WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam cooling

  1. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  2. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  3. The cooling of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling

  4. Cooled Beam Diagnostics on LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G; Carli, C; Chanel, M; Prieto, V; Sautier, R; Tan, J

    2008-01-01

    Electron cooling is central in the preparation of dense bunches of lead beams for the LHC. Ion beam pulses from the LINAC3 are transformed into short highbrightness bunches using multi-turn injection, cooling and accumulation in the Low Energy Ion Ring, LEIR [1]. The cooling process must therefore be continuously monitored in order to guarantee that the lead ions have the required characteristics in terms of beam size and momentum spread. In LEIR a number of systems have been developed to perform these measurements. These include Schottky diagnostics, ionisation profile monitors and scrapers. Along with their associated acquisition and analysis software packages these instruments have proved to be invaluable for the optimisation of the electron cooler.

  5. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Vlachoudis, V

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more ...

  6. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.

  7. Workshop on beam cooling and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The sessions of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, held in Montreux from 4-8 October 1993, are reported in these Proceedings. This meeting brought together international experts in the field of accelerator beam cooling. Its purpose was to discuss the status of the different cooling techniques currently in use (stochastic, electron, ionization, heavy-ion, and laser) and their actual performances, technological implications, and future prospects. Certain theoretical principles (muon cooling, cyclotron maser cooling) were discussed and are reported on in these Proceedings. Also of interest in this Workshop was the possibility of beam crystallization in accelerators using ultimate cooling. In the first part of these Proceedings, overview talks on the various cooling techniques, their implications, present performance, and future prospects are presented. More detailed reports on all the topics are then given in the form of oral presentations or poster sessions. Finally, the chairmen and/or convenors then present summary talks. (orig.)

  8. Integrals for IBS and Beam Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Simulation of beam cooling usually requires performing certain integral transformations every time step or so, which is a significant burden on the CPU. Examples are the dispersion integrals (Hilbert transforms) in the stochastic cooling, wake fields and IBS integrals. An original method is suggested for fast and sufficiently accurate computation of the integrals. This method is applied for the dispersion integral. Some methodical aspects of the IBS analysis are discussed

  9. Intensive Ion Beam In Storage Rings With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Kamerdjiev, V; Maier, R; Meshkov, I; Noda, K; Prasuhn, D; Sibuya, S; Sidorin, A; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Syresin, E M; Uesugi, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) and an ion beam at HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) are presented. Intensity of the ion beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described.

  10. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  11. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  12. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb 3 Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the

  13. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  14. Simulation of Laser-Compton Cooling of Electron Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgaki, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for JLC/NLC at E_0=2 GeV is considered.

  15. Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders: Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    CERN

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '6.10 Beam Cooling' of the Chapter '6 Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders' with the content: 6.10 Beam Cooling 6.10.1 Introduction 6.10.2 Beam Cooling Techniques 6.10.2.1 Radiation Cooling 6.10.2.2 Microwave Stochastic Cooling 6.10.2.3 Electron Cooling 6.10.2.4 Laser Cooling 6.10.2.5 Ionisation Cooling 6.10.2.6 Cooling of Particles in Traps

  16. The state of the art in hadron beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

  17. Longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled fast ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemüller, M.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.

    1999-01-01

    We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal-transverse co......We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal....... When applying laser cooling in square-well buckets over long time intervals, hard Coulomb collisions suddenly disappear and the longitudinal temperature drops by about a factor of three. The observed longitudinal behaviour of the beam shows strong resemblance with the transition to an Coulomb...

  18. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  19. Design and cooling of BESIII beryllium beam pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xunfeng; Ji, Quan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Lifang

    2008-01-01

    The beryllium beam pipe was restructured according to the requirements of the upgraded BESIII (Beijing Spectrometer) experiment. SMO-1 (sparking machining oil no. 1) was selected as the coolant for the central beryllium beam pipe. The cooling gap width of the beryllium beam pipe was calculated, the influence of concentrated heat load on the wall temperature of the beryllium beam pipe was studied, and the optimal velocity of the SMO-1 in the gap was determined at the maximum heat load. A cooling system for the beam pipe was developed to control the outer wall temperature of the beam pipe. The cooling system is reported in this paper with regard to the following two aspects: the layouts and the automation. The performance of the cooling system was tested on the beam pipe model with trim size. The test results show that the design of the beryllium beam pipe is reasonable and that the cooling system achieves the BESIII experimental aim. The cooling system has already passed the acceptance test and has been installed in position. It will be put into practice for the BESIII experiment in 2008.

  20. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, Sergei M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  1. Longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled fast ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemüller, M.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.

    1999-01-01

    -transverse coupling mechanisms. Laser cooling in novel bunch forms consisting of square-well buckets leads to longitudinally space-charge dominated beams. The observed longitudinal ion density distributions can be well described by a self-consistent mean-field model based on a thermodynamic Debye-Huckel approach......We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal....... When applying laser cooling in square-well buckets over long time intervals, hard Coulomb collisions suddenly disappear and the longitudinal temperature drops by about a factor of three. The observed longitudinal behaviour of the beam shows strong resemblance with the transition to an Coulomb...

  2. Beam cooling by using laser-undulator beat wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Fisher, D.L.; Mima, Kunioki; Koga, J.

    1995-01-01

    Non-Hamiltonian manipulation of internal structure of phase space of charged particle beams can result in much faster cooling than the conventional stochastic cooling. The longitudinal emittance reduction is accomplished by the ponderomotive force of the beat between the undulator and the laser adjusted appropriate in its broadband spectrum through feedback at each turn. (author)

  3. Dynamics of RF captured cooled proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kells, W.; Mills, F.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of electron cooling experiments at the Electron Cooling Ring (ECR) at Fermilab, several peculiar features of the longitudinal phase space of cold protons (200 MeV) captured in RF buckets were observed. Here we present the experimental facts, present a simple theory, and summarize computer simulation results which support the theory and facts

  4. Instability during bunch shortening of an electron-cooled beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Takanaka

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Bunch shortening causes an electron-cooled beam to be space charge dominated at low energies. Instability during the bunch shortening has been studied using a particle-tracking program where the 3D space-charge field due to the beam is calculated with a simplifying model.

  5. Laser-Cooled Continuous Cs-Beam Master Oscillator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, H; Buell, W. F; Iyanu, G

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present our design and prospects of a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT)-based cold Cs-beam atomic clock physics package and report the realization and characterization of a continuous, laser-cooled Cs atomic beam from a Cs MOT...

  6. Power handling capability of water-cooled beam stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran-Ngoc, T.

    1992-01-01

    Doubling the beam power on the RFQ1-1250 linear accelerator at Chalk River and designing a 40 kW beam diagnostic system for Tokamak de Varennes required a detailed investigation into the power handling capabilities of beam stops. Different techniques for augmentation of the critical heat flux on the cooling channel surface of beam stops are reviewed. In the case of a beam stop with twisted tape inserts, the swirl flow condition yields a higher critical heat flux than that of a straight axial flow. Although a critical heat flux in the order of 10 kW/cm 2 could be obtained at high flow velocities such as 45 m/s, such flows are not always practical in the design of beam stop cooling systems. At a water velocity of 4 m/s, the highest beam power density is estimated to be 1.4 kW/cm 2 for a beam stop design that uses double rows of cooling tubes. A similar design, where cooling channels are machined on a common copper block, would handle a power density up to 2.6 kW/cm 2 . Some preliminary hydraulic test results, related to a third design where high flow turbulence is created by two rows of intersected-channels, are also reported. (Author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  7. ICOOL: A Simulation Code for Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R. C.

    1999-01-01

    Current ideas [1,2] for designing a high luminosity muon collider require significant cooling of the phase space of the muon beams. The only known method that can cool the beams in a time comparable to the muon lifetime is ionization cooling [3,4]. This method requires directing the particles in the beam at a large angle through a low Z absorber material in a strong focusing magnetic channel and then restoring the longitudinal momentum with an rf cavity. We have developed a new 3-D tracking code ICOOL for examining possible configurations for muon cooling. A cooling system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of ∼50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary files can be generated for post-processing analysis by the user

  8. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nummela, S; Dendooven, P; Heikkinen, P; Huikari, J; Nieminen, A; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Rubchenya, V.; Aysto, J

    2002-01-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q = +2-->q = +1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler,

  9. BUNCHED BEAM STOCHASTIC COOLING SIMULAITONS AND COMPARISON WITH DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN, J.M.

    2007-09-10

    With the experimental success of longitudinal, bunched beam stochastic cooling in RHIC it is natural to ask whether the system works as well as it might and whether upgrades or new systems are warranted. A computer code, very similar to those used for multi-particle coherent instability simulations, has been written and is being used to address these questions.

  10. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  11. Beam-Based Alignment of Magnetic Field in the Fermilab Electron Cooler Cooling Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seletskiy, S. M.; Tupikov, V.

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires low effective anglular spread of electrons in the cooling section. One of the main components of the effective electron angles is an angle of electron beam centroid with respect to antiproton beam. This angle is caused by the poor quality of magnetic field in the 20 m long cooling section solenoid and by the mismatch of the beam centroid to the entrance of the cooling section. This paper focuses on the beam-based procedure of the alignment of the cooling section field and beam centroid matching. The discussed procedure allows to suppress the beam centroid angles below the critical value of 0.1 mrad

  12. Successful Electron Beam Recirculation Test for Fermilab Electron Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Crawford, A. Curtis; Sharapa, Anatoly; Shemyakin, Alexander

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we describe the successful operation of a dc recirculation electron beam system at energies 1 -- 1.5 MeV and currents in excess of 200 mA. This system employs an electrostatic HV supply like a Van de Graaff generator with maximum charging current of a few hundred microamps. Electron beam line consits of a 10 m long channel with discrete focusing elements flanked by high-gradient (10 kV/cm), small aperture (2.54 cm ID) acceleraton and deceleration tubes. This work is performed as part of the Fermilab R&D program to develop electron cooling for 8 GeV antiprotons.

  13. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

  14. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented

  15. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, S.; Dendooven, P.; Heikkinen, P.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubchenya, V.; Äystö, J.

    2002-04-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q=+2→ q=+1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler. The performance of the Wien filter has been tested off-line with a discharge ion source as well as on-line with a radioactive beam. The electron capture process of cooled q=+2 ions has been investigated in a radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler with varying partial pressures of nitrogen. Also, the superasymmetric fission production yields of 68< A<78 nuclei have been deduced.

  16. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nummela, S. E-mail: saara.nummela@phys.jyu.fi; Dendooven, P.; Heikkinen, P.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubchenya, V.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q=+2{yields}q=+1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler. The performance of the Wien filter has been tested off-line with a discharge ion source as well as on-line with a radioactive beam. The electron capture process of cooled q=+2 ions has been investigated in a radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler with varying partial pressures of nitrogen. Also, the superasymmetric fission production yields of 68

  17. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  18. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-01

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  20. Vertical blow-up in a low-current, stored, laser-cooled ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N; Siegfried, L E; Hangst, J S; Nielsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Using a novel technique for real-time transverse beam profile diagnostics of a stored ion beam, we have observed the transverse size of a stored, laser-cooled ion beam. Earlier we observed that the density of the beam is independent of the beam current. At very low currents we observe an abrupt change in this behavior: the vertical beam size increases suddenly by about an order of magnitude. This observation implies a sudden change in the indirect vertical cooling mediated by intrabeam scattering. Our results have serious implications for the ultimate beam quality attainable by laser- cooling. (12 refs).

  1. Low-current, vertical blowup in a stored laser-cooled ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N; Nielsen, S; Siegfried, L E; Hangst, J S

    2001-01-01

    Using a novel technique for real-time transverse beam profile diagnostics of a stored ion beam, we have observed the transverse size of a stored laser-cooled ion beam. Earlier we observed that the density of the beam is independent of the beam current. At very low currents, we observe an abrupt change in this behavior: The vertical beam size increases suddenly by about an order of magnitude. This observation implies a sudden change in the indirect vertical cooling mediated by intrabeam scattering. Our results have serious implications for the ultimate beam quality attainable by laser cooling. (11 refs).

  2. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C 3+ ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged 24 Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  3. Comments on frictional cooling and the zero energy options for cooling intense muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the proposed frictional cooling method is not directly applicable to intense (∼ 10 12 ) muon bunches, mostly due to space charge constraints. Other difficulties stem from the fact that the initial emittance must be quite small, compared to the nominal muon collider emittance. Excessive heat due to energy deposition in the foils, from the primary muon beam or from secondary electrons could also destroy the thin foils used as moderator. Other zero energy schemes are considered, separately for μ - and μ + . All of them lead the authors to the study of exotic electrons-ions-muons plasma

  4. Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling of Ion Beams Using a Wien Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2008-07-01

    Laser cooling of ion beams generally operates only upon the longitudinal motion of an ion beam. In order to extend this powerful dissipative force to the transverse directions, we consider introducing a Wien filter in a cooing straight section. It is theoretically shown that longitudinal cooling within a Wien filter naturally develops a transverse (mostly horizontal) cooling effect as well. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that this method enables us to reach an ultralow-temperature state of a stored ion beam.

  5. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaf, G. ten; Wouters, S. H. W.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geer, S. B. van der [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  6. Electron cooling of a bunched ion beam in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Mao, Lijun; Yang, Jiancheng; Xia, Jiawen; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Jie; Tang, Meitang; Shen, Guodong; Ma, Xiaoming; Wu, Bo; Wang, Geng; Ruan, Shuang; Wang, Kedong; Dong, Ziqiang

    2018-02-01

    A combination of electron cooling and rf system is an effective method to compress the beam bunch length in storage rings. A simulation code based on multiparticle tracking was developed to calculate the bunched ion beam cooling process, in which the electron cooling, intrabeam scattering (IBS), ion beam space-charge field, transverse and synchrotron motion are considered. Meanwhile, bunched ion beam cooling experiments have been carried out in the main cooling storage ring (CSRm) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou, to investigate the minimum bunch length obtained by the cooling method, and study the dependence of the minimum bunch length on beam and machine parameters. The experiments show comparable results to those from simulation. Based on these simulations and experiments, we established an analytical model to describe the limitation of the bunch length of the cooled ion beam. It is observed that the IBS effect is dominant for low intensity beams, and the space-charge effect is much more important for high intensity beams. Moreover, the particles will not be bunched for much higher intensity beam. The experimental results in CSRm show a good agreement with the analytical model in the IBS dominated regime. The simulation work offers us comparable results to those from the analytical model both in IBS dominated and space-charge dominated regimes.

  7. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Russinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Wang, L.; Xu, F.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Ferri, F.; Lucchini, G.; Mazza, R.; Paleari, F.; Strati, F.; Palladino, V.; Cecchet, G.; de Bari, A.; Capponi, M.; Cirillo, A.; Iaciofano, A.; Manfredini, A.; Parisi, M.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Filthaut, F.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Gruber, P.; Hanke, K.; Haseroth, H.; Janot, P.; Lombardi, A.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Grichine, V.; Gschwendtner, E.; Masciocchi, F.; Sandstrom, R.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; Petitjean, C.; Seviour, R.; Alexander, J.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Griffiths, S.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; White, C.; York, S.; Adams, D.; Apsimon, R.; Barclay, P.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Drumm, P.; Edgecock, R.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Ivaniouchenkov, Y.; Jones, A.; Lintern, A.; MacWaters, C.; Nelson, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rochford, J.H.; Rogers, C.; Spensley, W.; Tarrant, J.; Tilley, K.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fish, A.; Hare, R.; Greenwood, S.; Jamdagni, A.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; McKigney, E.; Matsushita, T.; Pasternak, J.; Sashalmi, T.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Blackmore, V.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.; Tunnell, C.D.; Witte, H.; Yang, S.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Geer, S.; Neuffer, D.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Roberts, T.J.; DeMello, A.; Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Huang, D.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; Lee, K.; Yang, X.; Rimmer, R.A.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Gregoire, G.; Hart, T.L.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.; Gallardo, J.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  8. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomilov, M. [University of Sofia (Bulgaria); et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  9. Simulation of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohgaki

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for Japan Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider at E_{0}=2 GeV is considered.

  10. Two-Pipe Chilled Beam System for Both Cooling and Heating of Office Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Gordnorouzi, Rouzbeh; Hultmark, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Simulations were performed to compare a conventional 4-pipe chilled beam system and a 2-pipe chilled beam system. The objective was to establish requirements, possibilities and limitations for a well-functioning 2-pipe chilled beam system for both cooling and heating of office buildings. The buil...

  11. Preparation of a monoenergetic sodium beam by laser cooling and deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellessen, J.; Sengstock, K.; Muller, J.H.; Ertmer, W.; Wallis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a sodium atomic beam with a density of approx. 10 5 at cm 3 within a velocity interval of less than 3 m/s with a mean velocity of typically 50-160 m/s which has been produced by laser deflection of a laser cooled atomic beam. Laser cooling with the frequency chirp method decelerates and cools a considerable part of an atomic beam into a narrow velocity group with a temperature of approx 30 mK as a part of the resulting atomic beam. This velocity group has been selectively deflected up to 30 degrees - 40 degrees using a light field with k vectors always perpendicular to the atomic trajectory. If the light field is prepared by use of a cylindrical lens, the angle of deflection is nearly independent from the actual orbit radius. For a laser frequency detuning of about one natural linewidth to the red, the strong frequency dependence of the light pressure force leads to a beam collimation via detuning-locking of the atomic trajectory. To avoid optical pumping we used a frequency modulated laser beam with a sideband spacing matched to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state. As the cooling was performed by the frequency chirp method, one can use a part of the cooling laser beam as deflecting laser beam. Typical velocity distributions in the deflected and undeflected atomic beam, measured 22 cm downstream the deflection zone. It shows the perfect transfer of the cooled velocity group from the laser cooled beam into the deflected beam; curve c) shows as comparison the result for the deflection of the initial thermal atomic beam

  12. Six-Dimensional Beam Cooling in a Gas Absorber. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland P.; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Six-Dimensional (6D) muon beam cooling using gaseous energy absorber and pressurized high-gradient RF was the subject of this Muons, Inc. SBIR grant with Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI), which began in July 2003 and ended in January 2007. A magnetic field configured such that higher energy muons have a longer path length can be used to generate the momentum-dependent energy loss needed for emittance exchange and six-dimensional beam cooling. In the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) developed in this project, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and solenoidal magnets and the RF cavities in them are filled with dense hydrogen so that higher energy particles then have more ionization energy loss. The properties of the HCC were examined using analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The exceptional beam cooling of the HCC has been demonstrated for use in muon colliders, neutrino factories, and stopping muon beams for diverse purposes.

  13. Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of a Muon Beams in a Ring Coolers

    CERN Document Server

    Klier, Amit

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of the phase-space volume of the beam (cooling) is essential for both muon colliders and neutrino factories. In a muon collider, in particular, the six-dimensional (6D) emittance must be reduced by six orders of magnitude. Cooling the beam in all phase space dimensions can be done through emittance exchange, where the beam loses energy passing through wedge-shaped absorbers in a dispersive magnetic field, designed in a way that fast muons go through more absorber material than slow ones and lose more energy. The longitudinal momentum is then regained using RF cavities. We simulate ring coolers, in which the beam undergoes 6-dimensional cooling through emittance exchange while rotating several times in the ring. The simulation software is a Geant3-based package, specially designed this purpose, with changing electric fields in RF cavities treated correctly. Magnetic fields are read from external maps. Some ring cooler designs and cooling simulation results are presented.

  14. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-03-17

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C{sup 3+} ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged {sup 24}Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  15. Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section

  16. Study of a Two-Pipe Chilled Beam System for both Cooling and Heating of Office Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordnorouzi, Rouzbeh; Hultmark, Göran; Afshari, Alireza

    Active chilled beam systems are used to provide heating and cooling in order to achieve comfortable thermal indoor climate. For heating and cooling applications, an active chilled beam has two water circuits comprising four pipes that supply warm and cold water respectively to the beam coil...... according to the space demand. Lindab Comfort A/S has introduced an active chilled beam system which has just one water circuit (two pipes) that is used for both heating and cooling. The concept is based on high temperature cooling and low temperature heating. In this study the energy saving potential...... of the new two-pipe active chilled beam system is investigated....

  17. Laser cooling and ion beam diagnosis of relativistic ions in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, S.

    1990-08-01

    Particle accelerator and storage ring technology has reached an advanced state, so that different heavy ion storage rings are coming into operation by now, capable of storing even fully stripped ions up to U 92+ . The main purpose of these machines are the accumulation of ions and the ability of improving the beam quality, that is the phase space density of the stored beams. This beam cooling is done successfully by the well established stochastic and electron cooling techniques. A new cooling method, the laser cooling, is taken over from atomic beam and ion trap experiments, where it has yielded extremely low temperatures of atomic samples. As a canditate at storage rings 7 Li + ions are stored in the Heidelberg TSR at 13.3 MeV. The ion beam properties of the metastable fraction like momentum spread, storage time and the influence of residual gas scattering are investigated by colinear laser spectroscopy in the experimental section of the TSR. An optical pumping experiment using two dye laser systems yields information about ion kinematics and velocity mixing processes in the ring. Lifetimes in the order of 100 ms for velocity classes marked in this way show that laser cooling can be applied to the stored 7 Li + beam. In an experimental situation of two strong counterpropagating laser beams, both tuned near resonance, a dramatic reduction of the ion beam momentum spread is observed. With a special geometrical control of laser and ion beam the longitudinal beam temperature is reduced from 260 K to at least 3 K with very high collection efficiency. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. Stochastic cooling in the CERN ISR during p-p colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschardt, E.; Studer, M.

    1983-01-01

    When the ISR is used as a p - p collider a high-intensity proton beam in R1 collides with a low-intensity antiproton beam in R2 for periods of up to two weeks. The luminosity lifetime is increased with a vertical stochastic cooling system in R1 designed for currents up to 10 A with a total bandwidth of 3.3 GHz. Cooling rates up to 0.7%/hr have been obtained. The R2 antiprotons are cooled vertically with a 100-600 MHz system which decreases the initial beam height by up to a factor of 7 and increases the luminosity by a factor of 1.3 to 1.4. A momentum cooling system in R2 (frequency range 55-155 MHz) creates empty space within the antiproton stacking aperture. This allows several stacks from the antiproton accumulator to be stored in the ISR. With this system which uses the Palmer method it has been proven experimentally that momentum cooling and horizontal betatron cooling are obtained simultaneously if the betatron phase between pick-up and exciter is an odd number of half-betatron wavelengths. The cooling rate of the momentum cooling system which is powerlimited is typically 4%/hr at 26 GeV/c. The layout of the cooling system is shown schematically. The position of the various elements is mainly determined by the available free space and the lattice parameters. Future applications include vertical cooling of antiprotons in all three planes in an experiment where a circulating 3.5-7.5 GeV/c antiproton beam collides with a hydrogen gas jet target

  19. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  20. Characterisation of the Muon Beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V.J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C.N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A.D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, G.; Cobb, J.H.; Colling, D.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L.M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Filthaut, F.; Fish, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fletcher, R.; Forrest, D.; Francis, V.; Freemire, B.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O.M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harrison, P.; Hart, T.L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Kolev, D.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lau, W.; Leaver, J.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Lucchini, G.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.B.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M.A.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Roberts, T.J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rusinov, I.; Sakamoto, H.; Sanders, D.A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P.J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Stanley, T.; Summers, D.J.; Takahashi, M.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C.D.; Vankova, G.; Verguilov, V.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Walaron, K.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C.G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Zisman, M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  1. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A. [Harwell Oxford, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics, Coventry (United Kingdom); Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hunt, C.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Richards, A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H. [Universite de Geneve, DPNC, Section de Physique, Geneva (Switzerland); De Bari, A.; Cecchet, G. [Sezione INFN Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy); Bayes, R.; Forrest, D.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K. [The University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Lucchini, G. [Sezione INFN Milano Bicocca (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Milano (Italy); Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova, G. [St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Department of Atomic Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravar, U. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L. [Sezione INFN Roma Tre e Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Owens, P.; White, C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C. [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Cooke, P.; Gamet, R. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J. [University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Filthaut, F. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ishimoto, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science, Department of Physics, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J. [Brunel University, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Onel, Y. [University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa City, IA (United States); Palladino, V. [Universita Federico II, Sezione INFN Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Roberts, T.J. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (US); Collaboration: The MICE Collaboration

    2013-10-15

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 {pi} mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 {pi} mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE. (orig.)

  2. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hunt, C.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Richards, A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; De Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Bayes, R.; Forrest, D.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Lucchini, G.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova, G.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Owens, P.; White, C.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G.; Filthaut, F.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Onel, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.B.; Roberts, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 π mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 π mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE. (orig.)

  3. Evaporative cooling of highly charged ions in EBIT [Electron Beam Ion Trap]: An experimental realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Levine, M.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Marrs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Both the total number and trapping lifetime of near-neon-like gold ions held in an electron beam ion trap have been greatly increased by a process of 'evaporative cooling'. A continuous flow of low-charge-state ions into the trap cools the high-charge-state ions in the trap. Preliminary experimental results using titanium ions as a coolant are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. WEDGE ABSORBERS FOR MUON COOLING WITH A TEST BEAM AT MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Acosta, J. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. [Mississippi U.; Mohayai, T. [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, P. [IIT, Chicago

    2016-10-18

    Emittance exchange mediated by wedge absorbers is required for longitudinal ionization cooling and for final transverse emittance minimization for a muon collider. A wedge absorber within the MICE beam line could serve as a demonstration of the type of emittance exchange needed for 6-D cooling, including the configurations needed for muon colliders. Parameters for this test are explored in simulation and possible experimental configurations with simulated results are presented.

  5. CSR: a new tool for storage and cooling of keV ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froese, Michael; Blaum, Klaus; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, Jose; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Kaiser, Dirk; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Menk, Sebastian; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Repnow, Roland; Schroeter, Claus D.; Schwalm, Dirk; Sieber, Thomas; Ullrich, Joachim; Varju, Jozef; Hahn, Robert von; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Toker, Jonathan; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    An electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being built in Heidelberg, Germany. The current status and final design of this ring, with a focus on the optimized 2 K chamber cooling, precision chamber suspension, and pumping down to extremely low pressures via cryogenic vacuum chambers will be presented. This ring will allow long storage times of highly charged ion and polyatomic molecular beams with energies in the range of keV per charge-state. Combining the long storage times with vacuum chamber temperatures approaching 2 K, infrared-active molecular ions will be radiatively cooled to their rotational ground states. Many aspects of this concept were experimentally tested with a cryogenic trap for fast ion beams (CTF), which has already demonstrated the storage of fast ion beams in a large cryogenic device. An upcoming test will investigate the effect of pre-baking the cryogenic vacuum chambers to 600 K on the cryogenic vacuum and the ion beam storage.

  6. Suppression of propagating TE modes in the FNAL antiproton source stochastic beam cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.C.

    1985-05-01

    A method of attenuating the propagation of waveguide modes in the stochastic cooling array beam pipes to be utilized in the accumulator and debuncher rings of the Fermilab antiproton source is described. The attenuation method treated involves lining the vertical walls of the beam pipes with a ferrimagnetic material. The general solution for propagation in a nonhomogeneously loaded waveguide is presented along with numerical results specific to the antiproton source beam cooling system. Also described is a broadband, automated technique for the simultaneous measurement of complex μ and epsilon developed to aid in the characterization of different ferrite materials. Permittivity and permeability data for a typical ferrite are presented along with a discussion of the effects of these parameters on waveguide mode attenuation in the ferrite lined beam pipes

  7. Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the progress of developing the required simulation tools and applying them to study the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.

