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Sample records for beam adjuvant radiotherapy

  1. Adjuvant high-dose-rate brachytherapy after external beam radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, Enis; Yildz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil H.; Atahan, I. Lale

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the local control and survival rates obtained with either external beam radiation therapy (ERT) and adjuvant high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) or ERT alone in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1993 and December 1999, 144 patients (106 male, 38 female) with the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer were treated with either ERT and adjuvant HDR BRT (Group A) or ERT alone (Group B) at our department. BRT was not applied in 38 patients for the following reasons: (1) Unit was unavailable (n=13), (2) Patient was younger than 18 years (n=17), (3) Patient received accelerated hyperfractionated ERT (n=6), and (4) Patient refused BRT (n=2). The median age for whole group was 43 (range: 9-82 years). According to the AJCC-1997 staging system, there were 11 (7.6%), 35 (24.3%), 38 (26.4%), and 60 (41.7%) patients in Stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 57 (39.6%) patients with T1, 41 (28.5%) with T2, 20 (13.9%) with T3, and 26 (18.1%) with T4 tumors. Histopathologic diagnosis was WHO 2-3 in 137 (95.2%) patients. ERT doses ranged between 58.8 and 74 Gy (median: 66 Gy). There were significantly more patients with young age, N2 status, and Stage III disease in Group B and with Stage II disease in Group A. Significantly more patients received chemotherapy in Group B. BRT with an HDR 192 Ir microSelectron afterloading unit was delivered in 106 patients at the conclusion of ERT using a single-channel nasal applicator. Dose was prescribed at 1 cm from the source, and total dose of 12 Gy in 3 fractions on 3 consecutive days was given immediately after ERT. Besides radiotherapy, 82 (56.9%) patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, as well. Follow-up time ranged between 12 and 80 months (median: 32 months). Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of local recurrence, locoregional failure, regional failure, and rate of distant metastasis. Local failure was observed in 11 (10.3%) out of 106

  2. Multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS). Diminished acceptance of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Heinecke, A.; Koepke, W.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: The Multicenter Study Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (MSDS) is an ongoing study in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland on the clinical benefit of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/xMO/x (5th ed. 1997). Methods: MSDS was designed as a prospective randomized trial. Patients receive thyroidectomy, radioiodine therapy (RIT) to ablate the thyroid remnant, and TSH-suppressive L-thyroxine therapy with or without RTx after documented elimination of cervical iodine-131 uptake (http://msds-studie.uni-muenster.de). Results: 311 patients were enrolled between January 2000 and March 2003. 279 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. 45 consented to randomization, of whom 17 were randomized into treatment arm A (RTx) and 18 into arm B (no RTx). Advised by the trial's independent Data Monitoring and Safety Committee, the MSDS steering committee decided to terminate randomization in April 2003 and continue MSDS as a prospective cohort study. 23 of the 234 patients in the observation arm of the trial were prescribed RTx by their physicians. Thus, 14% of the trial cohort were randomized or assigned to receive RTx (intention-to-treat analysis). In contrast, at least 44% of all patients with pT4 papillary DTC in Germany in the nationwide PCES study underwent RTx in 1996 (p 2 -test). Conclusions: Acceptance of external beam RTx as a treatment modality for DTC has receded to a degree that accrual of a sufficient number of patients for a randomized trial has been impossible. Observation of the trial cohort is continued in order to assess clinical event rates with and without RTx and chronic RTx toxicity. (orig.) [de

  3. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC and NCIC CTG EN.5 randomised trials): pooled trial results, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P; Swart, Ann Marie; Orton, J; Kitchener, H; Whelan, T; Lukka, H; Eisenhauer, E; Bacon, M; Tu, D; Parmar, M K B; Amos, C; Murray, C; Qian, W

    2009-01-10

    Early endometrial cancer with low-risk pathological features can be successfully treated by surgery alone. External beam radiotherapy added to surgery has been investigated in several small trials, which have mainly included women at intermediate risk of recurrence. In these trials, postoperative radiotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of isolated local recurrence but there is no evidence that it improves recurrence-free or overall survival. We report the findings from the ASTEC and EN.5 trials, which investigated adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in women with early-stage disease and pathological features suggestive of intermediate or high risk of recurrence and death from endometrial cancer. Between July, 1996, and March, 2005, 905 (789 ASTEC, 116 EN.5) women with intermediate-risk or high-risk early-stage disease from 112 centres in seven countries (UK, Canada, Poland, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, USA) were randomly assigned after surgery to observation (453) or to external beam radiotherapy (452). A target dose of 40-46 Gy in 20-25 daily fractions to the pelvis, treating five times a week, was specified. Primary outcome measure was overall survival, and all analyses were by intention to treat. These trials were registered ISRCTN 16571884 (ASTEC) and NCT 00002807 (EN.5). After a median follow-up of 58 months, 135 women (68 observation, 67 external beam radiotherapy) had died. There was no evidence that overall survival with external beam radiotherapy was better than observation, hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 0.75-1.48; p=0.77). 5-year overall survival was 84% in both groups. Combining data from ASTEC and EN.5 in a meta-analysis of trials confirmed that there was no benefit in terms of overall survival (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI 0.84-1.29) and can reliably exclude an absolute benefit of external beam radiotherapy at 5 years of more than 3%. With brachytherapy used in 53% of women in ASTEC/EN.5, the local recurrence rate in the observation group at 5 years

  4. Impact of External Beam Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Endometrial Adenocarcinoma: A Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Mols, Floortje; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Haartsen, Joke E.; Vingerhoets, Ad J.J.M.; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 5-10-year survivors of Stage I-II endometrial (adeno-)carcinoma (EC) treated with surgery alone or surgery with external beam adjuvant radiotherapy (EBRT) and an age-matched norm population. Methods and Materials: A population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted by the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. All patients were included who had been diagnosed with EC between 1994 and 1998 (n = 462). Information from the questionnaires returned was linked to data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry on patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Results: Responses were received from 75% of the patients. The analyses were restricted to women with Stage I-II disease at diagnosis, treated with either surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant EBRT, and without recurrent disease or new primary malignancies (n = 264). The patients who had received adjuvant EBRT (n = 80) had had a significantly higher tumor stage and grade at diagnosis (p < 0.0001) and a longer mean time since diagnosis (p = 0.04). Age, number of comorbid diseases, current marital status, nulliparity, education, and occupation were similar for both treatment groups. On multivariate analyses, adjuvant EBRT was independently and negatively associated with the vitality and physical and social well-being scale scores. The HRQOL scores of both treatment groups, however, were similar to those of an age-matched norm population. Conclusion: In general, the HRQOL of EC survivors is good. EC survivors treated with surgery alone had a better HRQOL than women treated with surgery and adjuvant EBRT, although for both groups, the HRQOL was in the range of the norm population

  5. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  6. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse

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    Choi, Mehee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Byrne, Richard W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Diaz, Aidnag Z., E-mail: aidnag_diaz@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ondine's curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97 mm Hg. He was diagnosed with Ondine's curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case.

  7. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer. Results after 874 patient-years of follow-up in the MSDS-trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Riemann, B.; Schober, O.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Heinecke, A.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluate the clinical benefit of external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive thyroid carcinoma with follicular cell differentiation (DTC). The Multicentre Study on Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (MSDS) was planned as a prospective multicenter trial on the benefit of adjuvant RTx in locally invasive DTC (pT4; UICC 1997) with or without lymph node metastases and no known distant metastases. All patients were treated with thyroidectomy, 131 I-therapy, and TSH-suppression and were randomized to receive additional RTx or not. In 4/2003 the trial became a prospective cohort study after only 45 of then 311 patients had consented to randomization. 351 of 422 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. Age was 48 ± 12 years (mean ± SD). 25% were men. Tumours were papillary in 90% and follicular in 10%. Of 47 patients randomized or allocated to RTx, 26 actually received RTx. Mean follow-up was 930 days. In an actual treatment analysis, 96% (25/26) of the RTx-patients reached complete remission (CR) vs. 86% in the non-RTx patients. Recurrences occurred in 0 vs. 3 % of patients: 6 reoperated for regional lymph node metastases, 1 tracheal invasion treated with tracheoplasty, 1 local invasion necessitating laryngectomy, 2 distant metastases (1 lung, 1 lung + bone). Serious chronic RTx toxicity occurred in 1/26 patients. The MSDS trial showed low mortality and recurrence rates and a weak benefit of RTx in terms of local control that did however not reach statistical significance. Routine RTx in locally invasive DTC can no longer be recommended. (orig.)

  8. Microplanar beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit the investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which replaces the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. In this study using the Monte Carlo method, the lateral and depth dose of a single planar microbeam of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom is investigated. Poster 195. (author)

  9. Three-dimensional non-coplanar conformal radiotherapy yields better results than traditional beam arrangements for adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W; Melamud, Alex; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field "box" was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical practice.

  10. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  11. Uterine sarcoma following adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma

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    Marmion, P.J.; Goldfarb, P.M.; Youngkin, T.P.

    1981-01-01

    Since adjuvant radiotherapy for rectosigmoid carcinoma appears to improve prognosis, the importance of delayed side effects such as radiation-induced malignant disease must be considered. The present report describes the first reported case of the development of a uterine carcinosarcoma more than 9 years after preoperative radiotherapy to the midpelvis for rectal carcinoma.

  12. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: AUA/ASTRO Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian M; Valicenti, Richard K; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J; Goldenberg, S Larry; Hahn, Carol; Klein, Eric; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Sartor, Oliver; Wolf, J Stuart; Faraday, Martha M

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. A systematic literature review using the PubMed®, Embase, and Cochrane databases was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, the use of radiotherapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a re-staging evaluation. Physicians should offer adjuvant radiotherapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (i.e., seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and should offer salvage radiotherapy to patients with prostatic specific antigen or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiotherapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiotherapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and the multi-disciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. Please visit the ASTRO and AUA websites (http://www.redjournal.org/webfiles/images/journals/rob/RAP%20Guideline.pdf and http://www.auanet.org/education/guidelines/radiation-after-prostatectomy.cfm) to view this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

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    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  14. Combination of External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) With Intratumoral Injection of Dendritic Cells as Neo-Adjuvant Treatment of High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients

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    Finkelstein, Steven E., E-mail: steven.finkelstein@moffitt.org [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Iclozan, Cristina; Bui, Marilyn M.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Ahmed, Jamil; Noyes, David R.; Cheong, David; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Heysek, Randy V.; Berman, Claudia; Lenox, Brianna C.; Janssen, William; Zager, Jonathan S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Letson, G. Douglas; Antonia, Scott J. [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Gabrilovich, Dmitry I., E-mail: dmitry.gabrilovich@moffitt.org [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the effect of combination of intratumoral administration of dendritic cells (DC) and fractionated external beam radiation (EBRT) on tumor-specific immune responses in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Material: Seventeen patients with large (>5 cm) high-grade STS were enrolled in the study. They were treated in the neoadjuvant setting with 5,040 cGy of EBRT, split into 28 fractions and delivered 5 days per week, combined with intratumoral injection of 10{sup 7} DCs followed by complete resection. DCs were injected on the second, third, and fourth Friday of the treatment cycle. Clinical evaluation and immunological assessments were performed. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. No patient had tumor-specific immune responses before combined EBRT/DC therapy; 9 patients (52.9%) developed tumor-specific immune responses, which lasted from 11 to 42 weeks. Twelve of 17 patients (70.6%) were progression free after 1 year. Treatment caused a dramatic accumulation of T cells in the tumor. The presence of CD4{sup +} T cells in the tumor positively correlated with tumor-specific immune responses that developed following combined therapy. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells but not regulatory T cells negatively correlated with the development of tumor-specific immune responses. Experiments with {sup 111}In labeled DCs demonstrated that these antigen presenting cells need at least 48 h to start migrating from tumor site. Conclusions: Combination of intratumoral DC administration with EBRT was safe and resulted in induction of antitumor immune responses. This suggests that this therapy is promising and needs further testing in clinical trials design to assess clinical efficacy.

  15. No serious late cardiac effects after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in premenopausal women with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Anita; Bendahl, Pear-Ola; Cwikiel, Magdalena; Eskilsson, Jan; Thapper, Kerstin Leofvander; Pahlm, Olle

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess cardiac mortality, coronary artery disease, myocardial dysfunction, and valvular heart disease in women younger than 65 years of age, at least 10 years after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety women (45-64 years old) with Stage II breast cancer without relapse, included in the South Sweden Breast Cancer Trial (premenopausal arm), with or without adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy ± cyclophosphamide were examined with myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography/Doppler, 10-17 years after radiotherapy. Thirty-four patients had been irradiated for left-sided tumors, 33 for right-sided tumors, and 23 patients had not been treated with radiotherapy. The radiotherapy (conventional roentgen, electron beams, and high-energy photon beams combined, in each patient) included the chest wall and the regional lymph nodes, with a specified target dose of 38-48 Gy, administered in daily fractions of 1.9-2.4 Gy, 5 days/week. Results: No cardiac deaths were found among the original 275 patients randomized to adjuvant therapy. In the 90 patients examined, abnormal findings were recorded for ECG (14 patients), exercise test (5 patients), myocardial scintigraphy (6 patients), thickening of valve cusps (14 patients), and mild valvular regurgitation (20 patients). All patients had normal systolic function. Diastolic dysfunction was observed in 6 patients (abnormal relaxation in 4 patients and restrictive filling abnormality in 2 patients). Although no significant differences were found between the 3 study groups, there was a tendency to more abnormal findings after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Women younger than 50 years of age at the time of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer, had no serious cardiac sequelae 13 years (median) later, despite partly old-fashioned radiation techniques

  16. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  17. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  18. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

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    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi [Tochigi Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  19. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi

    1999-01-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy on older and oldest elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, F; Cartei, F; Carau, B; Berretta, S; Spartà, D; Tirelli, U; Santangelo, A; Maugeri, D; Luca, S; Leotta, C; Sorace, R; Berretta, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy in terms of feasibility and activity in the patients aged > or = 75 with advanced rectal cancer. From January 2002 to December 2006, 41 consecutive patients (27 men and 14 women) aged > or = 75 received radiotherapy for local advanced rectal cancer, 9 in a pre-operative and 22 in a post-operative setting. Sixteen patients received concomitant chemotherapy. Variables considered were age, co-morbidities, evaluated according to the adult co-morbidity evaluation index (ACE-27), surgery versus no surgery, and timing of radiotherapy. The median age was 80.5 years (range 75-90). A total of 19.5% of the patients had no co-morbidity, 48.8% mild, 17.1% moderate, and 14.6% had severe co-morbidities. Thirty-nine subjects (95.1%) were submitted to surgery. All patients but one completed the planned radiation schedule. At a median follow-up of 23.1 months, the 2- and 4-year overall survival rates were 71.8% and 61.6%, respectively. There was a better survival for patients with no or mild co-morbidities (p=0.002) and a good performance status (p=0.003). The cancer-free survival at 2 and 4 years was 78.9% and 26.4%, respectively. No difference in acute and late toxicity rates was found between patients with different ACE-27 indexes. We conclude that compliance with radiotherapy is good and rate of toxicity is acceptable in elderly patients. Patients with no or mild co-morbidities have a significantly better survival. Increasing severity of co-morbidity may sufficiently shorten remaining life expectancy to cancel gains with adjuvant radiotherapy. Further prospective trials are needed to confirm these results.

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  2. Internal hemipelvectomy with intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy in the limb-sparing treatment of a pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, HJ; Szabo, BG

    The case of a patient with an extensive pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma treated with internal hemipelvectomy and intraoperative radiotherapy, followed by adjuvant high-dose external beam radiotherapy, with a successful attempt in achieving long-term local tumor control and limb-sparing treatment is

  3. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  4. Breast conserving treatment of breast carcinoma T2 (≤ 4 cm) and T3 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy, high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, external beam radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: local control and overall survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Celia Regina; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Baraldi, Helena Espindola; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 (≤ 4 cm) and T3 through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering local control and overall survival. Material and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 88 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIb and IIIa, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, treated from June/1995 to December/2006. Median follow-up was 58 months. Using clinical methods the tumor was evaluated before and after three or four cycles of chemotherapy based on anthracyclines. Overall survival and local control were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: Local control and overall survival in five years were 90% and 73.5%, respectively. Conclusion: local control and overall survival were comparable to other forms of treatment. (author)

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious

  6. The effect of short term neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation on erectile function in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer: an analysis of the 4- versus 8-month randomised trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Patricia E

    2012-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common consequence of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. The addition of neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) has an indeterminate additive effect. We examined the long-term effect on erectile function (EF) of two durations (4 months: arm 1 and 8 months: arm 2) of NAD prior to radiation (RT) for patients with localised prostate cancer from the Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group (ICORG 97-01) 4- versus 8-month trial. In this study we aimed to (1) analyse the overall effect on EF of NAD in an EBRT population, (2) compare the probability of retained EF over time in an EBRT population treated with either 4 or 8 months of NAD and (3) identify any variables such as risk group and age which may have an additive detrimental effect. This analysis provides unique long term follow up data.

  7. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35 o /couch, 312 o . Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  8. Limited advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy over 3D conformal radiation therapy in the adjuvant management of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W

    2009-06-01

    Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 degrees , 53 degrees , 107 degrees , 158 degrees , 204 degrees , 255 degrees , and 306 degrees . Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 degrees , 90 degrees , 315 degrees , and 345 degrees ; a gantry angle of 320 degrees /couch, 30 degrees ; and a gantry angle of 35 degrees /couch, 312 degrees . Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  9. Definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas: a single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duru Birgi, Sumerya; Teo, Mark; Dyker, Karen E.; Sen, Mehmet; Prestwich, Robin J D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the disease outcomes of patients treated with definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in a single institution. Between 2007–2012 patients were retrospectively identified from electronic databases who had undergone surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas with curative intent. Fourty three patients with sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma were identified (22 nasal cavity, 21 paranasal sinuses). 31/43 (72 %) had T3 or T4 disease; nodal stage was N0 in 38, N1 in 4, Na/b in 0 and N2c in 1 patient. Median age was 67 years (range 41–86). 18 (42 %) received definitive and 25 (58 %) adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered using either conventional radiotherapy (n = 39) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (n = 4). Elective neck radiotherapy was delivered to two patients. Chemotherapy was delivered to 6/43 (14 %) of patients. Two-year local control, regional control, distant metastases free survival, progression free survival, cause specific survival and overall survival were 81 %, 90 %, 95 %, 71 %, 84 % and 80 % respectively. There was no significant difference in outcome comparing patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with patients receiving definitive radiotherapy (2 year locoregional disease free survival 75 % and 70 % respectively, p = 0.98). Pooly differentiated tumours were significantly associated with inferior disease outcomes. Local, regional, combined local and regional, and distant failure occurred in 7 (16 %), 3 (7 %), 1 (2 %) and 2 (5 %) of patients; all 3 regional recurrences were in patients with nasal cavity squamous cell carcinomas who had not undergone elective neck treatment. Definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy provides an effective treatment for sinonasal malignancies. The main pattern of failure remains local, suggesting the need for investigation of

  10. Uterine sarcoma following adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. [/sup 60/Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmion, P.J. (Mercy Hospital and Medical Center, San Diego, CA); Goldfarb, P.M.; Youngkin, T.P.

