric Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, D A; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Fadyen, Andrew I. Mac

    2006-01-01

    We consider a newly-born millisecond magnetar, focusing on its interaction with the dense stellar plasma in which it is initially embedded. We argue that the confining pressure and inertia of the surrounding plasma acts to collimate the magnetar's Poynting-flux-dominated outflow into tightly beamed jets and increases its magnetic luminosity. We propose this process as an essential ingredient in the magnetar model for gamma-ray burst and asymmetric supernova central engines. We introduce the ``pulsar-in-a-cavity'' as an important model problem representing a magnetized rotating neutron star inside a collapsing star. We describe its essential properties and derive simple estimates for the evolution of the magnetic field and the resulting spin-down power. We find that the infalling stellar mantle confines the magnetosphere, enabling a gradual build-up of the toroidal magnetic field due to continuous twisting. The growing magnetic pressure eventually becomes dominant, resulting in a magnetically-driven explosion....

  17. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  18. Analysis of the discharge of the ATLAS barrel toroid and end cap toroids with different configurations of the protection circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Broggi, F; Sorbi, M; Volpini, G

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the discharge of the barrel toroid and end cap toroids with different protection circuits has been carried out in order to verify the possibility of a new simplified and cheaper configuration of the components of the circuit. In the study also the presence of short circuits has been considered. The comparison of the results and the analysis of the advantages and risks of the different configurations should allow the choice of the best solution for the economy and safety of the toroids. (4 refs).

  19. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  20. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  1. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  2. All-dielectric perforated metamaterials with toroidal dipolar response (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenishchev, Ivan; Basharin, Alexey A.

    2017-05-01

    We present metamaterials based on dielectric slab with perforated identical cylindrical clusters with perforated holes, which allow to support the toroidal dipolar response due to Mie-resonances in each hole. Note that proposed metamaterial is technologically simple for fabrication in optical frequency range. Metamaterial can be fabricated by several methods. For instance, we may apply the molecular beam epitaxy method for deposition of Si or GaAs layers, which have permittivity close to 16. Next step, nanometer/micrometer holes are perforated by focused ion beam method or laser cutting method. Fundamental difference of proposed metamaterial is technological fabrication process. Classically all- dielectric optical metamaterials consist of nano-spheres or nano-discs, which are complicated for fabrication, while our idea and suggested metamaterials are promising prototype of various optical/THz all-dielectic devices as sensor, nano-antennas elements for nanophotonics.

  3. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, Matt, E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  4. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    . The DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak......In this paper we study the simple case of the dynamics of a density perturbation localized in the edge region of a medium sized tokamak in a full 3D geometry. The 2D evolution of such a perturbation has been studied in details on the low-field side, where the gradient of the magnetic field always...... point radial inward, see e.g. [1-2]. Here, the initial condition is implemented in two very different 3D numerical codes, ATTEMPT [3], and a new developed code, DIESEL (Disk version of ESEL), and the results are compared and discussed in detail. The ATTEMPT code has been employed to study the blob...

  5. Electric disruption in a hydrogen toroidal plasma; Ruptura eletrica em um plasma toroidal em hidrogenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, M. [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Fisica; Silva, C.A.B. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Goes, L.C.S.; Sudano, J.P. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica

    1990-12-31

    By using a zero-dimensional model the ionizing initial phase of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated. The model consists on describing the plasma time evolution through the density and particle temperature space averaged on the plasma volume. The involved equations are energy and particles balance equations (electrons and ions). The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss is due to ionizing, processes of Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating transformer gives a initial voltage necessary to the breaking 11 refs., 2 figs.

  6. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  7. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  8. Thomson scattering diagnostic system design for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traverso, P. J., E-mail: pjt0002@auburn.edu; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YAG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize the stray laser light that could enter the collection optics. The beam line has been designed with an 8 m propagation distance to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter kept less than 3 mm inside the plasma volume. The beam exits the vacuum system through another Brewster window and enters a beam dump, again to minimize the stray light in the vacuum chamber. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f/#∼ 1 aspheric lens, a commercially available Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. Spectral rejection of stray laser light, if needed, can be performed with the use of an optional interference filter at the spectrometer input. The system has been developed for initial single point measurements of plasmas with core electron temperatures of approximately 20–300 eV and densities of 5 × 10{sup 18} to 5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} dependent upon operational scenario.

  9. On the use of a toroidal mirror to focus neutrons at the ILL neutron spin echo spectrometer IN15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, C. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Alefeld, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Copley, J.R.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The IN15 neutron spin echo spectrometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble) has been designed to accomodate a toroidal focusing mirror. This mirror will be used to increase the intensity at the sample position for measurements at long neutron wavelengths and to perform measurements in the low q-range (10{sup -3} {angstrom}{sup -1}). This paper summarizes the results of ray-tracing simulations for the toroidal mirror system. These calculations were performed in order to assess the effects of the neutron wavelength, gravitational fall, wavelength resolution and spherical aberrations on the quality of the focused beam. The gain in flux that can be expected from the focusing geometry is estimated. The recent installation and characterisation of the mirror is also briefly described.

  10. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  11. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  12. Impurity effects on toroidal ITG-modes and transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froejdh, M.

    1993-04-01

    The presence of impurities in tokamak plasmas has until recently been ignored in several fluctuation driven transport models. In this thesis some of the consequences of including an ion impurity species into a model for low frequency electrostatic modes and fluctuation driven transport are discussed. The direction of the particle flows in a two-ion-component plasma is studied for the outer part of the good confinement region. When the two ion species, main and impurity ions, have similar inwardly peaked density profiles the latter tends to determine the flow directions for typical tokamak plasma conditions. Hence, the impurities flow outwards and the main ions inwards, leading to so called plasma decontamination. The stability of the toroidal main and impurity ion temperature gradient modes (ITG-modes) is determined by using an advanced fluid model. The impurity effect on the background mode is found to be stabilizing for a large domain of parameters. However, a destabilization is also possible. An impurity mode driven by toroidicity is found and shown to be unstable in a new parameter region. The particle and thermal diffusivities are estimated and the scaling properties are studied. The magnitude of the ion thermal conductivity is shown to decrease due to the stabilizing influence of impurities. The radial variation of the transport coefficients are considered for some experimental equilibrium profiles. The stability properties of a contaminated tokamak plasma with dissipative trapped electrons are investigated. The dissipation is found to change the instability thresholds. The relation between wave energy, electron dissipation and instability is discussed. (35 refs.).

  13. Stabilization of sawteeth with third harmonic deuterium ICRF-accelerated beam in JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardo, Jean-Baptiste [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sharapov, Sergei; Fitzgerald, Michael; Hawkes, Nick; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boom, Jurrian [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier; Sarazin, Yanick; Schneider, Mireille [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eriksson, Jacob [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Mantsinen, Mervi [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Sawtooth stabilisation by fast ions is investigated in deuterium (D) and D-helium 3 (He3) plasmas of JET heated by deuterium Neutral Beam Injection combined in synergy with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) applied on-axis at 3rd beam cyclotron harmonic. A very significant increase in the sawtooth period is observed, caused by the ICRH-acceleration of the beam ions born at 100 keV to the MeV energy range. Four representative sawteeth from four different discharges are compared with Porcelli's model. In two discharges, the sawtooth crash appears to be triggered by core-localized Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes inside the q = 1 surface (also called “tornado” modes) which expel the fast ions from within the q = 1 surface, over time scales comparable with the sawtooth period. Two other discharges did not exhibit fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core, and no degradation of fast ion confinement was found in both modelling and direct measurements of fast ion profile with the neutron camera. The developed sawtooth scenario without fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core is of high interest for the burning plasmas. Possible causes of the sawtooth crashes on JET are discussed.

  14. Helico-conical beams for generating optical twisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Daria, Vincent Ricardo Mancao

    2010-01-01

    at the focus even as the topological charge is increased. Such beams can be applied to fundamental studies of light and atoms such as in quantum entanglement of the DAM, toroidal traps for cold atoms and for optical manipulation of microscopic particles. OPTICAL TWISTERS An optical vortex or light beam...... interference takes place. Here, we describe a diffracting beam with a spiral profile on both the amplitUde and phase of the beam. The spiral beam is a special case of a general set of Helico-Conical beams described in our previous work [1,21. This family of beams is initially characterized with an apodized...