  8. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Ihn

    2009-07-23

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at {lambda}{sub {omega}} = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5{+-}3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 {+-} 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, {lambda}-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two

  9. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae-Ihn

    2009-01-01

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at λ ω = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5±3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 ± 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, Λ-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two-color spectroscopy experiment

  10. Enhanced Schottky signals from electron-cooled, coasting beams in a heavy-ion storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, C., E-mail: claude.krantz@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, K.; Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Repnow, R.; Wolf, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-02-11

    Measurements at the Test Storage Ring of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg (Germany) have shown that the signal amplitude induced in a Schottky-noise pickup electrode by a coasting electron-cooled ion beam can be greatly enhanced by exposure of the latter to a perturbing radiofrequency signal which is detuned from the true beam revolution frequency. The centre frequencies obtained from harmonic analysis of the observed pickup signal closely follow those imposed on the ions by the electron cooling force. The phenomenon can be exploited to measure the true revolution frequency of ion beams of very low intensity, whose pure Schottky noise is too weak to be measurable under normal circumstances.

  11. First Experiments on Stochastic Cooling of Heavy Ion Beams at the ESR

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Nolden, F; Schwinn, A

    1998-01-01

    At the experimental storage ring ESR of GSI, one half of the foreseen pick-up and kicker tanks are installed, the rest will follow in 1998. First experimental tests of the stochastic precooling system have been performed since April 1997. Longitudinal Palmer cooling was successfully demonstrated. E-folding cooling times of 8.6 seconds were determined with carbon beams. No significant dependence of the cooling time on the number of particles was observed during these first tests. This may be explained by a low signal to noise ratio of the signals obtained from the pick-ups in the present configuration. With heavy ions in higher charge states faster cooling times are expected. The experiments are an important step towards the realization of experiments with radioactive fragments, e.g. in order to measure nuclear masses or half-lives of stripped exotic ions.

  12. Intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling of a single atom in a localized hollow-beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Ren, Ruimin; Du, Xiangli; Yin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize a convenient and efficient laser cooling of a single atom, we propose a simple and promising scheme to cool a single neutral atom in a blue-detuned localized hollow-beam trap by intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling, and study the dynamic process of the intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87 Rb atom in the localized hollow-beam trap by using Monte-Carlo simulations. Our study shows that a single 87 Rb atom with a temperature of 120 μK from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be directly cooled to a final temperature of 4.64 μK in our proposed scheme. We also investigate the dependences of the cooling results on the laser detuning δ of the localized hollow-beam, the power RP 0 of the re-pumping laser beam, the sizes of both the localized hollow-beam and the re-pumping beam, and find that there is a pair of optimal cooling parameters (δ and RP 0 ) for an expected lowest temperature, and the cooling results strongly depend on the size of the re-pumping beam, but weakly depend on the size of the localized hollow-beam. Finally, we further study the cooling potential of our localized hollow-beam trap for the initial temperature of a single atom, and find that a single 87 Rb atom with an initial temperature of higher than 1 mK can also be cooled directly to about 6.6 μK. (paper)

  13. Verification of passive cooling techniques in the Super-FRS beam collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, C. A.; Gellanki, J.; Najafi, M. A.; Moeini, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Kuiken, O. J.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Smit, H. A. J.; Timersma, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Super FRagment Separator (Super-FRS) at the FAIR facility will be the largest in-flight separator of heavy ions in the world. One of the essential steps in the separation procedure is to stop the unwanted ions with beam collimators. In one of the most common situations, the heavy ions are produced by a fission reaction of a primary 238U-beam (1.5 GeV/u) hitting a 12C target (2.5 g/cm2). In this situation, some of the produced ions are highly charged states of 238U. These ions can reach the collimators with energies of up to 1.3 GeV/u and a power of up to 500 W. Under these conditions, a cooling system is required to prevent damage to the collimators and to the corresponding electronics. Due to the highly radioactive environment, both the collimators and the cooling system must be suitable for robot handling. Therefore, an active cooling system is undesirable because of the increased possibility of malfunctioning and other complications. By using thermal simulations (performed with NX9 of Siemens PLM), the possibility of passive cooling is explored. The validity of these simulations is tested by independent comparison with other simulation programs and by experimental verification. The experimental verification is still under analysis, but preliminary results indicate that the explored passive cooling option provides sufficient temperature reduction.

  14. DISSOLVED OXYGEN REDUCTION IN THE DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM ION SOURCE COOLING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YIP, H.; BUSATH, J.; HARRISON, S.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Neutral beam ion sources (NBIS) are critical components for the neutral beam injection system supporting the DIII-D tokamak. The NBIS must be cooled with 3028 (ell)/m (800 gpm) of de-ionized and de-oxygenated water to protect the sources from overheating and failure. These ions sources are currently irreplaceable. Since the water cooled molybdenum components will oxidize in water almost instantaneously in the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO), de-oxygenation is extremely important in the NBIS water system. Under normal beam operation the DO level is kept below 5 ppb. However, during weeknights and weekends when neutral beam is not in operation, the average DO level is maintained below 10 ppb by periodic circulation with a 74.6 kW (100 hp) pump, which consumes significant power. Experimental data indicated evidence of continuous oxygen diffusion through non-metallic hoses in the proximity of the NBIS. Because of the intermittent flow of the cooling water, the DO concentration at the ion source(s) could be even higher than measured downstream, and hence the concern of significant localized oxidation/corrosion. A new 3.73 kW (5 hp) auxiliary system, installed in the summer of 2003, is designed to significantly reduce the peak and the time-average DO levels in the water system and to consume only a fraction of the power

  15. Design of Air-Cooled Beam Dump for Extraction Line of PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Perillo-Marcone, A; Venturi, V; Antonakakis, T; Vlachoudis, V; Nowak, E; Mason, G; Battistin, M; Czapski, M; Sgobba, S

    2013-01-01

    A new beam dump has been designed, which withstands the future proton beam extracted from the Proton Syncrotron Booster (PSB) at CERN, consisting of up to 1E14 protons per pulse at 2 GeV after its upgrade in 2018/2019. In order to be able to efficiently release the deposited heat, the new dump will be made out of a single cylindrical block of a copper alloy and cooled by forced ventilation. In order to determine the energy density distribution deposited by the beam in the dump, Monte Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA, and thermomechanical analyses carried out by importing the energy density into Ansys. In addition, CFD simulations of the airflow were carried out in order to accurately estimate the heat transfer convection coefficient on the surface of the dump. This paper describes the design process and highlights the constraints of integrating a new dump for increased beam power into the existing facility.

  16. The ITER neutral beam test facility: Designs of the general infrastructure, cryosystem and cooling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Chantant, M.; Gravil, B.; Henry, D.; Sabathier, F.; Doceul, L.; Thomas, E.; Houtte, D. van; Zaccaria, P.; Antoni, V.; Bello, S. Dal; Marcuzzi, D.; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mondino, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    The CEA Association is involved, in close collaboration with ENEA, FZK, IPP and UKAEA European Associations, in the first ITER neutral beam (NB) injector and the ITER neutral beam test facility design (EFDA task ref. TW3-THHN-IITF1). A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed in steady state on the neutral beam test facility (NBTF). The main purpose of this task is to make progress with the detailed design of the first ITER NB injector and to start the conceptual design of the ITER NBTF. The general infrastructure layout of a generic site for the NBTF includes the test facility itself equipped with a dedicated beamline vessel [P.L. Zaccaria, et al., Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility, this conference] and integration studies of associated auxiliaries such as cooling plant, cryoplant and forepumping system

  17. Studies of the Influence of Beam Profile and Cooling Conditions on the Laser Deposition of a Directionally-Solidified Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the laser deposition of single crystal and directionally-solidified superalloys, it is desired to form laser deposits with high volume fractions of columnar grains by suppressing the columnar-to-equiaxed transition efficiently. In this paper, the influence of beam profile (circular and square shapes and cooling conditions (natural cooling and forced cooling on the geometric morphology and microstructure of deposits were experimentally studied in the laser deposition of a directionally-solidified superalloy, IC10, and the mechanisms of influence were revealed through a numerical simulation of the thermal processes during laser deposition. The results show that wider and thinner deposits were obtained with the square laser beam than those with the circular laser beam, regardless of whether natural or forced cooling conditions was used. The heights and contact angles of deposits were notably increased due to the reduced substrate temperatures by the application of forced cooling for both laser beam profiles. Under natural cooling conditions, columnar grains formed epitaxially at both the center and the edges of the deposits with the square laser beam, but only at the center of the deposits with the circular laser beam; under forced cooling conditions, columnar grains formed at both the center and the edges of deposits regardless of the laser beam profile. The high ratios of thermal gradient and solidification velocity in the height direction of the deposits were favorable to forming deposits with higher volume fractions of columnar grains.

  18. Longitudinal dynamics of RF-bunched and electron-cooled ion beam at the CSRe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, W.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 730000 Lanzhou (China); Ma, X., E-mail: x.ma@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 730000 Lanzhou (China); Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Yuan, Y.J.; Zhang, D.C. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 730000 Lanzhou (China); Winters, D.F.A [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhu, X.L.; Li, J.; Liu, H.P.; Zhao, D.M.; Wang, Z.S.; Mao, R.S.; Zhao, T.C.; Wu, J.X.; Ma, X.M.; Yan, T.L.; Li, G.H.; Yang, X.D.; Liu, Y.; Yang, J.C. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 730000 Lanzhou (China); and others

    2014-02-01

    The longitudinal dynamics of RF-bunched and electron cooled ion beams have been studied at the experimental cooler storage ring (CSRe), at IMP Lanzhou. By RF-bunching the ion beam at the 50th and 100th harmonic of the revolution frequency, the longitudinal momentum spread and the bunch length of the {sup 22}Ne{sup 10+} ion beam with an energy of 70 MeV/u were measured by the new resonant Schottky pick-up and the capacitive pick-up, respectively. A minimum momentum spread of Δp/p=1.6×10{sup −5} has been reached with less than 10{sup 7} ions stored in the ring. By using the harmonic potential extracted from the Taylor expansion and the real sinusoidal potential of the bucket, the trend of momentum spread and synchrotron frequency as well as the bunch length as a function of beam current can be interpreted very well. According to this experiment, the RF-buncher is suitable for upcoming experiments on laser cooling of relativistic heavy ion beams at the CSRe.

  19. Beam Induced Ferrite Heating of the LHC Injection Kickers and Proposals for Improved Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Sobiech, Z; Taborelli, M; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker systems produce an integrated field strength of 1.3 T·m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of each magnet, which consists of a ceramic tube with conductors in the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the beam image current and screen the ferrite yoke against wakefields. Recent LHC operation, with high intensity beam stable for many hours, resulted in significant heating of both the ferrite yoke and beam impedance reduction ferrites. For one kicker magnet the ferrite yoke approached its Curie temperature. As a result of a long thermal time-constant the ferrite yoke can require several hours to cool sufficiently to allow re-injection of beam, thus limiting the running efficiency of the LHC. Thermal measurement data has been analysed, a thermal model developed and emissivity measurements carried out. Various measures to improve the ferrite cooling have...

  20. Laser-cooled atoms as a focused ion-beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanssen, J. L.; McClelland, J. J.; Dakin, E. A.; Jacka, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolving field of nanofabrication demands that more precise fabrication and evaluation tools be developed. We describe a method for creating a high quality focused ion beam with enhanced capabilities using an ion source based on laser-cooled neutral atoms in a magneto-optical trap. This technique will improve resolution and brightness beyond the current state of the art, can be used with the full range of atomic species that can be laser cooled and trapped, and will allow unprecedented control over the ion emission, allowing, for example, the production of single ions ''on demand.'' We give estimates for the emittance and present a realistic ray tracing analysis of a basic focusing system demonstrating the feasibility of focusing the beam to a spot size of less than 10 nm

  1. New developments on preparation of cooled and bunched Radioactive Ion beams at ISOL facilities the ISCOOL project and the rotating wall cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Podadera-Aliseda, I

    2006-01-01

    The future of physics research with radioactive isotopes is linked to the development of more accurate and specific experiments which will work with more exotic and energetic nuclei. Requirements from experiments are getting more and more stringent and represent a big challenge for the preparation of ion beams, since each one demands different optical specifications to optimize its setup and improve its results. This thesis focuses on the new developments achieved in preparation of RIB's (Radioactive Ion Beams) at ISOL facilities. Optical beam improvements based on cooling and bunching are the main points of the work. The design of a new general purpose second generation RFQCB (Radio Frequency ion Quadrupole Cooler and Buncher) for ISOLDE, the oldest ISOL facility, will be completely described. Nowadays, RFQCB's are one of the most important devices in the beam preparation stage thanks to the capacity to cool and bunch low-intensity ion beams quickly, easily and with great efficiency. The thesis will detail t...

  2. Redundant Sb condensation on GaSb epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy during cooling procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpapay, B.; Şahin, S.; Arıkan, B.; Serincan, U.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of four different cooling receipts on the surface morphologies of unintentionally-doped GaSb epilayers on GaSb (100) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Those receipts include three different Sb beam equivalent pressure (BEP) levels and two different termination temperatures. Surface morphologies of epilayers were examined by wet etching, surface profiler, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that during the cooling period, a Sb BEP of 4.00 × 10 −4 Pa at a termination temperature of 400 °C induces a smooth surface without Sb condensation whereas same Sb BEP at a termination temperature of 350 °C forms a 300 nm thick Sb layer on the surface. In addition, it is revealed that by applying a wet etching procedure and using a surface profiler it is possible to identify this condensed layer from the two-sloped feature of mesa profile. - Highlights: • Sb beam flux termination temperature is crucial for redundant Sb condensation. • Sb beam flux level has a role on the thickness of redundant condensed Sb layer. • Redundant Sb layer thickness can be measured by two-sloped mesa structure

  3. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, J. J.; Wilson, T. M. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Schwarzkopf, A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); zeroK NanoTech, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878 (United States); Twedt, K. A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland Nanocenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  4. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  5. An Ionization Cooling Channel for Muon Beams Based on Alternating Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, Juan C.; Fernow, Richard C.; Kirk, Harold G.; Palmer, Robert B.; Lebrun, Paul; Moretti, Alfred; Tollestrup, Alvin T.; Kaplan, Daniel M.; Fukui, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required Luminosity. Due to the limited lifetime of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers followed by r.f. cavities (''pillbox'' or ''open iris'' type), embedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and detailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-D phase space by a factor ∼ 2 over a distance of 20 m

  6. Simulations of a Gas-Filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Bogacz, S A; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Johnson, Rolland P; Kaplan, Daniel; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of a series of RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas that acts as the energy absorber for ionization cooling and suppresses RF breakdown in the cavities. Magnetic solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole coils outside of the RF cavities provide the focusing and dispersion needed for the emittance exchange for the beam as it follows a helical equilibrium orbit down the HCC. In the work presented here, two Monte Carlo programs have been developed to simulate a HCC to compare with the analytic predictions and to begin the process of optimizing practical designs that could be built in the near future. We discuss the programs, the comparisons with the analytical theory, and the prospects for a HCC design with the capability to reduce the six-dimensional phase space emittance of a muon beam by a factor o...

  7. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Rolland P; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S A; Del Frate, Licia; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Gonin, Ivan V; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Hartline, Robert; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David V; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Roberts, Thomas; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling id...

  8. A water-cooled x-ray monochromator for using off-axis undulator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.; Maser, J.

    2000-01-01

    Undulator beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources are designed to use the high-brilliance radiation that is contained in the central cone of the generated x-ray beams. The rest of the x-ray beam is often unused. Moreover, in some cases, such as in the zone-plate-based microfocusing beamlines, only a small part of the central radiation cone around the optical axis is used. In this paper, a side-station branch line at the Advanced Photon Source that takes advantage of some of the unused off-axis photons in a microfocusing x-ray beamline is described. Detailed information on the design and analysis of a high-heat-load water-cooled monochromator developed for this beamline is provided

  9. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-04ER86191 Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-05-07

    The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

  10. Modal Analysis and Measurement of Water Cooling Induced Vibrations on a CLIC Main Beam Quadrupole Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Janssens, S; Leuxe, R; Modena, M; Moron Ballester, R; Struik, M; Deleglise, C; Jeremie, A

    2011-01-01

    To reach the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design luminosity, the mechanical jitter of the CLIC main beam quadrupoles should be smaller than 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) displacement above 1 Hz. A stiff stabilization and nano-positioning system is being developed but the design and effectiveness of such a system will greatly depend on the stiffness of the quadrupole magnet which should be as high as possible. Modal vibration measurements were therefore performed on a first assembled prototype magnet to evaluate the different mechanical modes and their frequencies. The results were then compared with a Finite Element (FE) model. The vibrations induced by water-cooling without stabilization were measured with different flow rates. This paper describes and analyzes the measurement results.

  11. Two-stage crossed beam cooling with ⁶Li and ¹³³Cs atoms in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Tian; Yao, Hepeng; Wang, Lu; Li, Chen; Yang, Shifeng; Chen, Xuzong; Ma, Zhaoyuan

    2015-05-04

    Applying the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method developed for ultracold Bose-Fermi mixture gases research, we study the sympathetic cooling process of 6Li and 133Cs atoms in a crossed optical dipole trap. The obstacles to producing 6Li Fermi degenerate gas via direct sympathetic cooling with 133Cs are also analyzed, by which we find that the side-effect of the gravity is one of the main obstacles. Based on the dynamic nature of 6Li and 133Cs atoms, we suggest a two-stage cooling process with two pairs of crossed beams in microgravity environment. According to our simulations, the temperature of 6Li atoms can be cooled to T = 29.5 pK and T/TF = 0.59 with several thousand atoms, which propose a novel way to get ultracold fermion atoms with quantum degeneracy near pico-Kelvin.

  12. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  13. Developments at an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring for electron-cooled keV energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to final setup activities and the commissioning of an electrostatic cryogenic storage ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg. The first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015 has been documented and characterized using a set of non-destructive beam diagnostic tools developed within this work. These are (1) the current pick-up system for the determination of the current of the stored ion beam and its velocity, (2) a position pick-up system for measuring the transverse position of the ion beam center at six symmetric locations of the storage ring circumference, and (3) a Schottky pick-up system for the monitoring of coasting ion beams. Despite the requirements imposed by the cryogenic operation, the developed diagnostic system demonstrated its full functionality. First characterizations of the storage ring properties and the performance of the diagnostic system are presented. Based on previous work, an electron cooling system for CSR has been developed and largely realized. With the implementation into CSR in 2016, the electron cooler will enhance the storage ring into a unique experimental facility for electron-ion collision studies. With this CSR is on the track to become the first cryogenic storage ring featuring actively cooled ion beams.

  14. A directly cooled grating substrate for ALS [Advanced Light Source] undulator beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGennaro, R.; Swain, T.

    1989-08-01

    Design analyses using finite element methods are presented for thermal distortion of water-cooled diffraction grating substrates for a potential application at the LBL Advanced Light Source, demonstrating that refinements in cooling channel configuration and heat flux distribution can significantly reduce optical surface distortion with high heat loads. Using an existing grating substrate design, sensitivity of tangential slope errors due to thermal distortion is evaluated for a variety of thermal boundary conditions, including coolant flow rate and heat transfer film coefficients, surface illumination area and heat distribution profile, and location of the convection cooling surfaces adjacent to the heated region. 1 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Electron beam cooling at a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, and an electrostatic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi

    2006-01-01

    At the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, with an electron cooler was operated from 1989 to 1999, while an electrostatic storage ring with a small electron cooler has been operational since 2000. In this paper, the electron cooling at TARN II and the electrostatic storage ring is described. (author)

  16. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Justin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  17. A full-scale experimental set-up for assessing the energy performance of radiant wall and active chilled beam for cooling buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2015-01-01

    in decreasing the cooling need of the radiant wall compared to the active chilled beam. It has also been observed that the type and repartition of heat load have an influence on the cooling demand. Regarding the comfort level, both terminals met the general requirements, except at high solar heat gains......: overheating has been observed due to the absence of solar shading and the limited cooling capacity of the terminals. No local discomfort has been observed although some segments of the thermal manikin were slightly colder....

  18. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-06ER86282 Development and Demonstration of 6-Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muons, Inc.

    2011-05-24

    The overarching purpose of this project was to prepare a proposal for an experiment to demonstrate 6-dimensional muon beam cooling. The technical objectives were all steps in preparing the proposal, which was successfully presented to the Fermilab Accelerator Advisory Committee in February 2009. All primary goals of this project have been met.

  19. Parameter optimization for Doppler laser cooling of a low-energy heavy ion beam at the storage ring S-LSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    S-LSR is a compact ion storage ring constructed at Kyoto University several years ago. The ring is equipped with a Doppler laser cooling system aimed at beam crystallization. Bearing in mind hardware limitations in S-LSR, we try to find an optimum set of primary experimental parameters for the production of an ultracold heavy ion beam. Systematic molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for this purpose. It is concluded that the detuning and spot size of the cooling laser should be chosen around -42 MHz and 1.5 mm, respectively, for the most efficient cooling of 40 keV ^{24}Mg^+ beams in S-LSR. Under the optimum conditions, the use of the resonant coupling method followed by radio-frequency field ramping enables us to reach an extremely low beam temperature on the order of 0.1 K in the transverse degrees of freedom. The longitudinal degree of freedom can be cooled to close to the Doppler limit; i.e., to the mK range. We also numerically demonstrate that it is possible to establish a stable, long one-dimensionally ordered state of ions.

  20. Laser system for cooling of relativistic C{sup 3+}-ion beams in storage rings; Lasersystem zur Kuehlung relativistischer C{sup 3+}-Ionenstrahlen in Speicherringen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Tobias

    2015-02-15

    Cold ion beams are essential for many precision experiments at storage rings. While spectroscopic experiments gain from the high energy resolution, collision experiments benefit from the increased luminosity. Furthermore, sympathetic cooling of exotic species is conceivable with the aid of cold ion beams. Besides the long established electron cooling, alternative cooling methods are gaining in importance, especially for high energy particles. In the past, experiments to cool ions with lasers were performed. Because of the matching wavelength and output power, frequency doubled Argon-ion lasers at 257 nm were used during these experiments. Due to the strongly limited scanning potential of these systems, it was not possible to cool the full inertia spread of the ion beams. A new laser system was developed in this thesis because of the lack of commercial alternatives. After the characterization of the system, it was tested during a beamtime at the Experimentierspeicherring (ESR) at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI). The completely solid state based system delivers up to 180 mW of output power at 257 nm and is modehop free tunable up to 16 GHz in 10 ms at this wavelength. By using efficient diode lasers, the new system consumes considerably less power than comparable Argon-ion lasers. The fundamental wavelength of 1028 nm is amplified up to 16 W with an Yb-doped fiber amplifier. Subsequently, the target wavelength of 257 nm is realized in two consecutive build-up cavities. Another diode laser, stabilized to a wavelength meter, serves as a frequency reference. This new laser system first came to operation during beamtime in August 2012, when relativistic C{sup 3+} ions with β=0.47 were cooled successfully. For the first time it was possible to access the whole inertia spread of a bunched ion beam without electron precooling. In contrast to prior experiments, only the laser frequency was scanned and not the bunching frequency of the ion beam. The results

  1. Concept of a staged FEL enabled by fast synchrotron radiation cooling of laser-plasma accelerated beam by solenoidal magnetic fields in plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei; Lesz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal fields in a laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper, we present an outline of what a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like, and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  2. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  3. Design of a High-Perveance Electron Gun for Electron Cooling in the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) at CERN and Non-Interceptive Proton Beam Profile Monitors using Ion or Atomic Probe Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulou, Christina

    2002-01-01

    For an efficient electron cooling of the low-energy Pb54+ ions in LEIR a high-perveance (at least 3.6microperv) electron gun had to be designed. The theoretical study of electron guns has shown that the required perveance can be achieved by using a convex cathode. The gun should be immersed in a strong magnetic field (B=2-6kG) in order to obtain a parallel beam with very low transverse energy (typically 0.1 eV). This idea was confirmed by experimental tests at Fermilab. An adiabatic magnetic expansion is foreseen after the gun in order to reduce the magnetic field to accpetable values (0.6-1 kG) in the cooling section. The internal geometry of a convex cathode gun for the LEIR electron cooler together with the parameters of the magnetic expansion are proposed. The scheme fulfils the requirements. In addition, the author has made an important contribution in the field of beam instrumentation for the LHC and other accelerators at CERN. A profile monitor has been developed that uses a Xe ion probe beam that inte...

  4. Electron cooling experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, R.; Hardek, T.; Johnson, D.E.; Kells, W.; Kerner, V.; Lai, H.; Lennox, A.J.; Mills, F.; Miyahara, Y.; Oleksiuk, L.; Peters, R.; Rhoades, T.; Young, D.; McIntyre, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A 115 Mev proton beam has been successfully cooled in the Electron Cooling Ring at Fermilab. Initial experiments have measured the longitudinal drag force, transverse damping rate, and equilibrium beam size. The proton beam was cooled by a factor of aproximately 50 in momentum spread in 5 sec, and by a factor of 3 in transverse size in 15 sec. Long term losses were consistent with single scattering from residual gas, with lifetime approximately 1000 sec. Using the measured electron beam temperature T/sub e/.0.8(2) ev, the observed cooling agrees well with expectations from cooling theory. 13 refs

  5. Measurement of the lifetime and the proportion of 12C3+ ions in stored relativistic ion beams as a preparation for laser cooling experiments at the CSRe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. B.; Wen, W. Q.; Huang, Z. K.; Zhang, D. C.; Hai, B.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhao, D. M.; Yang, J.; Li, J.; Li, X. N.; Mao, L. J.; Mao, R. S.; Wu, J. X.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Eidam, L.; Winters, D.; Beck, T.; Kiefer, D.; Rein, B.; Walther, Th.; Loeser, M.; Schramm, U.; Siebold, M.; Bussmann, M.; Ma, X.

    2017-10-01

    We report on an experiment that was conducted in preparation of laser cooling experiments at the heavy-ion storage ring CSRe. The lifetimes of ion beams made up of 12C3+ and 16O4+ ions stored at an energy of 122 MeV/u in the CSRe were determined by two independent methods, firstly via a DC current transformer (DCCT) and secondly via a Schottky resonator. Using electron-cooling, the signals of the 12C3+ and 16O4+ ions could be separated and clearly observed in the Schottky spectrum. The obtained individual lifetimes of the 12C3+ and 16O4+ components were 23.6 s and 17.8 s, respectively. The proportion of 12C3+ ions in the stored ion beam was measured to be more than 70% at the beginning of the injection and increasing as a function of time. In addition to these measurements, the operation and remote control of a pulsed laser system placed directly next to the storage ring was tested in a setup similar to the one envisaged for future laser experiments.

  6. Commissioning of electron cooling in CSRe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaodong; Mao Lijun; Li Guohong; Li Jie; Ma Xiaoming; Yan Tailai; Yuan Youjin; Song Mingtao; Yang Jiancheng; Liu Yong; Zhao Tiecheng; Xia Jiawen; Zhang Wei; Gao Daqing; Zhou Zhongzu; Yan Hongbin; Mao Ruishi; He Yuan; Han Shaofei; Zheng Jianhua; Yang Xiaotian; Zhao Hongwei; Xiao Guoqing; Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Jia Huan; Parkhomchuk Vasily; Reva Vladimir; Skorobogatov Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The 400 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ion beam was successfully cooled by the intensive electron beam near 1 A in CSRe. The momentum cooling time was estimated near 15 s. The cooling force was measured in the cases of different electron beam profiles, and the different angles between the ion beam and electron beam. The lifetime of the ion beam in CSRe was over 80 h. The dispersion in the cooling section was confirmed as positive close to zero. The beam sizes before cooling and after cooling were measured by the moving screen. The beam diameter after cooling was about 1 mm. The bunch length was measured with the help of the signals from the beam position monitor. The diffusion was studied in the absence of the electron beam. (authors)

  7. Human perception of indoor environment generated by chilled ceiling combined with mixing ventilation or localised chilled beam under cooling mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Nygaard, Linette; Uth, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with 24 subjects were performed to study and compare the human perception of the indoor environment under summer conditions generated by a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation and localised chilled beam. The experiments were performed in an experimental chamber (4....../s during the 20 min period of physical activity, when the occupant was not at the desk with the localised chilled beam, resulting in increase of the air temperature in the room. Subjects used questionnaires to answer on thermal sensation and acceptability, perceived air quality, air movement and SBS...