    1981-05-01

    Since adjuvant radiotherapy for rectosigmoid carcinoma appears to improve prognosis, the importance of delayed side effects such as radiation-induced malignant disease must be considered. The present report describes the first reported case of the development of a uterine carcinosarcoma more than 9 years after preoperative radiotherapy to the midpelvis for rectal carcinoma.

  11. Adjuvant Versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Adverse Pathological Findings Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. D. Wallis MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing surgery for prostate cancer who have adverse pathological findings experience high rates of recurrence. While there are data supporting adjuvant radiotherapy compared to a wait-and-watch strategy to reduce recurrence rates, there are no randomized controlled trials comparing adjuvant radiotherapy with the other standard of care, salvage radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered at the time of recurrence. Methods: We constructed a health state transition (Markov model employing two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation using a lifetime horizon to compare the quality-adjusted survival associated with postoperative strategies using adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy. Prior to analysis, we calibrated and validated our model using the results of previous randomized controlled trials. We considered clinically important oncological health states from immediately postoperative to prostate cancer–specific death, commonly described complications from prostate cancer treatment, and other causes of mortality. Transition probabilities and utilities for disease states were derived from a literature search of MEDLINE and expert consensus. Results: Salvage radiotherapy was associated with an increased quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE (58.3 months as compared with adjuvant radiotherapy (53.7 months, a difference of 4.6 months (standard deviation 8.8. Salvage radiotherapy had higher QALE in 53% of hypothetical cohorts. There was a minimal difference in overall life expectancy (-0.1 months. Examining recurrence rates, our model showed validity when compared with available randomized controlled data. Conclusions: A salvage radiotherapy strategy appears to provide improved QALE for patients with adverse pathological findings following radical prostatectomy, compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. As these findings reflect, population averages, specific patient and tumor factors, and patient preferences remain central for individualized

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin/UFT) after radiotherapy for locallu advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Kawano, Toshiro; Yamashita, Kohsuke; Sugiyama, Masato [Kanagawa Cancer Center (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cancer, 40 patients, previously untreated (6 with stage III and 34 with stage IV; 26 with resectable, 10 with unresectable and 4 patients with inoperable) were treated with radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin /tegafur-uracil (UFT)) at our outpatient clinic. The primary site was identified in the larynx or hypopharynx in 15, oral cavity or oropharynx in 11, sinuses in 6, nasopharynx in 4, unknown primary in 3, and parotis in 1 patient. Treatment consisted of 6 courses of Nedaplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2} repeated at 4 weeks intervals, and one-year oral administration of UFTE 400mg/day, after radiotherapy. Toxicities included leukopenia (grade 3, 20.5%, grade 4, 2.6%), thrombocytopenia (grade 3, 7.7%). There was one death due to gastric ulcer. Twenty-five patients (62.5%) received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-year overall survival rate was 100% for stage III and 61.1% for stage IV. Over the same period, the progression-free survival rate was 83.3% for stage III and 46.1% for stage IV. 85.7% of complete response (CR) (12/14 patients) and 63.6% of partial response (PR) (14/22 patients) to radiotherapy showed that the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy. If the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy, the two-year progression free survival rate was not different between 81.8% for CR to radiotherapy and 81.3% for PR. The rate of distant failure was 2.5%, which was lower than that citedin previous reports. This adjuvant chemotherapy regimen is tolerable at outpatient clinics and might suppress distant metastasis after radiotherapy. (author)

  13. External beam radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 243 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with radiotherapy is presented. Radiotherapy was combined with 5-fluorouracil, or given alone. Seventy-four patients were treated with radical external beam radiotherapy for recurrent or inoperable rectal adenocarcinoma. One hundred and forty-five patients with advanced pelvic tumours or metastases were treated with palliative pelvic radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients with small-volume residual pelvic tumour or who were felt to be at high risk of pelvic recurrence following radical resection received postoperative radiotherapy. Complete tumour regression was seen in 38% of radically treated patients, and 24% of palliatively treated patients. Partial regression was observed in 56% of radically treated patients, and 58% of palliatively treated patients. Long-term local tumour control was more commonly observed for small tumours (< 5 cm diameter). Fifty-eight % of patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy remained free of local recurrence. Survival was significantly better with small tumours. The addition of 5FU did not appear to improve survival or tumour control. (author)

  14. Guide for External Beam Radiotherapy. Procedures 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bourhis, Jean; Eschwege, Francois; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Barillot, Isabelle; Bey, Pierre; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Olivier; Bolla, Michel; Bourguignon, Michel; Godet, Jean-Luc; Krembel, David; Valero, Marc; Bara, Christine; Beauvais-March, Helene; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Vidal, Jean-Pierre; Drouard, Jean; Sarrazin, Thierry; Lindecker-Cournil, Valerie; Robin, Sun Hee Lee; Thevenet, Nicolas; Depenweiller, Christian; Le Tallec, Philippe; Ortholan, Cecile; Aimone, Nicole; Baldeschi, Carine; Cantelli, Andree; Estivalet, Stephane; Le Prince, Cyrille; QUERO, Laurent; Costa, Andre; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Bourhis, Jean; Calais, Gilles; Lartigau, Eric; Ginot, Aurelie; Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bolla, Michel; Chauvet, Bruno; Maingon, Philippe; Martin, Etienne; Azria, David; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Grehange, Gilles; Hennequin, Christophe; Peiffert, Didier; Toledano, Alain; Belkacemi, Yazid; Courdi, Adel; Belliere, Aurelie; Peignaux, Karine; Mahe, Marc; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Kantor, Guy; Lepechoux, Cecile; Carrie, Christian; Claude, Line

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize quality and security in the delivery of radiation treatment, the French SFRO (Societe francaise de radiotherapie oncologique) is publishing a Guide for Radiotherapy. This guide is realized according to the HAS (Haute Autorite de sante) methodology of 'structured experts consensus'. This document is made of two parts: a general description of external beam radiation therapy and chapters describing the technical procedures of the main tumors to be irradiated (24). For each procedure, a special attention is given to dose constraints in the organs at risk. This guide will be regularly updated

  15. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy [it

  16. Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Sheen, Martin A.; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 88 patients with iris melanoma received proton beam radiotherapy, with 53.1 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: The patients had a mean age of 52 years and a median follow-up of 2.7 years. The tumors had a median diameter of 4.3 mm, involving more than 2 clock hours of iris in 32% of patients and more than 2 hours of angle in 27%. The ciliary body was involved in 20%. Cataract was present in 13 patients before treatment and subsequently developed in another 18. Cataract had a 4-year rate of 63% and by Cox analysis was related to age (p = 0.05), initial visual loss (p < 0.0001), iris involvement (p < 0.0001), and tumor thickness (p < 0.0001). Glaucoma was present before treatment in 13 patients and developed after treatment in another 3. Three eyes were enucleated, all because of recurrence, which had an actuarial 4-year rate of 3.3% (95% CI 0-8.0%). Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma is well tolerated, the main problems being radiation-cataract, which was treatable, and preexisting glaucoma, which in several patients was difficult to control

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil after curative resection of cancer of the pancreas and periampullary region: phase III trial of the EORTC gastrointestinal tract cancer cooperative group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkenbijl, J. H.; Jeekel, J.; Sahmoud, T.; van Pel, R.; Couvreur, M. L.; Veenhof, C. H.; Arnaud, J. P.; Gonzalez, D. G.; de Wit, L. T.; Hennipman, A.; Wils, J.

    1999-01-01

    The survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil versus observation alone after surgery was investigated in patients with pancreatic head and periampullary cancers. A previous study of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in these cancers by the Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer

  18. Chemotherapy as an adjuvant to Radiotherapy in treatment of Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumours, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermo therapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results.

  19. Side Effects of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Testicular Seminoma Stage I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamulin, M.; Grgic, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study the side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy of testicular seminoma stage I patients were followed up in the period between 13 to 84 months (median 28 months). The most frequent side effects in these patients during radiotherapy were gastrointestinal problems (nausea/vomiting), psychologic and cognitive problems and minor sexual problems. The reported side effects were treated by antimmimetics and anxiolytics. After radiotherapy, the side effects persisted in 6 % of patients but therapy was needed only in few. Healthy children were born to 76 % of patients in the age group 18 - 39 years after radiotherapy. The present study shows that adjuvant irradiation of paraaortal lymph nodes with total a dose of 24 Gy in 16 daily fractions in testicular seminoma patients causes acceptable side effects with acceptable quality of life and fertility, however in conditions of individual approach and family consulting. (author)

  20. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD 10 ), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the in plane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43 and 0.75 % respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10 % changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2 % level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, d max , is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD 10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD 10 , and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant.

  1. Regional control of melanoma neck node metastasis after selective neck dissection with or without adjuvant radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hooft van Huysduynen, Thijs; Rasch, Coen R. N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of adjuvant radiotherapy on regional control of melanoma neck node metastasis. DESIGN: A single-institution retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary care cancer center. PATIENTS: The study included 64 patients with melanoma neck node metastasis who were treated with

  2. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  3. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing; Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate

  5. Side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy in men with testicular seminoma stage I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamulin, M.; Grgic, M.; Bisof, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we followed up the side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with testicular seminoma stage I over a period from 13 to 84 months (median 28 months). The most frequent side effects during radiotherapy were gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting), psychological, cognitive, and minor sexual problems. The reported side effects were treated by antiemetics and anxiolytics. After radiotherapy, the side effects persisted in 6 % of patients, but only a few of them required additional treatment. Healthy children were born to 76 % of patients in the 18 to 39 years age group. This study shows that adjuvant radiotherapy of the para-aortic lymph nodes with the total dosage of 24 Gy in 16 daily fractions administered to testicular seminoma patients causes acceptable side effects, does not adversely affect quality of life and fertility, if the approach to treatment is individual and family consulting is provided. This makes adjuvant radiotherapy of the para-aortic lymph nodes an acceptable treatment for testicular seminoma stage I patients. (authors)

  6. Adjuvant Ab Interno Tumor Treatment After Proton Beam Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Ira; Riechardt, Aline I; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Joussen, Antonia M

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to show long-term outcomes concerning globe preservation in uveal melanoma patients after proton beam therapy with the main focus on outcomes according to different adjuvant ab interno surgical procedures. Retrospective cohort study. All patients treated with primary proton beam therapy for choroidal or ciliary body melanoma between June 1998 and June 2015 were included. A total of 2499 patients underwent primary proton beam therapy, with local tumor control and globe preservation rates of 95.9% and 94.8% after 5 years, respectively. A total of 110 (4.4%) patients required secondary enucleation. Unresponsive neovascular glaucoma was the leading cause of secondary enucleation in 78 of the 2499 patients (3.1%). The 5-year enucleation-free survival rate was 94.8% in the endoresection group, 94.3% in the endodrainage group, and 93.5% in the comparator group. The log-rank test showed P = .014 (comparator group vs endoresection group) and P = .06 (comparator group vs endodrainage-vitrectomy group). Patients treated with endoresection or endodrainage-vitrectomy developed less radiation retinopathy (30.5% and 37.4% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .048 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) and less neovascular glaucoma (11.6% and 21.3% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .01 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) compared with the comparator group (52.3% radiation retinopathy and 57.8% neovascular glaucoma after 5 years). This study suggests that in larger tumors the enucleation and neovascular glaucoma rates might be reduced by adjuvant surgical procedures. Although endoresection is the most promising adjuvant treatment option, the endodrainage-vitrectomy is recommended in patients who are ineligible for endoresection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Sjoeden, P.-O.

    1991-01-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author)

  8. Glioblastoma in elderly patients: safety and efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, F; Berretta, M; Colosimo, C; Stefanelli, A; Ursino, S; Zanet, E; Palmucci, T; Maugeri, D; Malaguarnera, M; Palmucci, S; Grasso, M; Tirelli, U; Cartei, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ), in terms of feasibility and activity, in elderly patients with glioblastoma. From January 2002 to December 2007, 42 consecutive patients with glioblastoma (27 men and 15 women) aged 65 years or more (median age 71.3 years), received radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ. Nineteen patients (45.2%) had a Karnofsky index >or=80. Thirty-six patients (85.8%) underwent complete or subtotal resection, while 6 patients (14.2%) were only biopsied. All patients received adjuvant radiotherapy within 4 weeks from surgery. Twenty-two patients (54.8%) underwent adjuvant TMZ. Early discontinuation of concomitant TMZ program due to toxicity was observed in 8 patients. Considered variables were: age, Karnofsky index, surgery versus no surgery, radiation dose, and chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 10.2 months, the 6- and 12-month overall survival rates were 81.9% and 27.8%, respectively. There was a significantly better survival for patients with a performance status according to Karnofsky >80 (p<0.0001). Actuarial progression-free survival at 6- and 12-month was 46.4% and 9.8%, respectively. Globally, the treatment was well tolerated with no treatment-related toxicity in 69% of patients. In conclusion, in elderly patients, the adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy was well tolerated with an acceptable rate of toxicity, and patients with a good performance status had a significantly better survival. However, further prospective trials are needed to confirm these results. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Late cutaneous effects of a local potent steroid during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with a local potent corticosteroid during adjuvant external radiotherapy (ERT) of breast cancer is associated with late skin toxicity. Material and methods: Sixty patients (32 treated with potent corticoid cream versus 28 controls...... with corticosteroid was 3.2 (95% CI: 1.0-10.1).Patients reported minor cosmetic dermatological sequelae. Seven patients developed telangiectasia, which caused cosmetic inconvenience. Conclusion: In this study, prophylactic corticosteroid treatment to ameliorate radiation dermatitis during adjuvant ERT of breast...

  10. Heavy Particle Beams in Tumor Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, M.

    1999-01-01

    Using heavy particles beam in the tumor radiotherapy is advantageous to the conventional radiation with photons and electrons. One of the advantages of the heavy charged particle is the energy deposition processes which give a well defined range in tissue, a Bragg peak of ionization in the depth-dose distribution and slow scattering, while the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue in the vicinity is minimized. These processes can show the relation between the heavy particle and the conventional radiation is illustrated with respect to the depth dose and the relative dose. The usage of neutrons (Thermal or epithermal) in therapy necessitates implementation of capture material leading to the production of heavy charged particles (a-particles) as a result of the nuclear interaction in between. Experimentally it is found that 80% of the absorbed dose is mainly due to the presence of capture material

  11. The Use of Strontium-90 Beta Radiotherapy as Adjuvant Treatment for Conjunctival Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M. L. Cohen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. To report the safety and efficacy of strontium (Sr90 beta radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment for conjunctival melanoma. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken from 1999 to 2007 of all patients who underwent Sr90 beta radiotherapy for incompletely excised conjunctival melanoma. Failure of treatment was defined as recurrence of a conjunctival melanoma at the same location following beta radiotherapy. Results. Twenty patients underwent Sr90 beta radiotherapy for incompletely excised conjunctival melanoma. Median follow-up interval was 59 months (8–152. All patients had conjunctival melanoma involving the bulbar conjunctiva. Underlying diagnoses included PAM with atypia in 60% (12 of 20, PAM without atypia in 15% (3 of 20, and de novo conjunctival melanoma in 25% (5 of 20. Following Sr90 beta radiotherapy, in 90% (18 out of 20 local control was achieved and visual acuity was not affected in any patient. Three patients (15% had dry eye symptoms, episcleritis, and descemetcoele, respectively. No cataract or secondary glaucoma was reported. Conclusions. Sr90 treatment is a very effective adjuvant treatment after excisional biopsy and cryotherapy for conjunctival melanoma with a local success rate of 90%. The treatment is not associated with significant side effects and visual acuity is not affected.

  12. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E.; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W.; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  13. Stage I seminoma of the testis. Adjuvant radiotherapy or surveillance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allhoff, E.P.; Liedke, S.; De Riese, W.; Stief, C.; Schneider, B.

    1991-01-01

    Lately the role of radiotherapy in stage I seminoma of the testis has been questioned by some authors who reported on a ''surveillance'' strategy for these patients. Since 1980, 124 patients with seminoma of the testis have been referred to this institution; 97 of 116 patients analysed presented with stage I disease and 10 of these had elevated levels of βHCG. A total of 64 patients were given radiotherapy after orchiectomy and 33 entered a surveillance protocol. After a median follow-up of 48 months, 3 patients in the surveillance group relapsed after 5, 13 and 49 months and 2 of the irradiated patients did so after 25 and 33 months. Elevation of βHCG was not significant because none of these patients showed progression. A low rate of progression and excellent survival are associated with standard treatment (orchiectomy and radiotherapy) and good results have been achieved with chemotherapy in cases of relapse. A surveillance policy is not recommended in stage I seminoma because of its slower growth compared with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGTC), the absence of a specific tumour marker, the 10% risk of occult metastases and the 3-fold higher progression rate compared with irradiated patients. We suggest the use of a reduced dosage and radiation field. (author)

  14. Gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I malignant teratoma of the testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.R.; Horwich, A.; Peckham, M.J.; Bliss, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Between January 1963 and December 1983, 248 patients with stage I teratoma were managed by the Testicular Tumour Unit of the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH). Before 1979, these patients were treated with adjuvant irradiation to the abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes (142 patients) to a mid-plane dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. In 1979, a surveillance policy was adopted (106 patients) and relapsing patients treated with chemotherapy. By 2 years post-orchidectomy, seven patients (4.9%) in the irradiated group developed duodenal ulceration compared to none in the surveillance group (p = 0.05). A past medical history of duodenal ulcer was a significant risk factor for ulceration after radiotherapy (p = 0.04) whereas a past history of abdominal surgery was not (p = 0.8). It is concluded that adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I teratoma may increase the risk of peptic ulceration. 14 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  15. Optimization of dose distributions for adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy of gastric cancer by IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Dobler, B.; Mai, S.; Hermann, B.; Tiefenbacher, U.; Wieland, P.; Steil, V.; Wenz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Locoregional relapse is a problem frequently encountered with advanced gastric cancer. Data from the randomized Intergroup trial 116 suggest effectiveness of adjuvant radiochemotherapy, albeit with significant toxicity. The potential of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce toxicity by significantly reducing maximum and median doses to organs at risk while still applying sufficient dose to the target volume in the upper abdomen was studied. Patient and Methods: For a typical configuration of target volumes and organs, a step-and-shoot IMRT plan (eight beam orientations), developed as a class solution for treatment of tumors in the upper abdomen (Figures 1 to 3), a conventional plan, a combination of the conventional plan with a kidney-sparing boost plan, and a conventional plan with noncoplanar ap and pa fields for improved kidney sparing were compared with respect to coverage of target volume and dose to organs at risk with a dose of 45 Gy delivered as the median dose to the target volume. Results: When using the conventional three-dimensionally planned box techniques, the right kidney could be kept below tolerance, but median dose to the left kidney amounted to between 14.8 and 26.9 Gy, depending on the plan. IMRT reduced the median dose to the left kidney to 10.5 Gy, while still keeping the dose to the right kidney 90% of prescription dose were delivered to > 90% of target volume with IMRT (Table 1). Conclusion: IMRT has the potential to deliver efficient doses to target volumes in the upper abdomen, while delivering dose to organs at risk in a more advantageous fashion than a conventional technique. For clinical implementation, the possibility of extensive organ motion in the upper abdomen has to be taken into account for treatment planning and patient positioning. The multitude of potential risks related to its application has to be the subject of thorough follow-up and further studies. (orig.)