  15. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  16. The characteristics of the ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity in the KSTAR plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Ha; Lee, Hyung Ho; Oh, Seung Tae [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) is one of the important diagnostics on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to get ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity. We describe the current status and the improvements made over the last two years. The current system upgraded from a Czerny-Turner spectrometer consists of two spectroscopic systems looking at the KSTAR neutral beam which is modulated 5 Hz for special period. One system has a DS spectrometer (f/2.8) lent from NIFS with pitch-controlled double slit fiber bundle with back- illuminated CCD and the other system has Kspectrometer (F/2.0) made by NFRI with intensified CCD. The K-spectrometer has a grating number of 2400 g/mm, focal length of 200 mm. The upgrade of two high throughput spectrometers enables to improve the time resolution from 200 msec to around 10 msec. This article focuses on improved edge spatial interval from increasing of plasma viewing channels to 5 mm and enhanced time resolution from a high throughput spectrometer with back-illuminated CCD. The upgrade has allowed to measure pedestal ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity profiles in KSTAR H-mode

  17. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Tasso, H

    2015-01-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  18. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  19. Compact Toroid Propagation in a Magnetized Drift Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert D.; Baker, Kevin L.; Hwang, David Q.; Evans, Russell W.

    2000-10-01

    Injection of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasma into a toroidal plasma confinement device may require the SCT to propagate through a drift tube region occupied by a pre-existing magnetic field. This field is expected to extert a retarding force on the SCT, but may also result in a beneficial compression. The effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields will be measured using the CTIX compact-toroid injector, together with a fast framing camera with an axial view of the formation, coaxial, and drift-tube regions. In the case of longitudinal magnetic field, comparisons will be made with the predictions of two-dimensional numerical simulation. The use of localized magnetic field to reduce plasma bridging of the insulating gap will also be investigated.

  20. Stellar dynamo models with prominent surface toroidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low mass fast rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying $\\alpha\\Omega$ mechanism.

  1. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  2. Ultra-high-Q toroidal microresonators for cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spillane, S M; Vahala, K J; Goh, K W; Wilcut, E; Kimble, H J

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of toroidal microcavities for strong-coupling cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Numerical modeling of the optical modes demonstrate a significant reduction of modal volume with respect to the whispering gallery modes of dielectric spheres, while retaining the high quality factors representative of spherical cavities. The extra degree of freedom of toroid microcavities can be used to achieve improved cavity QED characteristics. Numerical results for atom-cavity coupling strength, critical atom number N_0 and critical photon number n_0 for cesium are calculated and shown to exceed values currently possible using Fabry-Perot cavities. Modeling predicts coupling rates g/(2*pi) exceeding 700 MHz and critical atom numbers approaching 10^{-7} in optimized structures. Furthermore, preliminary experimental measurements of toroidal cavities at a wavelength of 852 nm indicate that quality factors in excess of 100 million can be obtained in a 50 micron principal diameter cavity, which w...

  3. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  4. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  5. Axion Haloscopes with Toroidal Geometry at CAPP/IBS

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2016-01-01

    The present state of the art axion haloscope employs a cylindrical resonant cavity in a solenoidal field. We, the Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea, are also pursuing halo axion discovery using this cylindrical geometry. However, the presence of end caps of cavities increases challenges as we explore higher frequency regions for the axion at above 2 GHz. To overcome these challenges we exploit a toroidal design of cavity and magnetic field. A toroidal geometry offers several advantages, two of which are a larger volume for a given space and greatly reduced fringe fields which interfere with our preamps, in particular the planned quantum-based devices. We introduce the concept of toroidal axion haloscopes and present ongoing research activities and plans at CAPP/IBS.

  6. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  7. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus ΓDd=(S1)d×RD-d is developed from a Lie-group representation and c*c*-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ41. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space-time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross-Neveu and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models, are considered. Then finite size effects on

  8. Toroidal, Counter-Toroidal, and Upwelling Flow in the Mantle Wedge of the Rivera and Cocos Plates: Implications for IOB Geochemistry in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Florian; Vásquez-Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Contreras, Juan

    2016-10-01

    We carried out analog laboratory modeling at a scale 1:4,000,000 and computer rendering of the flow patterns in a simulated western Middle American subduction zone. The scaled model consists of a transparent tank filled with corn syrup and housing two conveyor belts made of polyethylene strips. One of the strips dips 60° and moves at a velocity of 30 mm/min simulating the Rivera plate. The other one dips 45°, moves at 90 mm/min simulating the subduction of the Cocos plate. Our scaled subduction zone also includes a gap between the simulated slabs analogous to a tear recently observed in shear wave tomography studies. An acrylic plate 3 mm thick floats on the syrup in grazing contact with the polyethylene strips and simulates the overriding North America plate. Our experiments reveal a deep toroidal flow of asthenospheric mantle through the Cocos-Rivera separation. The flow is driven by a pressure gradient associated with the down-dip differential-motion of the slabs. Similarly, low pressure generated by the fast-moving Cocos plate creates a shallow counter-toroidal flow in the uppermost 100 km of the mantle wedge. The flow draws mantle beneath the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the Jalisco block, then plunges into the deep mantle by the descending poloidal cell of the Cocos slab. Moreover, our model suggests a hydraulic jump causes an ~250 km asthenosphere upwelling around the area where intra-arc extensional systems converge in western Mexico. The upwelling eventually merges with the shallow counter-toroidal flow describing a motion in 3D space similar to an Archimedes' screw. Our results indicate the differential motion between subducting slabs drives mixing in the mantle wedge of the Rivera plate and allows the slab to steepen and retreat. Model results are in good agreement with seismic anisotropy studies and the geochemistry of lavas erupted in the Jalisco block. The model can explain the eruption of OIB lavas in the vicinity of the City of

  9. Toroidal, Counter-Toroidal, and Upwelling Flow in the Mantle Wedge of the Rivera and Cocos Plates: Implications for IOB Geochemistry in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Florian; Vásquez-Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Contreras, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We carried out analog laboratory modeling at a scale 1:4,000,000 and computer rendering of the flow patterns in a simulated western Middle American subduction zone. The scaled model consists of a transparent tank filled with corn syrup and housing two conveyor belts made of polyethylene strips. One of the strips dips 60° and moves at a velocity of 30 mm/min simulating the Rivera plate. The other one dips 45°, moves at 90 mm/min simulating the subduction of the Cocos plate. Our scaled subduction zone also includes a gap between the simulated slabs analogous to a tear recently observed in shear wave tomography studies. An acrylic plate 3 mm thick floats on the syrup in grazing contact with the polyethylene strips and simulates the overriding North America plate. Our experiments reveal a deep toroidal flow of asthenospheric mantle through the Cocos-Rivera separation. The flow is driven by a pressure gradient associated with the down-dip differential-motion of the slabs. Similarly, low pressure generated by the fast-moving Cocos plate creates a shallow counter-toroidal flow in the uppermost 100 km of the mantle wedge. The flow draws mantle beneath the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the Jalisco block, then plunges into the deep mantle by the descending poloidal cell of the Cocos slab. Moreover, our model suggests a hydraulic jump causes an ~250 km asthenosphere upwelling around the area where intra-arc extensional systems converge in western Mexico. The upwelling eventually merges with the shallow counter-toroidal flow describing a motion in 3D space similar to an Archimedes' screw. Our results indicate the differential motion between subducting slabs drives mixing in the mantle wedge of the Rivera plate and allows the slab to steepen and retreat. Model results are in good agreement with seismic anisotropy studies and the geochemistry of lavas erupted in the Jalisco block. The model can explain the eruption of OIB lavas in the vicinity of the City of

  10. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.

    2007-01-01

    of toroidal velocity using the Weiland model and GLF23 also confirm that the ratio chi(phi)/chi(i) approximate to 0.4 reproduces the core toroidal velocity profiles well and similar accuracy with the ion temperature profiles. Concerning poloidal velocities on JET, the experimental measurements show...... that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the neo-classical estimate within the ITB. This significantly affects the calculated radial electric field and therefore, the E x B flow shear used for example in transport simulations. Both the Weiland model and GLF23 reproduce the onset...

  11. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  12. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The model by Braginskii for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to previous evaluations which contain an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglect the effect of the pitch angle. A radial gyroviscous force is found to survive the limit of constant density and rigid toroidal rotation of the flux surface, and a radial shear viscous force may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile.

  13. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  14. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  15. Comparative study between toroidal coordinates and the magnetic dipole field

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    There is a similar behaviour between the toroidal coordinates and the dipole magnetic field produced by a circular loop. In this work we evaluate up to what extent the former can be used as a representation of the latter. While the tori in the toroidal coordinates have circular cross sections, those of the circular loop magnetic field are nearly elliptical ovoids, but they are very similar for large aspect ratios.The centres of the latter displace from the axis faster than the former. By making a comparison between tori of similar aspect ratios, we find quantitative criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the approximation.

  16. First Toroidal Rotation Measurements of Protons and Impurities in the TJ-II Stellarator; Primeras Medidas de Rotacion Toroidal de Protones e Impurezas en el Stellarator TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapisarda, D.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2006-07-01

    First absolute toroidal rotation measurements in the TJ-II stellarator, by using passive emission spectroscopy, are presented. The wavelength calibration is performed by using a spectral system which combines the spectra coming from the plasma and from a lamp in real time. Measurements have been made both for protons and some impurity ions (C4+, He+), in discharges created by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and in discharges with neutral beam injection heating. In addition, a description of the systems as well as the calibration procedures an data analysis is addressed. (Author) 10 refs.