  8. Computer experiments on ion beam cooling and guiding in fair-wind gas cell and extraction RF-funnel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsov, Victor; Wada, Michiharu

    2004-01-01

    Here we present results of the further development of two novel ideas in the field of slow RI-beams production. They are a fair-wind gas cell concept for big-size high-pressure buffer gas cells and a new approach to the extraction system. For this purpose, detailed gas dynamic simulations based on the solution of a full system of time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations have been performed for both the fair-wind gas cell of 500 mm length at 1 bar helium buffer gas pressure and the RF-funnel extraction system at low buffer gas pressure. The results of gas dynamic calculations were used for detailed microscopic Monte Carlo ion-beam trajectory simulations under the combined effect of the buffer gas flow and electric fields of the RF-funnels. The obtained results made it apparent that the use of the fair-wind gas cell concept and extraction RF-funnels look very promising for production of high-quality low-energy RI-beams

  9. Experimental Progress in Fast Cooling in the ESR

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, Markus; Beller, Peter; Franzke, Bernhard; Nolden, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    The ESR storage ring at GSI is operated with highly charged heavy ions. Due to the high electric charge the ions interact much stronger with electromagnetic fields. Therefore both cooling methods which are applied to stored ions in the ESR, stochastic cooling and electron cooling, are more powerful than for singly charged particles. The experimental results exhibit cooling times for stochastic cooling of a few seconds. For cold ion beams, electron cooling provides cooling times which are one to two orders of magnitude smaller. The beams are cooled to beam parameters which are limited by intrabeam scattering. At small ion numbers, however, intrabeam scattering is suppressed by electron cooling, clear evidence was found that the ion beam forms a one-dimensional ordered structure, a linear chain of ions. The strengths of stochastic cooling and electron cooling are complementary and can be combined favorably. Stochastic cooling is employed for pre-cooling of hot secondary beams followed by electron cooling to pro...

  10. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  11. Passive vibro-acoustic detection of a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a sodium-cooled fast neutrons nuclear reactor by beam forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriot, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with a new method to detect a sodium-water reaction in a steam generator of a fast sodium-cooled nuclear reactor. More precisely, the objective is to detect a micro-leak of water (flow ≤ 1 g/s) in less than 10 seconds by measuring the external shell vibrations of the component. The strong background noise in operation makes impossible the use of a detection system based on a threshold overrun. A beam forming method applied to vibrations measured by a linear array of accelerometers is developed in this thesis to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to detect and locate the leak in the steam generator. A numerical study is first realized. Two models are developed in order to simulate the signals measured by the accelerometers of the array. The performances of the beam forming are then studied in function of several parameters, such as the source location and frequency, the damping factor, the background noise considered. The first model consists in an infinite plate in contact with a heavy fluid, excited by an acoustic monopole located in this fluid. Analyzing the transverse displacements in the wavenumber domain is useful to establish a criterion to sample correctly the vibration field of the plate. A second model, more representative of the system is also proposed. In this model, an elastic infinite cylindrical shell, filled with a heavy fluid is considered. The finite dimensions in the radial and circumferential directions lead to a modal behavior of the system which impacts the beam forming. Finally, the method is tested on an experimental mock-up which consists in a cylindrical pipe made in stainless steel and filled with water connected to hydraulic circuit. The water flow speed can be controlled by varying the speed of the pump. The acoustic source is generated by a hydro-phone. The performances of the beam forming are studied for different water flow speeds and different amplitude and frequencies of the source. (author) [fr

  12. Electron Cooling Dynamics for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Eidelman, Yu.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Malitsky, N.; Bruhwiler, D.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trubnikov, G.

    2005-01-01

    Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is presently underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this new regime, electron cooling has many unique features and challenges. At high energy, due to the difficulty of providing operational reserves, the expected cooling times must be estimated with a high degree of accuracy compared to extant low-energy coolers. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes and experimental benchmarking was launched at BNL. In this paper, we present an update of the high-energy cooling dynamics studies. We also include a discussion of some features of electron cooling relevant to colliders, such as the effects of rapid cooling of the beam core and an accurate treatment of the intra-beam scattering for such cooled ion distributions

  13. Pulsed E-beams to improve corrosion barriers for lead alloy cooled reactors. Overview and dedicated mechanical tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenburger, Alfons; Jianu, Adrian; Heinzel, Annette; DelGiacco, Mattia; Mueller, Georg [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochleistungsimpuls und Mikrowellentechnik

    2010-07-01

    Surface layers made of FeCrAl alloys on T91 steel have shown their capability as corrosion protection barriers in lead alloy. Pulsed E-beam treatment improves the density and more over the adherence of such layers. After the treatment of previous deposited coatings a surface graded material is achieved with a metallic bonded interface. Beside the superior corrosion protection based on thin slow growing alumina scales such barriers have shown in first low cycle fatigue and pressurized tube tests that the mechanical properties of the base materials are not deteriorated. In both tests lead alloy did not have any negative influence on the mechanical properties. Instead, creep to rupture tests in lead alloy result in a significant reduced creep to rupture strength of non-modified T91 test specimens. The negative influence of the lead alloy on the creep behaviour of non-modified T91 is stress dependent and the stress limit for 550 C was evaluated. The surface modified specimens tested at high stress levels instead had creep to rupture times similar to T91 (original state) tested in air. The thin oxide layers formed on the surface modified steel samples are less susceptible to crack formation and therefore to lead alloy enhanced creep. (orig.)

  14. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  15. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of loW--frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters

  16. Beam-Beam Simulations for Double-Gaussian Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two Gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-Gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-Gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular Gaussian beams and identical tuneshift parameters.

  17. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  18. Laser cooling of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  19. Theory of tapered laser cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Hiromi; Wei, J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of tapered laser cooling for fast circulating ion beams in a storage ring is constructed. The authors describe the fundamentals of this new cooling scheme, emphasizing that it might be the most promising way to beam crystallization. The cooling rates are analytically evaluated to study the ideal operating condition. They discuss the physical implication of the tapering factor of cooling laser, and show how to determine its optimum value. Molecular dynamics method is employed to demonstrate the validity of the present theory

  20. Optimization of electron cooling in the Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The paper describes electron cooling improvements recently implemented: adjustments of electron beam line quadrupoles to decrease the electron angles in the cooling section and better stabilization and control of the electron energy.

  1. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system

  2. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring. Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project, to be launched in 1978. Already early in 1978, stochastic cooling proved a resounding success, such that the antiproton (p-pbar)project was entirely based on it. Tests of electron cooling followed later: protons of 46 MeV kinetic energy were cooled with an electron beam of 26 kV and 1.3 A. The cage seen prominently in the foreground houses the HV equipment, adjacent to the "cooler" installed in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7908242.

  3. Elementary stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  4. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam is investigated. The simulation results show that discreteness in the interaction between the cooling laser beam and atomic beam, arising due to finite size and incidence angle of the cooling laser ...

  5. The final cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  6. Chilled beam application guidebook

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, David; Gräslund, Jonas; Hogeling, Jaap; Lund Kristiansen, Erik; Reinikanen, Mika; Svensson, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Chilled beam systems are primarily used for cooling and ventilation in spaces, which appreciate good indoor environmental quality and individual space control. Active chilled beams are connected to the ventilation ductwork, high temperature cold water, and when desired, low temperature hot water system. Primary air supply induces room air to be recirculated through the heat exchanger of the chilled beam. In order to cool or heat the room either cold or warm water is cycled through the heat exchanger.

  7. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  8. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, L.J., E-mail: maolijun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, X.D.; Li, J.; Yang, J.C.; Yuan, Y.J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Reva, V.B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ma, X.M.; Yan, T.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tang, M.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  9. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  10. LONGITUDINAL IONIZATION COOLING WITHOUT WEDGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERG, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The emittance of a muon beam must be reduced very rapidly due to the finite lifetime of the muons. The most effective known way to accomplish this is ionization cooling. It is straightforward to reduce transverse emittance through ionization cooling, but the reducing the longitudinal emittance is more challenging. Longitudinal cooling is necessary for a muon collider, and would be helpful for a neutrino factory. The method traditionally proposed for longitudinal cooling is emittance exchange involving wedges of absorber material: the longitudinal emittance is reduced at the cost of increased transverse emittance. The larger transverse emittance can then be reduced straightforwardly. An alternative method is proposed here, which does not require wedges of material but instead makes slight modifications to the standard transverse cooling lattice. We demonstrate a lattice which is a slight modification to a standard Super FOFO transverse cooling lattice, which has linear eigenvalues all of which have magnitude less than one

  11. ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; BARTON, D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.

  12. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  13. Cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E.; Dittrich, H.; Ernst, G.; Roller, W.

    1975-01-01

    The task on which the invention is based is to design a cooling tower in such a way that the negative influences of the wind, in particular strong side winds (wind velocities of over 10 m/s), on the functioning of the cooling tower are reduced or eliminated altogether. (orig./TK) [de

  14. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  15. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  16. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab

    2014-11-10

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittances by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  17. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  18. Mass measurement of halo nuclides and beam cooling with the mass spectrometer Mistral; Mesure de masse de noyaux a halo et refroidissement de faisceaux avec l'experience MISTRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, C

    2004-12-01

    Halo nuclides are a spectacular drip-line phenomenon and their description pushes nuclear theories to their limits. The most critical input parameter is the nuclear binding energy; a quantity that requires excellent measurement precision, since the two-neutron separation energy is small at the drip-line by definition. Moreover halo nuclides are typically very short-lived. Thus, a high accuracy instrument using a quick method of measurement is necessary. MISTRAL is such an instrument; it is a radiofrequency transmission mass spectrometer located at ISOLDE/CERN. In July 2003 we measured the mass of the Li{sup 11}, a two-neutron halo nuclide. Our measurement improves the precision by a factor 6, with an error of 5 keV. Moreover the measurement gives a two-neutron separation energy 20% higher than the previous value. This measurement has an impact on the radius of the nucleus, and on the state of the two valence neutrons. At the same time, a measurement of the Be{sup 11} was performed with an uncertainty of 4 keV, in excellent agreement with previous measurements. In order to measure the mass of the two-neutron halo nuclide Be{sup 14}, an ion beam cooling system is presently under development which will increase the sensitivity of the spectrometer. The second part of this work presents the development of this beam cooler using a gas-filled Paul trap. (author)

  19. The MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste [Imperial Coll., London; Hunt, Christopher [Imperial Coll., London; Palladino, Vittorio [INFN, Naples; Pasternak, Jaroslaw [Imperial Coll., London

    2016-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride. The design of the cooling-demonstration experiment will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.

  20. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  1. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  2. Muon Cooling - Emittance Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Muon Cooling is the key factor in building of a Muon collider, (to a less degree) Muon storage ring, and a Neutrino Factory. Muon colliders potential to provide a probe for fundamental particle physics is very interesting, but may take a considerable time to realize, as much more work and study is needed. Utilizing high intensity Muon sources - Neutrino Factories, and other intermediate steps are very important and will greatly expand our abilities and confidence in the credibility of high energy muon colliders. To obtain the needed collider luminosity, the phase-space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The Ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. We note that, the ionization losses results not only in damping, but also heating. The use of alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed, where the emittance are large. We present an overview of the cooling and discuss formalism, solenoid magnets and some beam dynamics

  3. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  4. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Barton, D.S.; Beavis, D.B.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Chang, X.Y.; Connolly, R.; Eidelman, Yu.I.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.M.; Hahn, H.; Harrison, M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Jain, A.K.; Johnson, P.D.J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.F.; Litvinenko, V.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.J.; Malitsky, N.; McIntyre, G.T.; Meng, W.; Mirabella, K.A.M.; Montag, C.; Nehring, T.C.N.; Nicoletti, T.; Oerter, B.; Parzen, G.; Pate, D.; Rank, J.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Scaduto, J.; Smith, K.; Trbojevic, D.; Wang, G.; Wei, J.; Williams, N.W.W.; Wu, K.-C.; Yakimenko, V.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhao, Y.; Abell, D.T.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bluem, H.; Burger, A.; Cole, M.D.; Favale, A.J.; Holmes, D.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Todd, A.M.M.; Burov, A.V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Delayen, J.R.; Derbenev, Y.S.; Funk, L. W.; Kneisel, P.; Merminga, L.; Phillips, H.L.; Preble, J.P.; Koop, I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shatunov, Y.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Koop, I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shatunov, Y.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Sekutowicz, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R and D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R and D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/

  5. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  6. Cooled particle accelerator target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  7. Report of the stochastic cooling subgroup of the RHIC workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.; Claus, J.; DiMassa, G.; Marriner, J.; Milutinovic, J.; Shafer, R.

    1988-01-01

    We have considered the possibility of stochastic cooling of beams for the RHIC collider. Similar studies have been carried out previously for RHIC and other bunched beam proton machines. The major motivation for cooling at RHIC is to stabilize the growth from intrabeam scattering. We find that cooling rates of the order of 500 sec are theoretically possible for beams of gold ions with γ = 100 if a cooling bandwidth of 10 GHz is used. However, the amount of microwave power which is required is large for momentum cooling and probably not practical. Considerably less power is required for slower rates. We believe that cooling times of 5000 sec for momentum cooling and 1000 sec for betatron cooling might be possible. 5 refs

  8. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  9. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johson, Rolland Paul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  10. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  11. Beam structure studies of low-energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, K.; Schneider, J. D.; Geisik, C.; Stevens, R. R.

    1991-05-01

    The ion beam structure at various axial positions along the beam-transport line has been monitored and studied utilizing a fluor screen and a video camera. The fluor material is aluminum oxide that is plasma-jet sprayed onto the surface of an aluminum or a water-cooled copper substrate. The visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false-color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for the on-line viewing by the experimentalist. Digitized video signals are stored for further off-line processing and extracting more information about the beam, such as beam profiles. This inexpensive and effective diagnostic enables the experimentalist to observe the real-time beam response (such as evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position) to parameter changes.

  12. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  13. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Barton, Donald; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruhwiler, David L; Burger, Al; Burov, Alexey; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Eidelman, Yury I; Favale, Anthony; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Funk, L W; Gassner, David M; Hahn, Harald; Harrison, Michael; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Koop, Ivan; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Mahler, George; Malitsky, Nikolay; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Merminga, Lia; Meshkov, Igor; Mirabella, Kerry; Montag, Christoph; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Parzen, George; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Shatunov, Yuri; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Trbojevic, Dejan; Troubnikov, Grigory; Wang, Gang; Wei, Jie; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang; ain, Animesh K

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.ags...

  14. Narrow Linewidth Laser Cooling via Adiabatic Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, John; Holland, Murray; Norcia, Matthew; Thompson, James; Cline, Julia

    2017-04-01

    We simulate and provide a theoretical framework for a new cooling method applicable to particles with narrow-linewidth optical transitions. The particles are adiabatically transferred to lower momentum states upon interaction with counter-propagating laser beams that are repeatedly swept over the transition frequency. A reduced reliance on spontaneous emission (compared to Doppler cooling) allows for larger slowing forces. Cooling via a 7.6 kHz dipole forbidden transition in Strontium-88 is simulated using one-dimensional quantum jump and c-number Langevin equation methods. This ``sweep cooling'' mechanism also shows promise for application to systems lacking closed cycling transitions, such as molecules.

  15. Lattice design and expected performance of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment demonstration of ionization cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterized neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavor at a neutrino factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at a muon collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE aims to demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using rf cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and reacceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling. A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised experiment can deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with its predicted cooling performance.

  16. Diagnostics for the NBETF actively cooled beamdump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1985-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility is currently testing multi-megawatt beams with pulse durations of up to 30 seconds. For this purpose, an actively cooled beam dump composed of heat-absorbing panels that dissipate the beam energy via high speed water flow has been installed and tested. The panels are mounted in a complex assembly necessary to accommodate the variety of ion sources to be tested. The beam dump required new diagnostics of two kinds: beam diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam, as inferred from energy transferred to the water, and panel diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam dump itself. This paper describes the response to these requirements, including new algorithms for beam profiles, and the authors compare this work to their earlier results for inertial beam dumps. Principal differences are that the power densities on the water-cooled panels can be only indirectly inferred from measurements of the transferred beam energy, and that the acquisition and preparation of 'raw' data is much more complex

  17. Diagnostics for the NBETF actively cooled beamdump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1984-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility is currently testing multi-megawatt beams with pulse durations of up to 30 seconds. For this purpose, an actively cooled beam dump composed of heat-absorbing panels tht dissipate the beam energy via high speed water flow has been installed and tested. The panels are mounted in a complex assembly necessary to accommodate the variety of ion sources to be tested. The beam dump required new diagnostics of two kinds: beam diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam, as inferred from energy transferred to the water, and panel diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam dump itself. In this paper we describe our response to these requirements, including new algorithms for beam profiles, and we compare this work to our earlier results for inertial beam dumps. Principal differences are that the power densities on the water-cooled panels can be only indirectly inferred from measurements of the transferred beam energy, and that the acquisition and preparation of raw data is much more complex

  18. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is ∼ 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  19. Transverse confinement in stochastic cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, D; Wallentowitz, S

    2004-01-01

    Stochastic cooling of trapped atoms is considered for a laser-beam configuration with beam waists equal to or smaller than the extent of the atomic cloud. It is shown that various effects appear due to this transverse confinement, among them heating of transverse kinetic energy. Analytical results of the cooling in dependence on size and location of the laser beam are presented for the case of a non-degenerate vapour

  20. ATLAS - Liquid Cooling Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonneau, P.

    1998-01-01

    Photo 1 - Cooling Unit - Side View Photo 2 - Cooling Unit - Detail Manifolds Photo 3 - Cooling Unit - Rear View Photo 4 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump, Heater and Exchanger Photo 5 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump and Fridge Photo 6 - Cooling Unit - Front View

  1. Novel Application of Density Estimation Techniques in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohayai, Tanaz Angelina [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [IIT, Chicago; Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford

    2017-10-12

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) aims to demonstrate muon beam ionization cooling for the first time and constitutes a key part of the R&D towards a future neutrino factory or muon collider. Beam cooling reduces the size of the phase space volume occupied by the beam. Non-parametric density estimation techniques allow very precise calculation of the muon beam phase-space density and its increase as a result of cooling. These density estimation techniques are investigated in this paper and applied in order to estimate the reduction in muon beam size in MICE under various conditions.

  2. 'Geant Simulation of Muon Cooling Rings,' 'Ionization Cooling Ring for Muons,' 'Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of Muon Beams in Ring Coolers,' 'Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research Within the Muon Collaboration,' 'Towards the Higgs Factory/Muon Collider,' 'Status of R and D on Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders,' 'Feasibility Study-II of a Muon-Based Neutrino Source,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'Higgs Factory Muon Collider,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'A Feasibility Study of a Neutrino Source Based on a Muon Storage Ring,' 'Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans,'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. G. Hanson and A. Klier; R. Palmer,; Amit Klier and Gail G. Hanson,; Mohammad M. Alsharo, et al,; G. Hanson,; G. Hanson,; S. Ozaki, R. Palmer, M.S. Zisman, and J. Gallardo, eds.,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; N. Holtkamp and D. Finley, eds.; C.M. Ankenbrandt

    2006-01-01

    now under way. The International Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Scoping Study (ISS) began at the NuFact05 Workshop in June 2005 with the goals of elaborating the physics case, defining the baseline options for such a facility and its neutrino detectors, and identifying the required R and D program to lay the foundations for a complete design study proposal, and an International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory is beginning. These studies entail iterative cost and technical difficulty evaluations, thereby providing guidelines for the advancing R and D program. One of the central subsystems of a neutrino factory or muon collider is the muon cooling system. The muon beam is cooled to increase the phase space density and allow the muons to pass through smaller apertures, thus reducing the cost of the following accelerator systems. This cooling is accomplished through ionization cooling, in which the beam is passed through liquid hydrogen absorbers and then accelerated in RF cavities to restore the longitudinal momentum. Ionization cooling was proposed more than twenty years ago But has not yet been demonstrated in practice. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) seeks to build and operate a muon-cooling device of a design proposed in Feasibility Study-II. In addition to cooling the muons, MICE includes apparatus to measure the performance of the device. The experiment will be carried out by a collaboration of physicists from the U.S., Europe, and Japan at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the U.K. MICE will begin operation in late 2007. Successful performance of the MICE experiment will provide the understanding needed to design a complete neutrino factory, in which the muons are cooled, accelerated, circulated in a storage ring, and decay to produce the neutrino beam. The first neutrino factory might be built in the U.S., Europe, or Japan. A Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) has recently been organized at Fermilab

  3. Cool Snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogager, Stinne Gunder Strøm; Grunert, Klaus G; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  4. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  5. FNAL R and D in medium energy electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, S; Crawford, A C; Kroc, T; MacLachlan, J; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C W; Shemyakin, A; Warner, A

    2000-01-01

    The first stage of the Fermilab Electron Cooling R and D program is now complete: a technology necessary to generate hundreds of milliamps of electron beam current at MeV energies has been demonstrated. Conceptual design studies show that with an electron beam current of 200 mA and with a cooling section of 20 m electron cooling in the 8.9 GeV/c Fermilab Recycler ring can provide antiproton stacking rates suitable for the Tevatron upgrades beyond Run II luminosity goals. A novel electron beam transport scheme with a weak magnetic field at the cathode and in the cooling section, and with discrete focusing elements in between will be used. A prototype of such an electron cooling system is now being built at Fermilab as part of the continuing R and D program. This paper describes the status of the electron cooling R and D program at Fermilab.

  6. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  7. Laser-Cooling for Light Ion Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N

    2000-01-01

    The ALICE Experiment to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will initially look at Pb82+-Pb82+ collisions. In a later stage, collisions of lighter ions are also foreseen. For lead ions, fast electron cooling will be used in the accumulation process at low energy to reach the beam brightness necessary for the experiment. For lighter ions, electron cooling becomes less efficient as the ratio Q2/A decreases (Q and A are respectively charge state and mass number of the ion). For this reason, a study has been made of the possibility to use the maturing technology of laser-cooling of fast ion beams to reach the desired emittances for lighter ions. The main problems encountered are the availability of useful ion species, the availability of corresponding laser systems, and the efficiency with which the transverse emittance can be reduced by the laser-cooling mechanism (which works mainly in the longitudinal plane).

  8. JUELICH: COSY acceleration and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The COSY cooler synchrotron at the KFA Forschungszentrum Jülich, inaugurated on 1 April, is now well on its way towards precision-defined high energy beams to open new fields for Jülich physics experiments. In two important goals, on 25 May the first beam cooled by electrons circulated inside the accelerator, then on 25 July physicists succeeded in accelerating the beam from the 270 MeV/c injection momentum to 600 MeV. Shortly after, this was pushed well above 1 GeV. Throughout the tuning process the number of stored particles increased steadily, finally peaking at 1.1 x 10 11 , a value compatible with the predicted limit at the injection energy. This success was the result of a painstaking search for the optimum parameter set, the commissioning crew being acutely aware that bringing such a large machine on line was a major experiment in its own right. The 3.3 GeV/c COSY machine belongs to the new class of hadron storage and cooler synchrotrons which started with CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring. COSY will 'sharpen' its beams to a narrow momentum spread using both electron and stochastic cooling to control the circulating particles. In addition it will provide space for internal experiments. Both features will allow for novel experimental approaches, and more than 100 physicists are eagerly waiting for the first proton reactions in their detectors

  9. New experimental results on electron cooling at COSY-Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, J.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, H.J.; Kobets, A.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent results of electron cooling of proton beams at COSY-Juelich are reported. Cooling at an electron energy of 70 keV has been studied for the first time. At the injection energy level of COSY, corresponding to 24.5 keV electron energy, the features of the cooled proton beam at extremely low intensities have been investigated in order to find out whether an ordering of the proton beam can be achieved. Such investigations are motivated by the results of a numerical simulation of the ordering process by the BETACOOL code. (author)

  10. Progress of the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulou, C; Bohm, R; Dolinskyy, O; Franzke, B; Hettrich, R; Maier, W; Menges, R; Nolden, F; Peschke, C; Petri, P; Steck, M; Thorndahl, L

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the recent achievements and ongoing developments for the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring is given. In focus are the hardware developments as well as the progress in predicting the system performance. The system operates in the frequency band 1-2 GHz, it has to provide fast 3D cooling of antiproton, rare isotope and stable heavy ion beams. The main challenges are (i) the cooling of antiprotons by means of cryogenic movable pick-up electrodes and (ii) the fast two-stage cooling (pre-cooling by the Palmer method, followed by the notch filter method) of the hot rare isotope beams (RIBs). Recently, a novel code for simulating the cooling process in the time domain has been developed at CERN. First results for the momentum cooling for heavy ions in the CR will be shown in comparison with results obtained in the frequency domain with the Fokker-Planck approach.

  11. Three-dimensional cooling of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Vsevolozhskaya, T A

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous ionization cooling of muon beams in all three - the longitudinal and two transverse - directions is considered in a scheme, based on bent lithium lenses with dipole constituent of magnetic field in them, created by a special configuration of current-carrying rod. An analysis of three-dimensional cooling is performed with the use of kinetic equation method. Results of numerical calculation for a specific beam line configuration are presented together with results of computer simulation using the Moliere distribution to describe the Coulomb scattering and the Vavilov distribution used to describe the ionization loss of energy.

  12. Optics of Electron Beam in the Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, A.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of ∼0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within ∼ 0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as ∼0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analysed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved

  13. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  14. Stochastic cooling equipment at the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The photo shows (centre) an experimental set-up for stochastic cooling of vertical betatron oscillations, used at the ISR in the years before the ICE ring was built. Cooling times of about 30 min were obtained in the low intensity range (~0.3 A). To be noted the four 50 Ohm brass input/output connections with cooling fins, and the baking-out sheet around the cylinder. On the left one sees a clearing electrode box allowing the electrode current to be measured, and the pressure seen by the beam to be evaluated.

  15. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Japan, Ibaraki; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Drielsma, F.; Karadzhov, Y.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.R.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Drews, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Winter, M.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90\\% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  16. On the Optimum Dispersion of a Storage Ring for Electron Cooling with High Space Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; Marié, L; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01

    With the intense electron beams used for cooling, matching of the ion and electron velocity over the largest possible fraction of the beam profile becomes important. In this situation, a finite dispersion from the ring in the cooling section can lead to an appreciable gain in the transverse cooling speed. Based on a simple model of the cooling force, an expression for the "optimum" dispersion as a function of the electron beam intensity, the momentum spread and other properties of the ion beam will be derived. This simple theory will be compared to measurements made on the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) at CERN during 1997.

  17. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  18. Beam line windows at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The A-6 main beam-line window at LAMPF separates the vacuum of the main beam line from the isotope production station, proton irradiation ports, and the beam stop, which operate in air. This window must withstand the design beam current of 1 mA at 800 MeV for periods of at least 3000 hours without failure. The window is water cooled and must be strong enough to withstand the 2.1 MPa (300 psig) cooling water pressure, as well as beam-induced thermal stresses. Two designs have been used to meet these goals, a stepped-plate window and a hemispherical window, both made from a precipitation-hardened nickel base alloy, Alloy 718. Calculations of the temperatures and stresses in each of these windows are presented

  19. A Muon Collider scheme based on Frictional Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Caldwell, A.; Galea, R.; Schlenstedt, S.