  16. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. (Univ.ersity of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil after curative resection of cancer of the pancreas and periampullary region: phase III trial of the EORTC gastrointestinal tract cancer cooperative group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.G. Klinkenbijl (Jean); J. Wils; J. Jeekel (Hans); T. Sahmoud; R. van Pel; M.L. Couvreur; C.H. Veenhof; J.P. Arnaud; D. González González (Dionisio); L.Th. de Wit (Laurens); A. Hennipman

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil versus observation alone after surgery was investigated in patients with pancreatic head and periampullary cancers. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A previous study of adjuvant

  18. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  19. Optimisation of cancer therapy : glucose antimetabolites as adjuvants in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Inhibiting the repair of radiation damage in the neoplastic cells and thus differentially increasing radiation damage can be one of the ways to improve efficiency of radiotherapy of cancer. The glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) which is known to inhibit glycolysis and ATP production in different cell systems, has been studied as to its effects on energy supply and repair of radiation damage in wild type yeast cells which are analogous to normal cells, and in respirator-deficient (RD) mutants which are analogous to hypoxic tumour cells. Results indicate that : (1) 2-DG/glucose in molar cencentration ratio of 1 completely inhibits the repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in RD mutants, (2) 2-DG enhances repair of sublethal radiation damage in wild-type yeast cells, (3) 2-DG induces a sharp fall in ATP level in RD-mutants as compared to that in wild type cells, (4) 2-DG inhibits repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, (5) 2-DG induces greater cell loss from the hypoxic as well as euoxic tumour cell population of sarcoma tumour-180 in mice, and (6) 2-DG increases the survival of normal mice when given whole-body gamma irradiaition. These results, therefore, show that 2-DG may differentially inhibit the repair process in tumours while enhancing repair in normal tissues. (M.G.B.)

  20. Testicular cancer: seminoma. Stage I. Adjuvant radiotherapy. Results at 3 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Ticera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate the results achieved with adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and methods: We analyzed 40 medical records of patients diagnosed with stage I of testicular cancer, all of them received adjuvant radiotherapy between April 1992 and May 2004. The histological type was classical seminoma (95%) and spermatocytes (5%). Diagnosis and staging were performed with testicular ultrasound, determination of tumor markers, computed tomography of abdomen - pelvis and chest radiographs. Radiotherapy: Patients were treated with 60 Co unit and a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Volumes: Group I: lumboaortic lymph node region and ipsilateral pelvis. Group II: lumboaortic only. Daily dose: 1.8 Gy, total dose: 30.6 Gy. Patient in supine position, 2 parallel fields and opposed, DFP: 80 cm, calculated from midplane. They were followed for 3 years with chest X-ray, CAT scan of abdomen and pelvis at 12 months and then a full clinical control 1 time per year. Results: We defined the rate of ipsilateral pelvic node recurrence (group I: 0% vs. Group II: 6.25%), progression at distance (group I: 8.3% vs. Group II: 0%) and global survival (GS) (group I: 100% vs. group II: 100%) at 3 years of follow up. Conclusions: Our result is similar to that published in the international literature. Given the small number of patients, no evidence of changes in GS with the addition of radiotherapy to ipsilateral pelvic node. Radiation therapy to lumboaortic lymph nodes is the usual treatment, being necessary to optimize the modality of radiotherapy (RC3D - IRMT) to reduce toxicity in a long term. (authors) [es

  1. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients with positive axillary nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    Between January 1983 and December 1988, 218 female patients with known breast cancer and positive axillary nodes were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy following radical mastectomy. Treatment results were retrospectively analysed at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University of College of Medicine. The patients were classified into 3 groups; group 1 included 80 patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy alone; in group 2, 52 patients treated with radiotherapy alone; and in group 3, 86 patients treated with combined chemo-radiotherapy. The mean age was 44 years and ranged from 27 to 70. The median follow-up time was 51 months. Seven-year relapse free and overall survival rates were 56% and 67%; in group 1, 50% and 56%; in group 2, 51% and 65%; and in group 3, 62% and 75% respectively. This difference was not statistically significant(p<0.05). The loco-regional failure rates were 13% and distant failure rates were 33%. There was less risk of loco-regional failure in group 2 and 3 which included radiotherapy (.0<0.05). But there was no significant y difference in the rates of distant failure(p>0.05). By univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor affecting relapse-free survival was the percentage of positive axillary nodes; and the overall survival significantly correlated with the primary tumor size, the number or percentage of positive axillary nodes, and stage. But in multivariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor was treatment modality. By univariate analysis of prognostic factors affecting the rates of overall failure and distant failure, the significant prognostic factors was the percentage of positive axillary nodes; and the risk of the loco-regional failure significantly correlated with the treatment modality. In conclusion, these results suggest a potential for decreasing the risk of loco-regional failure with the addition of postoperative radiotherapy to chemotherapy in the

  2. Long-term outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of central neurocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Li, Wen-Bin; Feng, Jin; Qiu, Xiao-Guang

    2014-01-01

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy for central neurocytomas (CNs) is not clear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the clinical outcomes of treating histologically confirmed CNs with adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Sixty-three CN patients were retrospectively evaluated: 24 patients underwent gross total resection (GTR); 28, subtotal resection (STR); 9, partial resection (PR), and 2, biopsy (Bx). They underwent adjuvant RT after surgery (median dose, 54 Gy). The median follow-up was 69 months (15–129 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) were 94.4% and 95% after GTR + RT, 96.4% and 100% after STR + RT, and 100% and 90.9% after PR + RT. Only three patients had tumor recurrence: at the primary site at 30 and 24 months in two GTR + PR patients, and dissemination to the spinal cord at 75 months in one STR + RT patient. Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients experienced late neurotoxicity (28, grade 1; 7, grade 2; 3, grade 3). Short-term memory impairment was the most common toxicity. RT after incomplete resection (IR) led to OS and PFS comparable to those for GTR. Considering the excellent outcomes and limited late toxicity, adjuvant RT maybe a good option for CN patients who undergo IR

  3. Comparison of "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" and six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Ata, Ozlem; Yılmaz, Setenay Arzu; Celik, Cetin

    2013-10-01

    To compare "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy with respect to tolerability and acute toxicity. Twenty-five women with surgically staged IIIC endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of either three cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m²) and carboplatin (AUC 6) on a q21-day schedule followed by irradiation (45-50.4 Gy) or six cycles of the same chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Acute toxicity related to either chemotherapy or radiotherapy was evaluated. Median age was 61.5 years (range 36-83 years). Eleven patients had sandwich chemo-radiotherapy, and the other 14 patients had 6 cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Three out of the five patients who could not complete all the cycles in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Acute radiotherapy related grade 1-2 gastrointestinal system (GIS) and genitourinary system (GUS) toxicities were observed in 72.8 and 63.6 % of patients, respectively, for sandwich group. Undesired treatment breaks in the course of radiotherapy were observed in six patients for sandwich chemo-radiotherapy and in one patient receiving six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. All the patients who had undesired treatment breaks in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Sandwich chemo-radiotherapy seems to be more toxic particularly for patients who had pelvic and para-aortic irradiation. Therefore, it might be more convenient to delay radiotherapy after six cycles of chemotherapy for patients with the indication of pelvic para-aortic radiotherapy.

  4. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yidong; Feng Qinfu; Lu Haizhen; Mao Yousheng; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Wang Mei; Zhao Jun; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Chen Dongfu; Liang Jun; Zhai Yirui; Wang Luhua; He Jie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  5. Late cutaneous effects of a local potent steroid during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ulff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with a local potent corticosteroid during adjuvant external radiotherapy (ERT of breast cancer is associated with late skin toxicity. Material and methods: Sixty patients (32 treated with potent corticoid cream versus 28 controls treated with moisturizer who had been included in a randomized study on prophylactic local corticosteroid treatment under adjuvant ERT in 2009 and 2010 were subjected to a follow-up study in 2016.Assessments of skin texture were registered according to the Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme (RTOG. Dryness, skin colour and skin thickness were objectively measured using non-invasive instruments. The patients were assessed for differences between their treated and untreated breasts. Results: Skin atrophy was not noticed in any of the 60 patients. Objective instrumental measurements did not reveal any significant differences in skin dryness, colour, pigmentation or skin thickness over the average follow-up time of six years. Clinical assessment based on the RTOG scoring system revealed that the odds ratio of having late skin problems in patients treated with moisturizer compared to patients treated with corticosteroid was 3.2 (95% CI: 1.0–10.1.Patients reported minor cosmetic dermatological sequelae. Seven patients developed telangiectasia, which caused cosmetic inconvenience. Conclusion: In this study, prophylactic corticosteroid treatment to ameliorate radiation dermatitis during adjuvant ERT of breast cancer was not associated with an increase in late skin toxicity nor did it result in skin atrophy. This study is limited by its small sample size, and the risk for false positive findings. Keywords: Adjuvant radiotherapy, Breast cancer, Corticosteroids, Radiation dermatitis, Steroid atrophy, Telangiectasia

  6. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  7. Physical properties of charged particle beams for use in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physical properties of the possible charged particle beams used for cancer radiotherapy are reviewed. Each property is discussed for all interesting particles (π, p, α, Ne ion) and the differences are emphasized. This is followed by a short discussion of the several beam delivery systems used in particle therapy today, emphasizing the differences in the problems for the several different radiations, particularly the differences between the accelerated particle beams and those of a secondary nature. Dose calculation techniques are described

  8. Delineation of target volumes and organs at risk in adjuvant radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck Nielsen, Mette; Berg, Martin; Pedersen, Anders N

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade planning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of early breast cancer has changed from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D conformal techniques. In the planning computerised tomography (CT) scan both the targets for RT and the organs at risk (OARs) are visualised, enabling an increased focus...... on target dose coverage and homogeneity with only minimal dose to the OARs. To ensure uniform RT in the national prospective trials of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), a national consensus for the delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) and OARs was required....

  9. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field 60 Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with 99m Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs

  10. The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hamza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal time sequences for chemotherapy and radiation therapy after breast surgery for patients with breast cancer remains unknown. Most of published studies were done for early breast cancer patients. However, in Egypt advanced stages were the common presentation. This retrospective analysis aimed to assess the optimum sequence for our population. Methods 267 eligible patients planned to receive adjuvant chemotherapy [FAC] and radiotherapy. Majority of patients (87.6% underwent modified radical mastectomy while, 12.4% had conservative surgery. We divided the patients into 3 groups according to the sequence of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Sixty-seven patients (25.1% received postoperative radiotherapy before chemotherapy [group A]. One hundred and fifty patients (56.2% were treated in a sandwich scheme (group B, which means that 3 chemotherapy cycles were given prior to radiotherapy followed by 3 further chemotherapy cycles. A group of 50 patients (18.7% was treated sequentially (group C, which means that radiotherapy was supplied after finishing the last chemotherapy cycle. Patients' characteristics are balanced between different groups. Results Disease free survival was estimated at 2.5 years, and it was 83.5%, 82.3% and 80% for patient receiving radiation before chemotherapy [group A], sandwich [group B] and after finishing chemotherapy [group C] respectively (p > 0.5. Grade 2 pneumonitis, which necessitates treatment with steroid, was detected in 3.4% of our patients, while grade 2 radiation dermatitis was 17.6%. There are no clinical significant differences between different groups regarded pulmonary or skin toxicities. Conclusion Regarding disease free survival and treatment toxicities, in our study, we did not find any significant difference between the different radiotherapy and chemotherapy sequences.

  11. A systematic review of health economic evaluation in adjuvant breast radiotherapy: Quality counted by numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Chris; Veldeman, Liv; Verhaeghe, Nick; Lievens, Yolande

    2017-11-01

    Evolving practice in adjuvant breast radiotherapy inevitably impacts healthcare budgets. This is reflected in a rise of health economic evaluations (HEE) in this domain. The available HEE literature was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively, using available instruments. HEEs published between 1/1/2000 and 31/10/2016 were retrieved through a systematic search in Medline, Cochrane and Embase. A quality-assessment using CHEERS (Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards) was translated into a quantitative score and compared with Tufts Medical Centre CEA registry and Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) results. Twenty cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) and thirteen cost comparisons (CC) were analysed. In qualitative evaluation, valuation or justification of data sources, population heterogeneity and discussion on generalizability, in addition to declaration on funding, were often absent or incomplete. After quantification, the average CHEERS-scores were 74% (CI 66.9-81.1%) and 75.6% (CI 70.7-80.5%) for CEAs and CCs respectively. CEA-scores did not differ significantly from Tufts and QHES-scores. Quantitative CHEERS evaluation is feasible and yields comparable results to validated instruments. HEE in adjuvant breast radiotherapy is of acceptable quality, however, further efforts are needed to improve comprehensive reporting of all data, indispensable for assessing relevance, reliability and generalizability of results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy in gastrointestinal tumors; Adjuvante Chemo- und Strahlentherapie bei gastrointestinalen Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendler, A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Feldmann, H.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Fink, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Siewert, J.R. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1995-04-21

    In modern surgical oncology, adjuvant therapies are important complementary strategies. In local advanced carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, 5-year survival data are still disappointing despite standardized surgery. In this context, it has to be differentiated between adjuvant therapy following complete tumor exstirpation (so-called UICC R{sub 0} resection) and additive therapies following incomplete tumor resections (UICC R{sub 1} or R{sub 2} resection). Modalities in the adjuvant setting are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the combined radio-/chemotherapy. In esophageal and gastric cancer there is up to now no benefit of postoperative adjuvant therapy. In pancreatic cancer, there are studies indicating a benefit of combined radio-/chemotherapy after complete tumor resection. A standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment is proven in colon cancer stage III (Dukes C) with levamisole and 5-FU. Completely resected rectal carcinoma should be treated postoperatively with combined radio-/chemotherapy. In the common clinical or practical setting, adjuvant therapy is indicated only in locally advanced gastrointestinal tumors following R{sub 0} resection. Postoperative therapy following incomplete tumor resection has its reason only in a palliative intention. (orig.) [Deutsch] Adjuvante Therapiestrategien sind wichtige flankierende Massnahmen der modernen onkologischen Chirurgie, da u.a. die 5-Jahres-Ueberlebensquoten bei lokal fortgeschrittenen Tumoren des Gastrointestinaltraktes nach wie vor unbefriedingend sind. Dabei muss grundsaetzlich zwischen adjuvanten Behandlungen nach kompletter Tumorexstirpation (UICC-R{sub 0}-Resektion) und der additiven Therapie nach palliativer Resektion (UICC-R{sub 1}- oder -R{sub 2}-Resektion) unterschieden werden. Als Modalitaeten kommen Chemotherapie, Strahlentherapie und ihre Kombination in Frage. Bei Oesophagus- und Magenkarzinomen kann derzeit keine gueltige Empfehlung zur adjuvanten Therapie gegeben werden. Die Radio

  13. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors in resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer: implication for adjuvant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Ryool; Eom, Keun Yong; Kim, In Ah; Cho, Jai Young; Yoon, Yoo Seok; Hwang, Dae Wook; Han, Ho Seong; Kim, Jae Sung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To find the applicability of adjuvant radiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EBDC), we analyzed the pattern of failure and evaluate prognostic factors of locoregional failure after curative resection without adjuvant treatment. In 97 patients with resected EBDC, the location of tumor was classified as proximal (n = 26) and distal (n = 71), using the junction of the cystic duct and common hepatic duct as the dividing point. Locoregional failure sites were categorized as follows: the hepatoduodenal ligament and tumor bed, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery, and other sites. The median follow-up time was 29 months for surviving patients. Three-year locoregional progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 50%, 42%, and 52%, respectively. Regarding initial failures, 79% and 81% were locoregional failures in proximal and distal EBDC patients, respectively. The most common site was the hepatoduodenal ligament and tumor bed. In the multivariate analysis, perineural invasion was associated with poor locoregional progression-free survival (p = 0.023) and progression-free survival (p = 0.012); and elevated postoperative CA19-9 (> or =37 U/mL) did with poor locoregional progression-free survival (p = 0.002), progression-free survival (p < 0.001) and overall survival (p < 0.001). Both proximal and distal EBDC showed remarkable proportion of locoregional failure. Perineural invasion and elevated postoperative CA19-9 were risk factors of locoregional failure. In these patients with high risk of locoregional failure, adjuvant radiotherapy could be considered to improve locoregional control.

  14. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stages II and III Resected Thymoma: A Single-institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinchun; Liu, Qin; Moseley, Jessica N; Baik, Christina S; Chow, Laura Q M; Goulart, Bernardo H M; Zlotnick, David; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antoni; Gallaher, Ian; Knopp, Joy M; Zeng, Jing; Patel, Shilpen

    2016-06-01

    The role of adjuvant radiation for Masaoka stages II and III thymoma remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefit of radiation therapy for resected stages II and III thymoma patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 175 thymoma patients treated from July 1996 to January 2013 at University of Washington Medical Center; 88 patients with adequate follow-up and who met histologic criteria were included. We evaluated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and compared these outcomes in patients treated by surgery (S) alone versus surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT). Cox regression models and log-rank tests were used to compare PFS and OS for S versus S+RT, and they were further assessed by margin-positive versus margin-negative subgroups using Kaplan-Meier curves. Among the 88 thymoma patients, 22 were stage II and 18 were stage III. For all stages II and III patients, adjuvant radiation was not identified as a significant predictor for PFS (P=0.95) or OS (P=0.63). A positive surgical margin predicted for a worse OS (hazard ratio=7.1; P=0.004). Further investigation revealed for resection margin-positive patients; S+RT had higher OS than S alone (P=0.006). For stages II and III thymoma, postoperative adjuvant radiation was not associated with statistically significant differences in PFS or OS in this study. Our results indicated a potential OS benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with positive resection margins, and therefore may be considered in this patient population.

  15. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stages II and III Resected Thymoma: a Single Institution Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinchun; Liu, Qin; Moseley, Jessica N.; Baik, Christina S.; Chow, Laura Q. M.; Goulart, Bernardo H. M.; Zlotnick, David; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antoni; Gallaher, Ian; Knopp, Joy M.; Zeng, Jing; Patel, Shilpen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Role of adjuvant radiation for Masaoka stage II and III thymoma remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of radiation therapy for resected stages II and III thymoma. Methods and Materials We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 175 thymoma patients treated from July 1996 to January 2013 at University of Washington Medical Center; 88 patients with adequate follow-up and who met histologic criteria were included. We evaluated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and compared these outcomes in patients treated by surgery (S) alone versus surgery plus radiotherapy (S + RT). Cox regression models and log-rank tests were used to compare PFS and OS for S versus S + RT, and they were further assessed by margin-positive versus margin-negative subgroups using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results Among the 88 thymoma patients, 22 were stage II and 18 were stage III. For all stages II and III patients, adjuvant radiation was not identified as a significant predictor for PFS (P = 0.95) or OS (P = 0.63). A positive surgical margin predicted for a worse OS (hazard ratio = 7.1; P = 0.004). Further investigation revealed for resection margin-positive patients; S + RT had higher OS than S alone (P = 0.006). Conclusions For stages II and III thymoma, postoperative adjuvant radiation was not associated with statistically significant differences in PFS or OS in this study. Our results indicated a potential OS benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with positive resection margins, and therefore may be considered in this patient population. PMID:24517958

  16. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  17. Treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma with high-dose external beam supervoltage radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brufman, G.; Weshler, Z.; Prosnitz, L.R.; Fuks, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1978, 87 patients with locally advanced Tsub(3-4)Nsub(0-3)M 0 carcinoma of the breast were treated with 5,000 to 8,000 rad of external beam supervoltage radiotherapy. Initial clinical eradication of the tumour was observed in 76 of 87 cases (87%), but the actuarial probability of local control at 5 yr was only 53%. Furthermore, the actuarial probability of disease-free survival was 25% at 5 yr and 13% at 10 yr. Most of the patients eventually succumbed to metastatic breast carcinoma and the actuarial survival at 5 yr was 43% and at 10 yr, 16%. The addition of adjuvant low-dose chemotherapy, given to 13 patients, did not affect the rates of local control, survival or disease-free survival. The most common long-term complication was extensive and deforming radiation-induced fibrosis of the treated breast. The actuarial probability of 10-yr survival without a local recurrence and without severe fibrosis of the treated breast was only 17.5%. The role of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma and the possible use of improved radiotherapy techniques to achieve a more effective long-term local control and a more desirable cosmetic end result are discussed. (author)

  18. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Gelson P. dos, E-mail: gpsantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540 Recife (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of {sup 60}Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A homemade ionization chamber was studied for routine use in radiotherapy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several characterization tests were performed and the results were satisfactory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber was compared to commercial ones and the results were similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber is suitable for calibration procedures in {sup 60}Co beams.