  17. Controlling the toroidal excitations in metamaterials for high-Q response

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuancheng; Fu, Quanhong; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of toroidal multipoles in metamaterials was investigated for high-Q response at a subwavelength scale. In this study, we explored the optimization of toroidal excitations in a planar metamaterial comprised of asymmetric split ring resonators (ASRRs). It was found that the scattering power of toroidal dipole can be remarkably strengthened by adjusting the characteristic parameter of ASRRs: asymmetric factor. Interestingly, the improvement in toroidal excitation accompanies increasing of the Q-factor of the toroidal metamaterial, it is shown that both the scattering power of toroidal dipole and the Q-factor were increased near one order by changing the asymmetric factor of ASRRs. The optimization in excitation of toroidal multipoles provide opportunity to further increase the Q-factor of toroidal metamaterial and boost light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale for potential applications in low-power nonlinear processing and sensitive photonic applications.

  18. Rational-q Triggered Transport Changes With Varying Toroidal Rotation in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Waltz, R. E.; van Zeeland, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Rhodes, T. L.

    2007-11-01

    Comparison of rational-q triggered ITBs in discharges with varying toroidal torque injection was carried out. Experiments were conducted in negative central shear discharges with different mixes of co/counter neutral beam injection (NBI) that altered the equilibrium ExB shear in conditions where transient improvements in transport occur near integer qmin values. The transport changes were seen in high and low rotation cases; however, the latter discharges did not transition to improved core confinement. Observations support the model that sufficient background ExB shear is required for barrier formation and zonal flow effects at integer qmin act as trigger in this case. The lack of TAE modes in the balanced injection cases indicates they are not linked to the transient confinement improvement. Fluctuation data obtained in co and balanced NBI show similar reductions in turbulence near integer qmin as well as poloidal velocity excursions that may be further evidence of zonal flow.

  19. Symmetry breaking in MAST plasma turbulence due to toroidal flow shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M. F. J.; van Wyk, F.; Field, A. R.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; the MAST Team

    2017-03-01

    The flow shear associated with the differential toroidal rotation of tokamak plasmas breaks an underlying symmetry of the turbulent fluctuations imposed by the up–down symmetry of the magnetic equilibrium. Using experimental beam-emission-spectroscopy measurements and gyrokinetic simulations, this symmetry breaking in ion-scale turbulence in MAST is shown to manifest itself as a tilt of the spatial correlation function and a finite skew in the distribution of the fluctuating density field. The tilt is a statistical expression of the ‘shearing’ of the turbulent structures by the mean flow. The skewness of the distribution is related to the emergence of long-lived density structures in sheared, near-marginal plasma turbulence. The extent to which these effects are pronounced is argued (with the aid of the simulations) to depend on the distance from the nonlinear stability threshold. Away from the threshold, the symmetry is effectively restored.

  20. Symmetry breaking in MAST plasma turbulence due to toroidal flow shear

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, M F J; Field, A R; Ghim, Y -c; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    The flow shear associated with the differential toroidal rotation of tokamak plasmas breaks an underlying symmetry of the turbulent fluctuations imposed by the up-down symmetry of the magnetic equilibrium. Using experimental Beam-Emission-Spectroscopy (BES) measurements and gyrokinetic simulations, this symmetry breaking in ion-scale turbulence in MAST is shown to manifest itself as a tilt of the spatial correlation function and a finite skew in the distribution of the fluctuating density field. The tilt is a statistical expression of the "shearing" of the turbulent structures by the mean flow. The skewness of the distribution is related to the emergence of long-lived density structures in sheared, near-marginal plasma turbulence. The extent to which these effects are pronounced is argued (with the aid of the simulations) to depend on the distance from the nonlinear stability threshold. Away from the threshold, the symmetry is effectively restored.

  1. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A., E-mail: akira.ueno@j-parc.jp; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H. [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  2. Computer Simulation of Transport Driven Current in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, William Joseph, III

    1995-01-01

    the "seed current" which the Bootstrap Theory requires. Such "100% bootstrapped" tokamak plasmas have been realized in experiments. The Bootstrap and dynamo mechanisms do not drive toroidal current where the poloidal magnetic field is zero, and so the Bootstrap Theory asserts that a "seed current" must be maintained by some other means at the magnetic axis. The simulations and analytical theory presented here indicate that in tokamak conditions, there is an additional spontaneous current drive due to the preferential loss of particles whose current opposes the net plasma current. In a centrally fueled tokamak, this mechanism drives current even at the magnetic axis. If this effect functions in experiments as it does in our simulations, then Transport Driven Current would eliminate the need for any external current drive in tokamaks, except simple ohmic heating for initial generation of the plasma.

  3. Homogeneous Construction of the Toroidal Lie Algebra of Type A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Lian; Cui Chen; Qinzhu Wen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we consider an analogue of the level two homogeneous construc-tion of the affine Kac-Moody algebra A1(1) by vertex operators.We construct modules for the toroidal Lie algebra and the extended toroidal Lie algebra of type A1.We also prove that the module is completely reducible for the extended toroidal Lie algebra.

  4. Observing and modelling the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields of the global dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert; Duvall, Thomas; Schüssler, Manfred; Schunker, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    The large scale solar dynamo is a cycle where poloidal flux is generated from toroidal flux, and toroidal flux is generated from poloidal flux. The toroidal and poloidal fields can be inferred from observations, and the Babcock-Leighton model shows how differential rotation and flux emergence explain the observed evolution of the fields.

  5. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  6. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  7. Theory of the M = 1 Kink Mode in Toroidal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.; Schep, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The energy principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to study the ideal MHD stability of the m = 1 internal kink mode in a toroidal plasma. The equilibrium configurations that are considered allow for a broad region where the safety factor q is close to unity. This region may extend to t

  8. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  9. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  10. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  11. Stability of toroidal magnetic fields in stellar interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Ibañez-Mejia, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D MHD simulations of purely toroidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field configurations to study the behavior of the Tayler instability. For the first time the simultaneous action of rotation and magnetic diffusion are taken into account and the effects of a poloidal field on the dynamic evolution of unstable toroidal magnetic fields is included. In the absence of diffusion, fast rotation (rotation rate compared to Alfv\\'en frequency) is able to suppress the instability when the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned and when the radial field strength gradient p 1.5, rapid rotation does not suppress the instability but instead introduces a damping factor to the growth rate in agreement with the analytic predictions. For the mixed poloidal-toroidal fields we find an unstable axisymmetric mode, not predicted analytically, right at the stability threshold for the non-axisymmetric modes; it has been argued that an axisymmetric mode is necessary for the closure of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo loop.

  12. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.; Passian, A.

    2017-04-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  13. Approximations for the natural logarithm from solenoid-toroid correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Semiz, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    It seems reasonable that a toroid can be thought of approximately as a solenoid bent into a circle. The correspondence of the inductances of these two objects gives an approximation for the natural logarithm in terms of the average of two numbers. Different ways of averaging give different approximants. They are expressions simpler than Taylor polynomials, and are meaningful over a wider domain.

  14. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale.

  15. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  16. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Document Server

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  17. OSCILLATION-DRIVEN MAGNETOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Meng-Xiang; Xu, Ren-Xin; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: linmx97@gmail.com, E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We study the magnetospheric activity in the polar cap region of pulsars under stellar oscillations. The toroidal oscillation of the star propagates into the magnetosphere, which provides additional voltage due to unipolar induction, changes Goldreich-Julian charge density from the traditional value due to rotation, and hence influences particle acceleration. We present a general solution of the effect of oscillations within the framework of the inner vacuum gap model and consider three different inner gap modes controlled by curvature radiation, inverse Compton scattering, and two-photon annihilation, respectively. With different pulsar parameters and oscillation amplitudes, one of three modes would play a dominant role in defining the gap properties. When the amplitude of oscillation exceeds a critical value, mode changing occurs. Oscillations also lead to a change of the size of the polar cap. As applications, we show the inner gap properties under oscillations in both normal pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs). We interpret the onset of radio emission after glitches/flares in AXPs/SGRs as due to oscillation-driven magnetic activities in these objects, within the framework of both the magnetar model and the solid quark star model. Within the magnetar model, radio activation may be caused by the enlargement of the effective polar cap angle and the radio emission beam due to oscillation, whereas within the solid quark star angle, it may be caused by activation of the pulsar inner gap from below the radio emission death line due to an oscillation-induced voltage enhancement. The model can also explain the glitch-induced radio profile change observed in PSR J1119–6127.

  18. Stability of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode in axisymmetric toroidal equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Wong, K.L.