    2005-01-01

    Muon Colliders would usher in a new era of scientific investigation in the field of high-energy particle physics. The cooling of muon beams is proving to be the greatest obstacle in the realization of a Muon Collider. Monte Carlo simulations of a muon cooling scheme based on Frictional Cooling were performed. Critical issues, which require further study, relating to the technical feasibility of such a scheme are identified. Frictional Cooling, as outlined in this paper, provides sufficient six-dimensional emittance to make luminous collisions possible. It holds exciting potential in solving the problem of Muon Cooling

  20. STATUS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.; OZAKI, T.; YOSHIDA, T.; NANKAWA, T.; KOZAI, N.; SAKAMOTO, F.; SUZUKI, Y.

    2007-06-25

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.

  1. The quest for crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2002-01-01

    The phase transition of an ion beam into its crystalline state has long been expected to dramatically influence beam dynamics beyond the limitations of standard accelerator physics. Yet, although considerable improvement in beam cooling techniques has been made, strong heating mechanisms inherent to existing high-energy storage rings have prohibited the formation of the crystalline state in these machines up to now. Only recently, laser cooling of low-energy beams in the table-top rf quadrupole storage ring PAaul Laser cooLing Acceleration System (PALLAS) has lead to the experimental realization of crystalline beams. In this article, the quest for crystalline beams as well as their unique properties as experienced in PALLAS will be reviewed.

  2. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  3. Inductive cooling in quantum magnetomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sanchez, Erick; Twamley, Jason; Bowen, Warwick P.; Vanner, Michael R.

    Coupling to light or microwave fields allows quantum control of the motion of a mechanical oscillator, and offers prospects for precision sensing, quantum information systems, and tests of fundamental physics. In cavity electromechanics ground state cooling has been achieved using resolved sideband cooling. Here we present an alternative approach based on a magnetomechanical system that inductively couples an LC resonator to a mechanical oscillator. The experimental setup consists of a micro cantilever with a pyramidal magnetic tip attached at the end of the beam. The sharp end of the magnetic tip is positioned close to the planar microfabricated inductor of the LC resonator. The displacement in the position of the end of the cantilever generates a change in flux through the coil inducing an electromotive force in the circuit. The current in the LC resonator generates a magnetic field, and then a force between the tip and the coil. When they are strongly coupled and the mechanical resonance frequency ωm exceeds the electrical decay rate of the resonator γe, resolved sideband cooling can be used to cool the mechanics. We present estimations for the coupling rates and the experimental parameters required for these experiments. E. Romero acknowledges to CONACyT.

  4. Intensity Improvement For AD Experiments Using Barrier Bucket Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Bojtár, L

    2009-01-01

    We propose to cool the antiproton beam confined into a 300 ns or shorter barrier bucket. The longitudinal emittance obtained this way is much smaller than it is possible with coasting beam cooling. This allows beam bunching already in the AD ring with 202.56 MHz, the frequency of the ASACUSA RFQD. The proposed scheme requires the installation of two 202.56 MHz cavities and a barrier bucket cavity into the ring. With this modest investment ASACUSA gains a factor 2-3 in intensity. A proof of principle test has been done during 3 MD sessions recently. The beam emittances in all planes were measured after the beam was cooled in the barrier bucket and were found sufficiently low.

  5. Present status of the RCNP circulation ring comments on magnetized electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, A.

    1989-01-01

    After the brief introduction of the RCNP cooling synchrotron (MSR - Multipurpose Storage Ring), the characteristics of the circulation ring (CR), which is now under construction, are summarized. Some efforts toward the MSR, the next stage of the CR, are also described. In the MSR the completely new scheme will be used for beam cooling. The possibility of stimmulated magnetized electron cooling (say, advanced electron cooling), which lies between the ordinary electron cooling and the new scheme, is discussed. (author)

  6. Cooling rings for TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-02-01

    Consideration is given to quantum fluctuations, intra beam scattering, cooling rates, and ring acceptance in order to see if one can obtain a normalized emittance of 10 -8 in any plausible cooling ring. It is concluded that only a small gain is obtained by varying the partition functions, but a very significant gain is made by using higher bending fields. The ring is found to get bigger if the magnet apertures are increased. The ring diameter is found to increase if the momentum spread of the beam is reduced. It is shown that the power can be reduced by allowing a high beamstrahlung energy loss resulting in higher current in the cooling ring. Parameters are also given for a 10 -7 m radian emittance case

  7. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Verlot, P

    2015-09-18

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms.

  8. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  9. Design Studies of Magnet Systems for Muon Helical Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.J.; Lopes, M.L.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Alsharo' a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, Stephen A.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-25

    Helical cooling channels with superimposed solenoid and helical dipole and quadrupole coils, and a pressurized gas absorber in the aperture offer high efficiency of 6D muon beam cooling. In this paper, we continue design studies and comparison of two basic concepts of magnet system proposed for a helical cooling channel focusing on the high field sections. The results of magnetic analysis and Lorentz force calculations as well as the superconductor choice are presented and discussed.

  10. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  11. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Atlas Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  12. Proposal for Laser Cooling of Complex Polyatomic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Doyle, John M

    2016-11-18

    An experimentally feasible strategy for direct laser cooling of polyatomic molecules with six or more atoms is presented. Our approach relies on the attachment of a metal atom to a complex molecule, where it acts as an active photon cycling site. We describe a laser cooling scheme for alkaline earth monoalkoxide free radicals taking advantage of the phase space compression of a cryogenic buffer-gas beam. Possible applications are presented including laser cooling of chiral molecules and slowing of molecular beams using coherent photon processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Epicyclic Helical Channels for Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanaciev, Alex Bogacz, Yaroslav Derbenev, Kevin Beard, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland Johnson, Guimei Wang, Katsuya Yonehara

    2009-05-01

    In order to achieve cooling of muons in addition to 6D helical cooling channel (HCC) [1], we develop a technique based on a parametric resonance. The use of parametric resonances requires alternating dispersion, minimized at locations of thin absorbers, but maximized in between in order to compensate for chromatic aberrations [2]. These solutions can be combined in an Epicyclic Helical Cooling Channel (EHCC) that meets requirements of alternating dispersion of beam periodic orbit with best conditions for maintenance of stable beam transport in a continuous solenoid-type field [3]. We discuss here basic features and new simulation results for EHCC.

  14. Beam experiment at TARN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, A.; Chida, K.; Hattori, T.

    1984-01-01

    TARN is a storage ring of low energy ions (T sub(N) -- 10 MeV/u) constructed in 1979 to verify the feasibility of intensity multiplication proposed at NUMATRON project. The mean radius and maximum magnetic rigidity of the ring are 5.06 m and 11.8 kG.m, respectively. Magnet system based on a strong focusing FODO lattice is composed of 8 dipole and 16 quadrupole magnets. Additional 12 sextupole magnets are also installed for chromaticity control. Intensity increase by the multi-turn injection is 20 times with the dilution factor of 2.0 in horizontal transverse phase space. Injected beams are RF captured with the frequency around 8 MHz and moved inner side of the ring by RF deceleration as large as -- 5 % in Δp/p. Beam intensity increases linearly up to around 20 stackings with the capture efficiency of 80 % and 30 Hz repetition rate. Dilution factor of the longitudinal phase space is measured at 1.8. Thus about 300 times total intensity increase has been attained. The e-folding beam life time of 7 MeV proton is measured at 400 s for the vacuum pressure of 1 x 10 -10 Torr. Stochastic momentum cooling experiment of 7 MeV proton has been performed. A feed-back system based on the 'Notch-Filter' method has been adopted for its simplicity and characteristics suitable for lower beam intensity. Cooling time for the 7 MeV proton beam with the intensity of 10 8 is estimated at 19 s for optimum cooling rate with the system gain of 105 dB, while the system gain as large as 111 dB has been achieved without self-oscillation of the electronics system. From the beam experiment, the cooling time of 10 8 proton beam with fractional momentum spread of 1.4 x 10 -2 is measured at --20 sec with the system gain of 97 db. (author)

  15. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH(•)) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach.

  16. Muon cooling channels

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard-K-Kei

    2003-01-01

    A procedure uses the equations that govern ionization cooling, and leads to the most important parameters of a muon cooling channel that achieves assumed performance parameters. First, purely transverse cooling is considered, followed by both transverse and longitudinal cooling in quadrupole and solenoid channels. Similarities and differences in the results are discussed in detail, and a common notation is developed. Procedure and notation are applied to a few published cooling channels. The parameters of the cooling channels are derived step by step, starting from assumed values of the initial, final and equilibrium emittances, both transverse and longitudinal, the length of the cooling channel, and the material properties of the absorber. The results obtained include cooling lengths and partition numbers, amplitude functions and limits on the dispersion at the absorber, length, aperture and spacing of the absorber, parameters of the RF system that achieve the longitudinal amplitude function and bucket area ...

  17. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-01-01

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  18. Solar hybrid cooling system for high-tech offices in subtropical climate - Radiant cooling by absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A solar hybrid cooling system is proposed for high-tech offices in subtropical climate. → An integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification. → Year-round cooling and energy performances were evaluated through dynamic simulation. → Its annual primary energy consumption was lower than conventional system up to 36.5%. → The passive chilled beams were more energy-efficient than the active chilled beams. - Abstract: A solar hybrid cooling design is proposed for high cooling load demand in hot and humid climate. For the typical building cooling load, the system can handle the zone cooling load (mainly sensible) by radiant cooling with the chilled water from absorption refrigeration, while the ventilation load (largely latent) by desiccant dehumidification. This hybrid system utilizes solar energy for driving the absorption chiller and regenerating the desiccant wheel. Since a high chilled water temperature generated from the absorption chiller is not effective to handle the required latent load, desiccant dehumidification is therefore involved. It is an integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification, which are powered up by solar energy. In this study, the application potential of the solar hybrid cooling system was evaluated for the high-tech offices in the subtropical climate through dynamic simulation. The high-tech offices are featured with relatively high internal sensible heat gains due to the intensive office electric equipment. The key performance indicators included the solar fraction and the primary energy consumption. Comparative study was also carried out for the solar hybrid cooling system using two common types of chilled ceilings, the passive chilled beams and active chilled beams. It was found that the solar hybrid cooling system was technically feasible for the applications of relatively higher cooling load demand. The annual primary energy

  19. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  20. Generation and propagation characteristics of a localized hollow beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Meng; Wang, Zhizhang; Yin, Yaling; Zhou, Qi; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2018-05-01

    A succinct experimental scheme is demonstrated to generate a localized hollow beam by using a π-phase binary bitmap and a convergent thin lens. The experimental results show that the aspect ratio of the dark-spot size of the hollow beam can be effectively controlled by the focal length of the lens. The measured beam profiles in free space also agree with the theoretical modeling. The studies hold great promise that such a hollow beam can be used to cool trapped atoms (or molecules) by Sisyphus cooling and to achieve an optically-trapped Bose–Einstein condensate by optical-potential evaporative cooling.

  1. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  2. Status of the R&D Towards Electron Cooling of RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Favale; D. Holmes; J.J. Sredniawski; Hans Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; V.V. Parkhomchuk; V.B. Reva; J. Alduino; D.S. Barton; Dana Richard Beavis; I. Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; Andrew Burrill; Rama Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; K.A. Drees; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; G. Ganetis; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; Hartmut Hahn; L.R. Hammons; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; D.L. Lederle; Vladimir Litvinenko; C. Longo; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; B. Oerter; C. Pai; George Parzen; D. Pate; D. Phillips; S.R. Plate; Eduard Pozdeyev; Triveni Rao; J. Reich; Thomas Roser; A.G. Ruggiero; T. Russo; C. Schultheiss; Z. Segalov; J. Smedley; K. Smith; T. Tallerico; S. Tepikian; R. Than; R.J. Todd; Dejan Trbojevic; J.E. Tuozzolo; P. Wanderer; G. WANG; D. Weiss; Q. Wu; Kin Yip; A. Zaltsman; A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; L.R. Prost; A.O. Sidorin; A.V. Smirnov; Yaroslav Derbenev; Peter Kneisel; John Mammosser; H. Phillips; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer; Jeffrey Saunders; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; A.V. Aleksandrov; D.L. Douglas; Y.W. Kang; D.T. Abell; G.I. Bell; David L. Bruhwiler; R. Busby; John R. Cary; D.A. Dimitrov; P. Messmer; Vahid Houston Ranjbar; D.S. Smithe; A.V. Sobol; P. Stoltz

    2007-08-01

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed cooling calculations have been made to determine the efficacy of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. Electron cooling of RHIC at collisions requires electron beam energy up to about 54 MeV at an average current of between 50 to 100 mA and a particularly bright electron beam. The accelerator chosen to generate this electron beam is a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a superconducting RF gun with a laser-photocathode. An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator: Photocathodes of novel design, superconducting RF electron gun of a particularly high current and low emittance, a very high-current ERL cavity and a demonstration ERL using these components.

  3. Cooling water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  4. Laser cooling of solids

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Parallel to advances in laser cooling of atoms and ions in dilute gas phase, which has progressed immensely, resulting in physics Nobel prizes in 1997 and 2001, major progress has recently been made in laser cooling of solids. I compare the physical nature of the laser cooling of atoms and ions with that of the laser cooling of solids. I point out all advantages of this new and very promising area of laser physics. Laser cooling of solids (optical refrigeration) at the present time can be lar...

  5. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  6. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  7. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, A C

    2003-01-01

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10 sup - sup 4 rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R and D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated ...

  8. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  9. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  10. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  11. Achromatic Cooling Channel with Li Lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2002-04-29

    A linear cooling channel with Li lenses, solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities is considered. A special lattice design is used to minimize chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. Transverse emittance of muon beam decreases from 2 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel of about 110 m length. Longitudinal heating is modest, therefore transmission of the channel is rather high: 96% without decay and 90% with decay. Minimal beam emittance achievable by similar channel estimated as about 0.25 mm at surface field of Li lenses 10 T.

  12. Ion beam coolers in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Cooling techniques for low-energy radioactive ion beams are reviewed together with applications on high-precision measurements of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. The emphasis in the presentation is on cooling, bunching and improving the overall characteristics of ion beams by RFQ-driven buffer gas cooling devices. Application of cooled and bunched beams in collinear laser spectroscopy to extract isotope shifts and hyperfine structure are presented with examples on radioactive Ti, Zr and Hf isotopes. The impact of the new-generation coolers on mass measurements of short-lived nuclei is discussed with examples on precision measurements of masses of super-allowed beta emitters. As a new concept, decay spectroscopy of radioactive ions trapped in a cooler Penning trap is presented.

  13. Collimator for the SPS extracted beam

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    This is a water cooled copper collimator (TCSA) which has exactly the shape of the cross section of the downstream magnetic beam splitter. Parts of the blown up primary proton beam pass above/below and left through this collimator. A small part of the protons is absorbed in the thin copper wedges. In this way the downstream magnetic splitter of the same cross section receives already a beam where its magnetic wedges are no longer hit by protons. The upstream, water cooled collimator, more resistant to protons, has cast a 'shadow' onto the downstream magnetic splitter, less resistant to protons. Gualtero Del Torre stands on the left.

  14. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  15. NASA Microclimate Cooling Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this outline form presentation is to present NASA's challenges in microclimate cooling as related to the spacesuit. An overview of spacesuit flight-rated personal cooling systems is presented, which includes a brief history of cooling systems from Gemini through Space Station missions. The roles of the liquid cooling garment, thermal environment extremes, the sublimator, multi-layer insulation, and helmet visor UV and solar coatings are reviewed. A second section is presented on advanced personal cooling systems studies, which include heat acquisition studies on cooling garments, heat rejection studies on water boiler & radiators, thermal storage studies, and insulation studies. Past and present research and development and challenges are summarized for the advanced studies.

  16. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237783; The ATLAS collaboration; Zwalinski, L.; Bortolin, C.; Vogt, S.; Godlewski, J.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Van Overbeek, M.; Blaszcyk, T.

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity.

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on crystalline ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Hofmann, I.; Liesen, D.

    1989-04-01

    The workshop consisted of mainly invited and some contributed papers. More informal discussions took place in three working groups on the following topics: beam cooling techniques; diagnostics of crystalline beams; storage rings for crystalline beams. The present volume collects all papers as well as the summaries of the working groups. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  18. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service; CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  19. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  20. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  1. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  2. Generating Low Beta Regions with Quadrupoles for Final Muon Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, J. G. [Mississippi U.; Cremaldi, L. M. [Mississippi U.; Hart, T. L. [Mississippi U.; Oliveros, S. J. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. J. [Mississippi U.; Neuffer, D. V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Muon beams and colliders are rich sources of new physics, if muons can be cooled. A normalized rms transverse muon emittance of 280 microns has been achieved in simulation with short solenoids and a betatron function of 3 cm. Here we use ICOOL, G4beamline, and MAD-X to explore using a 400 MeV/c muon beam and strong focusing quadrupoles to approach a normalized transverse emittance of 100 microns and finish 6D muon cooling. The low beta regions produced by the quadrupoles are occupied by dense, low Z absorbers, such as lithium hydride or beryllium, that cool the beam. Equilibrium transverse emittance is linearly proportional to the beta function. Reverse emittance exchange with septa and/or wedges is then used to decrease transverse emittance from 100 to 25 microns at the expense of longitudinal emittance for a high energy lepton collider. Work remains to be done on chromaticity correction.

  3. Commission of HIRFL-CSRe electron cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wang; Yang Xiaodong; Li Jie; Wang Zhixue; Zhao Hongwei; Yan Hongbin; Zhang Wei; Zhang Junhui

    2005-01-01

    In CSRe electron cooling device, a special electron gun which can produce variable profile electron beam with different size and density distribution was adopted for decreasing ion losses. Electrostatic bending device was used for reducing electron beam losses and improving vacuum condition. The instability of the electron beam is suppressed because the secondary electrons from collector would come back to the collector in the same orbit finally. Longitudinal magnetic field with parallelism better than 10 -4 was achieved by adopting of independent high precise solenoid coils at cooling section. In this case, the r.m.s deviations of the transverse magnetic field at cooling section in horizontal and vertical direction are 3.298 x 10 - '5 and 2.458 x 10 -5 respectively. The characters of the gun and collector were investigated. The results were presented and indicate that it achieves the design purpose very well. (authors)

  4. Development of a higher power cooling system for lithium targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, B; Green, S; Scott, M C; Bennett, J R J; Edgecock, T R

    2015-12-01

    The accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy beam at the University of Birmingham is based around a solid thick lithium target cooled by heavy water. Significant upgrades to Birmingham's Dynamitron accelerator are planned prior to commencing a clinical trial. These upgrades will result in an increase in maximum achievable beam current to at least 3 mA. Various upgrades to the target cooling system to cope with this increased power have been investigated. Tests of a phase change coolant known as "binary ice" have been carried out using an induction heater to provide a comparable power input to the Dynamitron beam. The experimental data shows no improvement over chilled water in the submerged jet system, with both systems exhibiting the same heat input to target temperature relation for a given flow rate. The relationship between the cooling circuit pumping rate and the target temperature in the submerged jet system has also been tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Transverse Coupling on Asymmetric Cooling in Compton Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Fast cooling of bunches circulating in a Compton ring is achieved by placing the collision point between electron bunches and laser pulses in a dispersive section and by, in addition, introducing a transverse offset between the laser pulse and the electron-beam closed orbit. Growth of the emittance in the dispersive transversal direction due to the additional excitation of betatron oscillations limits this type of cooling. Here we present the results of further studies on the fast cooling process, looking at the effect of the coupling of the transverse (betatron) oscillations. We first show theoretically that the transverse betatron coupling shortens the cooling time and hence reduces the steady-state energy spread of the electron beam, as well as the quantum losses. The theoretical estimates are then validated by simulations. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment at the KEK ATF Damping Ring is proposed.

  6. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still

  7. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  8. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  9. Simulation of Bichromatic Force Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiang; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Laser cooling without spontaneous emission as implemented by the bichromatic force (BF) remains a controversial topic. We have done a numerical simulation of the BF on He using the 23 S 33 P transition at λ = 389 nm in order to support the interpretation of previously reported measurements. Our experiments and the simulation reported here use a time scale comparable to the excited state lifetime so that spontaneous emission cannot contribute significantly. The average velocity change is 30 - 40 times larger than the recoil velocity but the measurements of both phase space and velocity space compression are limited by the longitudinal velocity spread of the atomic beam to ~ 2. The simulation clearly shows this spreading. The code passed several preliminary tests using single-frequency traveling and standing waves, and then it was run with the appropriate bichromatic light fields. Its output agrees very well with the measurements and, most importantly, shows that significant laser cooling is indeed possible on a time scale comparable to that of a single absorption-spontaneous cycle. Supported by ONR.

  10. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  11. Magnetic field measurement of HIRFL-CSR experimental ring electron cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Lijun; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yang Xiaodong; Li Jie; Lu Wang; Wang Zhixue; Yan Hongbin; Zhang Wei; Zhang Junhui; Zhao Hongwei

    2005-01-01

    The cooling time and cooling efficiency in electron cooling device strongly depend on the transverse temperature of electron beam. In order to reduce this temperature, a new type of cooling section solenoid composed of 68 coils was used in the HIRFL-CSR electron cooling device to produce a high parallelism magnetic field. With the Hall probe, the components of the magnetic field along the ion beam orbit were measured, and using the compass method the magnetic field parallelism in cooling section was measured. According to the measured results, the magnetic axis angle of each coil with respect to the geometric axis was regulated correspondingly. The magnetic field nonparallelism in the cooling section less than 1 x 10 -4 was achieved and a magnetic induction strength of 0.078 T was obtained. (authors)

  12. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  13. Electron cooling of D sup - at the ASTRID storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, J S; Andersen, L H; Balling, P; Raarup, M K

    2000-01-01

    A report of recent results on electron cooling of D sup - at an energy of 1.6 MeV in the ASTRID storage ring is given. The longitudinal velocity spread has been reduced from approx 4x10 sup - sup 4 (FWHM) to approx 7x10 sup - sup 5 (FWHM) at a current of approx 0.1 mu A. A drift in the mean velocity of the cooled beam has been reduced by application of a small RF signal on four sets of plates in the cooler. Initially, the velocity spread is found to decrease with ion current, indicating equilibrium between cooling and intra-beam scattering, whereas at later times (lower current) the velocity spread becomes constant, indicating equilibrium with the electron beam. To diagnose cooling, a simple system allowing to follow the frequency width and position of a Schottky harmonic on a sub-second time-scale, has been developed. The system uses a standard data acquisition card to digitize a down-mixed Schottky-signal and a FFT routine in Labview on a standard PC. The electron-cooled ion-beam is used for high-resolution...

  14. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  15. Study of cooling effectiveness for an integrated cooling turbine blade

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi; Mimura, Fujio; Fukuyama, Yoshitaka; 松下 政裕; 山根 敬; 三村 富嗣雄; 福山 佳孝

    2007-01-01

    Experimental study of film cooling, impingement cooling and integrated cooling were carried out with the aim of applying them to turbine cooling. The experiments were conducted with 673 K hot gas flow and room temperature cooling air. Test plate surface temperature distributions were measured with an infrared camera. This report presents fundamental research data on cooling performance of the test plates for the validation of numerical simulation. Moreover, simplify heat transfer calculations...

  16. Status of the international Muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, V.; Bonesini, M.

    2009-01-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first one and a particle identification system provide a measurement of the outgoing emittance. By July 2009 it is expected that the beam and first set of detectors will have been commissioned and a first measurement of input beam emittance may be reported. Along with the steps in the measurement of emittance reduction (cooling) that will follow later and in 2010. (authors)

  17. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  18. Second sector cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of July, cool-down is starting in the second LHC sector, sector 4-5. The cool down of sector 4-5 may occasionally generate mist at Point 4, like that produced last January (photo) during the cool-down of sector 7-8.Things are getting colder in the LHC. Sector 7-8 has been kept at 1.9 K for three weeks with excellent stability (see Bulletin No. 16-17 of 16 April 2007). The electrical tests in this sector have got opt to a successful start. At the beginning of July the cryogenic teams started to cool a second sector, sector 4-5. At Point 4 in Echenevex, where one of the LHC’s cryogenic plants is located, preparations for the first phase of the cool-down are underway. During this phase, the sector will first be cooled to 80 K (-193°C), the temperature of liquid nitrogen. As for the first sector, 1200 tonnes of liquid nitrogen will be used for the cool-down. In fact, the nitrogen circulates only at the surface in the ...

  19. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, C. [Fermilab

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  20. Totally Active Scintillator Tracker-Calorimeter for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078013; Blondel, Alain

    2014-09-31

    The recent discoveries in particle physics, the Higgs Boson and neutrino oscillations, voiced the need for new machines that can provide higher intensities, energy and precision. To study the neutrino oscillations in great details and to access new physics, a Neutrino Factory stands as an ultimate tool that offers a high intensity, well understood neutrino beam. On the other hand, a Muon Collider is indispensable for better understanding of a Higgs physics. Both machines share similar ingredients and one of them, that is essential to achieve high luminosity of the beams, is beam cooling. And the only feasible method to achieve cooling of a muons beam is based on ionization. An R&D project was established to verify a possibility of such a cooling, Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). Its purpose is to build a cooling cell capable of cooling a muon beam by 10% and measure the effect (the cooling effect is attributed to a reduction of beam emittance) with an absolute precision of 0.1%. This is achieve...

  1. Evaporative cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketterle, W.; Van Druten, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on evaporative cooling of trapped atoms: Theoretical models for evaporative cooling; the role of collisions for real atoms; experimental techniques and summary of evaporative cooling experiments. 166 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Barry Univ., Miami Shores, FL (United States). Physical Sciences; Irastorza, Igor [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Redondo, Javier [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-12-15

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a preference for a mild non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP represents the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO.

  3. Water-cooled electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Dumont, G; Righini, B

    2000-01-01

    LHC experiments demand on cooling of electronic instrumentation will be extremely high. A large number of racks will be located in underground caverns and counting rooms, where cooling by conventional climatisation would be prohibitively expensive. A series of tests on the direct water cooling of VMEbus units and of their standard power supplies is reported. A maximum dissipation of 60 W for each module and more than 1000 W delivered by the power supply to the crate have been reached. These values comply with the VMEbus specifications. (3 refs).

  4. Cooling towers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1981-02-01

    This bibliography cites 300 selected references containing information on various aspects of large cooling tower technology, including design, construction, operation, performance, economics, and environmental effects. The towers considered include natural-draft and mechanical-draft types employing wet, dry, or combination wet-dry cooling. A few references deal with alternative cooling methods, principally ponds or spray canals. The citations were compiled for the DOE Energy Information Data Base (EDB) covering the period January to December 1980. The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators

  5. Feasibility study of stochastic cooling of bunches in the SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dome, G.; Linnecar, T.

    1984-01-01

    The average luminosity of the SPS collider could be improved if the slow blow-up of transverse emittances due to beam-beam and intrabeam scattering effects were to be reduced by a transverse cooling system. We examine the parameters of such a system and propose a technological approach which seems better suited to the case of a few bunches circulating in a large machine. (orig./HSI)

  6. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to achieve high number densities of trapped cold atoms [17,18]. In zig-zag method, the transverse component of velocity of a moving atom in atomic beam is reduced by a laser beam propagating at an angle with respect to the axis of the atomic beam. In this method, a zig-zag path for the cooling laser beam is generated.