  19. Bilateral Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment during External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Hidaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of nontraumatic bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD during external beam radiotherapy for nonocular tumor, presented as an observational case study in conjunction with a review of the relevant literature. A 65-year-old male was referred to our hospital due to bilateral RRD. He underwent a biopsy for a tumor of the left frontal lobe 4 months prior to presentation, and the tumor had been diagnosed as primary central nerve system B-cell type lymphoma. He received chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy for 1 month. There were no traumatic episodes. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred during a series of radiotherapies. Simultaneous nontraumatic bilateral retinal detachment is rare. The effects of radiotherapy on ocular functionality, particularly in cases involving retinal adhesion and vitreous contraction, may include RRD. Thus, it is necessary to closely monitor the eyes of patients undergoing radiotherapy, particularly those undergoing surgery for retinal detachment and those with a history of photocoagulation for retinal tears, a relevant family history, or risk factors known to be associated with RRD.

  20. Nodal basin recurrence following lymph node dissection for melanoma: implications for adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R J; Gibbs, J F; Proulx, G M; Kollmorgen, D R; Jia, C; Kraybill, W G

    2000-01-15

    To analyze patterns of failure in malignant melanoma patients with lymph node involvement who underwent complete lymph node dissection (LND) of the nodal basin. To determine prognostic factors predictive of local recurrence in the lymph node basin in order to select patients who may benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of 338 patients undergoing complete LND for melanoma between 1970 and 1996 who had pathologically involved lymph nodes was performed. Mean follow-up from the time of LND was 54 months (range: 12-306 months). Lymph node basins dissected included the neck (56 patients), axilla (160 patients), and groin (122 patients). Two hundred fifty-three patients (75%) underwent therapeutic LND for clinically involved nodes, while 85 patients (25%) had elective dissections. Forty-four percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy. No patients received adjuvant radiotherapy to the lymph node basin. Overall and disease-specific survival for all patients at 10 years was 30% and 36%, respectively. Overall nodal basin recurrence was 30% at 10 years. Mean time to nodal basin recurrence was 12 months (range: 2-78 months). Site of nodal involvement was prognostic with 43%, 28%, and 23% nodal basin recurrence at 10 years with cervical, axillary, and inguinal involvement, respectively (p = 0.008). Extracapsular extension (ECE) led to a 10-year nodal basin failure rate of 63% vs. 23% without ECE (p basin at 10 years, compared to 16% for patients found to have involved nodes after elective dissection (p = 0.002). Lymph nodes larger than 6 cm led to a failure rate of 80% compared to 42% for nodes 3-6 cm and 24% for nodes less than 3 cm (p basin failure with 25%, 46%, and 63% failure rates at 10 years for 1-3, 4-10, and > 10 nodes involved (p = 0.0001). There was no significant difference in nodal basin control in patients with synchronous or metachronous lymph node metastases, nor in patients receiving or not receiving adjuvant systemic therapy

  1. Expanded risk groups help determine which prostate radiotherapy sub-group may benefit from adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether an expanded (five level risk stratification system can be used to identify the sub-group of intermediate risk patients with prostate cancer who benefit from combining androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and methods Using a previously validated 5-risk group schema, a prospective non-randomized data set of 1423 men treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency was assessed for the primary end point of biochemical control (bNED with the RTOG-ASTRO "Phoenix" definition (lowest PSA to date + 2 ng/mL, both with and without adjuvant ADT. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results There was no bNED benefit for ADT in the low or low intermediate groups but there was a statistically significant bNED benefit in the high intermediate, high and extreme risk groups. The 5-year bNED rates with and without ADT were 70% and 73% respectively for the low intermediate group (p = non-significant and 72% and 58% respectively for the high intermediate group (p = 0.002. Conclusion There appears to be no advantage to ADT where the Gleason score is 6 or less and PSA is 15 or less. ADT is beneficial in patients treated to standard dose radiation with Gleason 6 disease and a PSA greater than 15 or where the Gleason score is 7 or higher.

  2. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit; Siu, Lillian; Knox, Jennifer J.; Wong, Rebecca; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Moore, Malcolm; Ringash, Jolie

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study

  3. Target volume for adjuvant radiotherapy after prostatectomy; Volume cible de la radiotherapie adjuvante apres prostatectomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2007-11-15

    Although radical prostatectomy is an effective treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer, it fails in up to 20 to 40% of the cases. Local failure represents one of the possible patterns of relapse and is announced by detectable serum P.S.A. levels. Patients at high risk for local relapse have extra prostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration at pathology. Three recently published phase III randomized clinical trials have clearly shown that, for these patients, immediate adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of progression. For patients undergoing postoperative irradiation the standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation is required because no general consensus exists on prostate bed definition. The Genito-Urinary Working Party of the Radiation Oncology Group of the European Organization for the Research and treatment of cancer (R.O.G. O.R.T.C.) has developed a set of Guidelines to assist radiotherapists in the contouring of target volumes for postoperative irradiation: a consensus has been reached on a set of recommendations that are proposed to the radiation oncologist community. Emphasis has been put on the optimal cooperation between the surgeon, the pathologist and the radiotherapist in the frame of a multidisciplinary approach. Data on the presence and on the localization of extra prostatic extension and on positive surgical margins must be used. Placement of metallic clips in the tumor bed is of great help in localizing fixed anatomical sites as the anastomosis. The goal of such a document is to reduce inter-observer variability in target delineation in the framework of future clinical trials. (author)

  4. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouesse, Jacques; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m 2 mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy ± 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m 2 epirubicin, and 500 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed

  5. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent W.C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili [Cancer Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Lin Zhixiong, E-mail: zxlin5@yahoo.com [Cancer Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  6. Adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with endometrial cancers; Place de la radiotherapie dans la prise en charge postoperatoire des patientes atteintes de cancer de l'endometre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, R.; Monnier, L.; Belaid, A.; Berges, O.; Haie-Meder, C. [Service de curietherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Morice, P. [Service de chirurgie gynecologique, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Pautier, P. [Service d' oncologie medicale, Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of patients with endometrial cancer has been extensively modified in recent years. Several randomized studies have redefined the indications for adjuvant therapy in tumours staged 1. In the absence of poor prognostic factors, the management tends to be less aggressive than before, often limited to vaginal brachytherapy. Conversely, for more advanced lesions, for which prognosis is poor, combinations of chemo-radiation are currently being evaluated. This literature review aims to provide an update on recent developments in the management of adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial carcinoma. (authors)

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy for mesothelioma. Prospective analysis of a multi-institutional series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoli, Sandro; Vitali, Paola; Scotti, Vieri; Bertoni, Filippo; Spiazzi, Luigi; Ghedi, Barbara; Buonamici, Fabrizio Banci; Marrazzo, Livia; Guidi, Gabriele; Meattini, Icro; Bastiani, Paolo; Amichetti, Maurizio; Schwarz, Marco; Magrini, Stefano Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate survival, locoregional control and toxicity in a series of 56 mesothelioma patients treated from May 2005 to May 2010 with post-operative radiotherapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) in three Italian Institutions (Brescia, Florence, and Modena). Material and methods: Fifty-six patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after EPP were analyzed. Four patients were treated with 3DCRT, 50 with IMRT and two with helical tomotherapy. Forty-five to 50 Gy in 25 fractions were given to the affected hemithorax and to ipsilateral mediastinum, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the sites of microscopically involved margins up to 60 Gy in 20/56 cases. Results: Three year locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis free (DMF), disease free (DF), disease specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates are 90%, 66%, 57%, 62%, and 60%, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative RT with modern techniques is an effective method to obtain excellent local control and cure rates in mesothelioma patients submitted to EPP.

  8. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-01-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods

  9. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanuma, A. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  10. Adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy in the "sandwich" method for high risk endometrial cancer--a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaolan

    2015-06-24

    Endometrial cancer is a common female malignancy. Patients with high-risk endometrial cancer have relatively high incidence of metastasis and recurrence. Despite complete resection, patients with stage III or IV are at high risk of local or distant recurrence. Systemic adjuvant treatment includes chemotherapy and radiotherapy. But the optimal scheduling is not known. Recently proposed sequential chemo-radiotherapy as sandwich therapy for high risk endometrial cancer have yielded encouraging results. This article is to review the adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy in the "sandwich" method for high risk endometrial cancer to help clinicians identify the most effective adjuvant treatment for patients with high risks of it. We used MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and CBM databases to search the literature. A systematic review was made. And most data showed "sandwich" therapy is feasible, efficacious, well-tolerated and resulted in excellent long-term progression free and overall survival in the setting of advanced endometrial cancer. Randomized trials are necessary to compare chemo-radio therapy given in the "sandwich" fashion to other means of sequencing these treatment modalities. It is also necessary to define which population is best suited for "sandwich" adjuvant therapy.

  11. Olfactory neural tumours - the role of external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slevin, N.J.; Irwin, C.J.R.; Banerjee, S.S.; Path, F.R.C.; Gupta, N.K.; Farrington, W.T. [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon tumour arising in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. We report the management of nine cases treated with external beam radiotherapy subsequent to surgery, either attempted definitive removal or biopsy only. Recent refinements in pathological evaluation of these tumours are discussed. Seven cases were deemed classical olfactory neuroblastoma whilst two were classified as neuroendocrine carcinoma. The clinical features, radiotherapy technique and variable natural history are presented. Seven of eight patients treated radically were controlled locally, with a minimum follow-up of two years. Three patients developed cervical lymph node disease and three patients died of systemic metastatic disease. Suggestions are made as to which patients should have en-bloc resection rather than definitive radiotherapy. (author).

  12. The influence of adjuvant radiotherapy on patterns of failure and survivals in uterine carcinosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Jin; Kim, Hak Jae; Wu, Hong Gyun; Kim, Hans; Ha, Sung Whan; Kang, Soon Beom; Song, Yong Sang; Park, Noh Hyun; Kim, Jae Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on patterns of failure and survivals in uterine carcinosarcoma patients treated with radical surgery. Between October 1998 and August 2010, 19 patients with stage I?III uterine carcinosarcoma received curative hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without PORT at Seoul National University Hospital. Their hospital medical records were retrospectively reviewed. PORT and non-PORT groups included 11 and 8 patients, respectively. They were followed for a mean of 22.7 months (range, 7.8 to 126.6 months). At 5 years, the overall survival rates were 51.9% for entire, 61.4% for PORT, and 41.7% for non-PORT groups, respectively. There was no statistical difference between PORT and non-PORT groups with regard to overall survival (p = 0.682). Seven out of 19 (36.8%) patients showed treatment failures, which all happened within 12 months. Although the predominant failures were distant metastasis in PORT group and loco-regional recurrence in non-PORT group, there was no statistically significant difference in loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) (p = 0.362) or distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.548). Lymph node metastasis was found to be a significant prognostic factor in predicting poor LRRFS (p = 0.013) and DMFS (p = 0.021), while the International Federation Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p = 0.043) was associated with LRRFS. Considering that adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection was effective to decrease loco-regional recurrence and most treatment failures were distant metastasis, multimodal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy might be an optimal treatment for uterine carcinosarcoma patients.

  13. Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Yang Haihua; Shao Minghai; Wang Biyun; Wang Jianhua; Wu Sufang; Wu Shixiu; Jin Lihui; Ma, Charlie C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and materials: Between 2004 and 2007, 54 patients with locally advanced NPC were included in this protocol. Patient characteristics: median age 48; 69% male; 52% World Health Organization (WHO) III; 50% stage III, 50% stage IV. The patients underwent a course of definitive conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks with 2 Gy/fraction), with concurrent weekly paclitaxel 35 mg/m 2 from the first to the sixth week of radiation. AC was started 4 weeks after the end of the radiotherapy (RT), paclitaxel 135 mg/m 2 on day 1 and cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 on days 1-3 were administered every 4 weeks for two cycles. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months. Eighty-five percentage of complete response and 15% partial response were achieved at the time of one month after AC. The 3-year actuarial rate of local regional control was 86%; distant metastases-free survival, progression-free survival and overall survival at 3 years were 81%, 69% and 76%, respectively. Forty-nine (91%) patients completed six courses of concurrent chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel, and 4 (7%) patients delayed at the second cycle of AC. No patient developed severe acute toxicities. Conclusions: Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent RT followed by AC is a potentially effective and toxicity tolerable method for locally advanced NPC. Further studies are needed to identify the optimal dose of weekly paclitaxel in this strategy.

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy after surgery for uterine carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaal, Khadra; van der Heijden, Esther; Godfrey, Keith; Naik, Raj; Kucukmetin, Ali; Bryant, Andrew; Das, Nagindra; Lopes, Alberto D

    2013-02-28

    Uterine carcinosarcomas are uncommon with about 35% not confined to the uterus at diagnosis. The survival of women with advanced uterine carcinosarcoma is poor with a pattern of failure indicating greater likelihood of upper abdominal and distant metastatic recurrence. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant radiotherapy and/or systemic chemotherapy in the management of uterine carcinosarcoma. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2012, Issue 10, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to November 2012. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in women with uterine carcinosarcoma. Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) and risk ratios (RRs) comparing adverse events in women who received radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy were pooled in random-effects meta-analyses. Three trials met the inclusion criteria and these randomised 579 women, of whom all were assessed at the end of the trials. Two trials assessing 373 participants with stage III to IV persistent or recurrent disease, found that women who received combination therapy had a significantly lower risk of death and disease progression than women who received single agent ifosfamide, after adjustment for performance status (HR = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60 to 0.94 and HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58 to 0.90 for OS and PFS respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in all reported adverse events, with the exception of nausea and vomiting, where significantly more women experienced these ailments in the combination therapy group than the Ifosamide group (RR = 3.53, 95% CI: 1.33 to 9.37).In one

  15. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deshpande, Vikram [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Warshaw, Andrew L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: Tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  16. [External beam radiotherapy cone beam-computed tomography-based dose calculation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, A; Céleste, M; Lafond, C; Henry, O; Couespel, S; Simon, A; Acosta, O; de Crevoisier, R; Périchon, N

    2018-02-01

    In external beam radiotherapy, the dose planning is currently based on computed tomography (CT) images. A relation between Hounsfield numbers and electron densities (or mass densities) is necessary for dose calculation taking heterogeneities into account. In image-guided radiotherapy process, the cone beam CT is classically used for tissue visualization and registration. Cone beam CT for dose calculation is also attractive in dose reporting/monitoring perspectives and particularly in a context of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The accuracy of cone beam CT-based dose calculation is limited by image characteristics such as quality, Hounsfield numbers consistency and restrictive sizes of volume acquisition. The analysis of the literature identifies three kinds of strategies for cone beam CT-based dose calculation: establishment of Hounsfield numbers versus densities curves, density override to regions of interest, and deformable registration between CT and cone beam CT images. Literature results show that discrepancies between the reference CT-based dose calculation and the cone beam CT-based dose calculation are often lower than 3%, regardless of the method. However, they can also reach 10% with unsuitable method. Even if the accuracy of the cone beam CT-based dose calculation is independent of the method, some strategies are promising but need improvements in the automating process for a routine implementation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Locoregional failure of postmastectomy patients with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes without adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jason C.-H.; Chen, C.-M.; Liu, M.-C.; Tsou, M.-H.; Yang, P.-S.; Jian, J. J.-M.; Cheng, S.H.; Tsai, S.Y.; Leu, S.-Y.; Huang, A.T.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and risk factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with breast cancer who had T1 or T2 primary tumor and 1-3 histologically involved axillary lymph nodes treated with modified radical mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 1998, 125 patients with invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy and were found to have 1-3 positive axillary nodes. The median number of nodes examined was 17 (range 7-33). Of the 125 patients, 110, who had no adjuvant RT and had a minimum follow-up of 25 months, were included in this study. Sixty-nine patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 84 received adjuvant hormonal therapy with tamoxifen. Patient-related characteristics (age, menopausal status, medial/lateral quadrant of tumor location, T stage, tumor size, estrogen/progesterone receptor protein status, nuclear grade, extracapsular extension, lymphovascular invasion, and number of involved axillary nodes) and treatment-related factors (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) were analyzed for their impact on LRR. The median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Of 110 patients without RT, 17 had LRR during follow-up. The 4-year LRR rate was 16.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.1-23.1%). All but one LRR were isolated LRR without preceding or simultaneous distant metastasis. According to univariate analysis, age <40 years (p=0.006), T2 classification (p=0.04), tumor size ≥3 cm (p=0.002), negative estrogen receptor protein status (p=0.02), presence of lymphovascular invasion (p=0.02), and no tamoxifen therapy (p=0.0006) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Tumor size (p=0.006) was the only risk factor for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. On the basis of the 4 patient-related factors (age <40 years, tumor ≥3 cm, negative estrogen receptor protein, and lymphovascular invasion), the high-risk group (with 3 or 4

  18. Human papilloma virus and survival of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglie, Martina A; Soltermann, Alex; Haile, Sarah R; Huber, Gerhard F; Stoeckli, Sandro J

    2015-07-01

    Impact of p16 protein, a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus induced cancer, p53 and EGFR as well as clinical factors on survival in a patient cohort with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated by surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) ± concomitant chemotherapy (CT). This is a retrospective analysis of patient's charts and tumor tissue. 57 patients were consecutively included and their tumor tissue assembled on a tissue microarray following immunohistochemical analysis. Survival times were estimated by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis. The importance of clinical and immunohistochemical factors for outcome was estimated by cox proportional hazard models. With 88% 5-year overall survival, 91% 5-year disease-specific survival and 91% 5-year disease-free survival, respectively, we found excellent survival rates in this surgically treated patient cohort of mainly advanced OPSCC (93% AJCC stage III or IV). The only factors positively influencing survival were p16 overexpression as well as p53 negativity and even more pronounced the combination of those biomarkers. Survival analysis of patients classified into three risk categories according to an algorithm based on p16, smoking, T- and N-category revealed a low, intermediate and high-risk group with significant survival differences between the low and the high-risk group. Patients with OPSCC can be successfully treated by surgery and adjuvant RT ± CT with a clear survival benefit of p16 positive, p53 negative patients. We recommend considering a combination of immunohistochemical (p16, p53) and clinical factors (smoking, T- and N-category) for risk stratification.