    1993-09-01

    The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) is investigated in general tokamak equilibria with finite aspect ratio and finite plasma beta. The finite orbit width of the hot particles and the collisional damping of the trapped electrons are included. For the trapped hot particles, the finite orbit width is found to be stabilizing. For the circulating hot particles, the finite orbit width effect is stabilizing for larger values of v{sub h}/v{sub A} (> 1) and destabilizing for smaller values of v{sub h}/v{sub A} (< 1), where v{sub h} is the hot particle speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. The collisional damping of the trapped electrons is found to have a much weaker dependence on the collision frequency than the previous analytic results. The contribution of the curvature term to the trapped electron collisional damping is negligible compared to that of the parallel electric field term for typical parameters. The calculated critical hot particle beta values for the TAE instability are consistent with the experimental measurements.

  19. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  20. LEDA beam diagnostics instrumentation: Beam current measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D.; Day, L.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Kasemir, K.-U.; Martinez, D.; Power, J. F.; Shurter, R.; Stettler, M.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7 MeV and current of 100 mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Two types of current measurements are used. The first is an AC or pulsed-current measurement which uses three LANL built toroids. They are placed in the beamline in such a way as to measure important transmission parameters and act as a differential current-loss machine protection system. The second system is a DC current measurement used to measure cw beam characteristics and uses toroids from Bergoz Inc. There are two of these systems, so they can also be used for transmission measurements. The AC system uses custom processing electronics whereas the DC system uses a modified Bergoz® electronics system. Both systems feature data acquisition via a series of custom TMS320C40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of these systems, the calibration technique, the differential current loss measurements and fast-protection processing, current droop characteristics for the AC system, and existing system noise levels. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  1. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Benedetti, Carlo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bulanov, Stepan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Min [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China); Esarey, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Vay, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, Lule [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China); Leemans, Wim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2O3 laser for ionization injection.

  2. Generation and pointing stabilization of multi-GeV electron beams from a laser plasma accelerator driven in a pre-formed plasma waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mittelberger, D. E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Leemans, W. P., E-mail: WPLeemans@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Laser pulses with peak power 0.3 PW were used to generate electron beams with energy >4 GeV within a 9 cm-long capillary discharge waveguide operated with a plasma density of ≈7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Simulations showed that the super-Gaussian near-field laser profile that is typical of high-power femtosecond laser systems reduces the efficacy of guiding in parabolic plasma channels compared with the Gaussian laser pulses that are typically simulated. In the experiments, this was mitigated by increasing the plasma density and hence the contribution of self-guiding. This allowed for the generation of multi-GeV electron beams, but these had angular fluctuation ≳2 mrad rms. Mitigation of capillary damage and more accurate alignment allowed for stable beams to be produced with energy 2.7±0.1 GeV. The pointing fluctuation was 0.6 mrad rms, which was less than the beam divergence of ≲1 mrad full-width-half-maximum.

  3. Ultra-low emittance beam generation using two-color ionization injection in a CO2 laser-driven plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S S; Chen, M; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Vay, J -L; Yu, L -L; Leemans, W P

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance (tens of nm) beams can be generated in a plasma accelerator using ionization injection of electrons into a wakefield. An all-optical method of beam generation uses two laser pulses of different colors. A long-wavelength drive laser pulse (with a large ponderomotive force and small peak electric field) is used to excite a large wakefield without fully ionizing a gas, and a short-wavelength injection laser pulse (with a small ponderomotive force and large peak electric field), co-propagating and delayed with respect to the pump laser, to ionize a fraction of the remaining bound electrons at a trapped wake phase, generating an electron beam that is accelerated in the wake. The trapping condition, the ionized electron distribution, and the trapped bunch dynamics are discussed. Expressions for the beam transverse emittance, parallel and orthogonal to the ionization laser polarization, are presented. An example is shown using a 10-micron CO2 laser to drive the wake and a frequency-doubled Ti:Al2...

  4. Computer simulation of transport driven current in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunan, W.J.; Dawson, J.M. (University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Physics, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90024-1547 (United States))

    1994-09-19

    We have investigated transport driven current in tokamaks via 2+1/2 dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations. These have demonstrated a steady increase of toroidal current in centrally fueled plasmas. Neoclassical theory predicts that the bootstrap current vanishes at large aspect ratio, but we see equal or greater current growth in straight cylindrical plasmas. These results indicate that a centrally fueled and heated tokamak may sustain its toroidal current, even without the seed current'' which the neoclassical bootstrap theory requires.

  5. Efficient excitation and tuning of toroidal dipoles within individual homogenous nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Lei, Bing; Hu, Haojun; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the fundamental topic of light scattering by single homogenous nanoparticles from the new perspective of excitation and manipulation of toroidal dipoles. It is revealed that besides within all-dielectric particles, toroidal dipoles can also be efficiently excited within homogenous metallic nanoparticles. Moreover, we show that those toroidal dipoles excited can be spectrally tuned through adjusting the radial anisotropy parameters of the materials, which paves the way for further more flexible manipulations of the toroidal responses within photonic systems. The study into toroidal multipole excitation and tuning within nanoparticles deepens our understanding of the seminal problem of light scattering, and may incubate many scattering related fundamental researches and applications.

  6. CW/Pulsed H{sup −} ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People' s Republic of China (China); Zhang, A. L. [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People' s Republic of China (China); Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People' s Republic of China (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2015-04-08

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H{sup −} beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H{sup −} source able to produce very intense H{sup −} beams with important variation of the duty factor{sup [1]}. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H{sup −} ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H{sup −} ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H{sup −} beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π·mm·mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H{sup −} ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π·mm·mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H{sup −} source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H{sup −} source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  7. Observation of Fano resonance and classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in toroidal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Song; Yang, Helin [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Cong, Lonqing; Singh, Ranjan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Toroidal multipoles have recently been explored in various scientific communities, ranging from atomic and molecular physics, electrodynamics, and solid-state physics to biology. Here we experimentally and numerically demonstrate a three-dimensional toroidal metamaterial where two different toroidal dipoles along orthogonal directions have been observed. The chosen toroidal metamaterial also simultaneously supports Fano resonance and the classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena in the transmission spectra that originate from the electric-toroidal dipole and electric-magnetic dipole destructive interference. The intriguing properties of the toroidal resonances may open up avenues for applications in toroidal moments generator, sensing and slow-light devices. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Emittance growth due to the wake field driven by an electron beam accelerated in an RF-gun of free electron laser 'ELSA'

    CERN Document Server

    Salah, W

    2000-01-01

    It appears that the ease of the parameter chosen for 'ELSA' photo injector, the influence of the exit aperture, in terms of beam quality, is slight concerning the transverse emittance: (DELTA epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r /epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub = = r)(z)approx 3% at maximum, and negligible concerning the axial emittance. To complete this paper, we recall the results previously obtained concerning the wake field of a closed or open cavity for a beam approaching the anode . They had quantitatively specified the expected deep asymmetry between the conducting walls regarding their contribution to the total wake field, besides the space-charge contribution. (Given that the radial walls have no time to contribute, these conducting walls are the cathode and the anode.) Thus, concerning the effects on whole-beam emittances, the correction (DELTA epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i ...

  9. A Fully GPU-Based Ray-Driven Backprojector via a Ray-Culling Scheme with Voxel-Level Parallelization for Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Gyu; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Lee, Ho

    2015-12-01

    A ray-driven backprojector is based on ray-tracing, which computes the length of the intersection between the ray paths and each voxel to be reconstructed. To reduce the computational burden caused by these exhaustive intersection tests, we propose a fully graphics processing unit (GPU)-based ray-driven backprojector in conjunction with a ray-culling scheme that enables straightforward parallelization without compromising the high computing performance of a GPU. The purpose of the ray-culling scheme is to reduce the number of ray-voxel intersection tests by excluding rays irrelevant to a specific voxel computation. This rejection step is based on an axis-aligned bounding box (AABB) enclosing a region of voxel projection, where eight vertices of each voxel are projected onto the detector plane. The range of the rectangular-shaped AABB is determined by min/max operations on the coordinates in the region. Using the indices of pixels inside the AABB, the rays passing through the voxel can be identified and the voxel is weighted as the length of intersection between the voxel and the ray. This procedure makes it possible to reflect voxel-level parallelization, allowing an independent calculation at each voxel, which is feasible for a GPU implementation. To eliminate redundant calculations during ray-culling, a shared-memory optimization is applied to exploit the GPU memory hierarchy. In experimental results using real measurement data with phantoms, the proposed GPU-based ray-culling scheme reconstructed a volume of resolution 28032803176 in 77 seconds from 680 projections of resolution 10243768 , which is 26 times and 7.5 times faster than standard CPU-based and GPU-based ray-driven backprojectors, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that the ray-driven backprojector provides high-quality reconstruction images when compared with those generated by the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm using a pixel-driven backprojector, with an average of 2.5 times

  10. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  11. Initial value problem of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T.; Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Horton, W.