  7. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  8. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  9. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice.

  10. A condensed state in a system of stored and cooled ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    In heavy-ion storage rings a beam of particles with uniform mass and (positive) charge, is confined to a narrow region around an equilibrium orbit. The internal temperature in the co-moving reference frame for such beams may be lowered by stochastic or electron cooling to very low values: 1 0 K has been reported for proton beams. If such conditions are indeed realized in heavy-ion beams, new types of condensation phenomena should appear. For laser cooling techniques even lower temperatures are anticipated.Progress is reported on studies of computer simulations of such systems using the method of Molecular Dynamics. 11 figs., 8 refs., 2 tabs

  11. A Method of Slowing and Cooling Molecules and Neutral Atoms Using Time Varying Electric Field Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Harvey; Maddi, Jason; Dinneen, Timothy

    2000-06-01

    Time-invariant electric field gradients have long been used to deflect beams of molecules and neutral atoms. However, time-varying electric field gradients can also be used to accelerate, slow [1,2], cool [2], or bunch these same beams. The possible applications include slowing and cooling thermal beams of molecules and atoms, launching cold atoms from a trap into a fountain, beam transport, and measuring atomic dipole polarizabilities. [1] H.L. Bethlem, G. Berden, and G Meijer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1588 (1999). [2] J. A. Maddi, T.P. Dinneen, and H. Gould, Phys. Rev. A60, 3882 (1999).

  12. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  13. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1987-10-01

    The experimental data obtained in this program gives insight into the physical phenomena that occur on a film cooled airfoil, and should provide a relevant data base for verification of new design tools. Results indicate that the downstream film cooling process is a complex function of the thermal dilution and turbulence augmentation parameters with trends actually reversing as blowing strength and coolant-to-gas temperature ratio varied. The pressure surface of the airfoil is shown to exhibit a considerably higher degree of sensitivity to changes in the film cooling parameters and, consequently, should prove to be more of a challenge than the suction surface in accurately predicting heat transfer levels with downsteam film cooling.

  14. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  15. LHC cooling gains ground

    CERN Multimedia

    Huillet-Miraton Catherine

    The nominal cryogenic conditions of 1.9 K have been achieved in sectors 5-6 and 7-8. This means that a quarter of the machine has reached the nominal conditions for LHC operation, having attained a temperature of below 2 K (-271°C), which is colder than interstellar space! Elsewhere, the cryogenic system in Sector 8-1 has been filled with liquid helium and cooled to 2K and will soon be available for magnet testing. Sectors 6-7 and 2-3 are being cooled down and cool-down operations have started in Sector 3-4. Finally, preparations are in hand for the cool-down of Sector 1-2 in May and of Sector 4-5, which is currently being consolidated. The LHC should be completely cold for the summer. For more information: http://lhc.web.cern.ch/lhc/Cooldown_status.htm.

  16. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  17. Cooling tower waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

    1998-05-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

  18. The experimental program for high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities for muon cooling channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, B.; Chung, M.; Hanlet, P. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2018-01-01

    An intense beam of muons is needed to provide a luminosity on the order of 1034 cm‑2s‑1 for a multi-TeV collider. Because muons produced by colliding a multi-MW proton beam with a target made of carbon or mercury have a large phase space, significant six dimensional cooling is required. Through ionization cooling—the only cooling method that works within the lifetime of the muon—and emittance exchange, the desired emittances for a Higgs Factory or higher energy collider are attainable. A cooling channel utilizing gas filled radio frequency cavities has been designed to deliver the requisite cool muon beam. Technology development of these RF cavities has progressed from breakdown studies, through beam tests, to dielectric loaded and reentrant cavity designs. The results of these experiments are summarized.

  19. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  20. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  1. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  2. Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.

    1995-12-01

    Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider

  3. Superconducting solenoids for an international muon cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Rey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The international muon ionization cooling experiment MICE will consist of two focusing cooling cells and a pair of uniform field solenoids used for particle identification and emittance measurements. The 2.75-meter long cooling cells have a pair of field flip coils and a coupling coil. The 0.52-meter diameter field flip coils surround an absorber that removes transverse and longitudinal momentum from the muons to be cooled. The beam in the absorber is at a minimum beta point so that scattering of the muons is minimized. The 1.7-meter diameter coupling coils are outside of conventional 201.25 MHz RF cavities that accelerate the muons putting longitudinal momentum into the muons without putting back the transverse momentum into the beam. A third set of flip coils helps the muon beam transition from and to the experimental solenoids. The 0.6-meter diameter experimental solenoids have a uniform field region (good to about 1 part in 1000) that is 1.3-meters long. The MICE experiment magnets must operate as a single unit so that the field profile will produce the maximum muon cooling

  4. Laser cooling of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative description of laser cooling of neutral atoms is given. Two of the most important mechanisms utilized in laser cooling, the so-called Doppler Cooling and Sisyphus Cooling, are reviewed. The minimum temperature reached by the atoms is derived using simple arguments. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Heavy-ion cooling and radiative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.F.

    1988-09-01

    There is presently a large number of ion storage rings under construction which will use electron cooling for increasing the phase-space density of the stored ions in order to gain luminosity and resolution advantages for a variety of experiments. In this review a more general introduction to the electron-cooling technique is given. The atomic-physics aspects of electron-ion interactions at low relative velocity are identified. One of the most important processes is electron-ion radiative recombination because it can have strong implications on the operation of a storage ring employing electron cooling. Estimates are given of the ion-beam lifetime, as limited by recombination losses, as a function of electron density and temperature and for all values of the atomic number Z of the ions. The use of recombination processes in the electron cooler for atomic spectroscopy of few-electron heavy ions is discussed along with their implication on diagnostics of electron cooling. (orig.)

  6. LS1 Report: Summer cool down

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    As the final LS1 activities are carried out in the machine, teams have been cooling down the accelerator sector by sector in preparation for beams.   The third sector of the LHC to be cooled down - sector 1-2 - has seen the process begin this week. During the cool-down phase, survey teams are measuring and smoothing (or realigning) the magnets at cold. By the end of August, five sectors of the machine will be in the process of cooling down, with one (sector 6-7) at cold. The LHC Access Safety System (LASS) is now being commissioned, and will be validated during the DSO tests at the beginning of October. As teams consolidate the modifications made to LASS during the shutdown, many points were closed for testing purposes. The CSCM (copper stabiliser continuity measurement) tests have been completed in the first sector (6-7) and no defect has been found. These results will be presented to the LHC Machine Committee next week. CSCM tests will start in the second sector in mid-August. Following many...

  7. Minimizing Slope and Kick of Intermediate Bunches for Electron Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Ions in the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) will have transverse energy, which limits the beams density. Electron cooling is a process by which a beam of bunched electrons with small transverse kinetic energy is directed along the ion beam with the same velocity. The ions transfer their transverse kinetic energy to the electron bunches, making the ions lose transverse energy. Electron bunches will be supplied by an electron gun. The required current needed to cool the ion beam can be reached by reusing electrons and incorporating RF kicker cavities to supply a pulsed electric field that kicks every 11th bunch out of the cooling ring. This provides an exact solution that yields zero kick and slope to all intermediate bunches in the cooling ring, which is described by a cosine series with 11 terms. The goal of this project is to determine if solutions exist that are sufficiently close to zero kick and slope, but require less than 4 kicker cavities. The method used to find these solutions is minimizing an objective function through Sequential Least Squares Programming (SLSQP). A Pareto front then demonstrated the average kick vs. average slope when using 1 through 4 kickers.

  8. Cooling and squeezing via quadratic optomechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnenkamp, A.; Børkje, K.; Harris, J. G. E.; Girvin, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    We explore the physics of optomechanical systems in which an optical cavity mode is coupled parametrically to the square of the position of a mechanical oscillator. We derive an effective master equation describing two-phonon cooling of the mechanical oscillator. We show that for high temperatures and weak coupling, the steady-state phonon number distribution is nonthermal (Gaussian) and that even for strong cooling the mean phonon number remains finite. Moreover, we demonstrate how to achieve mechanical squeezing by driving the cavity with two beams. Finally, we calculate the optical output and squeezing spectra. Implications for optomechanics experiments with the membrane-in-the-middle geometry or ultracold atoms in optical resonators are discussed.

  9. Compton Ring with Laser Radiative Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.; Zimmermann, F.

    2013-10-01

    Proposed is an enhancement of laser radiative cooling by utilizing laser pulses of small spatial and temporal dimensions, which interact only with a fraction of an electron bunch circulating in a storage ring. The dynamics of such electron bunch when laser photons scatter off the electrons at a collision point placed in a section with nonzero dispersion is studied. In this case of `asymmetric cooling', the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering where the laser spot size is larger than the electron beam; and the synchrotron oscillations are damped faster. Results of extensive simulations are presented for the performance optimization of Compton gamma-ray sources and damping rings.

  10. Emergency reactor cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Hidefumi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling water in a gravitationally dropping water reservoir is injected into a reactor pressure vessel passing through a pipeline upon occurrence of emergency. The pipeline is inclined downwardly having one end thereof being in communication with the pressure vessel. During normal operation, the cooling water in the upper portion of the inclined pipeline is heated by convection heat transfer from the communication portion with the pressure vessel. On the other hand, cooling water present at a position lower than the communication portion forms cooling water lumps. Accordingly, temperature stratification layers are formed in the inclined pipeline. Therefore, temperature rise of water in a vertical pipeline connected to the inclined pipeline is small. With such a constitution, the amount of heat lost from the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline is reduced. Further, there is no worry that cooling water to be injected upon occurrence of emergency is boiled under reduced pressure in the injection pipeline to delay the depressurization of the pressure vessel. (I.N.)

  11. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  12. Gas cooled leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.; Hornik, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to cover as completely as possible and in sufficient detail the topics relevant to lead design. The first part identifies the problems associated with lead design, states the mathematical formulation, and shows the results of numerical and analytical solutions. The second part presents the results of a parametric study whose object is to determine the best choice for cooling method, material, and geometry. These findings axe applied in a third part to the design of high-current leads whose end temperatures are determined from the surrounding equipment. It is found that cooling method or improved heat transfer are not critical once good heat exchange is established. The range 5 5 but extends over a large of values. Mass flow needed to prevent thermal runaway varies linearly with current above a given threshold. Below that value, the mass flow is constant with current. Transient analysis shows no evidence of hysteresis. If cooling is interrupted, the mass flow needed to restore the lead to its initially cooled state grows exponentially with the time that the lead was left without cooling

  13. Vlasov analysis of microbunching instability for magnetized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C.

    2017-05-01

    For a high-brightness electron beam with high bunch charge traversing a recirculation beam line, coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge effects may result in microbunching instability (MBI). Both tracking simulation and Vlasov analysis for an early design of a circulator cooler ring (CCR) for the Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) reveal significant MBI [Ya. Derbenev and Y. Zhang, Proceedings of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, COOL'09, Lanzhou, China, 2009 (2009), FRM2MCCO01]. It is envisioned that the MBI could be substantially suppressed by using a magnetized beam. In this paper we have generalized the existing Vlasov analysis, originally developed for a nonmagnetized beam (or transversely uncoupled beam), to the description of transport of a magnetized beam including relevant collective effects. The new formulation is then employed to confirm prediction of microbunching suppression for a magnetized beam transport in the recirculation arc of a recent JLEIC energy recovery linac (ERL) based cooler design for electron cooling. It is found that the smearing effect in the longitudinal beam phase space originates from the large transverse beam size as a nature of the magnetized beams and becomes effective through the x -z correlation when the correlated distance is larger than the microbunched scale. As a comparison, MBI analysis of the early design of JLEIC CCR is also presented in this paper.

  14. Lattices with minimal space charge effects for crystalline beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Channell, P.J.; Neri, F.R.

    1995-12-31

    There are numerous techniques for cooling beams of charged particles including stochastic cooling, electron beam cooling, ionization (foil) cooling (for lepton beams only), and laser cooling which works only with ions with some electrons still attached. The successful implementation of laser cooling at Aarhus, has led to interest in crystalline beams, and it certainly seems that crystallization of small numbers of stored particles should be possible. There are limits, however, that may restrict the total number of charged particles stored; these include the limit on the space-charge tune shift, {vert_bar}{triangle}{nu}{vert_bar} < 0.25 (though the precise number is subject to debate) and intrabeam scattering. In this paper we will be concerned with the possibility of intense crystalline beams; for simplicity we treat only the nonrelativistic case, though the relativistic case is a simple extension of this work. In the next section we review the limits on the number of particles stored and observe that the beam size scaling with beam temperature is the important dependence that determines the limits on the stored current as a function of beam temperature. In section 3 we use a general formalism to determine the beam size scaling and apply it to various kinds of focusing lattices and determine the relevant limits. In section 4 we use simulations that include lattice elements, a cooling model, and an N-body space-charge model to confirm the predictions of section 3 and to explore the details of various schemes. In the final section we summarize and discuss our results.

  15. Benefits of cryogenic cooling on the operation of a pulsed CO2 laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... Abstract. The paper presents results of a theoretical model of a pulsed electron beam controlled. CO2 laser (EBCL) to investigate the effect of cooling on the laser gas mixture. It is shown that cryogenic cooling can significantly improve the performance of the laser. The efficiency of an. EBCL improved from ...

  16. Benefits of cryogenic cooling on the operation of a pulsed CO2 laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... The paper presents results of a theoretical model of a pulsed electron beam controlled CO2 laser (EBCL) to investigate the effect of cooling on the laser gas mixture. It is shown that cryogenic cooling can significantly improve the performance of the laser. The efficiency of an EBCL improved from 20% to ...

  17. Ion beam dump for JT-60 NBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Horiike, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shinzaburo; Morita, Hiroaki; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1981-10-01

    The design of the active cooling type ion beam dump for JT-60 NBI which receives the total beam power of 5.6 MW for 10 sec continuously is described. It is composed of array of many finned tubes which is made of oxygen free copper with 0.2% silver content. The safety margin against thermal and mechanical troubles is estimated by the heat transfer and the thermal stress calculation. (author)

  18. Commissioning of Fermilab's Electron Cooling System for 8-GeV Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gai, Wei; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kazakevich, Grigory; Kramper, Brian J; Kroc, Thomas K; Leibfritz, Jerry; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley M; Saewert, Greg W; Schmidt, Chuck; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V; Sutherland, Mary; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden

    2005-01-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is being currently commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper will report on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  19. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Becklehimer, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Donovan, Matthew J [ORNL; Layton, Christopher C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  20. Muon ionization cooling experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    A neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring is the ultimate tool for studies of neutrino oscillations, including possibly leptonic CP violation. It is also the first step towards muon colliders. The performance of this new and promising line of accelerators relies heavily on the concept of ionisation cooling of minimum ionising muons, for which much R&D is required. The concept of a muon ionisation cooling experiment has been extensively studied and first steps are now being taken towards its realisation by a joint international team of accelerator and particle physicists. The aim of the workshop is to to explore at least two versions of an experiment based on existing cooling channel designs. If such an experiment is feasible, one shall then select, on the basis of effectiveness, simplicity, availability of components and overall cost, a design for the proposed experiment, and assemble the elements necessary to the presentation of a proposal. Please see workshop website.

  1. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Cooling pond fog studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    The Fog Excess Water Index (FEWI) method of fog prediction has been verified by the use of data obtained at the Dresden cooling pond during 1976 and 1977 and by a reanalysis of observations made in conjunction with a study of cooling pond simulators during 1974. For applications in which the method is applied to measurements or estimates of bulk water temperature, a critical value of about 0.7 mb appears to be most appropriate. The present analyses confirm the earlier finding that wind speed plays little part in determining the susceptibility for fog generation

  3. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  4. Stochastic cooling for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehl, D.

    1984-01-01

    These two lectures have been prepared to give a simple introduction to the principles. In Part I we try to explain stochastic cooling using the time-domain picture which starts from the pulse response of the system. In Part II the discussion is repeated, looking more closely at the frequency-domain response. An attempt is made to familiarize the beginners with some of the elementary cooling equations, from the 'single particle case' up to equations which describe the evolution of the particle distribution. (orig.)

  5. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Lafyatis, G.; Martin, A.G.; Raab, E.L.; Landry, J.; Ahmad-Bitar, R.N.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  6. COD correction for laser cooling at S-LSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souda, Hikaru; Fujimoto, Shinji; Tongu, Hiromu; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Mikio; Ishikawa, Takehiro; Nakao, Masao; Ikegami, Masahiro; Wakita, Akihisa; Iwata, Soma; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Noda, Koji; Noda, Akira

    2008-01-01

    A closed orbit is corrected for single-turn injection to perform laser cooling experiments of 40 keV 24 Mg + beam at the small laser-equipped storage ring (S-LSR). Closed orbit distortion (COD) corrections have been carried out using a downhill simplex method, and CODs of less than ±0.5mm have been achieved throughout the whole circumference. The injection orbit and the CODs are optimized to pass through the two aperture holes in the alignment targets located in the laser cooling section with an algorithm to maximize beam lifetime. The CODs at the aperture holes are reduced to be less than ±0.2mm, assuring an overlap between the laser and the 24 Mg + ion beam.

  7. State machine operation of the MICE cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2014-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  8. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  9. The ELENA Beam Diagnostics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) to be built at CERN is aimed at substantially increasing the number of antiprotons to the low energy antiproton physics community. It will be a small machine which will decelerate low intensity beams (<4x107) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV and will be equipped with an electron cooler to avoid beam losses during the deceleration and to significantly reduce beam phase space at extraction. To measure the beam parameters from the extraction point of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), through the ELENA ring and all the way to the experiments, many systems will be needed to ensure that the desired beam characteristics are obtained. Particular attention needs to be paid to the performance of the electron cooler which depends on reliable instrumentation in order to efficiently cool the antiprotons. This contribution will present the different monitors that have been proposed to measure the various beam parameters as well as some of the developments going on to further improve th...

  10. Sodium leak detection system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, D.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a device for detecting sodium leaks from a reactor vessel of a liquid sodium cooled nuclear reactor the reactor vessel being concentrically surrounded by a a containment vessel so as to define an airtight gap containing argon. It comprises: a light source for generating a first light beam, the first light beam having first and second predominant wavelengths, the first wavelength being substantially equal to an absorption line of sodium and the second wavelength being chosen such that it is not absorbed by sodium and argon; an optical multiplexer optically coupled to the light source; optically coupled to the multiplexer, each of the sensors being embedded in the containment vessel of the reactor, each of the sensors projecting the first light beam into the gap and collecting the first light beam after it has reflected off of a surface of the reactor vessel; a beam splitter optically coupled to each of the sensors through the multiplexer, the beam splitter splitting the first light beam into second and third light beams of substantially equal intensities; a first filter dispersed within a path of second light beam for filtering the second wavelength out of the third light beam; first and second detector beams disposed with in the paths of the second and third light beams so as to detect the intensities of the second and third light beams, respectively; and processing means connected to the first and second detector means for calculating the amount of the first wavelength which is absorbed when passing through the argon

  11. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...

  12. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  13. Passive cooling containment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J.J.; Iotti, R.C.; Wright, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure and temperature transients of nuclear reactor containment following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally for the full scale NPR (New Production Reactor). All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified CONTEMPT code CONTEMPT-NPR. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux, and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and half foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of CONTEMPT-NPR and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale NPR

  14. New photothermal deflection technique to discriminate between heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Ross S.; Mathur, Veerendra K.; Barkyoumb, John H.

    2018-01-01

    Photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) is a highly sensitive and precise technique that is used to measure the optical absorption and thermal characteristics of a sample. While most applications of PDS utilize a heating beam, laser cooling of solids, or optical refrigeration as it is sometimes called, use this technique to determine if a laser is cooling or heating a sample. Current PDS methods for laser cooling require multiple laser wavelengths in both the Stokes and anti-Stokes region to ensure that cooling is occurring. This can cause problems if lasers must be changed or no lasers in the desired wavelength are available. Herein, we present a photothermal deflection technique that uses the deflection of the probe laser to determine if microcooling is occurring inside a sample.

  15. On analog simulation of ionization cooling of muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Ming

    2001-01-01

    Analog simulation, proposed here as an alternative approach for the study of ionization cooling of muons, is a scaled cooling experiment, using protons instead of muons as simulation particles. It is intended to be an effective and flexible, quick and inexpensive experiment for the understanding and validation of unprecedentedly complicated cooling physics, for the demonstration and optimization of various elaborated techniques for beam manipulation in 6D phase space. It can be done and perhaps should be done before the costly and time-consuming development of extremely challenging, muon-specific cooling technology. In a nutshell, the idea here is to build a toy machine in a playground of ideas, before staking the Imperial Guard of Napoleon into the bloody battlefield of Waterloo

  16. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing.

  17. Thermal Conditions in a Simulated Office Environment with Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conditions in a two person office room were measured with four air conditioning systems: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...

  18. Electron cooling application for luminosity preservation in an experiment with internal targets at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Sidorin, A O; Smirnov, A V; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Trubnikov, G V

    2003-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the beam parameter evolution in the experiments with internal target. In calculations of the proton and deuteron beams we concentrated on cluster, atomic beam, storage cell and pellet targets at ANKE experiment mainly. In these calculations electron and stochastic cooling, intrabeam scattering, scattering on the target and residual gas atoms are taken into account. Beam parameter evolution is investigated in the long-term time scale, up to one hour, at different beam energies in the range from 1.0 to 2.7 GeV for proton beam and from 1 to 2.11 GeV for deuteron beam. The results of numerical simulations of the proton and deuteron beam parameters at different energies obtained using new version of BETACOOL program (elaborated at the first stage of this work [1]) are presented. Optimum parameters of the electron cooling system are estimated. The COSY experiment requirements can be satisfied even when electron cooling time is rather long. That allows to apply an electron cooling ...

  19. Laser cooling of 85Rb atoms to the recoil-temperature limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the laser cooling of 85Rb atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice. We follow the two-step degenerate Raman sideband cooling scheme [Kerman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 439 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.439], where a fast cooling of atoms to an auxiliary state is followed by a slow cooling to a dark state. This method has the advantage of independent control of the heating rate and cooling rate from the optical pumping beam. We operate the lattice at a Lamb-Dicke parameter η =0.45 and show the cooling of spin-polarized 85Rb atoms to the recoil temperature in both dimensions within 2.4 ms with the aid of adiabatic cooling.

  20. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a Muon Ionization Cooling Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have been cooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionization cooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) are around or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. The field from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within the iris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. This report compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with an extended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils as part of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is short and thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peak field in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is the muon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon cooling channel

  1. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  2. Sorption cooling: a valid extension to passive cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornink, D.J.; Burger, Johannes Faas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Passive cooling has shown to be a very dependable cryogenic cooling method for space missions. Several missions employ passive radiators to cool down their delicate sensor systems for many years, without consuming power, without exporting vibrations or producing electromagnetic interference. So for

  3. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  4. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  5. Cooling devices in laser therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician′s personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice.

  6. Cooling apparatus and couplings therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, Bruce

    1993-11-01

    A cooling apparatus includes a container filled with a quantity of coolant fluid initially cooled to a solid phase, a cooling loop disposed between a heat load and the container. A pump for circulating a quantity of the same type of coolant fluid in a liquid phase through the cooling loop, a pair of couplings for communicating the liquid phase coolant fluid into the container in a direct interface with the solid phase coolant fluid.

  7. Beam-plasma interaction in a synchrotron-cooler ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, T.

    1989-01-01

    We propose a plasma target installed in the synchrotron-cooler ring in order to study the beam-plasma interaction. Various types of beam diagnostic devices and precise techniques developed for stochastic cooling and rf-stacking in the storage ring would be a powerful tool to approach the problems concerning the plasma behavior induced by the beam, such as plasma lens effect, anomalous stopping power and plasma instability. (author)

  8. ITER cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizio, A.; Hollies, R.E.; Sochaski, R.O.; Stubley, P.H.

    1992-06-01

    The ITER reference system uses low-temperature water for heat removal and high-temperature helium for bake-out. As these systems share common equipment, bake-out cannot be performed until the cooling system is drained and dried, and the reactor cannot be started until the helium has been purged from the cooling system. This study examines the feasibility of using a single high-temperature fluid to perform both heat removal and bake-out. The high temperature required for bake-out would also be in the range for power production. The study examines cost, operational benefits, and impact on reactor safety of two options: a high-pressure water system, and a low-pressure organic system. It was concluded that the cost savings and operational benefits are significant; there are no significant adverse safety impacts from operating either the water system or the organic system; and the capital costs of both systems are comparable

  9. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  10. Laser Cooling of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Panel (b) com- pares the cooling efficiencies of available thermoelectric coolers ( TECs ) with ZBLANP:Yb3+-based optical refrigerators. Devices based...on materials with low parasitic heating will outperform TECs below 200 . Coolers made from current materials are less efficient than TECs at all...luminescence extraction efficiency are being explored as well. A novel method based on the frustrated total internal reflection across a vacuum “ nano -gap” is

  11. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications

  12. Helium Loop Cooling Channel Hydraulic Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, Robert Vaughn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-02

    New methods for generating ⁹⁹Mo are being explored in an effort to eliminate proliferation issues and provide a domestic supply of ⁹⁹mTc for medical imaging. Electron accelerating technology is used by sending an electron beam through a series of ¹⁰⁰Mo targets. During this process a large amount of heat is created, which directly affects the operating temperature set for the system. In order to maintain the required temperature range, helium gas is used to serve as a cooling agent that flows through narrow channels between the target disks. Currently we are tailoring the cooling channel entrance and exits to decrease the pressure drop through the targets. Currently all hardware has be procured and manufactured to conduct flow measurements and visualization via solid particle seeder. Pressure drop will be studied as a function of mass flow and diffuser angle. The results from these experiments will help in determining target cooling geometry and validate CFD code results.

  13. Sisyphus Laser Cooling of a Polyatomic Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Augenbraun, Benjamin L; Anderegg, Loic; Sedlack, Alexander P; Doyle, John M

    2017-04-28

    We perform magnetically assisted Sisyphus laser cooling of the triatomic free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). This is achieved with principal optical cycling in the rotationally closed P(N^{''}=1) branch of either the X[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000)↔A[over ˜]^{2}Π_{1/2}(000) or the X[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000)↔B[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000) vibronic transitions. Molecules lost into the excited vibrational states during the cooling process are repumped back through the B[over ˜](000) state for both the (100) level of the Sr-O stretching mode and the (02^{0}0) level of the bending mode. The transverse temperature of a SrOH molecular beam is reduced in one dimension by 2 orders of magnitude to ∼750  μK. This approach opens a path towards creating a variety of ultracold polyatomic molecules by means of direct laser cooling.

  14. New method of beam bunching in free-ion lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessonov, E.G. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effective ion beam bunching method is suggested. This method is based on a selective interaction of line spectrum laser light (e.g. axial mode structure light) with non-fully stripped ion beam cooled in a storage rings, arranging the ion beam in layers in radial direction of an energy-longitudinal coordinate plane and following rotation of the beam at the right angle after switching on the RF cavity or undulator grouper/buncher. Laser cooling of the ion beam can be used at this position after switching off the resonator to decrease the energy spread caused by accelerating field of the resonator. A relativistic multilayer ion mirror will be produced this way. Both monochromatic laser beams and intermediate monochromaticity and bandwidth light sources of spontaneous incoherent radiation can be used for production of hard and high power electromagnetic radiation by reflection from this mirror. The reflectivity of the mirror is rather high because of the cross-section of the backward Rayleigh scattering of photon light by non-fully stripped relativistic ions ({approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) is much greater ({approximately} 10{divided_by}15 orders) then Thompson one ({approximately} r{sub e}{sup 2}). This position is valid even in the case of non-monochromatic laser light ({Delta}{omega}/{omega} {approximately} 10{sup -4}). Ion cooling both in longitudinal plane and three-dimensional radiation ion cooling had been proposed based on this observation. The using of these cooling techniques will permit to store high current and low emittance relativistic ion beams in storage rings. The bunched ion beam can be used in ordinary Free-Ion Lasers as well. After bunching the ion beam can be extracted from the storage ring in this case. Storage rings with zero momentum compaction function will permit to keep bunching of the ion beam for a long time.