  19. Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon H.; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Guenther

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay ≤20 weeks was found. The adjusted hazard ratio for RT within 77 days vs. after 77 days was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.87) for the interval to local recurrence, 1.05 (95% CI, 0.82-1.34) for disease-free survival, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.77-1.49) for overall survival. For the interval to local recurrence the adjusted hazard ratio for ≤48, 49-77, and 78-112 days was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.34-2.37), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.33-2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33-2.41), respectively, relative to ≥113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of ≤20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  20. The impact of patient compliance with adjuvant radiotherapy: a comprehensive cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Gruen, Arne; Sehouli, Jalid; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) is the standard of care for early stage breast cancer. It reduces the risk for local recurrence and prolongs survival. We assessed whether, the omission of RT because of patient's preference may influence the prognosis and, thus, the quality of cancer care. Detailed information from a prospectively collected database of a breast cancer center was analyzed. Multiple regression analysis and univariate and multivariate analysis for risk factors for recurrence were performed. The entire cohort of primary breast cancer patients in a given time period was analyzed. Data from 1903 patients undergoing treatment at breast cancer center between 2003 and 2008 were used. All patient underwent breast conserving surgery and RT was performed for all patients of the cohort. Local tumor control and disease-free survival were calculated. After a median follow-up of 2.18 years (maximum 6.39 years), 5.5% of patients did not follow guideline-based recommendations for RT. There was a significant correlation between noncompliance and patient's age, adjuvant hormonal therapy (97.0%), and adjuvant chemotherapy (96.8%). Seventy local recurrences occurred that corresponds to a local recurrence rate of 3.9%. The difference in regard to local recurrence-free 5-year survival between the compliant patients and the noncompliant patients is absolute 17.9 (93.3% and 75.4%). Noncompliant patients had suffered a 5.02-fold increased risk of local recurrence than compliant patients. The omission of RT after breast-conserving surgery results in a higher local failure rate and significantly worsens clinical outcome. Age may play an important role because of the comorbidities of aged patients or the assumed low RT tolerance in this group. On a clinical level, this data suggests that improvement is needed to correct this situation, and the question remains as to how best to improve RT compliance

  1. Organ function and quality of life after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olthoff, Arno; Hess, Clemens F. [Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Ewen, Andreas; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Roedel, Ralph; Steiner, Wolfgang [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Cancerology, CHU Morvan, Brest (France)

    2009-05-15

    Background and purpose: transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) and adjuvant radiotherapy are an established therapy regimen for locally advanced laryngeal cancer at our institution. Aim of the present study was to assess value of quality of life (QoL) data with special regard to organ function under consideration of treatment efficacy in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer treated with larynx-preserving TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and methods: from 1994 to 2006, 39 patients (ten UICC stage III, 29 UICC stage IVA/B) with locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas were treated with TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy. Data concerning treatment efficacy, QoL (using the VHI [Voice Handicap Index], the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires) and organ function (respiration, deglutition, voice quality) were obtained for ten patients still alive after long-term follow-up. Correlations were determined using the Spearman rank test. Results: after a median follow-up of 80.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 46.8% and the locoregional control rate 76.5%, respectively. The larynx preservation rate was 89.7% for all patients and 100% for patients still alive after follow-up. Despite some verifiable problems in respiration, speech and swallowing, patients showed a subjectively good QoL. Conclusion: TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer and an alternative to radical surgery. Even if functional deficits are unavoidable in the treatment of locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas, larynx preservation is associated with a subjectively good QoL. (orig.)

  2. Debate: adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy or not? More data is the wiser choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, Gerald B.; Hong, Angela; Gondi, Vinai; Burmeister, Bryan; Jacobsen, Kari; Lo, Serigne; Paton, Elizabeth; Shivalingam, Brindha; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Every year 170,000 patients are diagnosed with brain metastases (BMs) in the United States. Traditionally, adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (AWBRT) has been offered following local therapy with neurosurgery (NSx) and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to BMs. The aim is to increase intracranial control, thereby decreasing symptoms from intracranial progression and a neurological death. There is a rapidly evolving change in the radiation treatment of BMs happening around the world. AWBRT is now being passed over in favour of repeat scanning at regular intervals and more local therapies as more BMs appear radiologically, BMs that may never become symptomatic. This change has happened after the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in Item 5 of its “Choosing Wisely 2014” list recommended: “Don't routinely add adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy to SRS for limited brain metastases”. The guidelines are supposed to be based on the highest evidence to hand at the time. This article debates that the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published prior to this recommendation consistently showed AWBRT significantly increases intracranial control, and avoids a neurological death, what it is meant to do. It also points out that, despite the enormity of the problem, only 774 patients in total had been randomised over more than three decades. These trials were heterogeneous in many respects. This data can, at best, be regarded as preliminary. In particular, there are no single histology AWBRT trials yet completed. A phase two trial investigating hippocampal avoiding AWBRT (HAWBRT) showed significantly less NCF decline compared to historical controls. We now need more randomised data to confirm the benefit of adjuvant HAWBRT. However, the ASTRO Guideline has particularly impacted accrual to trials investigating this, especially the international ANZMTG 01.07 WBRTMel trial. This is an RCT investigating AWBRT following local treatment in patients with one

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and unacceptable late toxicity in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzari G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Lazzari,1 Maria Iole Natalicchio,2 Angela Terlizzi,3 Francesco Perri,4 Giovanni Silvano1 1Radiation Oncology Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Taranto, 2Molecular Biology Laboratory, Pathological Anatomy Department, Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia, 3Medical Physic Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, 4Medical Oncology Unit, Presidio Ospedaliero Centrale - Santissima Annunziata, Taranto, Italy Background: There has recently been a strong interest in the inter-individual variation in normal tissue and tumor response to radiotherapy (RT, because tissue radiosensitivity seems to be under genetic control. Evidence is accumulating on the role of polymorphic genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could influence normal tissue response after radiation. The most studied SNPs include those in genes involved in DNA repair (single- and double-strand breaks, and base excision and those active in the response to oxidative stress.Case report: We present the case report of a 60-year-old woman with early breast cancer who underwent adjuvant hormone therapy and conventional radiotherapy, and subsequently developed unacceptable cosmetic toxicities of the irradiated breast requiring a genetic test of genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. The patient was found to be heterozygous for G28152A (T/C and C18067T (A/G mutations in X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 and 3 (XRCC3, respectively, homozygous for A313G (G/G mutation in glutathione S transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1, and wild-type for A4541G (A/A in XRCC3 and G135C (G/G in RAD51 recombinase.Conclusion: The role of SNPs should be taken into account when a severe phenomenon appears in normal tissues after radiation treatment, because understanding the molecular basis of individual radiosensitivity may be useful for identifying moderately or extremely radiosensitive patients who may need tailored therapeutic strategies. Keywords: radiosensitivity, SNPs, fibrosis, DNA repair

  4. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  5. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  6. A case of delayed anastomotic fistula occurred nine years after adjuvant radiotherapy following rectal cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Fukao, Takashi; Kuriyama, Shiho; Ohtawa, Yasuyuki; Waku Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man who underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2007 (RbRa, pT4a, pN1, cM0, pStage 3a). With the surgically stripped surface testing positive, the pelvic cavity was subjected to 50 Gy of radiation as part of adjuvant radiotherapy. In December 2015, the patient presented with anal pain and bloody stool.A CT scan revealed a pelvic abscess accompanied by gas patterns around the anastomotic site, and a colonoscopy detected formation of a fistula at the anastomotic site. Although CT-guided drainage was performed in response, a new abscess was formed promptly. In April 2016, laparoscopic colostomy with double orifices was performed on the transverse colon. Thereafter the abscesses in the buttocks required four sessions of incision and drainage. The condition improved with no purulent discharge after December 2016. As of 11 months after the colostomy, the pelvic abscess is gradually contracting, though some fistulas have remained. The patient has been followed up on an ambulatory basis.This case is considered to be of an intrapelvic abscess associated with the delayed anastomotic fistula occurred after a lapse of 9 years following irradiation. (author)

  7. Timing of surgery and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in ewing sarcoma of the chest wall: a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbo, Jason W; Shannon Orr, W; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Billups, Catherine A; Navid, Fariba; Rao, Bhaskar N; Davidoff, Andrew M; Krasin, Matthew J

    2012-11-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the most common chest wall malignancy in adolescents. Current therapy incorporates chemotherapy to treat systemic disease and radiotherapy to assist with local control. We sought to evaluate the timing of surgery and role of adjuvant radiotherapy. We reviewed the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital chest wall ES experience from 1979 to 2009. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment variables, and outcomes were analyzed with respect to timing of surgery and use of adjuvant radiotherapy. Our cohort consisted of 36 patients with chest wall ES; median follow-up was 14.2 years, and 15-year estimate of overall survival was 66 %. In patients with localized disease, the timing of surgery (up-front vs. delayed) did not impact margin negativity or the use of adjuvant radiotherapy, but it did decrease the extent of chest wall resection. When considering radiotherapy in patients with localized disease, we found that patients who did not receive radiotherapy had smaller tumor size (median 6 vs. 10 cm) (p = 0.04) and were more likely to have had negative margins (p = 0.01) than patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy. One patient in each group developed a locoregional recurrence. The 15-year estimated of overall survival for patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy was 80 versus 100 % for those who did not. Delayed surgery decreased the extent of chest wall resection and helped define a patient population with favorable tumor biology. Patients with complete pathologic responses to chemotherapy, and those with tumors <8 cm and negative surgical margins may be spared adjuvant radiotherapy without any decrement in overall survival.

  8. Survival benefit of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant radiotherapy in lymph node positive esophageal cancer: a population based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumallapally, Nishitha; Meshref, Ahmed; Mousa, Mohammed; Hendawi, Mohamed; Lan, Mei; Salem, Ahmed I; Forte, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The impact of radiotherapy on the survival of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (EC) is presently insufficiently explored. Thus, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry, this study aimed to compare the survival rates of patients with lymph node (LN) positive EC who received curative resection and were treated by neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), respectively. Retrospectively collected data from the SEER database using all 18 SEER registries on patients that underwent esophagectomy for EC was evaluated. All patients with LN positive pathology who received either neoadjuvant or adjuvant RT and curative intent esophagectomy from 2004 to 2007 were included. A comparison of 5-year relative survival outcome among groups categorized by sex, race, age, histology, and tumor size was performed. A total of 933 patients were evaluated; 636 (69%) and 297 (31%) received RT in neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting respectively. Their overall 5-year relative survival rates were 32.8% (95% CI: 28.7-36.9) and 26.5% (95% CI: 21-32.3) (P=0.058). Patients in the neoadjuvant RT group who underwent curative resection for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of EC had an improved 5-year relative survival rate of 43.4% (95% CI: 32.5-53.8) compared to 26.5% (95% CI: 15.4-38.9) measured for the adjuvant RT group (P=0.03). The results further revealed a significant increase in the 5-year relative survival rates for stage T3 and Tx when RT was given in neoadjuvant setting compared to adjuvant RT group (T3 28.5% vs. 20.2%, P=0.011; Tx 46.3% vs. 8.9%, P=0.021). When the patients were grouped according to race, sex or age, or based on the timing of radiation relative to surgery, in the other histological or T stage groups, there were no statistically significant differences in the 5-year survival rates. Compared to adjuvant radiotherapy, neoadjuvant radiotherapy results in a better 5-year relative survival in patients with squamous cell

  9. Optimization of beam orientations and beam weights for conformal radiotherapy using mixed integer programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Chuang; Dai Jianrong; Hu Yimin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2003-12-21

    An algorithm for optimizing beam orientations and beam weights for conformal radiotherapy has been developed. The algorithm models the optimization of beam orientations and beam weights as a problem of mixed integer linear programming (MILP), and optimizes the beam orientations and beam weights simultaneously. The application process of the algorithm has four steps: (a) prepare a pool of beam orientation candidates with the consideration of avoiding any patient gantry collision and avoiding direct irradiation of organs at risk with quite low tolerances (e.g., eyes). (b) Represent each beam orientation candidate with a binary variable, and each beam weight with a continuous variable. (c) Set up an optimization problem according to dose prescriptions and the maximum allowed number of beam orientations. (d) Solve the optimization problem with a ready-to-use MILP solver. After optimization, the candidates with unity binary variables remain in the final beam configuration. The performance of the algorithm was tested with clinical cases. Compared with standard treatment plans, the beam-orientation-optimized plans had better dose distributions in terms of target coverage and avoidance of critical structures. The optimization processes took less than 1 h on a PC with a Pentium IV 2.4 GHz processor.

  10. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  11. Effects of adjuvant radiotherapy on borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZENG, SHIYAN; ZHANG, XINDAN; YANG, DEJUAN; WANG, XIAOYI; REN, GUOSHENG

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment for borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors is wide local excision (margins ≥1 cm), in the context of either breast-conserving surgery (BCS) or total mastectomy (TM). Due to the high risk of local recurrence (LR) following surgical intervention alone, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) has been previously investigated; however, the conclusions have been inconsistent. This systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to assess the efficacy of adjuvant RT for borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors. Pubmed and Web of Science were systematically searched to identify relevant studies assessing the effect of adjuvant RT on borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors from the inception of this technique through May, 2014. A total of 8 studies were identified among 332 citations. In this meta-analysis, patients who received adjuvant RT had a lower relative risk of LR [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23–0.64]. The absolute risk difference was 10.1% (95% CI: 4.9–17.6), corresponding to a number needed to treat of 10. Our pooled meta-analysis clearly demonstrated a decreased risk of LR in patients with borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors who received RT following BCS (HR=0.31, 95% CI: −0.10–0.72). However, the combined HR for LR in the TM group did not demonstrate that adjuvant RT was superior to no RT (HR=0.68, 95% CI: −0.28–1.64). No significant differences were observed in overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) between the two groups. Our analysis suggested that adjuvant RT for borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors decreased the LR rate in patients undergoing BCS. However, adjuvant RT was not found to exert an effect on OS or DFS. PMID:26137284

  12. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Per J; Marijnen, Corrie AM; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wiggers, Theo; Glimelius, Bengt; Etten, Boudewijn van; Hospers, Geke AP; Påhlman, Lars; Velde, Cornelis JH van de; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beukema, Jannet C; Kapiteijn, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  13. Combination of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy is associated with improved survival at early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozen, Hamdullah; Çiftçi, Rumeysa; Vatansever, Dogan; Topuz, Samet; Iyibozkurt, Ahmet Cem; Bozbey, Hamza Ugur; Yaşa, Cenk; Çali, Halime; Yavuz, Ekrem; Kucucuk, Seden; Aydiner, Adnan; Salihoglu, Yavuz

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment modalities and identify risk factors associated with recurrence and survival rates in women diagnosed with early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma. In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with early stage (stages I-II) carcinosarcoma and type II endometrial cancer were reviewed. All women underwent comprehensive surgical staging. Postoperative treatment options of chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), observation (OBS) and chemotherapy-radiotherapy (CT-RT) combination were compared in terms of recurrence and survival outcome. In CT-RT treatment arm, recurrence rate was found as 12.5% and this result is significantly lower than the other treatment approaches (P = 0.01 CT alone: 33.3%, RT alone: 26.7%, OBS: 62.5%). Three-year disease free survival(DFS) rate and overall survival (OS) rate were statistically higher for the group of women treated with combination of CT-RT (92-95%) compared to the women treated with RT alone (65-72%), treated with CT alone (67-74%) and women who received no adjuvant therapy (38-45%). The multivariate analysis revealed that carcinosarcoma histology was associated with shortened DFS and OS (P = 0.001, P = 0.002). On the other hand, being at stage Ia (P = 0.01, P = 0.04) and receiving adjuvant treatment of CT-RT combination (P = 0.005, P = 0.002) appeared to lead to increased DFS and OS rates. We identified that a combination treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is superior compared to other postoperative adjuvant treatment approaches concerning PFS, OS and recurrence rates in stages I-II of type II endometrial cancers and uterine carcinosarcoma. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. The early toxicity of escalated versus standard dose conformal radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression for patients with localised prostate cancer: Results from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, David P.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Langley, Ruth E.; Graham, John D.; Huddart, Robert A.; Syndikus, Isabel; Matthews, John H.L.; Scrase, Christopher D.; Jose, Chakiath C.; Logue, John; Stephens, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Five-year disease-free survival rates for localised prostate cancer following standard doses of conventional radical external beam radiotherapy are around 80%. Conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) raises the possibility that radiotherapy doses can be increased and long-term efficacy outcomes improved, with safety an important consideration. Methods: MRC RT01 is a randomised controlled trial of 862 men with localised prostate cancer comparing Standard CFRT (64 Gy/32 f) versus Escalated CFRT (74 Gy/37 f), both administered with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression. Early toxicity was measured using physician-reported instruments (RTOG, LENT/SOM, Royal Marsden Scales) and patient-reported questionnaires (MOS SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, FACT-P). Results: Overall early radiotherapy toxicity was similar, apart from increased bladder, bowel and sexual toxicity, in the Escalated Group during a short immediate post-radiotherapy period. Toxicity in both groups had abated by week 12. Using RTOG Acute Toxicity scores, cumulative Grade ≥2 bladder and bowel toxicity was 38% and 30% for Standard Group and 39% and 33% in Escalated Group, respectively. Urinary frequency (Royal Marsden Scale) improved in both groups from pre-androgen suppression to 6 months post-radiotherapy (p < 0.001), but bowel and sexual functioning deteriorated. This pattern was supported by patient-completed assessments. Six months after starting radiotherapy the incidence of RTOG Grade ≥2 side-effects was low (<1%); but there were six reports of rectal ulceration (6 Escalated Group), six haematuria (5 Escalated Group) and eight urethral stricture (6 Escalated Group). Conclusions: The two CFRT schedules with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression have broadly similar early toxicity profiles except for the immediate post-RT period. At 6 months and compared to before hormone therapy, bladder symptoms improved, whereas bowel and sexual symptoms worsened. These assessments of early treatment safety will be

  15. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D., E-mail: jdschoenfeld@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  16. Radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Jung; Eom, Keun Young; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, In Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the incidences and potential predictive factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (SRP) and radiographic pulmonary toxicity (RPT) following adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer. A particular focus was made to correlate RPT with the dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters based on three-dimensional RT planning (3D-RTP) data. From September 2003 through February 2006, 171 patients with breast cancer were treated with adjuvant RT following breast surgery. A radiation dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered with tangential photon fields on the whole breast or chest wall. A single anterior oblique photon field for supraclavicular (SCL) nodes was added if indicated. Serial follow-up chest radiographs were reviewed by a chest radiologist. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria were used for grading SRP and a modified World Health Organization (WHO) grading system was used to evaluate RPT. The overall percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=} 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), and 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were calculated. We divided the ipsilateral lung into two territories, and defined separate DVH parameters, i.e., V{sub 15} {sub TNGT}, V{sub 20} {sub TNGT}, V{sub 30} {sub TNGT}, MLD {sub TNGT}, and V{sub 15} {sub SCL}, V{sub 20} {sub SCL} V {sub 30SCL}, MLD {sub SCL} to assess the relationship between these parameters and RPT. Four patients (2.1%) developed SRP (three with grade 3 and one with grade 2, respectively). There was no significant association of SRP with clinical parameters such as, age, pre-existing lung disease, smoking, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and regional RT. When 137 patients treated with 3D-RTP were evaluated, 13.9% developed RPT in the tangent (TNGT) territory and 49.2% of 59 patients with regional RT developed RPT in the SCL territory. Regional RT ({rho} < 0.001) and age ({rho} = 0.039) was significantly correlated with RPT. All DVH parameters except for V

  17. Clinical experience with routine diode dosimetry for electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy is frequently administered based on clinical setups without formal treatment planning. We felt, therefore, that it was important to monitor electron beam treatments by in vivo dosimetry to prevent errors in treatment delivery. In this study, we present our clinical experience with patient dose verification using electron diodes and quantitatively assess the dose perturbations caused by the diodes during electron beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A commercial diode dosimeter was used for the in vivo dose measurements. During patient dosimetry, the patients were set up as usual by the therapists. Before treatment, a diode was placed on the patient's skin surface and secured with hypoallergenic tape. The patient was then treated and the diode response registered and stored in the patient radiotherapy system database via our in-house software. A customized patient in vivo dosimetry report showing patient details, expected and measured dose, and percent difference was then generated and printed for analysis and record keeping. We studied the perturbation of electron beams by diodes using film dosimetry. Beam profiles at the 90% prescription isodose depths were obtained with and without the diode on the beam central axis, for 6-20 MeV electron beams and applicator/insert sizes ranging from a 3-cm diameter circular field to a 25 x 25 cm open field. Results: In vivo dose measurements on 360 patients resulted in the following ranges of deviations from the expected dose at the various anatomic sites: Breast (222 patients) -20.3 to +23.5% (median deviation 0%); Head and Neck (63 patients) -21.5 to +14.8% (median -0.7%); Other sites (75 patients) -17.6 to +18.8% (median +0.5%). Routine diode dosimetry during the first treatment on 360 patients (460 treatment sites) resulted in 11.5% of the measurements outside our acceptable ±6% dose deviation window. Only 3.7% of the total measurements were outside ±10% dose deviation. Detailed

  18. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A; Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed.