    1998-06-01

    The initial value problem of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode is studied based on the Laplace transform of the ion gyrokinetic equation and the electron Boltzmann relation with the charge neutrality condition. Due to the toroidal magnetic drift, the Laplace-transformed density and potential perturbations have a branch cut as well as poles on the complex-frequency plane. The inverse Laplace transform shows that the temporal evolution of the density and potential perturbations consists of the normal modes and the continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from the poles and the branch cut, respectively. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with the eigenfrequencies determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode shows power-law decay oscillation. For the stable case, the long-time asymptotic behavior of the potential and density perturbations is dominated by the continuum mode which decays slower than the normal modes. (author)

  12. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  13. Toroidal magnetized iron neutrino detector for a neutrino factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, A.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Burguet-Castell, J.

    2013-08-01

    A neutrino factory has unparalleled physics reach for the discovery and measurement of CP violation in the neutrino sector. A far detector for a neutrino factory must have good charge identification with excellent background rejection and a large mass. An elegant solution is to construct a magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) along the lines of MINOS, where iron plates provide a toroidal magnetic field and scintillator planes provide 3D space points. In this report, the current status of a simulation of a toroidal MIND for a neutrino factory is discussed in light of the recent measurements of large $\\theta_{13}$. The response and performance using the 10 GeV neutrino factory configuration are presented. It is shown that this setup has equivalent $\\delta_{CP}$ reach to a MIND with a dipole field and is sensitive to the discovery of CP violation over 85% of the values of $\\delta_{CP}$.

  14. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France); Smolyakov, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z{sup 2}/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  15. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z2/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  16. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2011-12-01

    The model by Braginskii [1] (Braginskii, S. I. 1965 Transport processes in plasma. In: Review of Plasma Physics, Vol. 1 (ed. M.A. Leontovich). New York, NY: Consultants Bureau, pp. 205-311) for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to a previous evaluation, which contains an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglects the effect of the pitch angle. Parallel viscosity contributes a radial shear viscous force, which may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile. An evaluation is performed of this radial viscous force for a tokamak near equilibrium, which indicates qualitative agreement between theory and measurement for impure plasma discharges with strong toroidal flow.

  17. Precession of Toroidally Passing Particles in Tokamaks and Spherical Tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B.White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2003-01-30

    The toroidal precession of the well-circulating particles and particles that are passing toroidally but trapped poloidally is studied. Expressions for the precession frequency, which are convenient for practical use, are obtained and analyzed. It is found that the key parameters that determine the magnitude and the direction of the precession velocity are the plasma elongation, the magnitudes and profiles of the safety factor and beta defined as the ratio of the local plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure at the magnetic axis. An important role of the ''paramagnetic'' precession in highly elongated plasmas is revealed. The analysis carried out is based on the obtained expressions for the equilibrium magnetic field strength and the field line curvature.

  18. Radial transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The radial flux of toroidal angular momentum is needed to determine tokamak intrinsic rotation profiles. Its computation requires knowledge of the gyrokinetic distribution functions and turbulent electrostatic potential to second-order in $\\epsilon = \\rho/L$, where $\\rho$ is the ion Larmor radius and $L$ is the variation length of the magnetic field. In this article, a complete set of equations to calculate the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum in any tokamak is presented. In particular, the $O(\\epsilon^2)$ equations for the turbulent components of the distribution functions and electrostatic potential are given for the first time without assuming that the poloidal magnetic field over the magnetic field strength is small.

  19. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, L. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  20. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, Louis [EURATOM-IPP Association, Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  1. Verification of gyrokinetic particle simulation of current-driven instability in fusion plasmas. I. Internal kink mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClenaghan, J.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Deng, W.; Wang, Z. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) capability has been extended for simulating internal kink instability with kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. The global simulation domain covers the magnetic axis, which is necessary for simulating current-driven instabilities. GTC simulation in the fluid limit of the kink modes in cylindrical geometry is verified by benchmarking with a magnetohydrodynamic eigenvalue code. Gyrokinetic simulations of the kink modes in the toroidal geometry find that ion kinetic effects significantly reduce the growth rate even when the banana orbit width is much smaller than the radial width of the perturbed current layer at the mode rational surface.

  2. Miniature anastigmatic spectrometer design with a concave toroidal mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianing; Chen, He; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan

    2016-03-01

    An advanced optical design for a low-cost and astigmatism-corrected spectrometer with a high resolution is presented. The theory and method of astigmatism correction are determined with the use of a concave toroidal mirror. The performances of a modified spectrometer and a traditional spectrometer are compared, and the analysis is verified. Experimentally, the limiting resolution of our spectrometer is 0.1 nm full width at half-maximum, as measured for 579.1 nm.

  3. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  4. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  5. Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission Systems: Terminology and Present Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of continuously variable transmission systems in many different areas such as aerospace, robotics, machinery and automotive industries as an alternative to conventional speed changers with constant ratio becomes widely.Especially in the automotive industry, these systems have been used increasingly, since they enable that internal combustion engines in vehicles run at optimal speeds, and consequently provide considerable fuel savings and therefore lower emission values and also they provide powerful acceleration and quiet working. CVT systems have several constructive variants such as belted, chained, balled, toroidal etc. In this paper, toroidal CVT systems based on elastohydrodynamic principles are concerned with, and fundamental works of last two decades in this field are reviewed. However, the relevant terminology and dynamics along with the control of these systems are briefly treated for better understanding of the literature mentioned. Attention is drawn to the lack of some significant issues in present research works, and potential future works are pointed out. This paper, to the authors’ knowledge, will be the first review on toroidal CVT systems in Turkish literature

  6. The Geometry on Smooth Toroidal Compactifications of Siegel varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Shing-Tung

    2012-01-01

    This is a part of our joint program. The purpose of this paper is to study smooth toroidal compactifications of Siegel varieties and their applications, we also try to understand the K\\"ahler-Einstein metrics on Siegel varieties through the compactifications. Let $A_{g,\\Gamma}:=H_g/\\Gamma$ be a Siegel variety, where $H_g$ is the genus-$g$ Siegel space and $\\Gamma$ is an arithmetic subgroup in $\\Aut(H_g)$. There are four aspects of this paper : 1.There is a correspondence between the category of degenerations of Abelian varieties and the category of limits of weight one Hodge structures. We show that any cusp of Siegel space $\\frak{H}_g$ can be identified with the set of certain weight one polarized mixed Hodge structures. 2.In general, the boundary of a smooth toroidal compactification $\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}$ of $A_{g,\\Gamma}$ has self-intersections.For most geometric applications, we would like to have a nice toroidal compactification such that the added infinity boundary $D_\\infty =\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}-A_{g,\\Gam...

  7. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, Donald A., E-mail: spongda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  8. Dependence of the L- to H-mode Power Threshold on Toroidal Rotation and the Link to Edge Turbulence Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, G; Gohil, P; Schlossberg, D; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Groebner, R; Makowski, M; Moyer, R; Petty, C; Rhodes, T; Schmitz, L; Shafer, M; Solomon, W; Umansky, M; Wang, G; White, A; Xu, X

    2008-10-13

    The injected power required to induce a transition from L-mode to H-mode plasmas is found to depend strongly on the injected neutral beam torque and consequent plasma toroidal rotation. Edge turbulence and flows, measured near the outboard midplane of the plasma (0.85 < r/a < 1.0) on DIII-D with the high-sensitivity 2D beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system, likewise vary with rotation and suggest a causative connection. The L-H power threshold in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift away from the X-point decreases from 4-6 MW with co-current beam injection, to 2-3 MW with near zero net injected torque, and to <2 MW with counter injection. Plasmas with the ion {del}B drift towards the X-point exhibit a qualitatively similar though less pronounced power threshold dependence on rotation. 2D edge turbulence measurements with BES show an increasing poloidal flow shear as the L-H transition is approached in all conditions. At low rotation, the poloidal flow of turbulent eddies near the edge reverses prior to the L-H transition, generating a significant poloidal flow shear that exceeds the measured turbulence decorrelation rate. This increased poloidal turbulence velocity shear may facilitate the L-H transition. No such reversal is observed in high rotation plasmas. The poloidal turbulence velocity spectrum exhibits a transition from a Geodesic Acoustic Mode zonal flow to a higher-power, lower frequency, zero-mean-frequency zonal flow as rotation varies from co-current to balanced during a torque scan at constant injected neutral beam power, perhaps also facilitating the L-H transition. This reduced power threshold at lower toroidal rotation may benefit inherently low-rotation plasmas such as ITER.

  9. MgH2 → Mg phase transformation driven by a high-energy electron beam: An in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I. P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I. R.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change have been studied using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope to transform MgH2 into Mg. The study involved selected-area diffraction and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The orientation relation ( ? and ? ), obtained from the electron diffraction study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms during the phase change. The in situ EELS results have been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH2, which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems.