  15. ITER cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kveton, O.K.

    1990-11-01

    The present specification of the ITER cooling system does not permit its operation with water above 150 C. However, the first wall needs to be heated to higher temperatures during conditioning at 250 C and bake-out at 350 C. In order to use the cooling water for these operations the cooling system would have to operate during conditioning at 37 Bar and during bake-out at 164 Bar. This is undesirable from the safety analysis point of view, and alternative heating methods are to be found. This review suggests that superheated steam or gas heating can be used for both baking and conditioning. The blanket design must consider the use of dual heat transfer media, allowing for change from one to another in both directions. Transfer from water to gas or steam is the most intricate and risky part of the entire heating process. Superheated steam conditioning appears unfavorable. The use of inert gas is recommended, although alternative heating fluids such as organic coolant should be investigated

  16. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  17. Cooling lubricants; Kuehlschmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Breuer, D. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Blome, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Deininger, C. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Hahn, J.U. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Kleine, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Nies, E. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Pflaumbaum, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Stockmann, R. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Willert, G. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Sonnenschein, G. [Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    As a rule, the base substances used are certain liquid hydrocarbons from mineral oils as well as from native and synthetic oils. Through the addition of further substances the cooling lubricant takes on the particular qualities required for the use in question. Employees working with cooling lubricants are exposed to various hazards. The assessment of the concentrations at the work station is carried out on the basis of existing technical rules for contact with hazardous substances. However, the application/implementation of compulsory investigation and supervision in accordance with these rules is made difficult by the fact that cooling lubricants are, as a rule, made up of complicated compound mixtures. In addition to protecting employees from exposure to mists and vapours from the cooling lubricants, protection for the skin is also of particular importance. Cooling lubricants should not, if at all possible, be brought into contact with the skin. Cleansing the skin and skin care is just as important as changing working clothes regularly, and hygiene and cleanliness at the workplace. Unavoidable emissions are to be immediately collected at the point where they arise or are released and safely disposed of. This means taking into account all sources of emissions. The programme presented in this report therefore gives a very detailed account of the individual protective measures and provides recommendations for the design of technical protection facilities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Als Basisstoffe dienen in der Regel bestimmte fluessige Kohlenwasserstoffverbindungen aus Mineraloelen sowie aus nativen oder synthetischen Oelen. Durch die Zugabe von weiteren Stoffen erlangt der Kuehlschmierstoff seine fuer den jeweiligen Anwendungsabfall geforderten Eigenschaften. Beschaeftigte, die mit Kuehlschmierstoffen umgehen, sind unterschiedliche Gefahren ausgesetzt. Die Beurteilung der Kuehlschmierstoffkonzentrationen in der Luft am Arbeitsplatz erfolgt auf der Grundlage bestehender

  18. Optimal design of a beam stop for Indus-2 using finite element heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The radiation source impinges ∼ 1 kW power on the beam stop and the heat transfer capabilities of the beam stop have been evaluated. Temperature distribution in the beam stop has been obtained under various cooling conditions using the finite element analysis calculations with ANSYS software. Design parameters of ...

  19. Laser cooling by adiabatic transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew; Cline, Julia; Bartolotta, John; Holland, Murray; Thompson, James

    2017-04-01

    We have demonstrated a new method of laser cooling applicable to particles with narrow linewidth optical transitions. This simple and robust cooling mechanism uses a frequency-swept laser to adiabatically transfer atoms between internal and motional states. The role of spontaneous emission is reduced (though is still critical) compared to Doppler cooling. This allows us to achieve greater slowing forces than would be possible with Doppler cooling, and may make this an appealing technique for cooling molecules. In this talk, I will present a demonstration of this technique in a cold strontium system. DARPA QUASAR, NIST, NSF PFC.

  20. Bunching and cooling of radioactive ions with REXTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, P; Bollen, G; Forstner, O; Huber, G; Oinonen, M; Zimmer, J

    2002-01-01

    The post-accelerator REX-ISOLDE at ISOLDE/CERN will deliver radioactive ion beams with energies up to 2.2 MeV/u. For this purpose, a Penning trap and an electron-beam ion source are combined with a linear accelerator. REXTRAP—a large gas-filled Penning trap—has started its commissioning phase. First tests have shown that REXTRAP is able to accumulate, cool and bunch stable ISOLDE ion beams covering a large mass range. Fulfilling the REX-ISOLDE demands, it can handle beam intensities from a few hundred up to 1×10 6 ions per pulse at repetition rates up to 50 Hz.

  1. Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

  2. Vlasov analysis of microbunching instability for magnetized beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tsai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For a high-brightness electron beam with high bunch charge traversing a recirculation beam line, coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge effects may result in microbunching instability (MBI. Both tracking simulation and Vlasov analysis for an early design of a circulator cooler ring (CCR for the Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC reveal significant MBI [Ya. Derbenev and Y. Zhang, Proceedings of the Workshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, COOL’09, Lanzhou, China, 2009 (2009, FRM2MCCO01]. It is envisioned that the MBI could be substantially suppressed by using a magnetized beam. In this paper we have generalized the existing Vlasov analysis, originally developed for a nonmagnetized beam (or transversely uncoupled beam, to the description of transport of a magnetized beam including relevant collective effects. The new formulation is then employed to confirm prediction of microbunching suppression for a magnetized beam transport in the recirculation arc of a recent JLEIC energy recovery linac (ERL based cooler design for electron cooling. It is found that the smearing effect in the longitudinal beam phase space originates from the large transverse beam size as a nature of the magnetized beams and becomes effective through the x-z correlation when the correlated distance is larger than the microbunched scale. As a comparison, MBI analysis of the early design of JLEIC CCR is also presented in this paper.

  3. Cold atomic beams of high brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhdestvensky, Yu V

    2004-01-01

    The possibility is studied for obtaining intense cold atomic beams by using the Renyi entropy to optimise the laser cooling process. It is shown in the case of a Gaussian velocity distribution of atoms, the Renyi entropy coincides with the density of particles in the phase space. The optimisation procedure for cooling atoms by resonance optical radiation is described, which is based on the thermodynamic law of increasing the Renyi entropy in time. Our method is compared with the known methods for increasing the laser cooling efficiency such as the tuning of a laser frequency in time and a change of the atomic transition frequency in an inhomogeneous transverse field of a magnetic solenoid. (laser cooling)

  4. Laser cooling of molecular anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzombard, Pauline; Hamamda, Mehdi; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-05-29

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarize the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C_{2}^{-}, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photodetachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C_{2}^{-}, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources, and antimatter physics.

  5. Laser Cooling of Molecular Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Yzombard, Pauline; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarise the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C$\\_2^-$, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photo-detachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C$\\_2^-$, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources and antimatter physics.

  6. Cooling water systems design using process integration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flowrate and low cooling water return temperature thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  7. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  8. Gas cooled HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.

    1985-01-01

    In the He-cooled, graphite-moderated HTR with spherical fuel elements, the steam generator is fixed outside the pressure vessel. The heat exchangers are above the reactor level. The hot gases stream from the reactor bottom over the heat exchanger, through an annular space around the heat exchanger and through feed lines in the side reflector of the reactor back to its top part. This way, in case of shutdown there is a supplementary natural draught that helps the inner natural circulation (chimney draught effect). (orig./PW)

  9. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  10. Illumination and radiative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Shanhui; Raman, Aaswath Pattabhi; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden

    2018-03-20

    Aspects of the present disclosure are directed to providing and/or controlling electromagnetic radiation. As may be implemented in accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus includes a first structure that contains an object, and a second structure that is transparent at solar wavelengths and emissive in the atmospheric electromagnetic radiation transparency window. The second structure operates with the first structure to pass light into the first structure for illuminating the object, and to radiatively cool the object while preserving the object's color.

  11. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications.

  12. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications

  13. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation &

  14. Cooling water conditioning and quality control for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Designers and operators of Tokamaks and all associated water cooled, peripheral equipment, are faced with the task of providing and maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. The primary reason for supplying low conductivity water to the DIII-D vacuum vessel coils, power supplies and auxiliary heating components is to assure, along with the use of a non-conducting break in the supply piping, sufficient electrical resistance and thus an acceptable current-leakage path to ground at operating voltage potentials. As important, good quality cooling water significantly reduces the likelihood of scaling and fouling of flow passages and heat transfer surfaces. Dissolved oxygen gas removal is also required in one major DIII-D cooling water system to minimize corrosion in the ion sources of the neutral beam injectors. Currently, the combined pumping capacity of the high quality cooling water systems at DIII-D is ∼5,000 gpm. Another area that receives close attention at DIII-D is the chemical treatment of the water used in the cooling towers. This paper discusses the DIII-D water quality requirements, the means used to obtain the necessary quality and the instrumentation used for control and monitoring. Costs to mechanically and chemically condition and maintain water quality are discussed as well as the various aspects of complying with government standards and regulations

  15. Cooled spool piston compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  16. Water cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to reduce any loss of primary water coolant from around a reactor core of a water cooled nuclear reactor caused by any failure of a pressure vessel, an inner vessel is positioned within and spaced from the pressure vessel. The reactor core and main portion of the primary water coolant circuit and a heat exchanger are positioned within the inner vessel to maintain some primary water coolant around the reactor core and to allow residual decay heat to be removed from the reactor core by the heat exchanger. In the embodiment shown an aperture at the upper region of the inner vessel is dimensioned configured and arranged to prevent steam from a steam space of an integral pressurised water cooled nuclear reactor for a ship entering the main portion of the primary water coolant circuit in the inner vessel if the longitudinal axis of the nuclear reactor is displaced from its normal substantially vertical position to an abnormal position at an angle to the vertical direction. Shields are integral with the inner vessel. (author)

  17. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masaru.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable quick cooling of a core by efficiently utilizing coolant supplied in an emergency. Constitution: A feedwater nozzle and a water level detector are disposed in the gap between a partition plate for supporting the top of a fuel assembly and a lattice plate for supporting the bottom of the fuel assembly. At the time of a loss of coolant accident, coolant is injected from a sprinkling nozzle toward the reactor core, and is also injected from a feedwater nozzle. When the coolant reaches a prescribed level in the reactor core, the water level is detected by the detector, the coolant is fed by a pump to the lower plenum, and the submerging speed of the reactor core is thereby accelerated. When the water level again becomes lower than the prescribed level, the coolant is again filled from the feedwater nozzle, and similar operation is thereafter repeated. Accordingly, the coolant filled in the reactor core can be efficiently utilized to cool the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Feasibility of beam crystallization in a cooler storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been known theoretically that a charged-particle beam circulating in a storage ring exhibits an “ordered” configuration at the space-charge limit. Such an ultimate state of matter is called a crystalline beam whose emittance is ideally equal to zero except for quantum noise. This paper discusses how close one can come to various ordered states by employing currently available accelerator technologies. The dynamic nature of ultracold beams and conditions required for crystallization are briefly reviewed. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the feasibility of this unique phenomenon, considering practical situations in general cooling experiments. It is pointed out that several essential obstacles must be overcome to reach a three-dimensional crystalline state in a storage ring. Doppler laser cooling of ion beams is also numerically simulated to explore the possibility of beam crystallization in an existing machine.

  19. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  20. What can go wrong in stochastic cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108502

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses very practical aspects of stochastic cooling systems both during construction, running-in, operation and trouble shooting. Due to the high electronic gain, high sensitivity and large bandwidth of such systems, precautions have to be taken to avoid all sorts of EMI/EMC related problems as well as crosstalk and self-oscillations. Since un-intended beam heating is always much more efficient than the desired cooling the overall performance depends critically on avoiding this heating which often takes places outside the nominal frequency band of operation. Another important aspect is “cross heating”, i.e., unavoidable crosstalk from longitudinal to transverse systems and vice versa. Obviously adequate measurement procedures with beam for gain phase and optimum delay are mandatory and certain caveats and hints are given. The paper concludes with a listing of unusual and unexpected problems found during many years of operation of such systems at CERN.

  1. Towards laser cooling and trapping of barium monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Rees; Iwata, Geoffrey; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2017-04-01

    We report progress towards the laser cooling of diatomic BaH, demonstrating operation of a cryogenic buffer gas beam source with a brightness of 106 -107 molecules in the trapping region per ablation pulse, the brightest hydride beam to our knowledge. This source has enabled studies of the transitions and properties of BaH relevant to laser cooling, and we show preliminary results towards optical manipulation. Looking forward, plans for chirped molecular slowing on the A Σ excited state, followed by magneto-optical trapping on the B Σ excited state will be presented. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of photo-dissociation of ultracold BaH as a source of dilute ultracold hydrogen suitable for precision spectroscopy, a unique application for the monohydrides.

  2. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  3. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebarjadi, M., E-mail: m.zebarjadi@rutgers.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Institute of Advanced Materials, Devices, and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  4. Radiative cooling for thermophotovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Sun, Xingshu; Bermel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Radiative cooling has recently garnered a great deal of attention for its potential as an alternative method for photovoltaic thermal management. Here, we will consider the limits of radiative cooling for thermal management of electronics broadly, as well as a specific application to thermal power generation. We show that radiative cooling power can increase rapidly with temperature, and is particularly beneficial in systems lacking standard convective cooling. This finding indicates that systems previously operating at elevated temperatures (e.g., 80°C) can be passively cooled close to ambient under appropriate conditions with a reasonable cooling area. To examine these general principles for a previously unexplored application, we consider the problem of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion of heat to electricity via thermal radiation illuminating a photovoltaic diode. Since TPV systems generally operate in vacuum, convective cooling is sharply limited, but radiative cooling can be implemented with proper choice of materials and structures. In this work, realistic simulations of system performance are performed using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) techniques to capture thermal emitter radiation, PV diode absorption, and radiative cooling. We subsequently optimize the structural geometry within realistic design constraints to find the best configurations to minimize operating temperature. It is found that low-iron soda-lime glass can potentially cool the PV diode by a substantial amount, even to below ambient temperatures. The cooling effect can be further improved by adding 2D-periodic photonic crystal structures. We find that the improvement of efficiency can be as much as an 18% relative increase, relative to the non-radiatively cooled baseline, as well as a potentially significant improvement in PV diode lifetime.

  5. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, R.J. E-mail: pasquin@fnal.gov

    2004-10-11

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  6. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2004-10-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  7. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented

  8. Cooling clothing utilizing water evaporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Tominaga, Naoto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    We developed cooling clothing that utilizes water evaporation to cool the human body and has a mechanism to control the cooling intensity. Clean water was supplied to the outer surface of the T-shirt of the cooling clothing, and a small fan was used to enhance evaporation on this outer surface...... temperature ranging from 27.4 to 30.7 °C to establish a suitable water supply control method. A water supply control method that prevents water accumulation in the T-shirt and water dribbling was validated; this method is established based on the concept of the water evaporation capacity under the applied...

  9. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  10. Regeneratively Cooled Porous Media Jacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a porous media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and porous media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are porous media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.

  11. Physical installation of Pelletron and electron cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung of 5 MeV electrons at a loss current of 50 microamp in the acceleration region is estimated to produce X-ray intensities of 7 Rad/sec. Radiation losses due to a misteer or sudden obstruction will of course be much higher still (estimated at 87,500 Rad/hr for a 0.5 mA beam current). It is estimated that 1.8 meters of concrete will be necessary to adequately shield the surrounding building areas at any possible Pelletron installation site. To satisfy our present electron cooling development plan, two Pelletron installations are required, the first at our development lab in the Lab B/NEF Enclosure area and the second at the operational Main Injector service building, MI-30, in the main Injector ring. The same actual Pelletron and electron beam-line components will be used at both locations. The Lab B installation will allow experimentation with actual high energy electron beam to develop the optics necessary for the cooling straight while Main Injector/Recycler commissioning is taking place. The MI-30 installation is obviously the permanent home for the Pelletron when electron cooling becomes operational. Construction plans for both installations will be discussed here

  12. Recent Developments Of The EXCYT Radioactive Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L

    2003-01-01

    The EXCYT radioactive beam facility at LNS, based on the ISOL (Isotope Separator On Line) technique, will start producing its first radioactive beams during 2004. We are setting up a suitable high sensitivity diagnostics, in order to guarantee a real time monitoring of the beam parameters (transversal profiles, ion composition and current), offering also the capability to perform the beam imaging at very low beam energy (50 keV). For this purpose, a simple technique based on the use of a thin CsI(Tl) scintillating plate that does not require any amplification system inside the beam pipe, has been employed. Tests performed with stable beams have shown a current sensitivity well below 105 pps, a value that can be improved by adopting a more suitable lens and an intensified and cooled CCD camera.

  13. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  14. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  15. Cooling of rectangular bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frainer, V.J.

    1979-01-01

    A solution of the time-transient Heat Transfer Differential Equation in rectangular coordinates is presented, leading to a model which describes the temperature drop with time in rectangular bars. It is similar to an other model for cilindrical bars which has been previously developed in the Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy of UFRGS. Following these models, a generalization has been made, which permits cooling time evaluation for all profiles. These results are compared with experimental laboratory data in the 1200 to 800 0 C range. Some other existing models were also studied which have the purpose of studing the same phenomenon. Their mathematical forms and their evaluated values are analyzed and compared with experimental ones. (Author) [pt

  16. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheels, Ronald H [Concord, MA

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  17. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  18. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R ampersand D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility

  19. Core catcher cooling for a gas-cooled fast breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Water, molten salts, and liquid metals are under discussion as coolants for the core catcher of a gas-cooled fast breeder. The authors state that there is still no technically mature method of cooling a core melt. However, the investigations carried out so far suggest that there is a solution to this problem. (RW/AK) [de

  20. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  1. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Richard A; Brezovich, Ivan A; Fiveash, John B

    2014-05-01

    The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular

  2. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  3. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  4. The separated-sector cyclotron: beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic components that were ordered for the rest of the proposed beamlines at the NAC have been delivered. Design and manufacture of a special harp for the beam swinger has commenced. The Faraday cups and slits in the transfer beamline were replaced by water-cooled versions, owing to the decision to transport beams of higher intensity than initially specified. A prototype water-cooled slit for use in the low-energy beamline emittance measurement system has been installed, replacing the previous uncooled slit, to meet the requirement to measure the emittance of high-intensity beams. Software to automate the emittance measurement procedure is being developed. The method of calibration and alignment of the beamline scanners has been improved resulting in a more accurate measurement of the beam position. Software is being developed to regulate the beam current on the neutron therapy target. Current measurement from the target is used as feedback to regulate the aperture of a slit-system in the low-energy transfer beamline. This procedure will be implemented as soon as final tests have been carried out during the next scheduled shutdown. 3 figs

  5. Be Cool, Man! / Jevgeni Levik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levik, Jevgeni

    2005-01-01

    Järg 1995. aasta kriminaalkomöödiale "Tooge jupats" ("Get Shorty") : mängufilm "Be Cool, Chili Palmer on tagasi!" ("Be Cool") : režissöör F. Gary Gray, peaosades J. Travolta ja U. Thurman : USA 2005. Lisatud J. Travolta ja U. Thurmani lühiintervjuud

  6. Dialogues in the COOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, S.I.P.; Kroeze, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Options for the Long-term (COOL) Project is a participatory integrated assessment (PIA) comprising extensive dialogues at three levels: national, European and global. The objective of the COOL Project was to ‘develop strategic notions on how to achieve drastic reductions of greenhouse

  7. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  8. Improving cooling of cavity blackbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Catherine; Chauvel, Gildas

    2013-10-01

    A cavity blackbody is the appropriate IR reference source for IR sensors which require high radiance levels. It combines high emissivity independent from wavelength and high speed warm up and high stability thanks to its light trap structure. However, the inconvenient of this structure is that it leads to a prohibitive cooling time. HGH developed a method to speed up the cooling time.

  9. Mechanical response of local rapid cooling by spray water on constrained steel frame structure at high temperature in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yunchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally rapid cooling of spray water had strong impact on high temperature steel structure. When temperature of beam reached 600°C and cooling rate was more than 20°C/s, the maximum axial tension could reach more than 5 times of the originally compressive force. The compressive bending moment at joint of beam-to-column changed to tensile bending moment, and the maximum bending moment could reach above 4 times as that when heated. After rapid cooling by spray water, deflection at mid-span increased slightly.

  10. ATA diagnostic beam dump conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    A diagnostic beam dump, able to withstand 72,000 pulses (10 kA, 50 MeV/pulse) per shift was designed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the conceptual beam dump design consisting of 80 vitreous carbon plate-foam elements is able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses generated. X-rays produced by bremsstrahlung are absorbed by a three element copper plate-foam x-ray absorber. Cooling between bursts of electron pulses is provided by pressurized helium.

  11. First circulating beam in the AA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    On 3 July 1980, two years after project authorization, beam circulated for the first time in the AA. It was a 3.56 GeV/c proton test beam. We see an expecting crowd, minutes before the happy event. The persons are too numerous to name them all, but the 3 most prominent ones are at the centre (left to right): Roy Billinge (Joint AA Project Leader, with his hand on the control box), Eifionydd Jones (white shirt), Simon van der Meer (spiritus rector and Joint AA Project Leader). The first antiprotons were injected, made to circulate and cooled soon after, on 14 July 1980.

  12. Photoionization studies with molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y.

    1976-09-01

    A molecular beam photoionization apparatus which combines the advantages of both the molecular beam method with photoionization mass spectrometry has been designed and constructed for carrying out some unique photoionization experiments. Rotational cooling during the supersonic expansion has resulted in high resolution photoionization efficiency curves for NO, ICl, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/I. The analysis of these spectra has yielded ionization potentials for these molecules to an accuracy of +- 3 MeV. Detailed autoionization structures were also resolved. This allows the investigation of the selection rules for autoionization, and the identification of the Rydberg series which converge to the excited states of the molecular ions. The degree of relaxation for thermally populated excited states has been examined using NO and ICl as examples. As a result of adiabatic cooling, a small percentage of dimers is also formed during the expansion. The photoionization efficiency curves for (NO)/sub 2/, ArICl, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ have been obtained near the thresholds. Using the known dissociation energies of the (NO)/sub 2/, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ van der Waals molecules, the corresponding dissociation energies for NO-NO/sup +/, Ar/sub 2//sup +/, Kr/sub 2//sup +/, and Xe/sub 2//sup +/ have been determined. The ionization mechanisms for this class of molecules are examined and discussed.

  13. RF System for the MICE Demonstration of Ionisation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald, K.; et al.

    2017-04-01

    Muon accelerators offer an attractive option for a range of future particle physics experiments. They can enable high energy (TeV+) high energy lepton colliders whilst mitigating the difficulty of synchrotron losses, and can provide intense beams of neutrinos for fundamental physics experiments investigating the physics of flavor. The method of production of muon beams results in high beam emittance which must be reduced for efficient acceleration. Conventional emittance control schemes take too long, given the very short (2.2 microsecond) rest lifetime of the muon. Ionisation cooling offers a much faster approach to reducing particle emittance, and the international MICE collaboration aims to demonstrate this technique for the first time. This paper will present the MICE RF system and its role in the context of the overall experiment.

  14. A He-gas Cooled, Stationary Granular Target

    CERN Document Server

    Pugnat, P

    2003-01-01

    In the CERN approach to the design of a neutrino factory, the repetition frequency of the proton beam is high enough to consider stationary solid targets as a viable solution for multi-MW beams. The target consists of high density tantalum spheres of 2 mm diameter which can efficiently be cooled by passing a high mass flow He-gas stream through the voids between the Ta-granules. Very small thermal shocks and stresses will arise in this fine grained structure due to the relatively long burst of 3.3 ms from the SPL-proton linac. In a quadruple target system where each target receives only one quarter of the total beam power of 4 MW, conservative temperature levels and adequate lifetimes of the target are estimated in its very high radiation environment. A conceptual design of the integration of the target into the magnetic horn-pion-collector is presented.

  15. Molecular-beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N 2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl → NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2 2 P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included

  16. Huge opportunity for solar cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In Europe more than 400 solar cooling systems have been installed. By contrast, only a small number of solar cooling installations exist in Australia - primarily adsorption and absorption systems for commercial and hospitals - although these systems are growing. As with other renewable energy technologies, cost is a challenge. However solar cooling is currently competitive with other technologies, with some suggesting that system costs have been decreasing by about 20% per annum in recent times. Australia is also leading efforts in the development of residential solar desiccant technology, currently commercialising Australian-developed technology. Commercial and industrial enterprises are increasingly aware of the impact of demand charges, the potential to install technology as a hedge against future energy price rises and opportunities associated with increased on-site generation and reduced reliance on the grid, often necessitating on-site demand reduction and management. They are also driven by environmental and corporate social responsibility objectives as well as the opportunity for energy independence and uninterruptible operation. Interestingly, many of these interests are mirrdred at residential level, inspiring CSIRO's commercialisation of a domestic scale solar air conditioner with Australian manufacturer Brevis Climate Systems. Australia and other countries are increasingly aware of solar cooling as technology which can reduce or replace grid-powered cooling, particularly in applications where large building thermal energy requirements exist. In these applications, heating, cooling and hot water are generated and used in large amounts and the relative amounts of each can be varied dynamically, depending on building requirements. Recent demonstrations of solar cooling technology in Australia include Hunter TAFE's Solar Desiccant Cooling System - which provides heating, cooling and hot water to commercial training kitchens and classrooms - GPT

  17. Plasma impurities and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawin, H.W.

    1976-11-01

    In high-temperature low-density plasmas radiation cooling by impurity atoms can be an important energy loss mechanism, since the radiation is not reabsorbed. In a brief historical survey it is shown that the problem is not new but was discussed since the first beginning of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is then shown radiation losses enter into the general power balance equation of a plasma containing impurities. The equations for the different types of radiation losses are given as a function of the atomic quantities. In a special section simplifications due to the corona model assumption are discussed. It follows a detailed survey of the results obtained by several authors for the ionization balance and power losses of impurity elements observed in present high-temperature plasma machines used in CTR, especially in TOKAMAKS. In the conclusion a survey is given of the atomic data which experimentalists and theorists need for current research on impurities in fusion-like plasmas. (86 references)

  18. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  19. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  20. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  1. On synthesis and optimization of cooling water systems with multiple cooling towers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flow rate and low cooling water return temperature, thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  2. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yin-e [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  3. Hybrid cooling tower Neckarwestheim 2 cooling function, emission, plume dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuning, G.; Ernst, G.; Maeule, R.; Necker, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fan-assisted hybrid cooling tower of the 1300 MW power plant Gemeinschafts-Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim 2 was designed and constructed based on results from theoretical and experimental studies and experiences from a smaller prototype. The wet part acts in counterflow. The dry part is arranged above the wet part. Each part contains 44 fans. Special attention was payed to the ducts which mix the dry into the wet plume. The cooling function and state, mass flow and contents of the emission were measured. The dispersion of the plume in the atmosphere was observed. The central results are presented in this paper. The cooling function corresponds to the predictions. The content of drifted cooling water in the plume is extremely low. The high velocity of the plume in the exit causes an undisturbed flow into the atmosphere. The hybrid operation reduces visible plumes strongly, especially in warmer and drier ambient air

  4. Laser cooling, evaporative cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Pradip N.

    2002-01-01

    Laser radiations are used to slow down atoms by the process of momentum transfer. This leads to reducing the temperature to micro kelvin region. Gas phase atoms are trapped by using magnetic fields. The recent advances have led to the realization of the dream of physicists of confining the atoms and reducing their velocities to the limit imposed by quantum mechanics. A number of new experiments are possible with the cooled and trapped atoms and ions that would be useful to solve many problems of theoretical physics. Further cooling by the process of evaporative technique has led to the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation predicted by Einstein and Bose nearly seventy-five years ago. A brief review of the method of laser cooling, magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling methods used for obtaining ultracold atoms are discussed. It is possible to obtain temperature in the nano kelvin region without using cryogenic methods thus simplifying the experimental methods to a great extent. (author)

  5. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  6. Optimization of cooling strategy and seeding by FBRM analysis of batch crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dejiang; Liu, Lande; Xu, Shijie; Du, Shichao; Dong, Weibing; Gong, Junbo

    2018-03-01

    A method is presented for optimizing the cooling strategy and seed loading simultaneously. Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used to determine the approximating optimal cooling profile. Using these results in conjunction with constant growth rate assumption, modified Mullin-Nyvlt trajectory could be calculated. This trajectory could suppress secondary nucleation and has the potential to control product's polymorph distribution. Comparing with linear and two step cooling, modified Mullin-Nyvlt trajectory have a larger size distribution and a better morphology. Based on the calculating results, the optimized seed loading policy was also developed. This policy could be useful for guiding the batch crystallization process.