  19. Simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbottom, Carl Graham; Khoo, Vincent S.; Webb, Steve

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for the concurrent optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in conformal radiotherapy treatment planning has been developed and tested on a cohort of five patients. The algorithm is based on a beam-weight optimization scheme with a downhill simplex optimization engine. The use of random voxels in the dose calculation provides much of the required speed up in the optimization process, and allows the simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in a reasonable time. In the implementation of the beam-weight optimization algorithm just 10% of the original patient voxels are used for the dose calculation and cost function evaluation. A fast simulated annealing algorithm controls the optimization of the beam arrangement. The optimization algorithm was able to produce clinically acceptable plans for the five patients in the cohort study. The algorithm equalized the dose to the optic nerves compared to the standard plans and reduced the mean dose to the brain stem by an average of 4.4% (±1.9, 1 SD), p value=0.007. The dose distribution to the PTV was not compromised by developing beam arrangements via the optimization algorithm. In conclusion, the simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights has been developed to be routinely used in a realistic time. The results of optimization in a small cohort study show that the optimization can reliably produce clinically acceptable dose distributions and may be able to improve dose distributions compared to those from a human planner

  20. Combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy for irresectable Klatskin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, U.M. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Staatz, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Alzen, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Abt. Kinderradiologie, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Andreopoulos, D. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); BOC Oncology Centre, Nikosia (Cyprus)

    2002-12-01

    Background: In most cases of proximal cholangiocarcinoma, curative surgery is not possible. Radiotherapy can be used for palliative treatment. We report our experience with combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy of advanced Klatskin's tumors. Patients and Methods: 30 patients were treated for extrahepatic proximal bile duct cancer. Our schedule consisted for external beam radiotherapy (median dose 30 Gy) and a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost (median dose 40 Gy) delivered in four or five fractions, which could be applied completely in twelve of our patients. 15 patients in the brachytherapy and nine patients in the non-brachytherapy group received additional low-dose chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Results: The brachytherapy boost dose improved the effect of external beam radiotherapy by increasing survival from a median of 3.9 months in the non-brachytherapy group to 9.1 months in the brachytherapy group. The effect was obvious in patients receiving a brachytherapy dose above 30 Gy, and in those without jaundice at the beginning of radiotherapy (p<0.05). Conclusions: The poor prognosis in patients with advanced Klatskin's tumors may be improved by combination therapy, with the role of brachytherapy and chemotherapy still to be defined. Our results suggest that patients without jaundice should be offered brachytherapy, and that a full dose of more than 30 Gy should be applied. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei den meisten Patienten mit proximalen Cholangiokarzinomen ist eine kurative Operation nicht mehr moeglich. Im Rahmen der Palliativbehandlung kann die Strahlentherapie eingesetzt werden. Wir berichten ueber unsere Erfahrungen mit der Kombination aus perkutaner und intraluminaler Strahlentherapie fortgeschrittener Klatskin-Tumoren. Patienten und Methode: 30 Patienten wurden wegen extrahepatischer proximaler Gallengangskarzinome behandelt. Unser Therapieschema umfasste eine perkutane Strahlentherapie (mediane Dosis: 30 Gy) sowie einen

  1. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  2. Monte Carlo based simulation of LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator along with beam shaper applicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Heidarloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is one of the radiotherapy methods that delivers a high single fraction of radiation dose to the patient in one session during the surgery. Beam shaper applicator is one of the applicators that is recently employed with this radiotherapy method. This applicator has a considerable application in treatment of large tumors. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam produced by LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator in conjunction with this applicator have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation by MCNP code. The results showed that the electron beam produced by the beam shaper applicator would have the desirable dosimetric characteristics, so that the mentioned applicator can be considered for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the good agreement between the results of simulation and practical dosimetry, confirms the applicability of Monte Carlo method in determining the dosimetric parameters of electron beam  intraoperative radiotherapy

  3. Clinical results of iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Takahiro; Mizokami, Atsushi; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report the clinical results of iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy at Kanazawa University Hospital. The study population consisted of 166 patients diagnosed with T1c-T3bN0M0 prostate cancer treated with high dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy and followed up for 6 months or longer. Treatment consisted of external beam radiotherapy to the prostate at 44 Gy/22 fractions and high dose rate brachytherapy at 18 Gy/3 fractions. Median follow-up interval was 31.5 months (range 6.2-88.7). The overall 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rate was 93.0%. The 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rates for the patients in low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups according to the D'Amico risk classification criteria were 96.1%, 89.0% and 91.6%, respectively. When limited to the group that did not receive adjuvant hormonal therapy, the 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rates for the patients in low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups were 96.0%, 96.3% and 82.9%, respectively. Grade 3 or greater adverse effects were rare. Urethral stricture was observed in only 1.0% of the patients. Eighty percent of patients retained erectile function after high dose rate brachytherapy and reported satisfaction with sexual function. High dose rate brachytherapy is considered a good form of treatment for localized prostate cancer, although longer follow-up is necessary. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy for ocular lesions by electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaishi, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    Radiotherapy can be very significant as the treatment for ocular lesions, eyes need to be preserved as properly as possible on their functions and cosmetics. The appliance of conventional X ray therapy has been gradually abandaned as conventional X ray therapy ceased to be accepted as the general treatment for malignant tumors. Consequently the necessity of electron beam therapy has been rising even as the substituted method for conventional X ray therapy. The department of radiology of Gunma University was obliged to establish a new therapy for ocular lesions, and has been trying electron beam therapy since 1973; It is concluded that electron beam therapy is not at all inferior to conventional X ray therapy as reported above. Basic therapeutic methods for ocular lesions are the following: 1) For epidermoid carcinoma, 600 rads at a time, 3600 - 4200 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 2) For malignant melanoma, 1000 rads at a time, 4000 - 5000 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 3) For orbitar lymphoid neoplasm, Cobalt-60 γ ray or Linac X ray is applied together with electron beam. 4) For embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, adenoid cystic cancer etc., the therapy for whole body is necessary. 5) For benign tumors, a small dose at a time is applied for a long time. (author)

  5. The reasonable timing of the adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent: suggestion based on progression patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Bae, Duk Soo [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We designed this study to identify and suggest the reasonable timing of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent and patterns of progression. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 50 carcinosarcoma patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2010. Among these 50 patients, 32 underwent curative surgery and 13 underwent maximal tumor debulking surgery. The remaining five patients underwent biopsy only. Twenty-six patients received chemotherapy, and 15 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 17.3 months. Curative resection (p < 0.001) and stage (p < 0.001) were statistically significant factors affecting survival. During follow-up, 30 patients showed progression. Among these, eight patients (16.0%) had loco-regional progression only. The patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy did not show loco-regional progression, and radiotherapy was a significant negative risk factor for loco-regional progression (p = 0.01). The time to loco-regional progression was much earlier for non-curative than curative resection (range, 0.7 to 7.6 months vs. 7.5 to 39.0 months). Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of carcinosarcoma might be related to a low loco-regional progression rate. Radiotherapy should be considered in non-curatively resected patients as soon as possible.

  6. Introduction of beam flatness filter for 60Co teletherapy beam and its efficacy in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravichandran, R.; Ravikumar, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the western countries cobalt-60 machines have become obsolete, whereas in India we have about 250 machines operational for clinical radiotherapy. The basic differences of 6 MV x-ray beam and cobalt-60 beam are: a) build-up d max point, b) flatness of beam at depths, and c) sharpness of the beam edge. We looked at the homogeneity of delivered dose in the target volume in a 3 field SAD technique for 60 Co (80 cm, 100 cm) and 6 MV treatments. More dose variations are seen in 60 Co treated volume. The excess curvature of isodose curves of 60 Co at depths may be one of the reasons for this inhomogeneity in dose to target volume. Therefore, there is need for achieving perfect flatness in the isodose curves at desired depths. A flattening filter was fabricated using dental wax impression material to account for depths of curvature of 50% 60 Co isodose curve. The filter was fabricated for the Theratron 780C machine for necessary flatness. The beam flatness with filter was measured with a) ionization and b) TL dosimetry methods. The flattened beam profile was compared with 6 MV x-ray beam (Clinac-1800, M/s Varian, USA). Our measurements show uniform flatness of cobalt-60 isodose curve at desired depth and useful radiation field width comparable to 6 MV x-ray photon profile at full width at half maximum (FWHM). If this concept is extendable to short field widths, it appears that there is scope for use of such filter in the treatments of oesophagus, larynx, and pituitary tumours to achieve dose homogeneity. Using this flatness filter and penumbra trimmer, we may achieve better quality cobalt-60 beam for radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Computerized treatment planning systems for external photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Computerized treatment planning systems (TPSs) are used in external beam radiotherapy to generate beam shapes and dose distributions with the intent to maximize tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. Patient anatomy and tumour targets can be represented as 3-D models. The entire process of treatment planning involves many steps and the medical physicist is responsible for the overall integrity of the computerized TPS to accurately and reliably produce dose distributions and associated calculations for external beam radiotherapy. The planning itself is most commonly carried out by a dosimetrist, and the plan must be approved by a radiation oncologist before implementation in actual patient treatments. Treatment planning prior to the 1970s was generally carried out through the manual manipulation of standard isodose charts on to patient body contours that were generated by direct tracing or lead wire representation, and relied heavily on the judicious choice of beam weight and wedging by an experienced dosimetrist. The simultaneous development of computed tomography (CT), along with the advent of readily accessible computing power from the 1970s on, led to the development of CT based computerized treatment planning, providing the ability to view dose distributions directly superimposed upon a patient's axial anatomy. The entire treatment planning process involves many steps, beginning from beam data acquisition and entry into the computerized TPS, through patient data acquisition, to treatment plan generation and the final transfer of data to the treatment machine. Successive improvements in treatment planning hardware and software have been most notable in the graphics, calculation and optimization aspects of current systems. Systems encompassing the 'Virtual Patient' are able to display beam's eye views (BEVs) of radiation beams and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for arbitrary dose distributions. Dose calculations have evolved from

  8. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ost, Piet, E-mail: piet.ost@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Potter, Bruno [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Briganti, Alberto [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Nagler, Evi V.T. [Department of Nephrology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Fonteyne, Valerie [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  9. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  10. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  11. Simultaneous optimization of photons and electrons for mixed beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S; Fix, M K; Joosten, A; Henzen, D; Frei, D; Volken, W; Kueng, R; Aebersold, D M; Stampanoni, M F M; Manser, P

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate an inverse treatment planning process (TPP) for mixed beam radiotherapy (MBRT) capable of performing simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures. A simulated annealing based direct aperture optimization (DAO) is implemented to perform simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures, both shaped with the photon multileaf collimator (pMLC). Validated beam models are used as input for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Consideration of photon pMLC transmission during DAO and a weight re-optimization of the apertures after deliverable dose calculation are utilized to efficiently reduce the differences between optimized and deliverable dose distributions. The TPP for MBRT is evaluated for an academic situation with a superficial and an enlarged PTV in the depth, a left chest wall case including the internal mammary chain and a squamous cell carcinoma case. Deliverable dose distributions of MBRT plans are compared to those of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), photon IMRT and if available to those of clinical VMAT plans. The generated MBRT plans dosimetrically outperform the MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans for all investigated situations. For the clinical cases of the left chest wall and the squamous cell carcinoma, the MBRT plans cover the PTV similarly or more homogeneously than the VMAT plans, while OARs are spared considerably better with average reductions of the mean dose to parallel OARs and D 2% to serial OARs by 54% and 26%, respectively. Moreover, the low dose bath expressed as V 10% to normal tissue is substantially reduced by up to 45% compared to the VMAT plans. A TPP for MBRT including simultaneous optimization is successfully implemented and the dosimetric superiority of MBRT plans over MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans is demonstrated for academic and clinical situations including superficial targets with and without deep-seated part.

  12. Simultaneous optimization of photons and electrons for mixed beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Fix, M. K.; Joosten, A.; Henzen, D.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Kueng, R.; Aebersold, D. M.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.; Manser, P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate an inverse treatment planning process (TPP) for mixed beam radiotherapy (MBRT) capable of performing simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures. A simulated annealing based direct aperture optimization (DAO) is implemented to perform simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures, both shaped with the photon multileaf collimator (pMLC). Validated beam models are used as input for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Consideration of photon pMLC transmission during DAO and a weight re-optimization of the apertures after deliverable dose calculation are utilized to efficiently reduce the differences between optimized and deliverable dose distributions. The TPP for MBRT is evaluated for an academic situation with a superficial and an enlarged PTV in the depth, a left chest wall case including the internal mammary chain and a squamous cell carcinoma case. Deliverable dose distributions of MBRT plans are compared to those of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), photon IMRT and if available to those of clinical VMAT plans. The generated MBRT plans dosimetrically outperform the MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans for all investigated situations. For the clinical cases of the left chest wall and the squamous cell carcinoma, the MBRT plans cover the PTV similarly or more homogeneously than the VMAT plans, while OARs are spared considerably better with average reductions of the mean dose to parallel OARs and D 2% to serial OARs by 54% and 26%, respectively. Moreover, the low dose bath expressed as V 10% to normal tissue is substantially reduced by up to 45% compared to the VMAT plans. A TPP for MBRT including simultaneous optimization is successfully implemented and the dosimetric superiority of MBRT plans over MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans is demonstrated for academic and clinical situations including superficial targets with and without deep-seated part.

  13. Radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma of the chest wall seven years after adjuvant radiotherapy following the surgery of breast cancer. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Tohru; Roppongi, Takashi; Kanno, Keiichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Fujii, Takanao [Numata National Hospital, Shibukawa, Gunma (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman, who had underwent an adjuvant radiotherapy following the modified radical mastectomy in the left primary breast cancer in June 1988. She underwent second surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (electronic radiotherapy) for recurrent breast cancer in the major pectoral muscle and received chemoimmunotherapy in May 1989. In May 1996 she complained of two ulcers of the chest wall. The ulcer biopsy findings was squamous cell carcinoma, and we diagnosed she fell the radiation-induced skin cancer. She underwent chest wall resection and reconstruction with vertical rectal abdominal musculocutaneous flap (V-RAM). However two months later her chest wall resection, she again got the recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in the right axillary lymph nodes and left pleura. The third radiotherapy and the chemotherapy with pepleomycin were uneffective on her recurrent cancer. And she died in March 1997. (author)

  14. Treatment results and prognostic analysis of 47 patients with urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ke; Hou Xiaorong; Shen Jie; Lian Xin; Sun Shuai; Zhang Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors of 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: From October 1998 to October 2008, 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients had stage T 3 /T 4 disease, 7 had lymph node metastasis. Thirty-nine patients had G3 tumor, 13 had stump-positive. The median radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (36-64 Gy). 81% patients (38/47) were treated with regional irradiation. Results: The median follow-up time was 21 months (6 -88 months). The follow-up rate was 92%. The median overall survival time was 35 months (5 -88 months). The 2-and 5-year overall survival rates were 57% and 49%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the median overall survival time was better in patients with stage T 1 or T 2 compared with stage T 3 or T 4 tumor (42 months vs. 19 months, χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), with age of ≤65 years compared with >65 years (28 mouths vs 18 months,χ 2 =8.23, P =0.004). There was no significant difference in the long term survival in patients with non-radical surgery compared with radical mastectomy (21 months vs. 20 months, χ 2 = 0.90, P = 0.344). In multivariate analysis, the stage T 3 or T 4 (χ 2 = 7.89, P =0.005), >65 years old (χ 2 = 4.85, P = 0.028), renal pelvis involvement (χ 2 = 5.65, P = 0.018), and tumor located in the mid or inferior segment (χ 2 =6.08,P =0.014) were factors associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions: Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve the efficacy of patients with locally advanced urethral transitional cell carcinoma. Advanced T stage and > 65 years age are associated with poorer prognosis. (authors)

  15. The role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma invading the trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Sik [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the effect of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on local failure-free survival rate (LFFS) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) invading the trachea. Fifty-six patients with locally advanced PTC invading the trachea were treated with surgical resection. After surgery, 21 patients received adjuvant EBRT and radioactive iodine therapy (EBRT group) and 35 patients were treated with radioactive iodine therapy (control group). The age range was 26–87 years (median, 56 years). The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 4 to 145 months). EBRT doses ranged from 50.4 to 66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Esophagus invasion and gross residual disease was more frequent in the EBRT group. In the control group, local recurrence developed in 9 (9/35, 26%) and new distant metastasis in 2 (2/35, 6%) patients, occurring 4 to 68 months (median, 37 months) and 53 to 68 months (median, 60 months) after surgery, respectively. Two patients had simultaneous local recurrence and new distant metastasis. There was one local failure in the EBRT group at 18 months after surgery (1/21, 5%). The 5-year LFFS was 95% in the EBRT group and 63% in the control group (p = 0.103). In the EBRT group, one late grade 2 xerostomia was developed. Although, EBRT group had a higher incidence of esophagus invasion and gross residual disease, EBRT group showed a better 5-year LFFS. Adjuvant EBRT may have contributed to the better LFFS in these patients.

  16. Value of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis after Extended Thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Feng Lu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Adjuvant radiation within 1 month after extended thymectomy may be helpful in controlling postoperative MG, such as decreasing the possibility of postoperative myasthenic crisis, and raising cumulative probabilities of reaching CSR.