  10. Study of NBI-driven chirping mode properties and radial location by the heavy ion beam probe in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.; Castejón, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Khabanov, P. O.; Kozachek, A. S.; Krupnik, L. I.; Liniers, M.; Lysenko, S. E.; de Pablos, J. L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Zenin, V. N.; HIBP Group; TJ-II Team

    2016-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) were studied in low magnetic shear flexible heliac TJ-II (B 0  =  0.95 T, R 0  =  1.5 m,   =  0.22 m) neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas (P NBI  ⩽  1.1 MW, E NBI  =  32 keV) using the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). L-mode hydrogen plasmas heated with co-, counter- and balanced-NBI and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) were investigated in various magnetic configurations with rotational transform ι(a)/2π  =  1/q ~ 1.5-1.6. The HIBP diagnostic is capable of simultaneously measuring the oscillations of the plasma electric potential, density and poloidal magnetic field. In earlier studies chirping modes have been observed with 250 kHz  electric potential perturbations have a ballooning character, while the density and B pol perturbations are nearly symmetric for both ECRH  +  NBI and NBI-only plasmas. On TJ-II, the dominant effect on the nonlinear evolution of the AE from the chirping state to the steady-frequency state is the magnetic configuration, determined by the vacuum ι and plasma current I pl.

  11. Profile Measurement of Ion Temperature and Toroidal Rotation Velocity with Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Diagnostics in the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴静; 姚列明; 朱建华; 韩晓玉; 李文柱

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the profile measurement of impurity ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity that can be achieved by using the charge exchange recombination spectrum (CXRS) diagnostics tool built on the HL-2A toknmak. By using CXRS, an accurate impurity ion temperature and toroidal plasma rotation velocity profile can be achieved under the condition of neutrM beam injection (NBI) heating. Considering the edge effect of the line of CVI 529.06 nm (n= 8-7), which contains three lines (active exciting spectral line (ACX), passivity exciting spectral line (PCX) and electron exciting spectral line (ICE)), and using three Gaussian fitted curves, we obtain the following experimental results: the core ion temperature of HL-2A device is nearly thousands of eV, and the plasma rotation velocity reaches about 104 m· s^-1. At the end of paper, some explanations are presented for the relationship between the curves and the inner physical mechanism.

  12. Profile Measurement of Ion Temperature and Toroidal Rotation Velocity with Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Diagnostics in the HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Yao, Lieming; Zhu, Jianhua; Han, Xiaoyu; Li, Wenzhu

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the profile measurement of impurity ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity that can be achieved by using the charge exchange recombination spectrum (CXRS) diagnostics tool built on the HL-2A tokamak. By using CXRS, an accurate impurity ion temperature and toroidal plasma rotation velocity profile can be achieved under the condition of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Considering the edge effect of the line of CVI 529.06 nm (n = 8~7), which contains three lines (active exciting spectral line (ACX), passivity exciting spectral line (PCX) and electron exciting spectral line (ICE)), and using three Gaussian fitted curves, we obtain the following experimental results: the core ion temperature of HL-2A device is nearly thousands of eV, and the plasma rotation velocity reaches about 104 m · s-1. At the end of paper, some explanations are presented for the relationship between the curves and the inner physical mechanism.

  13. Measurement of angular divergence and ion species ratios of an rf-driven multicusp ion source for diagnostic neutral beam by Doppler shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, S. J.; Yang, H. L.; Hwang, S. M.

    2000-03-01

    The ion species ratios as well as the angular divergences are measured by using a Doppler shift spectroscopy of Hα spectral lines, which originate from several different ions, such as H2+ and H3+ as well as H+, and are spectrally well resolvable from each other on the measured spectral window of detection system. The angular divergences of the ion beam components are determined from the linewidths of the measured emission lines, and the ratio of mixed species is deduced from the intensity ratio of each peak. The ion species ratios measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy are cross checked by a mass analyzing magnet. The measurements are performed varying the input rf power and the operating source pressure.

  14. Multi-kiloampere, electron-beam generation using metal photo-cathodes driven by ArF and KrF lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.L.; Moya, S.A.; Ridlon, R.N.; Seitz, G.J.; Shurter, R.P.

    1996-06-01

    An electron-beam-pumped laser operating at ArF (193 nm) or KrF (248 nm) producing 35 MW (3.5 J in 100 ns) has been used to illuminate a micro-machined aluminum cathode. The cathode was pulsed to 2.75 MV at fields of 185 kV/cm (15-cm AK gap) using REX[1,2](a 4-MV, 5-kA,85-ns) pulsed-diode machine. The extracted current versus incident laser power, and therefore, quantum efficiency was measured for KrF at 5x10{sup -5}; ArF was significantly higher at 1x10{sup -3}. Current densities of 100 A/cm{sup 2} and total currents of 2 kA have been achieved, the latter by increasing the cathode area in proportion to the laser power.

  15. Highly-efficient source of collimated multi-MeV photons driven by radiation reaction of an electron beam in a self-generated magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, D J; Arefiev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high brilliance X-ray radiation sources is revolutionizing physics, chemistry, and biology research through their novel applications. Another breakthrough is anticipated with the construction of next-generation laser facilities which will operate at intensities beyond $10^{23}$ $\\mathrm{W/cm^2}$, leading to higher yield, shorter wavelength radiation sources. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate that a source of collimated multi-MeV photons with conversion efficiency comparable to the one expected for these facilities is achievable at an order of magnitude lower in intensity, within reach of the existing facilities. In the optimal setup, the laser pulse irradiates a bulk solid-density target, heating the target electrons and inducing relativistic transparency. As the pulse then propagates, it generates a beam of energetic electrons which in turn drives a strong azimuthal magnetic field. This field significantly enhances the radiation reaction for the electrons, yielding tens of ...

  16. An Instability-driven Dynamo for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2000-01-01

    We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD) operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energetically adequate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advective accretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by the buoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. The efficiency of magnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino losses although an MHD collimation mechanism may deem this process a more viable alternative to neutrino-burst-driven models of gamma ray bursts.

  17. Toroidal cell and battery. [storage battery for high amp-hour load applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, W. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell.

  18. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  19. Installation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The initial system takes a single point measurement on the magnetic axis and will be used to assess options for an expansion to a multi-point system to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstructions using the V3FIT code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line is designed to propagate ~ 8 m to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. An Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified CCD camera is used in conjunction with a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 532-580 nm. A single point system will initially measure plasmas with core electron temperatures of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  20. Observation of Central Toroidal Rotation Induced by ICRF on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiayun; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Xinjun; Lyu, Bo; Chen, Jun; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Yu, Yi; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian

    2016-02-01

    Core plasma rotation of both L-mode and H-mode discharges with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating (MH) scheme was measured with a tangential X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Co-current central impurity toroidal rotation change was observed in ICRF-heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Rotation increment as high as 30 km/s was generated at ∼1.7 MW ICRF power. Scaling results showed similar trend as the Rice scaling but with significant scattering, especially in L-mode plasmas. We varied the plasma current, toroidal field and magnetic configuration individually to study their effect on L-mode plasma rotation, while keeping the other major plasma parameters and heating unchanged during the scanning. It was found that larger plasma current could induce plasma rotation more efficiently. A scan of the toroidal magnetic field indicated that the largest rotation was obtained for on-axis ICRF heating. A comparison between lower-single-null (LSN) and double-null (DN) configurations showed that LSN discharges rendered a larger rotation change for the same power input and plasma parameters. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175208, 11305212, 11375235, 11405212 and 11261140328), the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology (2014FXCX003) and Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities & Students (BK21 PLUS)

  1. Toroidal mode driven by ion temperature gradients and magnetic-field curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olla, P.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of magnetic-field curvature on the ion-mixing mode is studied in a collisionless-plasma regime. A simple plane model with an external gravity-simulating magnetic curvature is adopted. A dispersion relation which connects the ion-mixing mode to the ubiquitous mode is obtained. It is found that, within the limitations of the present local model, an inhomogeneous plasma can support fluctuations with frequencies larger than those expected in an analysis which disregards the effect of magnetic curvature. The instability threshold of this mode, which depends on the ion temperature gradient, is lowered. The effect of gravity on the ion response influences the quasi-linear ion heat transport.

  2. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  3. Stationary motion of a self gravitating toroidal incompressible liquid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Giorgio; Oliva, Waldyr M

    2012-01-01

    We consider an incompressible fluid contained in a toroidal stratum which is only subjected to Newtonian self-attraction. Under the assumption of infinitesimal tickness of the stratum we show the existence of stationary motions during which the stratum is approximatly a round torus (with radii r, R and R>>r) that rotates around its axis and at the same time rolls on itself. Therefore each particle of the stratum describes an helix-like trajectory around the circumference of radius R that connects the centers of the cross sections of the torus.

  4. Total and paired domination numbers of toroidal meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a graph without isolated vertices. The total domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices that can dominate all vertices in $G$, and the paired domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices in a dominating set whose induced subgraph contains a perfect matching. This paper determines the total domination number and the paired domination number of the toroidal meshes, i.e., the Cartesian product of two cycles $C_n$ and $C_m$ for any $n\\ge 3$ and $m\\in\\{3,4\\}$, and gives some upper bounds for $n, m\\ge 5$.