  7. Sharp edge broad-band lasers for ``white-light`` cooling in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Lenisa, P.; Petruio, S. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); Mariotti, E.; Moi, L. [INFM, Siena (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Siena (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    We have developed broad-band laser sources which show a sharp edge in their spectra and are particularly suitable for ``white-laser`` cooling of ions in storage rings. They allow for a very large velocity capture range by maintaining the same cooling rate allowed by the single mode lasers. A large fraction of the circulating ions are expected to be cooled both in coasting and bunched beams. The device, which does not use an active medium, can easily operate at any frequency from UV to IR spectral region. (orig.). 13 refs.

  8. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  9. Sympathetic Cooling of Quantum Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Meghana; Weimer, Hendrik

    2017-04-01

    We discuss the possibility of maximizing the cooling of a quantum simulator by controlling the system-environment coupling such that the system is driven into the ground state. We make use of various analytical tools such as effective operator formalism and the quantum master equations to exactly solve the model of an Ising spin chain consisting of N particles coupled to a radiation field. We maximize the cooling by finding the dependence of the effective rate of transitions of the various excited states into the ground state. We show that by adding a single dissipative qubit, we already get quite substantial cooling rates. Volkswagen Foundation, DFG.

  10. Cooling towers principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G B; Osborn, Peter D

    1990-01-01

    Cooling Towers: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the theory and practice, so that installations are correctly designed and operated. As with all branches of engineering, new technology calls for a level of technical knowledge which becomes progressively higher; this new edition seeks to ensure that the principles and practice of cooling towers are set against a background of up-to-date technology. The book is organized into three sections. Section A on cooling tower practice covers topics such as the design and operation of c

  11. Evaluation Of Cooling Tower Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djunaidi

    2001-01-01

    Cooling tower degradation has been evaluated for the last 10 years. Its heat transfer capacity has been decreasing after several years of operation due to aging. Evaluation is carried out by calculating the degradation rate, namely the annual increase of outlet temperatures of the cooling tower. Data was randomly taken daily at 15 MW reactor power. Data was taken after the reactor operation of ± 8 hours. Evaluation since 1990 shows that the degradation rate is nearly one degree per year. This degradation can be by minimized, replacement of damaged components, non-excessive operation and design modification of the cooling tower namely by extending the period of contract between water and air

  12. CLIC inner detectors cooling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, F.; Villarejo Bermudez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concepts require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sen- sors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detec- tor specifications. This note introduces a detector cooling strategy using dry air as a coolant and shows the results of computational fluid dynamics simulations used to validate the proposed strategy.

  13. Sample Loading and Accelerated Cooling of Cryogen-free Dilution Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleberg, G.; Matthews, A. J.; Batey, G.; Elford, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from system tests of top and bottom loading cryogen-free dilution refrigerators which enable cool-down times from room temperature to mK temperatures in 6 to 8 hours. The loading and unloading processes take only a few minutes to perform and the cooling procedure is fully automated. Sample temperatures of less than 10 mK have been achieved with up to 8 coaxial cables and 25 DC-wires connected to the sample holder. We also present cool-down tests of a beam line dilution refrigerator with a 35 kg mass installed on the mixing chamber. A heat pipe was developed to accelerate the cooling of large experimental payloads and the mass was cooled from room temperature to 30 mK in less than 28 hours.

  14. Evaluation of existing cooling systems for reducing cooling power consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatamipour, M.S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Isfahan University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahiyar, H.; Taheri, M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    This work was designed to estimate the cooling load power consumption during the summer in the hot and humid areas of Iran. The actual electrical energy consumption for cooling systems of some typical buildings with various applications (3 residential home buildings, 2 industrial plant buildings, a trade center with 38 shops, 3 public sectors and a city hospital) in a hot and humid region in South of Iran was recorded during the peak load period of the year (July-August). The records were used for estimating the total power consumption of the cooling systems in this region. According to this estimation, which was confirmed by the regional electrical power distribution office, the cooling systems power consumption in this region accounted for more than 60% of the total power consumption during the peak load period of the year. A computer program was developed for simulating the effect of various parameters on cooling load of the buildings in hot and humid regions. According to the simulation results, use of double glazed windows, light colored walls and roofs, and insulated walls and roofs can reduce the cooling load of the buildings more than 40%. (author)

  15. Passive low energy cooling of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Baruch

    1994-01-01

    A practical sourcebook for building designers, providing comprehensive discussion of the impact of basic architectural choices on cooling efficiency, including the layout and orientation of the structure, window size and shading, exterior color, and even the use of plantings around the site. All major varieties of passive cooling systems are presented, with extensive analysis of performance in different types of buildings and in different climates: ventilation; radiant cooling; evaporative cooling; soil cooling; and cooling of outdoor spaces.

  16. Technique for measuring cooling patterns in ion source grids by infrared scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Eubank, H.P.; Kugel, H.W.

    1980-02-01

    Many plasma sources designed for neutral beam injection heating of plasmas now employ copper beam acceleration grids which are water-cooled by small capillary tubes fed from one or more headers. To prevent thermally-induced warpage of these grids it is essential that one be able to detect inhomogeneities in the cooling. Due to the very strong thermal coupling between adjacent cooling lines and the concomitant rapid equilibration times, it is not practical to make such measurements in a direct manner with a contact thermometer. We have developed a technique whereby we send a burst of hot water through an initially cool grid, followed by a burst of cool water, and record the transient thermal behavior usng an infrared television camera. This technique, which would be useful for any system with cooling paths that are strongly coupled thermally, has been applied to a number of sources built for the PLT and PDX tokamaks, and has proven highly effective in locating cooling deficiencies and blocked capillary tubes

  17. Active and passive beam application design guide for global application

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Passive Beam Application Design Guide is the result of collaboration by worldwide experts to give system designers a current, authoritative guide on successfully applying active and passive beam technology. Active and Passive Beam Application Design Guide provide energy-efficient methods of cooling, heating, and ventilating indoor areas, especially spaces that require individual zone control and where internal moisture loads are moderate. The systems are simple to operate, with low maintenance requirements. This book is an essential resource for consulting engineers, architects, owners, and contractors who are involved in the design, operation, and installation of these systems. Building on REHVA’s Chilled Beam Application Guidebook, this new guide provides up-to-date tools and advice for designing, commissioning, and operating chilled-beam systems to achieve a determined indoor climate, and includes examples of active and passive beam calculations and selections. Dual units (SI and I-P) are...

  18. Cryogenic Beam Screens for High-Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R

    2013-01-01

    Applied superconductivity has become a key enabling technology for high-energy particle accelerators, thus making them large helium cryogenic systems operating at very low temperature. The circulation of high-intensity particle beams in these machines generates energy deposition in the first wall through different processes. For thermodynamic efficiency, it is advisable to intercept these beam-induced heat loads, which may be large in comparison with cryostat heat in-leaks, at higher temperature than that of the superconducting magnets of the accelerator, by means of beam screens located in the magnet apertures. Beam screens may also be used as part of the ultra-high vacuum system of the accelerator, by sheltering the gas molecules cryopumped on the beam pipe from impinging radiation and thus avoiding pressure runaway. Space being extremely tight in the magnet apertures, cooling of the long, slender beam screens also raises substantial problems in cryogenic heat transfer and fluid flow. We present sizing rule...

  19. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  20. Simulations of High-Energy Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, Alexei V; Bruhwiler, David L; Eidelman, Yury I; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay; Meshkov, Igor; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Smirnov, Alexander V; Troubnikov, Grigory

    2005-01-01

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC.

  1. SIMULATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; EIDELMAN, YU.; LITVINENKO, V.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC.

  2. SIMULATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; EIDELMAN, YU.; LITVINENKO, V.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-01-01

    High-energy electron cooling of RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires a detailed calculation of the cooling process, which takes place simultaneously with various diffusive mechanisms in RHIC. In addition, many unexplored effects of high-energy cooling in a collider complicate the task of getting very accurate estimates of cooling times. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper, we present an update on code development and its application to the high-energy cooling dynamics studies for RHIC

  3. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    De; 42.55.Px. The advancement in the technique of laser cooling of atoms to manipulate atomic motion has opened many new and exciting areas of research and technology including high ... the first time by Hansch and Schawlow [5]. Transverse laser cooling of atomic beams has been demonstrated by applying various ...

  4. Intermediate energy electron cooling for antiproton sources using a Pelletron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Adney, J.; Ferry, J.; Kells, W.; Larson, D.J.; Mills, F.E.; Sundquist, M.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown at FNAL that the electron cooling of protons is a very efficient method for reaching high luminosity in a proton beam. The emittance of the 120 KeV electron beam used at Fermilab corresponds to a cathode temperature of 0.1 eV. In order to apply cooling techniques to GeV proton beams the electron energies required are in the MeV range. In the experiment reported in this paper the emittance of a 3-MeV Pelletron electron accelerator was measured to determine that its emittance scaled to a value appropriate for electron cooling. The machine tested was jointly owned and operated by the University of California at Santa Barbara and National Electrostatics Corporation for research into free-electron lasers which also require low emittance beams for operation. This paper describes the thermal emittance of the beam to be the area in phase space in which 90% of the beam trajectories lie and goes on to describe the emittance-measurement method both in theory and application

  5. Geothermal heat can cool, too

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how geothermal energy can not only be used to supply heating energy, but also be used to provide cooling too. The article reports on a conference on heating and cooling with geothermal energy that was held in Duebendorf, Switzerland, in March 2008. The influence of climate change on needs for heating and cooling and the need for additional knowledge and data on deeper rock layers is noted. The seasonal use of geothermal systems to provide heating in winter and cooling in summer is discussed. The planning of geothermal probe fields and their simulation is addressed. As an example, the geothermal installations under the recently renewed and extended 'Dolder Grand' luxury hotel in Zurich are quoted. The new SIA 384/6 norm on geothermal probes issued by the Swiss Association of Architects SIA is briefly reviewed.

  6. Cooling methods for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspersic, B.; Fabjan, L.; Petelin, S.

    1977-01-01

    There are some results of measurements carried out on the wet cooling tower 275 MWe at TE Sostanj and on the experimental cooling tower at Jozef Stefan Institute, as well. They are including: the measurements of the output air conditions, the measurements of the cross current of water film and vapour-air flowing through two plates, and the distribution of velocity in boundary layer measured by anemometer

  7. Evaporative Cooling of Atoms to Quantum Degeneracy in an Optical Dipole Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Saptarishi; Roy, Sanjukta; Unnikrishnan, C S

    2007-01-01

    We discuss our experimental results on forced evaporative cooling of cold rubidium 87 Rb atoms to quantum degeneracy in an Optical Dipole Trap. The atoms are first trapped and cooled in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) loaded from a continuous beam of cold atoms. More than 10 10 atoms are trapped in the MOT and then about 10 8 atoms are transferred to a Quasi-Electrostatic Trap (QUEST) formed by tightly focused CO2 laser (λ = 10.6μm) beams intersecting at their foci in an orthogonal configuration in the horizontal plane. Before loading the atoms into the dipole trap, the phase-space density of the atomic ensemble was increased making use of sub-doppler cooling at large detuning and the temporal dark MOT technique. In a MOT the phase-space density of the atomic ensemble is six orders of magnitude less than what is required to achieve quantum degeneracy. After transferring atoms into the dipole trap efficiently, phase-space density increases by a factor of 10 3 . Further increase in phase-space density to quantum degeneracy is achieved by forced evaporative cooling of atoms in the dipole trap. The evaporative cooling process involves a gradual reduction of the trap depth by ramping down the trapping laser intensity over a second. The temperature of the cold atomic cloud was measured by time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The spatial distribution of the atoms is measured using absorption imaging. We report results of evaporative cooling in a single beam and in a crossed double-beam dipole traps. Due to the large initial phase space density, and large initial number of atoms trapped, the quantum phase transition occurs after about 600 ms of evaporative cooling in our optimized crossed dipole trap

  8. Final Report for 'ParSEC-Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David L Bruhwiler

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy has plans, during the next two or three years, to design an electron cooling section for the collider ring at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) [1]. Located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), RHIC is the premier nuclear physics facility. The new cooling section would be part of a proposed luminosity upgrade [2] for RHIC. This electron cooling section will be different from previous electron cooling facilities in three fundamental ways. First, the electron energy will be 50 MeV, as opposed to 100's of keV (or 4 MeV for the electron cooling system now operating at Fermilab [3]). Second, both the electron beam and the ion beam will be bunched, rather than being essentially continuous. Third, the cooling will take place in a collider rather than in a storage ring. Analytical work, in combination with the use and further development of the semi-analytical codes BETACOOL [4,5] and SimCool [6,7] are being pursued at BNL [8] and at other laboratories around the world. However, there is a growing consensus in the field that high-fidelity 3-D particle simulations are required to fully understand the critical cooling physics issues in this new regime. Simulations of the friction coefficient, using the VORPAL code [9], for single gold ions passing once through the interaction region, have been compared with theoretical calculations [10,11], and the results have been presented in conference proceedings papers [8,12,13,14] and presentations [15,16,17]. Charged particles are advanced using a fourth-order Hermite predictor corrector algorithm [18]. The fields in the beam frame are obtained from direct calculation of Coulomb's law, which is more efficient than multipole-type algorithms for less than ∼ 10 6 particles. Because the interaction time is so short, it is necessary to suppress the diffusive aspect of the ion dynamics through the careful use of positrons in the simulations, and to run 100's of simulations with the same physical

  9. Final Report for 'ParSEC-Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L Bruhwiler

    2005-09-16

    The Department of Energy has plans, during the next two or three years, to design an electron cooling section for the collider ring at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) [1]. Located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), RHIC is the premier nuclear physics facility. The new cooling section would be part of a proposed luminosity upgrade [2] for RHIC. This electron cooling section will be different from previous electron cooling facilities in three fundamental ways. First, the electron energy will be 50 MeV, as opposed to 100's of keV (or 4 MeV for the electron cooling system now operating at Fermilab [3]). Second, both the electron beam and the ion beam will be bunched, rather than being essentially continuous. Third, the cooling will take place in a collider rather than in a storage ring. Analytical work, in combination with the use and further development of the semi-analytical codes BETACOOL [4,5] and SimCool [6,7] are being pursued at BNL [8] and at other laboratories around the world. However, there is a growing consensus in the field that high-fidelity 3-D particle simulations are required to fully understand the critical cooling physics issues in this new regime. Simulations of the friction coefficient, using the VORPAL code [9], for single gold ions passing once through the interaction region, have been compared with theoretical calculations [10,11], and the results have been presented in conference proceedings papers [8,12,13,14] and presentations [15,16,17]. Charged particles are advanced using a fourth-order Hermite predictor corrector algorithm [18]. The fields in the beam frame are obtained from direct calculation of Coulomb's law, which is more efficient than multipole-type algorithms for less than {approx} 10{sup 6} particles. Because the interaction time is so short, it is necessary to suppress the diffusive aspect of the ion dynamics through the careful use of positrons in the simulations, and to run 100's of simulations with

  10. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  11. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  12. Potential of stochastic cooling of heavy ions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, M; Blaskiewicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of the high intensity lead beams in the LHC are strongly influenced by intra-beam scattering (IBS), leading to significant emittance growth and particle losses at all energies. Particle losses during collisions are dominated by nuclear electromagnetic processes and the debunching effect arising from the influence of IBS, resulting in a non-exponential intensity decay during the fill and short luminosity lifetimes. In the LHC heavy ion runs, 3 experiments will be taking data and the average fill duration will be rather short as a consequence of the high burn-off rate. The achievements with stochastic cooling at RHIC suggest that such a system at LHC could substantially reduce the emittance growth and the debunching component during injection and collisions. The luminosity lifetime and fill length could be improved to optimize the use of the limited run time of 4 weeks per year. This paper discusses the first results of a feasibility study to use stochastic cooling on the lead ion beams in the LHC....

  13. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Petrov, A.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Syresin, E.; Titkova, I.

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 μA/V 3/2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual)

  14. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Petrov, A; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M; Titkova, I

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 mu A/V sup 3 sup / sup 2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual).

  15. ISR beam scrapers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Beam scrapers seen in the direction of the beam. The two horizontal scraper foils are near the centre of the beam pipe andthe two scrapers for protection of the vacuum chamber are further outside. In the lower part of the beam pipe is the vertical halo scraping blade.

  16. Telecommunication using muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location

  17. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  18. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  19. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  20. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We demonstrate the selective deflection of the bosonic isotope 174Yb and the fermionic isotope 171Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK. Keywords. Laser cooling; cold atoms; atomic beam; optical molasses. PACS Nos 37.10.De; 42.50.

  1. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans installed...

  2. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  3. Long-time dynamics of laser-cooled ions in the TSR storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudrich, M.

    2000-01-01

    This diploma thesis studies experimentally the long-time dynamics of laser-cooled 9 Be + -beams at the TSR under different cooling conditions. The goal is to enlarge the understanding of ultra-cold, non-neutral plasma at high center-of-mass energies. By means of improved measurement capabilities one can now for the first time monitor the entire phase-space over a long time. This makes it possible to quantitatively analyse the possibilities and limitations of laser cooling at a storage ring. Under optimum cooling conditions a regime of high phase-space density is reached, close to the region where influences of Coulomb coupling are expected. Furthermore, a Monte-Carlo model is worked out that qualitatively describes the beam dynamics. The model includes the influence of transverse-longitudinal coupling due to intra beam scattering on the longitudinal phase-space distribution. At high phase-space density a sudden disappearance of intra beam collisions is observed experimentally and possible interpretations are given. (orig.)

  4. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  5. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strehl, P.

    1994-04-01

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  6. Measuring the coolness of interactive products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Anders; Raptis, Dimitrios; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    is the COOL questionnaire. We based the creation of the questionnaire on literature suggesting that perceived coolness is decomposed to outer cool (the style of a product) and inner cool (the personality characteristics assigned to it). In this paper, we focused on inner cool, and we identified 11 inner cool...... characteristics. These were used to create an initial pool of question items and 2236 participants were asked to assess 16 mobile devices. By performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, we identified three factors that can measure the perceived inner coolness of interactive products: desirability...

  7. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  8. Optical stochastic cooling for RHIC using optical parametric amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Babzien

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose using an optical parametric amplifier, with a ∼12   μm wavelength, for optical-stochastic cooling of ^{79}Au ions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. While the bandwidth of this amplifier is comparable to that of a Ti:sapphire laser, it has a higher average output power. Its wavelength is longer than that of the laser amplifiers previously considered for such an application. This longer wavelength permits a longer undulator period and higher magnetic field, thereby generating a larger signal from the pickup undulator and ensuring a more efficient interaction in the kicker undulator, both being essential elements in cooling moderately relativistic ions. The transition to a longer wavelength also relaxes the requirements for stability of the path length during ion-beam transport between pickup and kicker undulators.

  9. Thermodynamic limits of dynamic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Janzing, Dominik; Mahler, Guenter

    2011-10-01

    We study dynamic cooling, where an externally driven two-level system is cooled via reservoir, a quantum system with initial canonical equilibrium state. We obtain explicitly the minimal possible temperature T(min)>0 reachable for the two-level system. The minimization goes over all unitary dynamic processes operating on the system and reservoir and over the reservoir energy spectrum. The minimal work needed to reach T(min) grows as 1/T(min). This work cost can be significantly reduced, though, if one is satisfied by temperatures slightly above T(min). Our results on T(min)>0 prove unattainability of the absolute zero temperature without ambiguities that surround its derivation from the entropic version of the third law. We also study cooling via a reservoir consisting of N≫1 identical spins. Here we show that T(min)∝1/N and find the maximal cooling compatible with the minimal work determined by the free energy. Finally we discuss cooling by reservoir with an initially microcanonic state and show that although a purely microcanonic state can yield the zero temperature, the unattainability is recovered when taking into account imperfections in preparing the microcanonic state.

  10. Newton's law of cooling revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, M

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer from any object to its surrounding is not only due to conduction and convection but also due to radiation. The latter does not vary linearly with temperature difference, which leads to deviations from Newton's law. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the cooling of objects with a small Biot number. It is shown that Newton's law of cooling, i.e. simple exponential behaviour, is mostly valid if temperature differences are below a certain threshold which depends on the experimental conditions. For any larger temperature differences appreciable deviations occur which need the complete nonlinear treatment. This is demonstrated by results of some laboratory experiments which use IR imaging to measure surface temperatures of solid cooling objects with temperature differences of up to 300 K.

  11. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  12. Application of electron beam technology in improving sewage water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    sewage and to increase the water quality of the wastewater by decreasing BOD and COD. So, the irradiation sewage water can find its application either in agriculture for irrigation or in industry sector for cooling purpose or in both the sectors. Key words: Disinfection, electron beam accelerator, organic matter, sewage water ...

  13. Development of ion/proton beam equipment for industrial uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ho; Lee, J. H.; Cho, Y. S.; Joo, P. K.; Kang, S. S.; Song, W. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. H.; Chang, G. H.; Bang, S. W.

    1999-12-01

    KAERI has possessed design and fabrication technologies of various ion sources including Duoplasmatron and DuoPiGatron developed by R and D projects of the long-term nuclear technology development program. In order to industrialize ion beam equipments utilizing these ion sources, a technology transfer project for a technology transfer project for a domestic firm has been performed. Under this project, engineers of the firm have been trained through classroom lectures of ion beam principles and OJT, an ion/proton beam equipment (DEMO equipment) has been designed, assembled and commissioned jointly with the engineers. Quality of the ion sources has been quantified, and technologies for ion beam equipment construction, functional test and application research have been developed. The DEMO equipment, which consists of an ion source, power supplies, vacuum, cooling and target systems, has been fabricated and tested to secure stability and reliability for industrial uses. Various characteristic tests including high voltage insulation, beam extraction, beam current measuring, etc. have been performed. This DEMO can be utilized for ion sources development as well as ion beam process development for various industrial products. Engineers of the firm have been trained for the industrialization of ion beam equipment and joined in beam application technology development to create industrial needs of beam equipment. (author)

  14. Some ideas on the choice of designs and materials for cooled mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    This paper expresses some views on the fabrication of future synchrotron beam-line optics; more particularly the metallurgical issues in high-quality metal mirrors. A simple mirror with uniform cooling channels is first analyzed theoretically, followed by the cullular-pin-post system with complex coolant flow path. Choice of mirror material is next considered. For the most challenging situations (need for intensive cooling), the present practice is to use nickel-plated glidcop or silicon; for less severe challenges, Si carbide may be used and cooling may be direct or indirect; and for the mildest heat loads, fused silica or ulf are popular. For the highest performance mirrors (extreme heat load), the glidcop developments should be continued perhaps to cellular-pin-post systems. For extreme distortion, Si is indicated and invar offers both improved performance and lower price. For less extreme challenges but still with cooling, Ni-plated metals have the cost advantage and SXA and other Al alloys can be added to glidcop and invar. For mirrors with mild cooling requirements, stainless steel would have many advantages. Once the internal cooling designs are established, they will be seen as more cost-effective and reliable than clamp-on schemes. Where no cooling is needed, Si, Si carbide, and the glasses can be used. For the future, the effect of electroless Ni layers on cooling design need study, and a way to finish nickel that is compatible with multilayers should be developed

  15. Performance limits of direct cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators - experimental results at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Fernandez, P.; Mills, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The successful use of cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators at third-generation synchrotron facilities is well documented. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) it has been shown that, at 100 mA operation with the standard APS undulator A, the cryogenically cooled silicon monochromator performs very well with minimal (<2 arcsec) or no observable thermal distortions. However, to date there has not been any systematic experimental study on the performance limits of this approach. This paper presents experimental results on the performance limits of these directly cooled crystals. The results show that if the beam is limited to the size of the radiation central cone then, at the APS, the crystal will still perform well at twice the present 100 mA single 2.4 m-long 3.3 cm-period undulator heat load. However, the performance would degrade rapidly if a much larger incident white-beam size is utilized

  16. Condenser cooling water quality at Kaiga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namboodiri, E.G.A.

    1995-01-01

    Once-through circulation of river water is envisaged in Kaiga for cooling the condenser and other related equipment. Water drawn from Kali river will be used for this purpose. After cooling the condenser, the water is let into the river through the outfall system. The materials used in the cooling water system consist mainly of SS 316 and carbon steel. Chlorination is the treatment proposed to the cooling water. The cooling water quality is found to be satisfactory. (author). 2 refs

  17. Hybrid Methods for Simulation of Muon Ionization Cooling Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Josiah D.

    COSY Infinity is an arbitrary-order beam dynamics simulation and analysis code. It can determine high-order transfer maps of combinations of particle optical elements of arbitrary field configurations. For precision modeling, design, and optimization of next-generation muon beam facilities, its features make it a very attractive code. New features are being developed for inclusion in COSY to follow the distribution of charged particles through matter. To study in detail some of the properties of muons passing through material, the transfer map approach alone is not sufficient. The interplay of beam optics and atomic processes must be studied by a hybrid transfer map-Monte Carlo approach in which transfer map methods describe the average behavior of the particles in the accelerator channel including energy loss, and Monte Carlo methods are used to provide small corrections to the predictions of the transfer map accounting for the stochastic nature of scattering and straggling of particles. The advantage of the new approach is that it is very efficient in that the vast majority of the dynamics is represented by fast application of the high-order transfer map of an entire element and accumulated stochastic effects as well as possible particle decay. The gains in speed shown in this work are expected to simplify the optimization of muon cooling channels which are usually very computationally demanding due to the need to repeatedly run large numbers of particles through large numbers of configurations. This work describes the development of the required algorithms and their application to the simulation of muon ionization cooling channels. The code is benchmarked against other codes, validated with experimental results, and predicts results for current muon ionization cooling efforts.