  17. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  18. Breast conserving treatment of breast carcinoma T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy, high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, external beam radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: local control and overall survival analysis; Tratamento conservador do cancer de mama T2 ({<=} 4 cm) e T3 por quimioterapia neoadjuvante, quadrantectomia, braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose como reforco de dose, teleterapia complementar e quimioterapia adjuvante: analise de controle local e sobrevida global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Celia Regina; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Baraldi, Helena Espindola; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: celiarsoares@terra.com.br; Fristachi, Carlos Elias [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Onco-Ginecologia e Mastologia; Paes, Roberto Pinto [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering local control and overall survival. Material and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 88 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIb and IIIa, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, treated from June/1995 to December/2006. Median follow-up was 58 months. Using clinical methods the tumor was evaluated before and after three or four cycles of chemotherapy based on anthracyclines. Overall survival and local control were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: Local control and overall survival in five years were 90% and 73.5%, respectively. Conclusion: local control and overall survival were comparable to other forms of treatment. (author)

  19. [Comparative study of radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy (75.6 Gy) combined with hormone therapy for prostate cancer of intermediate D'Amico risk classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissier, R; Karsenty, G; Muracciole, X; Daniel, L; Delaporte, V; Maurin, C; Coulange, C; Lechevallier, E

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three percent of the localized cancers belongs initially to the group of intermediate risk of D'Amico. The standard treatments validated by the French Association of Urology are the radical prostatectomy and the external beam radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared the carcinologic results of the radical prostatectomy±adjuvant treatment (RP) and the external beam radiotherapy combining high dose (75.6 Gy) and short hormonotherapy (RH), in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer. The series consisted of 143 patients treated between 2000 and 2006 in the department of Urology and Kidney transplantation of the Conception Hospital, Marseilles. The main assessment criteria was the survival without biological recurrence (SBR). The median follow-up was 90 months [59-51]. The 5 years and 8 years SBR were 85% and 73% in the RH group, versus 74% and 65% with RP (P=0.196). There was a significant difference between the series: on the age of diagnosis (63.9 versus 73.3 years, P<0.001), the Charlson score of comorbidity (2 versus 3, P<0.001) and the number of intermediate criteria per patients (one intermediate criteria: RP 74% versus 57%, P<0.01). According to our study, there was no superiority of the radical prostatectomy±adjuvant treatment or the external radiotherapy combining high dose and concomitant short hormonotherapy on the survival without biological recurrence at 5 and 8 years. Many studies confirm that a concomitant hormonotherapy increases the carcinologic control, even with a high rate external beam radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Preclinical studies on the use of medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum as an adjuvant in radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopakumar, G.; Martin, Femy; Antony, Sherin K.; Pillai, Thulasi G.; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an extract of Ganoderma lucidum occurring in South India possesses significant radioprotective property ex vivo. The present study describes the in vivo radioprotection of normal cells in tumour-bearing mice exposed to gamma radiation. Oral administration of G. lucidum extract (GLE) to tumour-bearing Swiss albino mice along with exposure to gamma radiation resulted in tumour regression. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) on cells of normal and tumour tissues from tumour-bearing animals treated with GEE and radiation, revealed that there was significant reduction in radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA in normal tissues compared to the tumour, indicating preferential protection to normal tissues. The findings suggest the potential use of this mushroom extract as an adjuvant in radiotherapy, for tumour regression and prevention of radiation-induced cellular damages in normal tissues. (author)

  1. Porocarcinoma scalp with high risk features treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wineeta Melgandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare malignant sweat gland tumor arising from the intra dermal part of the gland and accounts for only 0.005% of all epithelial cutaneous tumors. Commonly involved site includes extremities and face. Scalp is a rare site for porocarcinoma with less than 20 reported cases so far. Wide local excision with clear margins remains the treatment of choice. Review of literature revealed a local recurrence rate of 37.5% and a nodal involvement risk of 20%. Porocarcinoma of the scalp is peculiar in that the primary tumor may be large at presentation, making surgery with adequate margins difficult. Adjuvant radiotherapy must be considered in a case to case basis due to the high local recurrence rates compared to other sites of porocarcinoma and should be given to all patients with close margins and extra capsular extension.

  2. Multiple Cutaneous Angiosarcomas after Breast Conserving Surgery and Bilateral Adjuvant Radiotherapy: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast angiosarcomas (BAs are rare but serious events that may arise after radiation exposure. Disease outcome is poor, with high risk of local and distant failure. Recurrences are frequent also after resection with negative margins. The spectrum of vascular proliferations associated with radiotherapy in the setting of breast cancer has expanded, including radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions (AVLs of the breast skin as a rare, but well-recognized, entity. Although pursuing a benign behavior, AVLs have been regarded as possible precursors of postradiation BAs. We report an unusual case of a 71-year-old woman affected by well-differentiated bilateral cutaneous BA, diagnosed 1.9 years after adjuvant RT for synchronous bilateral breast cancer. Whole-life clinical followup is of crucial importance in breast cancer patients.

  3. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, John R.; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT TM ). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT TM algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point

  4. DOSE-ESCALATED EXTERNAL BEAM RADIOTHERAPY DURING HORMONO-RADIOTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The introduction of modern technologies of conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT into clinical practice for the treatment of prostate cancer requires proper quality assurance measures as well as a careful analysis of both the efficacy and toxicity data of treatments. The purpose of this study was to inves- tigate tolerance and the immediate efficacy of conformal dose-escalated EBRT during hormono-radiotherapy for prostate cancer. material and methods. The study involved 156 prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT. Among them, 30 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, and in 126 patients the total dose was esca- lated to 72-76 Gy (median total dose - 74.0 Gy. Fifty-nine patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Results. The prescribed course of treatment was completed in all the patients with prostate cancer. Acute radiation-induced bladder reactions (RTOG were observed in 50 (32.1 % patients, of whom 48 (30.8 % experienced grade I reactions, and 2 (1.3 % experienced grade II reactions. Eighteen (11.5 % patients had radiation-induced rectum reactions, not above grade I. The development of grade II dysuric phenomena necessitated treatment interruption only in two patients. Of 9 (5.8 % patients who had late bladder complica- tions (RTOG/EORTC, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and one (0.6 % patient developed grade II complications. Of 11 (7.1 % patients who had rectum complications, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and 3 (1.9 % patients developed grade II complications. No patients experienced the increase in toxicity of treatment during dose escalation up to a total dose exceeding 70 Gy. During the follow-up period, only one patient developed recurrent disease. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest acceptable levels of toxicity following a continuous course of dose-escalated EBRT given in conjunction with hormono-radiotherapy to prostate cancer patients. Further

  5. External Beam Radiotherapy Affects Serum Testosterone in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Raisa S; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Zaffuto, Emanuele; Smith, Ariane; Bandini, Marco; Marchioni, Michele; Tian, Zhe; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Schiffmann, Jonas; Delouya, Guila; Lambert, Carole; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Beauchemin, Marie Claude; Barkati, Maroie; Ménard, Cynthia; Graefen, Markus; Saad, Fred; Tilki, Derya; Taussky, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have examined testosterone levels after external beam radiation (EBRT) monotherapy, but since 2002 only sparse contemporary data have been reported. To examine testosterone kinetics in a large series of contemporary patients after EBRT. The study was conducted in 425 patients who underwent definitive EBRT for localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2014. Patients were enrolled in several phase II and III trials. Exclusion criteria were neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy or missing data. Testosterone was recorded at baseline and then according to each study protocol (not mandatory in all protocols). Statistical analyses consisted of means and proportions, Kaplan-Meier plots, and logistic and Cox regression analyses. Testosterone kinetics after EBRT monotherapy and their influence on biochemical recurrence. Median follow-up of 248 assessable patients was 72 months. One hundred eighty-six patients (75.0%) showed a decrease in testosterone. Median time to first decrease was 6.4 months. Median percentage of decrease to the nadir was 30% and 112 (45.2%) developed biochemical hypogonadism (serum testosterone testosterone decrease, 117 (62.9%) recovered to at least 90% of baseline levels. Advanced age, increased body mass index, higher baseline testosterone level, and lower nadir level were associated with a lower chance of testosterone recovery. Subgroup analyses of 166 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy confirmed the results recorded for the entire cohort. In survival analyses, neither testosterone decrease nor recovery was predictive for biochemical recurrence. EBRT monotherapy influences testosterone kinetics, and although most patients will recover, approximately 45% will have biochemical hypogonadism. We report on the largest contemporary series of patients treated with EBRT monotherapy in whom testosterone kinetics were ascertained. Limitations are that testosterone follow-up was not uniform and the study

  6. Modifiable risk factors for acute skin toxicity in adjuvant breast radiotherapy: Dosimetric analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Lorna G; Lavan, Naomi; Dunne, Mary; McArdle, Orla

    2018-03-23

    Acute skin toxicity in adjuvant breast radiation can be reduced with modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques. However, having reviewed the literature, we found no dosimetric constraint for acute skin toxicity that would be applicable to modern RT planning. This study aimed to identify dosimetric factors that are associated with higher rates of acute skin toxicity. A retrospective review was carried out including women who received adjuvant forward-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after breast-conserving surgery. Acute skin toxicity grade was prospectively recorded. A total of 131 patients were analyzed. On multivariate analysis, the V105% > 30 cc (p = 0.013) and the use of conventional fractionation (CF) (p = 0.001) were statistically significant for acute skin toxicity. On literature review, current quantitative dosimetric parameters that have shown statistical significance include a V107% > 3 cc in hypofractionation (HF), V107% > 9 cc in CF, treated volume 110% > 5.13%, and V107% > 28.6%. There is little evidence on the predictive value of clinically applicable dosimetric factors in acute skin toxicity. Given the recent improvements in RT planning, we would consider a V107% or a V110% too high a dosimetric value to be useful for the majority of patients. We have shown that a V105% of greater than 30 cc is significantly associated with acute skin toxicity, controlling for other variables. We suggest that this is currently the most useful modifiable parameter available to reduce skin toxicity and is applicable to modern RT planning. We also suggest that consideration be given to hypofractionated schedules to further reduce acute skin toxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy electron boost followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy in resected soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azinovic, Ignacio; Martinez Monge, Rafael; Aristu, Jose Javier; Salgado, Esteban; Villafranca, Elena; Hidalgo, Oscar Fernandez; Amillo, Santiago; San Julian, Miguel; Villas, Carlos; Aramendia, Jose Manuel; Calvo, Felipe A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the patterns of failure and the toxicity profile of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) after resection of soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities (STS). Patients and methods: Forty-five patients with extremity STS were treated with IOERT and moderate-dose postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy). Twenty-six patients were treated for primary disease (PD) and 19 patients for an isolated recurrence (ILR). Tumor size was >5 cm (maximum diameter) in 36 patients (80%), and high-grade histology in PD patients was present in 14 patients (54%). In nine patients, IOERT was used alone, due to previous irradiation or patient refusal. Chemotherapy (neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant) was mainly given to high-grade tumors. Results: Nine patients relapsed in the extremity (20%), and 12 patients in distant sites (28%). Actuarial local control at 5 years was 88% for patients with negative/close margins and 57% for patients presenting positive margins (P=0.04). Five patients (11%) developed neuropathy associated with the treatment. Extremity preservation was achieved in 40 patients (88%). With a median follow-up of 93 months (range: 27-143 months) for the patients at risk, 25 patients remain alive (a 7-year actuarial survival rate of 75% for PD and 47% for ILR; P=0.01). Conclusions: IOERT combined with moderate doses of external beam irradiation yields high local control and extremity preservation rates in resected extremity STS. Peripheral nerves in the IOERT field are dose-limiting structures requiring a dose compromise in the IOERT component to avoid severe neurological damage

  9. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and external-beam radiotherapy versus external-beam irradiation alone for prostate cancer. A quality-of-life analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Fischedick, Karin; Siluschek, Jaroslav; Kehl, Mareike; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) on quality of life after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A group of 170 patients (85 with and 85 without NHT) has been surveyed prospectively before EBRT (70.2-72 Gy), at the last day of EBRT, a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Pairs with and without NHT (median treatment time of 3.5 months before EBRT) were matched according to the respective planning target volume and prostate volume. Before EBRT, significantly lower urinary function/bother, sexual function and hormonal function/bother scores were found for patients with NHT. More than 1 year after EBRT, only sexual function scores remained lower. In a multivariate analysis, NHT and adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) versus NHT only (hazard ratio 14; 95% confidence interval 2.7-183; p = 0.02) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists versus antiandrogens (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.1-12; p = 0.04) proved to be independent risk factors for long-term erectile dysfunction (no or very poor ability to have an erection). With the exception of sexual function (additional adjuvant HT and application of LHRH analog independently adverse), short-term NHT was not found to decrease quality of life after EBRT for prostate cancer. (orig.)

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Raut, Nirmal; Arora, Brijesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Dutta, Debnarayan; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Kurkure, Purna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present outcome data in a prospective study of radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed DIPGs were prospectively treated with focal RT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions along with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m 2 , Days 1-42). Four weeks after completing the initial RT-TMZ schedule, adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m 2 , Days 1-5) was given every 28 days to a maximum of 12 cycles. Response was evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. Results: Between March 2005 and November 2006, 20 children (mean age, 8.3 years) were accrued. Eighteen patients have died from disease progression, one patient is alive with progressive disease, and one patient is alive with stable disease. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.15 months and 6.9 months, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity during the concurrent RT-TMZ phase included thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, leucopenia in 2, and vomiting in 7. Transient Grade II skin toxicity developed in the irradiated fields in 18 patients. During the adjuvant TMZ phase, Grade III/IV leucopenia developed in 2 patients and Grade IV thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. Patients with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of a high-grade tumor had worse survival than those with a low-grade tumor (p = 0.001). Patients with neurologic improvement after RT-TMZ had significantly better survival than those who did not (p = 0.048). Conclusions: TMZ with RT has not yielded any improvement in the outcome of DIPG compared with RT alone. Further clinical trials should explore novel treatment modalities.

  11. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, A Yuriko; Hsu, Annie; La, Trang; Kunz, Pamela; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A; Visser, Brendan; Goodman, Karyn A; Koong, Albert C; Chang, Daniel T

    2010-08-15

    The current study was performed to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Fifty-seven patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer were treated postoperatively: 26 with 3D CRT and 31 with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was capecitabine (n=31), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n=25), or none (n=1). The median radiation dose was 45 Gy. Dose volume histogram parameters for kidney and liver were compared between treatment groups. The 2-year overall survival rates for 3D CRT versus IMRT were 51% and 65%, respectively (P=.5). Four locoregional failures occurred each in the 3D CRT (15%) and the IMRT (13%) patients. Grade>or=2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was found to be similar between the 3D CRT and IMRT patients (61.5% vs 61.2%, respectively) but more treatment breaks were needed (3 vs 0, respectively). The median serum creatinine from before radiotherapy to most recent creatinine was unchanged in the IMRT group (0.80 mg/dL) but increased in the 3D CRT group from 0.80 mg/dL to 1.0 mg/dL (P=.02). The median kidney mean dose was higher in the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (13.9 Gy vs 11.1 Gy; P=.05). The median kidney V20 was lower for the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (17.5% vs 22%; P=.17). The median liver mean dose for IMRT and 3D CRT was 13.6 Gy and 18.6 Gy, respectively (P=.19). The median liver V30 was 16.1% and 28%, respectively (PCancer Society.

  12. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 β-estradiol (E 2 ) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E 2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E 2 , 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  13. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  14. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  15. The ESTRO-EQUAL quality assurance network for photon and electron radiotherapy beams in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, I.H.; Dutreix, A.; Richter, J.; Bridier, A.; Chavaudra, J.; Svensson, H.

    2001-01-01

    Background: In 1998 an ESTRO Quality Assurance Network for radiotherapy (EQUAL) has been set up for 25 European countries for photon and electron beams in reference and non-reference conditions. Material and Methods: Measurements are done using LiF powder (DTL937-Philitech, France) that is processed with the PCL3 automatic reader (Fimel-PTW). The participating centers irradiate the TLDs with an absorbed dose of 2 Gy according to the clinical routine. Results: Until September 2000 EQUAL has checked 135 photon beams (including the beams rechecked) from 51 radiotherapy centers in Germany out of 86 accepted centers. The results show that 2% of the beam outputs in reference conditions and 3% of the percentage depth doses are outside the tolerance level (deviation > ± 5%). 6% of the beam output variations and of the wedge transmission factors show deviations > ± 5%. The global analysis of results shows deviations > ± 5% in at least one parameter for 18 beams out of the 135 beams checked. Five rechecked beams present one ''real dosimetric'' problem in one or more parameters, corresponding to 4% of the 114 beams for which the deviations cannot be attributed to set-up errors. - The EQUAL network has checked 89 electron beams in Germany. The results show that all beam outputs checked are within the tolerance level. The standard deviation for the beam output in reference conditions is 2.0% and 2.2% for the beam output for the others field sizes. The percentage of deviations > 3% and ≤ 5% for the reference beam output is higher for electron beams than for photon beam checks. Therefore the electron beam calibration and the TPS algorithms should be improved to increase the accuracy of the patient dosimetry for radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  16. Comparison of radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in colon cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, R.R.; Wong, J.F.C.; Kuhn, J.A.; Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D.; Wanek, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy were compared in a nude mouse human colon cancer model. Radioimmunotherapy was delivered by intraperitoneal injection of 90 Y-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-CEA MAB). Single fraction external beam radiotherapy was delivered using a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Control groups received saline, unlabeled anit-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody. Tumor growth suppression was expressed as delay to reach 2g compared to saline controls. Unlabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody had no effect. External beam radiotherapy of 300, 600, 1000 and 2000 cGy produced growth delays of 3, 12, 17, and 22 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy with 120 μCi, 175 μCi, and 225 μCi resulted in growth delays of 20, 34, and 36 days. Estimated absorbed tumor dose was 1750 cGy in the 120 μCi group. Similar comparisons were done with the more radioresistant WiDr human colon carcinoma cell line. External beam radiotherapy doses of 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 cGy resulted in growth delays of 6, 21, 36 and 48 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy of 120 μCi and 175 μCi resulted in growth delays of 9 and 19 days, respectively. The 120 μCi dose delivered an estimated absorbed tumor dose of 1080 cGy to WiDr tumors. In summary, for the radiosensitive LS174T line, radioimmunotherapy produced biologic effects that were comparable to a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. For the more radioresistant WiDr tumor, radioimmunotherapy produced a biologic effect which was less than a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. These studies suggest that a tumor's response to radioimmunotherapy relative to that of external beam radiotherapy is, in part, dependent on tumor radiosensitivity and repair capacity. 23 refs., 5 figs. 4 tabs

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologic stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Ten-year update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy (RT) following radical prostatectomy (RP) in a group of patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate followed for a median of 10 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1983, 159 patients underwent RP for newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the prostate and were found to have pathologic Stage T3/4 tumors. Forty-six received adjuvant RT and 113 did not. Radiotherapy usually consisted of 45-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to the prostate bed of 10-15 Gy, to a total dose of 55-65 Gy. Patients were analyzed with respect to survival, disease-free survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastases. A rising prostate-specific antigen in the absence of other evidence of relapse was scored as a separate category of recurrence. Results: Both groups of patients have been followed for a median of 10 years. The actuarial survival at 10 and 15 years was 62% and 62% for the RT group compared to 52% and 37%, respectively, for the RP group (p = 0.18). The disease-free survival for the RT group was 55% and 48% at 10 and 15 years, respectively, compared to 37% and 33% for the RP group (p = 0.16). Similarly, there was no difference in the rate of distant metastases between the two groups. In contrast, the local relapse rate was significantly reduced by the addition of postoperative radiotherapy. The actuarial local control rate at 10 and 15 years was 92% and 82%, respectively, for the RT group vs. 60% and 53% for the RP group (p 0.002). Conclusions: While postoperative pelvic RT significantly improves local control compared to RP alone for pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer, it has no impact on distant metastases and consequently does not improve survival. These data are consistent with the conclusion that many patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer have occult metastases at presentation and will not be cured by local therapies alone

  18. Hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma and other primitive neuroectodermal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Jeffrey C.; Donahue, Bernadine; DaRosso, Robert; Nirenberg, Anita

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This single-institution Phase I/II study conducted from 1989 to 1995 evaluates the feasibility of a multi-modality protocol combining hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (HFRT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in 23 patients with newly diagnosed primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising in the central nervous system. Methods and Materials: All 23 patients had a histologically confirmed PNET and were over 3 years of age at diagnosis. The eligibility criteria for PNET patients with cerebellar primaries (medulloblastoma) included either a high T stage (T3b or 4) or high M stage (M1-3). All patients with noncerebellar primaries were eligible regardless of T or M stage. The median age of the 23 patients was 9 years (mean 3-25); 11 were female. The primary tumor arose in the cerebellum in 19. Of these medulloblastoma patients, 15 had high T stages (T3b or T4) with large locally invasive tumors and no evidence of metastases (M0), constituting Group 1. Thirteen (86%) of these patients had gross total resections. Four other medulloblastoma patients had both high T and high M stages, constituting Group 2. Group 3 consisted of four other patients with exocerebellar primaries (two brain, one brain stem, and one cauda equina), three of whom were M3. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered within 4 weeks of surgery. Twice-daily 1-Gy fractions were administered separated by 4-6 h. The total dose to the primary intracranial tumor and other areas of measurable intracranial disease was 72 Gy. The prophylactic craniospinal axis dose was 36 Gy, and boosts of 44-56 Gy were administered to metastatic spinal deposits. Following radiotherapy, monthly courses of multiagent chemotherapy were administered sequentially (cyclophosphamide-vincristine followed by cisplatin-etoposide followed by carboplatin-vincristine) for a total of 9 months. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy as planned. Only three patients lost >10% of their body weight. One patient

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  20. Intrinsic subtypes and benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy - results from two independent randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Tramm, Trine; Nielsen, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    in few studies. METHODS: Gene expression-based intrinsic subtyping was performed in 228 breast tumors collected from two independent post-mastectomy clinical trials (British Columbia and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 82b trials), where pre-menopausal patients with node-positive disease were...... randomized to adjuvant radiotherapy or not. All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and a subgroup of patients underwent ovarian ablation. Tumors were classified into intrinsic subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Normal-like using the research-based PAM50 classifier. RESULTS...