  5. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  6. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  7. Radio frequency driven multicusp sources (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1998-02-01

    The radio frequency (rf)-driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the superconducting super collider injector. The source can routinely provide 30 mA of H˜ beam at 0.1% duty factor. By adding a minute quantity of cesium to the discharge, H- beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H˜1 has been achieved. The rf-driven H˜ source is being further developed for 6% duty factor operation to be used in the national spallation neutron source. Application of the rf-driven multicusp source has been extended to radioactive ion beam production, ion projection lithography, and compact neutron tubes.

  8. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ∼5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ∼7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  9. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J.

    2016-11-01

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ˜5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ˜7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  10. Characteristics of toroidal rotation and ion temperature pedestals between ELM bursts in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, S. H.; Kwon, J. M.; Ko, W. H.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, H.; Terzolo, L.

    2016-06-01

    Steep pedestal profiles of ion temperature (Ti) and toroidal rotation ( V ϕ ) are routinely observed in neutral beam injection (NBI)-heated KSTAR H-mode plasmas [W. H. Ko et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 083013 (2015)]. In this work, we report a result of detailed analysis of pedestal characteristics. By analyzing a set of data with different experimental conditions, we show that Ti and V ϕ pedestals are coupled to each other and correlation between them becomes stronger when NBI-torque is lower. This suggests the existence of intrinsic toroidal torque in the pedestal. Based on a 1D transport analysis, we find that the prevalence of residual micro-turbulences is necessary to explain momentum transport in the pedestal. The estimated strength of intrinsic torque is shown to be comparable to that from a 2.7 MW NBI source. Finally, we show that non-diffusive momentum flux is indispensable to explain momentum transport in the pedestal, and a residual stress model fits the observed momentum flux reasonably.

  11. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  12. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  13. Absence of toroidal moments in 'aromagnetic' anthracene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alborghetti, S; Coey, J M D [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Puppin, E; Brenna, M; Pinotti, E; Zanni, P [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)], E-mail: alborgs@tcd.ie

    2008-06-15

    Colloidal suspensions of anthracene and other aromatic compounds have been shown to respond to a magnetic field as if they possessed a permanent magnetic moment. This phenomenon was named 'aromagnetism' by Spartakov and Tolstoi, and it was subsequently attributed to the interaction of an electric toroidal moment with a time-varying magnetic field. However, there has been no independent confirmation of the original work. Here, we have selected purified anthracene crystallites which respond to a low magnetic field and investigate how this response depends on the gradient and the time derivative of the field. We conclude that the anomaly cannot be attributed to a toroidal interaction but is due to a constant magnetic moment of the particles. Close examinations using magnetometry and scanning electron microscopy reveal metallic clusters of Fe and Ni up to a few hundred nanometres in size embedded in the anomalous crystallites. These inclusions represent 1.8 ppm by weight of the sample. The observed presence of ferromagnetic inclusions in the ppm range is sufficient to explain the anomalous magnetic properties of micron-sized anthracene crystals, including the reported optical properties of the colloidal suspensions.

  14. Instability of toroidal magnetic field in jets and plerions

    CERN Document Server

    Begelman, M C

    1997-01-01

    Jets and pulsar-fed supernova remnants (plerions) tend to develop highly organized toroidal magnetic field. Such a field structure could explain the polarization properties of some jets, and contribute to their lateral confinement. A toroidal field geometry is also central to models for the Crab Nebula - the archetypal plerion - and leads to the deduction that the Crab pulsar's wind must have a weak magnetic field. Yet this `Z-pinch' field configuration is well known to be locally unstable, even when the magnetic field is weak and/or boundary conditions slow or suppress global modes. Thus, the magnetic field structures imputed to the interiors of jets and plerions are unlikely to persist. To demonstrate this, I present a local analysis of Z-pinch instabilities for relativistic fluids in the ideal MHD limit. Kink instabilities dominate, destroying the concentric field structure and probably driving the system toward a more chaotic state in which the mean field strength is independent of radius (and in which re...

  15. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2015-02-01

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model: the first is the Skyrme model, and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term, both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions, and they are characterized by two integers P and Q , representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B =P Q . We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 with Q =1 , while for P =6 and Q =1 , it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q >1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q =1 . Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  16. Last End Cap Toroid installation : The Pharaonic enterprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaud Foussat

    After the successful and impressive transport feat from Building 191 to Point 1 was carried out by the Friderici crew on 28th June, the second and last Toroid End Cap, ECT-C, was transferred into the surface building, SX1, on 2nd July. The ECT-C was installed in the ATLAS cavern on the C-side on 12th July. As the person responsible for the project, in my opinion, one of the crucial points of this project was to design all the tooling and installation sequences taking into account the building infrastructure dimensional constraints. View of the ECT installation tooling and preparation for the ECT-C descent into the ATLAS 80m-shaft by the ATLAS magnet group and DBS teams. The movement of the 240-ton magnet and 12-m diameter toroid end-cap was achieved in collaboration with SCALES, a subcontractor company, using a hydraulic gantry able to lower the ECT inside the shaft by 5m below the floor level . This allowed the DBS team to attach the end-cap with the 2 x 140 tons overhead crane and lower it onto the c...

  17. Inversion of the Abel equation for toroidal density distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper I present three new results of astronomical interest concerning the theory of Abel inversion. 1) I show that in the case of a spatial emissivity that is constant on toroidal surfaces and projected along the symmetry axis perpendicular to the torus' equatorial plane, it is possible to invert the projection integral. From the surface (i.e. projected) brightness profile one then formally recovers the original spatial distribution as a function of the toroidal radius. 2) By applying the above-described inversion formula, I show that if the projected profile is described by a truncated off-center gaussian, the functional form of the related spatial emissivity is very simple and - most important - nowhere negative for any value of the gaussian parameters, a property which is not guaranteed - in general - by Abel inversion. 3) Finally, I show how a generic multimodal centrally symmetric brightness distribution can be deprojected using a sum of truncated off-center gaussians, recovering the spatial emis...

  18. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  19. Rotation shear induced fluctuation decorrelation in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    The enhanced decorrelation of fluctuations by the combined effects of the E {times} B flow (V{sub E}) shear, the parallel flow (V{sub {parallel}}) shear, and the magnetic shear is studied in toroidal geometry. A two-point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a cylindrical model shows that the reduction of the radial correlation length below its ambient turbulence value ({Delta}r{sub 0}) is characterized by the ratio between the shearing rate {omega}{sub s} and the ambient turbulence scattering rate {Delta}{omega}{sub T}. The derived shearing rate is given by {omega}{sub s}{sup 2} = ({Delta}r{sub 0}){sup 2}[1/{Delta}{phi}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(qV{sub E}/r){r_brace}{sup 2} + 1/{Delta}{eta}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(V{parallel}/qR){r_brace}{sup 2}], where {Delta}{phi} and {Delta}{eta} are the correlation angles of the ambient turbulence along the toroidal and parallel directions. This result deviates significantly from the cylindrical result for high magnetic shear or for ballooning-like fluctuations. For suppression of flute-like fluctuations, only the radial shear of qV{sub E}/r contributes, and the radial shear of V{parallel}/qR is irrelevant regardless of the plasma rotation direction.

  20. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  1. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  2. Deconfinement in Yang-Mills theory through toroidal compactification with deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Simic, Dusan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce field theory techniques through which the deconfinement transition of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory can be moved to a semi-classical domain where it becomes calculable using two-dimensional field theory. We achieve this through a double- trace deformation of toroidally compactified Yang-Mills theory on R2 \\times S1_L \\times S1_{\\beta}. At large N, fixed-L, and arbitrary {\\beta}, the thermodynamics of the deformed theory is equivalent to that of ordinary Yang-Mills theory at leading order in the large N expansion. At fixed-N, small L and a range of {\\beta}, the deformed theory maps to a two-dimensional theory with electric and magnetic (order and disorder) perturbations, analogs of which appear in planar spin-systems and statistical physics. We show that in this regime the deconfinement transition is driven by the competition between electric and magnetic perturbations in this two-dimensional theory. This appears to support the scenario proposed by Liao and Shuryak regarding the magnetic comp...

  3. Design and implementation of a multichannel millimeter wave interferometer for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. C.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Maurer, D. A.; Stevenson, B. A. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A three-channel 1 mm wave interferometer has been designed, assembled, and installed on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid torsatron (CTH). The interferometer design makes novel use of a subharmonic mixer for detection, which simplifies alignment. It employs a single electronically tunable source that is repetitively chirped using a sawtooth waveform of frequency up to 1 MHz. The 15.25 GHz drive oscillator is multiplied in two stages to 122 GHz before a final doubler stage brings it to 244 GHz. Local oscillator (LO) power at 122 GHz is directed through waveguide to the LO input of the subharmonic mixer of each viewing chord, simplifying alignment. Phase detection is performed by directly digitizing the amplified mixer outputs at 50 MHz and processing them with a software algorithm. Initial measurements made with the central chord of the new interferometer agree with those from the existing 4 mm system at low densities. The 1 mm system performs well in current-driven discharges reaching densities over 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, whereas the lower frequency interferometer is found to be less reliable due to loss of fringes. This is a critical improvement for experiments studying the onset, avoidance, and vacuum magnetic transform dependence of disruptions in the CTH device.