  18. Forced draft wet cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, A.; Caudron, L.; Viollet, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    The disposal of the heat released from a 1000MW power plant needs a natural draft tower of about 130m of diameter at the base, and 170m height, or a cooling system with a draft forced by about forty vans, a hundred meters in diameter, and thirty meters height. The plumes from atmospheric cooling systems form, in terms of fluid mechanics, hot jets in a cross current. They consist in complex flows that must be finely investigated with experimental and computer means. The study, currently being performed at the National Hydraulics Laboratory, shows that as far as the length and height of visible plumes are concerned, the comparison is favorable to some types of forced draft cooling system, for low and medium velocities, (below 5 or 6m/s at 10m height. Beyond these velocities, the forced draft sends the plume up to smaller heights, but the plume is generally more dilute [fr

  19. Aberration compensation in a Skew parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sy, Amy V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Afanasev, Andrei [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Bao, Y. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Skew Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (Skew PIC) represents a novel method for focusing of highly divergent particle beams, as in the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In the muon collider concept, the resultant equilibrium transverse emittances from cooling with Skew PIC are an order of magnitude smaller than in conventional ionization cooling. The concept makes use of coupling of the transverse dynamic behavior, and the linear dynamics are well-behaved with good agreement between analytic solutions and simulation results. Compared to the uncoupled system, coupling of the transverse dynamic behavior purports to reduce the number of multipoles required for aberration compensation while also avoiding unwanted resonances. Aberration compensation is more complicated in the coupled case, especially in the high-luminosity muon collider application where equilibrium angular spreads in the cooling channel are on the order of 200 mrad. We present recent progress on aberration compensation for control of highly divergent muon beams in the coupled correlated optics channel, and a simple cooling model to test the transverse acceptance of the channel.

  20. Silver bonded, internally water-cooled monochromators for CHESS wiggler beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenski, Karl W.; Shen Qun; Doing, Park

    1997-01-01

    Intense synchrotron radiation from high power wiggler sources has long been a difficult high-heat-load problem to the design of properly cooled x-ray optics. Large, high power and very intense beams thermally distort crystal optics, reducing throughput and broadening rocking curves. An internally cooled silicon monochromator has been fabricated which demonstrated the capability of diffracting wiggler radiation of unprecedented power without significant degradation of the beam. Cooling water flows through rectangular cooling channels 1 mm wide, 1 mm below the diffracting surface, fed by a manifold bonded to the underside of the diffracting crystal. A novel silver diffusion bond was used to ensure leak-tight UHV performance. Recent test results at wiggler station F2 show a linear behavior of the x-ray flux with increasing storage ring current up to a total power of 3 kW and a peak surface power density of 5 W/mm 2 . The improved monochromator has led to an increase of x-ray flux by a factor of six over previous contact-cooled designs and shows that internal water-cooling can be an effective solution to high-heat-load problems at high power wiggler stations

  1. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  2. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Guidez, Joel; Andrieux, Catherine; Baque, Francois; Bonin, Bernard; Boullis, Bernard; Cabet, Celine; Carre, Frank; Dufour, Philippe; Gauche, Francois; Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe; Le Flem, Marion; Le Coz, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Masson, Michel; Mathonniere, Gilles; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Pelletier, Michel; Rodriguez, Gilles; Saez, Manuel; Seran, Jean-Louis; Varaine, Frederic; Zaetta, Alain; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  3. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  4. Optimization of the cooling power distribution in a superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendl, C.M.; Noe, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of setting the resonators in a superconducting heavy-ion linac to a certain optimum distribution of cooling power have been evaluated in terms of the total acceleration such a distribution may produce, compared to a distribution in which each resonator dissipates power equally. The optimum power distribution can be expressed in closed form in certain simplified cases, but the general case is solved by equalizing the 'marginal power cost' of the resonators by iteration in a computer simulation. For the Stony Brook linac an additional possible acceleration of several percent is thus predicted for typical beams. (author)

  5. Development of a monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton beam source for high-precision investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuroda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration developed an ultraslow antiproton beam source, monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton source for high-precision investigation (MUSASHI, consisting of an electromagnetic trap with a liquid He free superconducting solenoid and a low energy antiproton beam transport line. The MUSASHI was capable of trapping and cooling more than 1×10^{7} antiprotons and extracting them as an ultraslow antiproton beam with energy of 150–250 eV.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF SHORT UNDULATORS FOR ELECTRON-BEAM-RADIATION INTERACTION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Fagerberg, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Figora, M. [Northern Illinois U.; Sturtz, A. [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-10-19

    Interaction of an electron beam with external field or its own radiation has widespread applications ranging from coherent-radiation generation, phase space cooling or formation of temporally-structured beams. An efficient coupling mechanism between an electron beam and radiation field relies on the use of a magnetic undulator. In this contribution we detail our plans to build short (11-period) undulators with 7-cm period refurbishing parts of the aladdin U3 undulator [1]. Possible use of these undulators at available test facilities to support experiments relevant to cooling techniques and radiation sources are outlined.

  7. Revisit of combined parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2013-10-01

    This aim of this paper is to revisit the parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging configuration, and to investigate whether this configuration has any advantages. Twenty years ago, it was suggested to simultaneously use a parallel-beam (or a fan-beam) collimator and a cone-beam collimator to acquire single photon emission computed tomography data. The motivation was that the parallel-beam (or the fan-beam) collimator can provide sufficient sampling, while the cone-beam collimator is able to provide higher photon counts. Even with higher total counts, this hybrid system does not give significant improvement (if any) in terms of image noise and artifacts reduction. If a conventional iterative maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm is used to reconstruct the image, the resultant reconstruction may be worse than the parallel-beam-only (or fan-beam-only) system. This paper uses the singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to explain this phenomenon. The SVD results indicate that the parallel-beam-only and the fan-beam-only system outperform the combined systems. The optimal imaging system does not necessary to be the one that generates the projections with highest signal-to-noise ratio and best resolution.

  8. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  9. Beam generation at next generation RIB facilities: conceptual design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Alton, G.D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-12-27

    In order to produce useful intensities of radioactive ion beams, ISOL targets must be designed that can withstand direct irradiation with high power beams. Computational thermal modeling techniques offer a cost effective way for evaluating prototype target concepts in the quest to find an optimum design. In this report, a number of codes are utilized to select target materials and to model the primary beam power density, thermal transport and temperature distributions in ISOL targets. These studies suggest that radiation cooling, in combination with Lissajous beam scan techniques, can be used to control temperatures in practically sized targets, to levels commensurate with irradiation with 1-GeV, 400-kW proton beams for next generation RIB facilities.

  10. Beam Profile Diagnostics for the Fermilab Medium Energy Electron Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tassotto, G.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.

    2005-10-01

    The Fermilab Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to store and cool 8.9 GeV antiprotons. The cooler will be based on a Pelletron electrostatic accelerator working in an energy-recovery regime. Several techniques for determining the characteristics of the beam dynamics are being investigated. Beam profiles have been measured as a function of the beam line optics at the energy of 3.5 MeV in the current range of 10/sup -4/-1 A, with a pulse duration of 2 /spl mu/s. The profiles were measured using optical transition radiation produced at the interface of a 250-/spl mu/m aluminum foil and also from YAG crystal luminescence. In addition, beam profiles measured using multiwire detectors were investigated. These three diagnostics will be used together to determine the profile dynamics of the beam. In this paper we report the results so far obtained using these techniques.

  11. Beam-Profile Instrumentation for a Beam-Halo Measurement Overall Description, Operation, and Beam Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gilpatrick, J D; Day, L; Kerstiens, D; Stettler, M; Valdiviez, R

    2001-01-01

    The halo experiment presently being conducted at the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has specific instruments that acquire horizontally and vertically projected particle-density beam distributions out to greater than 105:1 dynamic range. We measure the core of the distributions using traditional wire scanners, and the tails of the distribution using water-cooled graphite scraping devices. The wire scanner and halo scrapers are mounted on the same moving frame whose location is controlled with stepper motors. A sequence within the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software communicates with a National Instrument LabVIEW virtual instrument to control the movement and location of the scanner/scraper assembly. Secondary electrons from the wire scanner 33 μm carbon wire and protons impinging on the scraper are both detected with a lossy-integrator electronic circuit. Algorithms implemented within EPICS and in Research Systems Interactiv...

  12. Beam heating of the neutralizer gas of neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.

    1989-02-01

    It was shown by Pamela that the target thickness of the neutralizer gas in neutral beam injectors is smaller than to be expected from gas flow calculations. He explained his findings by direct and indirect beam heating of the gas and a consequent flow acceleration. The role of the neutralizer plasma electrons in the gas heating scenario is reconsidered here. To this end the particle and energy balances of the electrons are solved with allowance for ionization and dissociation of the gas by the electrons. It is shown that the direct contribution of the electrons to heating is not dominant. Their indirect contribution via ion acceleration in the space charge sheath in front of the walls is usually stronger. Methods to increase the neutralizer target thickness are investigated. They are essentially (1) structuring the neutralizer surface in order to reduce the reflection of medium energy particles and to increase the gas accommodation, (2) cooling down the neutralizer to LN 2 -temperature. The scaling of the target thickness with various parameters is investigated and compared with 'cold' flow. Initially it was assumed that the neutralizer plasma electrons are hot and able to excite Balmer alpha radiation in collisions with H 2 molecules. The investigation shows that the electrons must be cold instead (T e + 2 and H + 3 ions leading to excited hydrogen atoms. (orig.)

  13. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Production of the heat exchanger tubes, which will cool down the LHC magnets, and of the cold bore tubes, in which the proton beams will circulate, is due to be completed around the end of 2004. These essential components of the LHC magnets are receiving their finishing touches at CERN : cold bore tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Insulation of the cold bore tubes in which the LHC beams will circulate takes place in Building 927. In the background, Bruno Meunier checks the wrapping machine while, in the foreground, Olivier Vasseur removes the polyester wrapping that covers the tube's insulating layers.

  15. The study on the evaporation cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower of film type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingjian; You Xinkui; Qiu Qi; Li Jiezhi

    2011-01-01

    Based on heat and mass transport mechanism of film type cooling, which was combined with an on-site test on counter flow film type cooling tower, a mathematical model on the evaporation and cooling efficiency and effectiveness has been developed. Under typical climatic conditions, air conditioning load and the operating condition, the mass and heat balances have been calculated for the air and the cooling water including the volume of evaporative cooling water. Changing rule has been measured and calculated between coefficient of performance (COP) and chiller load. The influences of air and cooling water parameters on the evaporative cooling efficiency were analyzed in cooling tower restrained by latent heat evaporative cooling, and detailed derivation and computation revealed that both the evaporative cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower are the same characteristics parameters of the thermal performance of a cooling tower under identical assumptions.

  16. Wavefront aberration measurement in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG slab using a wavefront sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikocinski, P.; Novak, O.; Smrz, M.; Pilar, J.; Jelinkova, H.; Endo, A.; Lucianetti, A.; Mocek, T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated wavefront aberrations in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG slab with a wavefront sensor using a probe beam technique under non-lasing condition. To analyze the pump-induced phase aberrations created in the crystal, the measured wavefronts were fitted with orthonormal Zernike polynomials. The Yb:YAG crystal of 2 mm thickness, 10 mm diameter, and 3 at.% doping concentration was mounted in a copper holder in a closed-loop pulse tube cryostat with cooling capacity of 12 W at 100 K. The gain medium was single-end pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode at pumping intensity of 6.5 kW/cm2 with a maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz, pulse duration of 1 ms, and pump spot diameter of 2.5 mm. The time resolved measurement revealed that defocus, which was the main wavefront aberration, represents not only a thermal lensing effect but also an electronic lensing effect. The thermally induced defocus is more dominant at high repetition rate than the electronically induced defocus. We also measured wavefront aberrations of amplified beams in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG slab. A room temperature operated thin-disk regenerative amplifier was used as a seed laser. The seed beam was amplified in the cryogenically cooled crystal at 160 K in a double pass configuration. The wavefront measurement was conducted at semi-saturated conditions, at three different repetition rates: 10 Hz, 20 Hz and 40 Hz, and at five different pump intensities in the range between 6.5 kW/cm2 and 14.8 kW/cm2. Under lasing condition, only defocus aberration were induced. Due to opposite signs of the defocus aberration of the seed beam and pumped induced in the Yb:YAG crystal, wavefront of the amplified beam had smaller PtV (Peak to Valley) and RMS values than the seed beam.

  17. Cool Runnings For String 2

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    String 2 is a series of superconducting magnets that are prototypes of those which will be installed in the LHC. It was cooled down to 1.9 Kelvin on September 14th. On Thursday last week, the dipoles of String 2 were successfully taken to nominal current, 11850 A.

  18. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  19. A cool present for LEIR

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring), which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, has taken delivery of one of its key components, its electron cooling system. From left to right, Gérard Tranquille, Virginia Prieto and Roland Sautier, in charge of the electron cooling system for LEIR at CERN, and Christian Lacroix, in charge of installation for the LEIR machine. On 16 December, the day before CERN's annual closure, the LEIR teams received a rather impressive Christmas present. The "parcel" from Russia, measuring 7 metres in length and 4 metres in height, weighed no less than 20 tonnes! The component will, in fact, be one of the key elements of the future LEIR, namely its electron cooling system. LEIR is one of the links in the injector chain that will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, in particular ALICE (see Bulletin No. 28/2004 of 5 July 2004), within the framework of the I-LHC Project. The electron cooling system is designed to reduce and standardise transverse ion velocity. This focuses the bea...

  20. Chromospheres of Luminous Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.

    Direct ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) reveals variable chromospheric structures and mass motions. Spectroscopy also demonstrates the changes of wind opacity, speeds, and mass loss in luminous stars. Cool stars have complex chromospheres that need to be considered in construction of stellar atmospheric models and subsequent spectral analyses.

  1. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out, ...

  2. System for cooling a cabinet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a cooling system comprising an active magnetic regenerator having a cold side and a hot side, a hot side heat exchanger connected to the hot side of the magnetic regenerator, one or more cold side heat exchangers, and a cold store reservoir comprising a volume...

  3. Passive Cooling of Body Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Ronald; Matic, Peter; Mott, David

    2013-03-01

    Warfighter performance can be adversely affected by heat load and weight of equipment. Current tactical vest designs are good insulators and lack ventilation, thus do not provide effective management of metabolic heat generated. NRL has undertaken a systematic study of tactical vest thermal management, leading to physics-based strategies that provide improved cooling without undesirable consequences such as added weight, added electrical power requirements, or compromised protection. The approach is based on evaporative cooling of sweat produced by the wearer of the vest, in an air flow provided by ambient wind or ambulatory motion of the wearer. Using an approach including thermodynamic analysis, computational fluid dynamics modeling, air flow measurements of model ventilated vest architectures, and studies of the influence of fabric aerodynamic drag characteristics, materials and geometry were identified that optimize passive cooling of tactical vests. Specific architectural features of the vest design allow for optimal ventilation patterns, and selection of fabrics for vest construction optimize evaporation rates while reducing air flow resistance. Cooling rates consistent with the theoretical and modeling predictions were verified experimentally for 3D mockups.

  4. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  5. T10 Beam Studies & Beam Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Michael Georges; Van Dijk, Maarten; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In order to test detector components before their installation in actual experiments, one uses test beams in which one can control particle typ, momentum and size to high degree. For this project the focus of a secondary beam at T10 in the East Area at CERN was analysed using an AZALEA telescope from DESY.

  6. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  7. Two strategies of lowering surface deformations of internally cooled X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberta, P.; Áč, V.; Hrdý, J.

    2013-01-01

    Internally cooled X-ray optics, like X-ray monochromators and reflecting X-ray mirrors, play a crucial role in defining a beamlines resolution, degree of coherence and flux. A great effort is invested in the development of these optical components. An important aspect of the functionality of high heat load optics is its cooling and its influence on surface deformation. The authors present a study of two different geometrical cooling approaches. Its influence on beam inhomogeneity due to the strain from the manufacturing process is presented. X-ray topographic images and FWHM measurements are presented. FEA simulations of cooling efficiency and surface deformations were performed. The best achieved results are under an enlargement of 0.4μrad of the measured rocking curve

  8. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  9. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozijn, F M J; Biesheuvel, J; Flores, A S; Ubachs, W; Blume, G; Wicht, A; Paschke, K; Erbert, G; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical isolator and beam shaping optics, 14 mW of 626 nm power remains of which 70% is coupled into an external enhancement cavity containing a nonlinear crystal for second-harmonic generation. We produce up to 35 μW of 313 nm radiation, which is subsequently used to laser cool and detect 6×10(2) beryllium ions, stored in a linear Paul trap, to a temperature of about 10 mK, as evidenced by the formation of Coulomb crystals. Our setup offers a simple and affordable alternative for Doppler cooling, optical pumping, and detection to presently used laser systems.

  10. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  11. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  12. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  13. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  14. Gas turbine heat transfer and cooling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin; Ekkad, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    FundamentalsNeed for Turbine Blade CoolingTurbine-Cooling TechnologyTurbine Heat Transfer and Cooling IssuesStructure of the BookReview Articles and Book Chapters on Turbine Cooling and Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 2010ReferencesTurbine Heat TransferIntroductionTurbine-Stage Heat TransferCascade Vane Heat-Transfer ExperimentsCascade Blade Heat TransferAirfoil Endwall Heat TransferTurbine Rotor Blade Tip Heat TransferLeading-Edge Region Heat TransferFlat-Surface Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 20102.10 ClosureReferencesTurbine Film CoolingIntroductionFilm Cooling on Rotat

  15. An Electron Beam Profile Instrument Based on FBGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Sporea

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application.

  16. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  17. Beam scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system for deflecting a beam of particles having different momenta, preferably through a 90 0 angle, so as to cause the beam to impinge upon a moving target and to scan across the target is described. The system includes a means responsive to a beam from a suitable source for causing the beam to periodically scan in a scanning plane and further means for deflecting the periodically scanned beam through the desired angle in a deflection plane so that the deflected beam impinges on the target. Means are included in the system for reducing the momentum dispersion at the target in both the deflection and the scanning planes and for spatially focussing the beam so as to produce a desired beam diameter at the target

  18. Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Sexton, Brendan Francis; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2002-01-01

    A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

  19. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  20. A combined capillary cooling system for cooling fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Paula; Pelizza, Pablo Rodrigo; Galante, Renan Manozzo; Bazzo, Edson [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (LabCET/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Combustao e Engenharia de Sistemas Termicos], Emails: ana@labcet.ufsc.br, pablo@labcet.ufsc.br, renan@labcet.ufsc.br, ebazzo@emc.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    The operation temperature control has an important influence over the PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) performance. A two-phase heat transfer system is proposed as an alternative for cooling and thermal control of PEMFC. The proposed system consists of a CPL (Capillary Pumped Loop) connected to a set of constant conductance heat pipes. In this work ceramic wick and stainless mesh wicks have been used as capillary structure of the CPL and heat pipes, respectively. Acetone has been used as the working fluid for CPL and deionized water for the heat pipes. Experimental results of three 1/4 inch stainless steel outlet diameter heats pipes and one CPL have been carried out and presented in this paper. Further experiments are planned coupling the proposed cooling system to a module which simulates the fuel cell. (author)

  1. An Electromagnetic Beam Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electromagnetic beam converter and a method for conversion of an input beam of electromagnetic radiation having a bell shaped intensity profile a(x,y) into an output beam having a prescribed target intensity profile l(x',y') based on a further development...

  2. Beams 92: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  3. Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements

  4. Electron Cloud with Inverted Beam Screens

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of computer simulations studying the effect of wrongly oriented LHC beam screens on the local electron-cloud heat load and density. At 3.5 or 7-TeV energy and for maximum secondary emission-yield values below 1.5, with the inverted sawtooth orientation about ten times higher heat load is expected than for the standard orientation, and the wrongly oriented sawtooth chambers could lead to a local heat-load bottleneck during the process of surface conditioning at 25-ns bunch spacing. The available cooling margin can be significantly increased by correcting the sawtooth orientations at least for two dipole magnets in LHC arc cells 26 and 32 R3, in order that there be no half-cell cooling loop containing more than one inverted screen.

  5. Electron Cloud with Inverted Beam Screens

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of computer simulations studying the effect of wrongly oriented LHC beam screens on the local electron-cloud heat load and density. At 3.5 or 7-TeV energy and for maximum secondary emission-yield values below 1.5, with the inverted sawtooth orientation about ten times higher heat load is expected than for the standard orientation, and the wrongly oriented sawtooth chambers could lead to a local heatload bottleneck during the process of surface conditioning at 25-ns bunch spacing. The available cooling margin can be significantly increased by correcting the sawtooth orientations at least for two dipole magnets in LHC arc cells 26 and 32 R3, in order that there be no half-cell cooling loop containing more than one inverted screen.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the performance of different cooling strategies with the concept of cool exergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Shukuya, Masanori; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    The whole chains of exergy flows for different cooling systems were compared. The effects of cooling demand (internal vs. external solar shading), space cooling method (floor cooling vs. air cooling with ventilation system), and the availability of a nearby natural heat sink (intake air...... for the ventilation system being outdoor air vs. air from the crawl-space, and air-to-water heat pump vs. ground heat exchanger as cooling source) on system exergy performance were investigated. It is crucial to minimize the cooling demand because it is possible to use a wide range of heat sinks (ground, lake, sea......-water, etc.) and indoor terminal units, only with a minimized demand. The water-based floor cooling system performed better than the air-based cooling system; when an air-to-water heat pump was used as the cooling source, the required exergy input was 28% smaller for the floor cooling system. The auxiliary...

  7. Theory, technology, and technique of stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1993-10-01

    The theory and technological implementation of stochastic cooling is described. Theoretical and technological limitations are discussed. Data from existing stochastic cooling systems are shown to illustrate some useful techniques

  8. Design: More than a cool chair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Austin, Robert; Sullivan, Erin

    2006-01-01

    Austin, R., Friis, K., Sullivan, E. 2006. Design: More than a cool chair. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing.......Austin, R., Friis, K., Sullivan, E. 2006. Design: More than a cool chair. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing....

  9. High temperature cooling system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Eric P.

    2006-12-12

    A method for cooling a heat source, a method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition therein, and a cooling system. The method for cooling employs a containment vessel with an oxidizable interior wall. The interior wall is oxidized to form an oxide barrier layer thereon, the cooling composition is monitored for excess oxidizing agent, and a reducing agent is provided to eliminate excess oxidation. The method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition involves introducing a sufficient quantity of a reactant which is reactive with the vessel in order to produce a barrier layer therein that is non-reactive with the cooling composition. The cooling system includes a containment vessel with oxidizing agent and reducing agent delivery conveyances and a monitor of oxidation and reduction states so that proper maintenance of a vessel wall oxidation layer occurs.

  10. A review of photovoltaic cells cooling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubeer, Swar A.; Mohammed, H. A.; Ilkan, Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    This paper highlights different cooling techniques to reduce the operating temperature of the PV cells. This review paper focuses on the improvement of the performance of the small domestic use PV systems by keeping the temperature of the cells as low as possible and uniform. Different cooling techniques have been investigated experimentally and numerically the impact of the operating temperature of the cells on the electrical and thermal performance of the PV systems. The advantages and disadvantages of ribbed wall heat sink cooling, array air duct cooling installed beneath the PV panel, water spray cooling technique and back surface water cooling are examined in this paper to identify their effective impact on the PV panel performance. It was identified that the water spray cooling system has a proper impact on the PV panel performance. So the water cooling is one way to enhance the electrical efficiency of the PV panel.

  11. A review of photovoltaic cells cooling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubeer Swar A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights different cooling techniques to reduce the operating temperature of the PV cells. This review paper focuses on the improvement of the performance of the small domestic use PV systems by keeping the temperature of the cells as low as possible and uniform. Different cooling techniques have been investigated experimentally and numerically the impact of the operating temperature of the cells on the electrical and thermal performance of the PV systems. The advantages and disadvantages of ribbed wall heat sink cooling, array air duct cooling installed beneath the PV panel, water spray cooling technique and back surface water cooling are examined in this paper to identify their effective impact on the PV panel performance. It was identified that the water spray cooling system has a proper impact on the PV panel performance. So the water cooling is one way to enhance the electrical efficiency of the PV panel.

  12. Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate a novel cooling concept called Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) for future high thrust in-space propulsion...

  13. Conceptual design and the simulation of final cooling section for a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrinsky, A.N.; Zolkin, T.V.

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of final cooling for muon beams, based on using current-carrying liquid-lithium rods, is discussed. The dynamics of particles in the course of cooling taking into account the non-paraxial motion has been studied with the help of computer simulation. It is suggested to minimize the effective increase of the longitudinal emittance caused by fluctuations of ionization losses and large angular spread, by the rotation of the longitudinal phase-space portrait for arranging self-action. We have considered the non-dissipative multiple successive full emittance redistribution from the longitudinal dimension to transverse one, necessary for cooling of all degrees of freedom. This redistribution is based on special rotations of the particle six-dimensional phase space by the beam division in several streams and their consequent merging with the minimum increment of full emittance and minimal beam losses taking into account their local phase-space density. Some of the basic technical parameters of the cooling system elements have been estimated.

  14. Electronic chip cooling system using graphite fins

    OpenAIRE

    Xue , Dong; Wu , Long; Xun , Lian

    2017-01-01

    International audience; As electronic devices get smaller, cooling systems with higher thermal efficiency is demanding by fast growing electronic industry. Great amount of research has been performed on the cooling systems but research on the materials of the cooling systems needs more work. Graphite with high thermal conductivity and light weight is a great candidate to be used in electronic devices. The bottleneck of using graphene in the cooling systems is the thermal transport among the i...

  15. Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bear, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project's successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency

  16. Ionization cooling ring for muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palmer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical ionization cooling rings could lead to lower cost or improved performance in neutrino factory or muon collider designs. The ring modeled here uses realistic three-dimensional fields. The performance of the ring compares favorably with the linear cooling channel used in the second U.S. Neutrino Factory Study. The normalized 6D emittance of an ideal ring is decreased by a factor of approximately 240, compared with a factor of only 15 for the linear channel. We also examine such real-world effects as windows on the absorbers and rf cavities and leaving empty lattice cells for injection and extraction. For realistic conditions the ring decreases the normalized 6D emittance by a factor of 49.

  17. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  18. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  19. Renewables for Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This timely report examines the technologies, current markets and relative costs for heat and cold production using biomass, geothermal and solar-assisted systems. It evaluates a range of national case studies and relevant policies. Should the successful and more cost-effective policies be implemented by other countries, then the relatively untapped economic potential of renewable energy heating and cooling systems could be better realised, resulting in potential doubling of the present market within the next few years.

  20. Thermionic cooling in semiconductor multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Lough, B.; Zhang, C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A solid-state refrigerator in which electrons transport heat has advantages over the conventional vapour-cycle, compressor-based domestic refrigerator since it has no moving parts, it is low-maintenance, silent, vibration-free and does not require the use of refrigerant gases. The usual approach to making an all-electrical refrigerator is by thermoelectric refrigeration. After a period of intense research in the 1950s and 60s it was realised that the efficiency of thermoelectric devices was less than, and unlikely to exceed, that of conventional compressor units. While thermoelectric cooling has found specialised applications in cases where reliability, compactness and weight are important considerations, it does not appear that thermo-electrics will ever successfully compete in the domestic market, in spite of recent advances in the design and fabrication of thermoelectric materials. A new approach to an all-electric refrigerator is to employ thermionic emission over potential barriers. A key difference between a thermoelectric device and a thermionic device is that in the former the electrons are scattered in their motion and in the latter they are not. Thus thermionic cooling, in principle, can be much more efficient than thermoelectric cooling. A radical new realisation of the thermionic refrigerator was suggested recently in which a multilayer semiconductor structure would be used. We discuss the optimisation of such a multilayer semiconductor cooling system by considering (1) electron-phonon interactions in the barriers and electrodes; (2) the detailed treatment of thermal conductivity; (3) an exact numerical solution of the heat and energy currents (in contrast to the previous approximate analytic solutions); (4) the effect of varying layer thickness across the device; and (5) the effect of varying current density across the device