  4. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  5. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Axisymmetric Plasmas with Non-Circular Cross Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bing-Ren; LI Ji-Quan; DONG Jia-Qi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geodesic acoustic mode in general toroidally axisymmetric plasmas such as Tokamak and spherical torus is studied in detail. The mode structure is found and the dispersion equation is derived and solved for arbitrary toroidally axi-symmetric plasmas. Besides the finite aspect ratio, effects of elongation and triangularity on this mode are clarified.

  6. Surface imprint of toroidal flow at retreating slab edges: The first geodetic evidence in the Calabrian subduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, M.; Piromallo, C.; Chiarabba, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dense GPS observations can help Earth scientists to capture the surface imprint of mantle toroidal flow at slab edges. We document this process in the Calabrian subduction system, where the Ionian slab rollback took place during the past 30 Ma, following a stepwise process driven by migration of lithospheric tearing. We found rotation rates of 1.29°/Ma (counterclockwise) and 1.74°/Ma (clockwise), for poles located close to the northern and southern slab edges, respectively. These small-scale, opposite rotations occur along complex sets of active faults representing the present-day lithospheric expression of the tearing processes affecting the southeastward retreating Ionian slab at both edges. The observed rotations are likely still young and the process more immature at the northern tear, where it is unable to reorient mantle fabric and therefore is unseen by SKS splitting.

  7. Long-range magnetic response of toroidal boron structures: B16 and [Co@B16](-/3-) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Popov, Ivan A; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2017-09-20

    A correlation between the long-range characteristics of the magnetic response of toroidal boron-based structures is given, involving the uncoordinated B16 cluster and the hypercoordinated [Co@B16](-/3-) counterparts. It is found that the perfectly symmetrical doubly aromatic systems share common features, involving a continuous shielding region for the orientation-averaged response (isotropic), and a long-ranged shielding cone under a perpendicularly oriented applied field (B). In contrast, the conflicting aromatic structure given by the slightly distorted species, exhibits an enhanced deshielding cone under B, which dominates the isotropic character of the response. In addition, [Mn@B16](-) and [Cu@B16](-) clusters were evaluated, denoting the role of the coordinated metal atom in such property. This information is valuable to account for a global magnetic response driven by the bonding pattern acting in each respective compound, and for the possible characterization of intermolecular aggregates or extended structures via NMR experiments.

  8. Ion Extraction from a Toroidal Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source: a Numerical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliri, Claudia; Volpe, Francesco; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are magnetic mirror plasmas of microwave-heated electrons and cold multi-charged ions. The ions are extracted from one end of the mirror and injected in accelerators for nuclear and particle physics studies, hadrontherapy, or neutral beam injection in fusion plasmas. ECRIS devices progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of ``triple products'' comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modeling indicates. Possible techniques involve charge-dependent drifts, divertors, specially designed magnetic fields and associated loss-cones, electrostatic and/or magnetic deflectors, or techniques used in accelerators to transfer particles from one storage ring or accelerator to the next. Here we present single-particle tracings assessing and comparing these extraction techniques.

  9. Ion temperature gradient driven mode in presence of transverse velocity shear in magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sheared poloidal flow on the toroidal branch of the ion temperature gradient driven mode of magnetized nonuniform plasma is studied. A novel "nonmodal" calculation is used to analyze the problem. It is shown that the transverse shear flow considerably reduced the growth...

  10. Design and Implementation of a 200kW, 28GHz gyrotron system for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Ennis, D. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Bigelow, T.

    2016-10-01

    The Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) is an l = 2 , m = 5 torsatron/tokamak hybrid (R0 = 0.75 m, ap 0.2 m, and | B | supplement the existing 15 kW klystron system operating at the fundamental frequency; the latter will be used to initially generate the plasma. Ray-tracing calculations that guide the selection of launching position, antenna focal length, and beam-steering characteristics of the ECRH have been performed with the TRAVIS code [ 1 ] . The calculated absorption is up to 95.7% for vertically propagating rays, however, the absorption is more sensitive to magnetic field variations than for a side launch where the field gradient is tokamak-like. The design of the waveguide path and components for the top-launch scenario will be presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  11. Core-Shell Structured Dielectric-Metal Circular Nanodisk Antenna: Gap Plasmon Assisted Magnetic Toroid-like Cavity Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantennas, the properties of which are essentially determined by their resonance modes, are of interest both fundamentally and for various applications. Antennas with various shapes, geometries and compositions have been demonstrated, each possessing unique properties and potential applications. Here, we propose the use of a sidewall coating as an additional degree of freedom to manipulate plasmonic gap cavity modes in strongly coupled metallic nanodisks. It is demonstrated that for a dielectric middle layer with a thickness of a few tens of nanometers and a sidewall plasmonic coating of more than ten nanometers, the usual optical magnetic resonance modes are eliminated, and only magnetic toroid-like modes are sustainable in the infrared and visible regime. All of these deep-subwavelength modes can be interpreted as an interference effect from the gap surface plasmon polaritons. Our results will be useful in nanoantenna design, high-Q cavity sensing, structured light-beam generation, and photon e...

  12. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mordik, S.N. E-mail: iapuas@gluk.apc.org; Ponomarev, A.G

    2002-03-21

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model.

  13. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mordik, S N

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model.

  14. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  15. Toroidally Asymmetric Distributions of Hydrocarbon (CD) Emission and Chemical Sputtering Sources in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Watkins, J G

    2006-05-16

    Measurements in DIII-D show that the carbon chemical sputtering sources along the inner divertor and center post are toroidally periodic and highest at the upstream tile edge. Imaging with a tangentially viewing camera and visible spectroscopy were used to monitor the emission from molecular hydrocarbons (CH/CD) at 430.8 nm and deuterium neutrals in attached and partially detached divertors of low-confinement mode plasmas. In contrast to the toroidally periodic CD distribution, emission from deuterium neutrals was observed to be toroidally symmetric along the inner strike zone. The toroidal distribution of the measured tile surface temperature in the inner divertor correlates with that of the CD emission, suggesting larger parallel particle and heat fluxes to the upstream tile edge, either due to toroidal tile gaps or height steps between adjacent tiles.

  16. The Experiment of Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Experiments of Modulated Toroidal Current were done on the HT-6M tokamakand HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The toroidal current was modulated by programming theOhmic heating field. Modulation of the plasma current has been used successfully to suppressMHD activity in discharges near the density limit where large MHD m = 2 tearing modes weresuppressed by sufficiently large plasma current oscillations. The improved Ohmic confinementphase was observed during modulating toroidal current (MTC) on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). A toroidal frequency-modulated current,induced by a modulated loop voltage, was added on the plasma equilibrium current. The ratio ofA.C. amplitude of plasma current to the main plasma current △Ip/Ip is about 12% ~ 30%. Thedifferent formats of the frequency-modulated toroidal current were compared.

  17. Toroidal high-spin isomers in light nuclei with N not equal to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The combined considerations of both the bulk liquid-drop-type behavior and the quantized aligned rotation with cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach revealed previously that even-even, N=Z, toroidal high-spin isomeric states have general occurrences for light nuclei with A between 28 and 52. We find that in this mass region there are in addition N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers when the single-particle shells for neutrons and protons occur at the same cranked frequency $\\hbar \\omega$. Examples of N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers, $^{36}_{16}$S$_{20}$($I$=74$\\hbar$) and $^{40}_{18}$Ar$_{22}$($I$=80,102$\\hbar$), are located and examined. The systematic properties of these N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers fall into the same regular (muti-particle)-(muti-hole) patterns as other N=Z toroidal high-spin isomers.

  18. Modulating toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Shikui; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high-$n$ edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high-$n$ modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high-$n$ modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in recent EAST experiments.

  19. Transport of parallel momentum induced by current-symmetry breaking in toroidal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenen, Y; Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Casson, F J; Hornsby, W A; Snodin, A P; Strintzi, D

    2009-03-27

    The symmetry of a physical system strongly impacts on its properties. In toroidal plasmas, the symmetry along a magnetic field line usually constrains the radial flux of parallel momentum to zero in the absence of background flows. By breaking the up-down symmetry of the toroidal currents, this constraint can be relaxed. The parallel asymmetry in the magnetic configuration then leads to an incomplete cancellation of the turbulent momentum flux across a flux surface. The magnitude of the subsequent toroidal rotation increases with the up-down asymmetry and its sign depends on the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. Such a mechanism offers new insights in the interpretation and control of the intrinsic toroidal rotation in present day experiments.

  20. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was