  1. Use of deodorants during adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a survey of compliance with standard advice, impact on patients and a literature review on safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, P H; Graham, J L

    2009-12-01

    Proscription of antiperspirant or deodorant use during adjuvant breast radiotherapy is common. The investigators were seeking an information base to facilitate design of an appropriate controlled trial of the use of deodorants during radiotherapy. The first component consisted of a survey of women after adjuvant breast radiotherapy seeking information about routine deodorant use and potential concern if deodorants were not permitted during radiotherapy. The second component comprised a literature search for any existing controlled evidence regarding harm from deodorant use during radiotherapy. Four hundred fourteen women completed surveys. Two hundred eighty recalled advice against deodorants. Two hundred ninety-nine women routinely used deodorants, 70% of whom used roll-on products. Forty-five continued deodorant use during radiation, 20 of these despite recalling advice not to wear a deodorant. Of the 233 women who routinely wore a deodorant but abstained during radiotherapy, 19% expressed a lot of concern about body odour and 45% were slightly concerned. Three controlled studies totalling 310 patients report specific deodorants versus no deodorant use which did not show statistically significantly increased skin reactions, but had only a small subset with axillary irradiation. The proscription of deodorant use during radiotherapy is of unproven benefit and causes body odour concern to the majority of women who are usual deodorant users. The next most appropriate trial would compare use of the usual deodorant versus no deodorant, would encompass a significant number of women with radiotherapy to the axilla or application of deodorant to irradiated skin areas, and include endpoints other than skin reaction alone.

  2. Does obesity hinder radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients? The implementation of new techniques in adjuvant radiotherapy – focus on obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Moszyńska-Zielińska

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of obesity in Poland and its relation to endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC is resulting in the increasing necessity of treating obese women. Treatment of an overweight patient with EEC may impede not only the surgical procedures but also radiotherapy, especially external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. The problems arise both during treatment planning and when delivering each fraction due to the difficulty of positioning such a patient – it implies the danger of underdosing targets and overdosing organs at risk. Willingness to use dynamic techniques in radiation oncology has increased for patients with EEC, even those who are obese. During EBRT careful daily verification is necessary for both safety and treatment accuracy. The most accurate method of verification is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT with soft tissue assessment, although it is time consuming and often requires a radiation oncologist. In order to improve the quality of such treatment, the authors present the practical aspects of planning and treatment itself by means of dynamic techniques in EBRT. The authors indicate the advantages and disadvantages of different types of on-board imaging (OBI verification images. Considering the scanty amount of literature in this field, it is necessary to conduct further research in order to highlight proper planning and treatment of obese endometrial cancer patients. The review of the literature shows that all centres that wish to use EBRT for gynaecological tumours should develop their own protocols on qualification, planning the treatment and methods of verifying the patients’ positioning.

  3. Spot-scanning beam delivery with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed spot size pencil beams in heavy ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Xin-Guo; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; He, Peng-Bo; Shen, Guo-Sheng; Ji, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) spot-scanning method is one of the most commonly used irradiation methods in charged particle beam radiotherapy. Generally, spot-scanning beam delivery utilizes the same size pencil beam to irradiate the tumor targets. Here we propose a spot-scanning beam delivery method with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed size pencil beams for heavy ion radiotherapy. This uses pencil beams with a bigger spot size in the lateral direction and wider mini spread-out Bragg peak (mini-SOBP) to irradiate the inner part of a target volume, and pencil beams with a smaller spot size in the lateral direction and narrower mini-SOBP to irradiate the peripheral part of the target volume. Instead of being controlled by the accelerator, the lateral size of the pencil beam was adjusted by inserting Ta scatterers in the beam delivery line. The longitudinal size of the pencil beam (i.e. the width of the mini-SOBP) was adjusted by tilting mini ridge filters along the beam direction. The new spot-scanning beam delivery using carbon ions was investigated theoretically and compared with traditional spot-scanning beam delivery. Our results show that the new spot-scanning beam delivery has smaller lateral penumbra, steeper distal dose fall-off and the dose homogeneity (1-standard deviation/mean) in the target volume is better than 95%. Supported by Key Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232207), National Key Technology Support Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015BAI01B11), National Key Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2016YFC0904602) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11075191, 11205217, 11475231, 11505249)

  4. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug

  5. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  6. Characterizing a pulse-resolved dosimetry system for complex radiotherapy beams using organic scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Ottosson, Rickard; Lindvold, Lars René

    2011-01-01

    A fast-readout dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators has been developed for the purpose of conducting point measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy beams involving high spatial and temporal dose gradients. The system measures the dose for each linac radiation pulse w...... and quality assurance of complex radiotherapy treatments.......A fast-readout dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators has been developed for the purpose of conducting point measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy beams involving high spatial and temporal dose gradients. The system measures the dose for each linac radiation pulse....... No significant differences between measurements and simulations were observed. The temporal resolution of the system was demonstrated by measuring dose per pulse, beam start-up transients and the quality factor for 6 MV. The precision of dose per pulse measurements was within 2.7% (1 SD) for a 10 cm × 10 cm...

  7. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods: Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  8. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamberger, R.C. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD); Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 ..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E/sub 2/ (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E/sub 2/, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  9. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  10. A population based study on variations in the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, G.; Katenkamp, D.; Roehrig, B.; Hoyer, H.; Fueller, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The assessment of the compliance with consensus recommendations for adjuvant radiation therapy among women with breast cancer. The study is based on data obtained in a population-based cohort-study, which was performed to evaluate the quality of health care for patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods: About one million inhabitants live in the study region Eastern Thuringia. 2,031 cases with invasive breast cancer without distant metastasis (MO) or inflammatory spread were registered from 1995 to 2000. Out of these 1,700 with complete documentation of covariates were included in multivariate analysis. To examine the simultaneous influence of all clinical factors and 'caseload' on the likelihood to receive adjuvant radiation therapy a logistic regression model was fitted for radiation therapy after mastectomy. In order to describe the impact of each individual clinic on treatment decision as 'caseload' was replaced by the clinics with more than 30 primary treatments. Results: Following breast conserving therapy (BCT) 90.6% of the patients received adjuvant radiation therapy. In the univariate analysis older age was negatively associated with the use of radiation therapy among women with BCT (Table 1). Furthermore, comorbid conditions were negatively associated with the use of radiation therapy. For all other cofactors no associations were found. Subsequent to mastectomy 33.0% of the women underwent radiation therapy (Table 2). Associations between the use of radiation therapy and age, tumor category, number of positive lymph nodes, multiple tumors, histologic differentiation grade, residual tumor as well as hormone receptor status were found. In the multivariate analysis only older age (≥70 years) was identified as negative indicator for the utilization of radiation therapy. Among patients with mastectomy increasing tumor size was a positive predictor on radiation therapy (Table 3). In addition more than three positive lymph nodes, multiplicity, poor

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  12. Analysis of dose in heterogeneity adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical treatment of cases of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechi, Bruna E.; Schwarz, Ana Paula; Teston, Adriano; Rodrigues, Joanilso S.

    2013-01-01

    Assuming the systems planning radiotherapy recognize all body structures of the same density (d=1 g/cm³), variations in electron density within the irradiated area, as is the case of patients who undergo reconstruction mammary processes and use tissue expanders, may influence the dose distribution in the treatment and may produce heterogeneities which are not measured by changing its actual distribution into healthy tissues or in the target volume to be irradiated. Through the calculation of the algorithms' dose distribution of the XiO® planning system (Fast Fourier Transform, Convolution, Superposition, Fast Superposition e Clarkson), when using correction of heterogeneity between tissues of different densities, there was obtained a percentage ratio of dose increase in the structures of interest, and of the amount of absorbed dose by healthy organs adjacent to the target volume. (author)

  13. External beam radiotherapy facilities in Ukraine. Trends and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starenkiy, V.P.; Petrichenko, O.O.; Averyanova, L.O.

    2017-01-01

    The most important aspects of technological support of the radiation therapy of Ukraine are considered in accordance with the requirements of the IAEA. The reasons that influence the availability of radiotherapy for cancer patients in Ukraine are analyzed taking into account the experience of Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine.

  14. Tratamento radioterápico adjuvante nos sarcomas de extremidades de alto grau Adjuvant radiotherapy in high-grade extremity sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio da Silva Franca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as terapias utilizadas em nossa instituição no tratamento dos sarcomas de extremidades de alto grau, mediante análise da sobrevida global do tratamento multidisciplinar. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com 36 pacientes, no período de 1993 a 2007, em estádios IIb/III, submetidos a radioterapia externa após cirurgia com ou sem reforço de dose com braquiterapia. RESULTADOS: Trinta e seis pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico seguido de radioterapia externa, sendo que quatro pacientes (11% receberam reforço de dose com braquiterapia e sete pacientes (19% receberam quimioterapia. A dose mediana de radioterapia foi de 50 Gy (IC95%: 47-53 Gy, sendo realizado reforço de dose em quatro pacientes com braquiterapia, com dose variando de 16,2-35 Gy. A quimioterapia foi indicada em sete pacientes (19% com margens positivas. Quinze pacientes apresentaram recidiva local e/ou a distância (42% e todos faleceram. Vinte e um pacientes (58% encontram-se sem evidência clínica e radiológica de recidiva local e/ou a distância. O seguimento mediano é de 88 meses (IC95%: 74-102. A taxa de sobrevida global para sete anos foi de 80%. CONCLUSÃO: Concluímos que a associação cirurgia + radioterapia apresenta-se como tratamento eficaz e com ótimas respostas e melhora da sobrevida global na possibilidade de associação da braquiterapia.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the therapies utilized in the authors' institution for management of high-grade extremity sarcomas, analyzing the overall survival rates following multidisciplinary treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study developed in the period from 1993 to 2007 with 36 patients diagnosed with stages IIb/III, submitted to postoperative external beam radiotherapy, with or without boost dose, utilizing high-dose brachytherapy. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Four patients (11% received boost dose

  15. An assessment of effective dose to staff in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, D.J.; Nicholson, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation safety in external beam radiotherapy is governed by national legislation. Annual doses recorded by radiographers and others associated with external beam radiotherapy are typically much lower than the relevant dose limit. However, it is possible that larger doses might be received as a result of an accidental irradiation. In the event of a significant exposure resulting in a dose at or near a relevant dose limit, an accurate conversion has to be made from the dose meter reading to the limiting quantity. A method was devised to demonstrate ratios of effective dose to personal dose equivalent which might be anticipated in the even of an individual other than the patient being irradiated within a radiotherapy treatment room consisting of a linear accelerator. The variation of ratios obtained under different conditions is discussed. (author)

  16. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl.......3 degrees (SD1.2 degrees) to 0.06 degrees (SD 0.3 degrees)....

  17. Proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma: The Liverpool-Clatterbridge experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using a 62-MeV cyclotron in patients considered unsuitable for other forms of conservative therapy. Methods and Materials A total of 349 patients with choroidal melanoma referred to the Liverpool Ocular Oncology Centre underwent proton beam radiotherapy at Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology (CCO) between January 1993 and December 2003. Four daily fractions of proton beam radiotherapy were delivered, with a total dose of 53.1 proton Gy, and with lateral and distal safety margins of 2.5 mm. Outcomes measured were local tumor recurrence; ocular conservation; vision; and metastatic death according to age, gender, eye, visual acuity, location of anterior and posterior tumor margins, quadrant, longest basal tumor dimension, tumor height, extraocular extension, and retinal invasion. Results The 5-year actuarial rates were 3.5% for local tumor recurrence, 9.4% for enucleation, 79.1% for conservation of vision of counting fingers or better, 61.1% for conservation of vision of 20/200 or better, 44.8% for conservation of vision of 20/40 or better, and 10.0% for death from metastasis. Conclusion Proton beam radiotherapy with a 62 MeV cyclotron achieves high rates of local tumor control and ocular conservation, with visual outcome depending on tumor size and location

  18. Adjuvant Proton Beam Therapy in the Management of Thymoma: A Dosimetric Comparison and Acute Toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rahul R; Rhome, Ryan; Hug, Eugen; Tsai, Henry; Cahlon, Oren; Chon, Brian; Goenka, Anuj

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the dosimetric differences between proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for resected thymoma. We simultaneously report our early clinical experience with PBT in this cohort. We identified 4 patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma treated at our center from 2012 to 2014 who completed adjuvant PBT to a median dose of 57.0 cobalt Gy equivalents (CGE; range, 50.4-66.6 CGE) after definitive resection. Adjuvant radiation was indicated for positive (n = 3) or close margin (n = 1). Median age was 45 (range, 32-70) years. Stages included II (n = 2), III (n = 1), and IVA (n = 1). Analogous IMRT plans were generated for each patient for comparison, and preset dosimetric endpoints were evaluated. Early toxicities were assessed according to retrospective chart review. Compared with IMRT, PBT was associated with lower mean doses to the lung (4.6 vs. 8.1 Gy; P = .02), esophagus (5.4 vs. 20.6 Gy; P = .003), and heart (6.0 vs. 10.4 Gy; P = .007). Percentages of lung, esophagus, and heart receiving radiation were consistently lower in the PBT plans over a wide range of radiation doses. There was no difference in mean breast dose (2.68 vs. 3.01 Gy; P = .37). Of the 4 patients treated with PBT, 3 patients experienced Grade 1 radiation dermatitis, and 1 patient experienced Grade 2 dermatitis, which resolved after treatment. With a median follow-up of 5.5 months, there were no additional Grade ≥ 2 acute or subacute toxicities, including radiation pneumonitis. PBT is clinically well tolerated after surgical resection of thymoma, and is associated with a significant reduction in dose to critical structures without compromising coverage of the target volume. Prospective evaluation and longer follow-up is needed to assess clinical outcomes and late toxicities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer. A multicenter trial of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Thinh, D.H.Q.; Kato, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for the treatment of N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in Asian countries, especially regions of South and Southeast Asian countries where NPC is endemic. Between 2005 and 2009, 121 patients with NPC (T1-4 N2-3 M0) were registered from Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, The Philippines, China and Bangladesh. Patients were treated with 2D radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 ), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 on Day 1) and fluorouracil (800 mg/m 2 on Days 1-5) for 3 cycles. Of the 121 patients, 56 patients (46%) required interruption of radiotherapy (RT). The reasons for interruption of RT were acute non-hematological toxicities such as mucositis, pain and dermatitis in 35 patients, hematological toxicities in 11 patients, machine break-down in 3 patients, poor general condition in 2 patients, and others in 8 patients. Of the patients, 93% completed at least 4 cycles of weekly cisplatin during radiotherapy, and 82% completed at least 2 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. With a median follow-up time of 46 months for the surviving 77 patients, the 3-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 89%, 74% and 66%, respectively. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Grade 3-4 toxicities of mucositis, nausea/vomiting and leukopenia were observed in 34%, 4% and 4% of the patients, respectively. In conclusion, further improvement in survival and locoregional control is necessary, although our regimen showed acceptable toxicities. (author)

  20. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolamide for glioblastoma in good performance status elderly patients – early results of a phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eFloyd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (Standard RT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS >70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months, 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated radiotherapy course, radiosurgery boost and

  1. Image-guided radiotherapy in near real time with intensity-modulated radiotherapy megavoltage treatment beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing, Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  2. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Karin; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-03-28

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce.Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood.In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  3. External beam radiotherapy combined with intraluminal brachytherapy in esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Mul, Veronique E.; Plukker, John Th.; Sijtsema, Nanna M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of definitive radiation therapy in patients with potentially curable esophageal cancer and to evaluate the side-effects of this treatment. Methods and materials: Sixty-two patients with esophageal cancer, who were treated with definitive, curatively intended radiotherapy consisting of external radiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions), preceded and followed by LDR or HDR intraluminal brachy (12 Gy in 2 fractions) were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Recurrences were reported in 38 patients (61%), of which 25 (64%) failed locally first. The overall survival rates at 1, 2 and 5 years were 57%, 34% and 11%, respectively. The median overall survival was 15 months. No prognostic factors could be identified. Most frequently reported treatment related toxicities were esophagitis, ulcerations, (11%) and strictures (16%). In 10 patients (16%) severe toxicities, were reported including grade III ulceration (2 cases), stricture (1 case), radiation pneumonitis (1 case), perforation (1 case), esophageal-pleural-tracheal fistula (1 case), and acute esophageal bleeding (4 cases). A history of gastrectomy was significantly associated with the development of severe toxicity. Conclusion: Curatively intended radiotherapy alone can be offered to esophageal cancer patients, even when surgery and/or chemotherapy are not feasible. However, we observed severe toxicity in a substantial part of the patients. Given the relatively high rate of severe complications and the uncertainties regarding dose escalation, the addition of brachytherapy, with consequently high surface doses, should be limited to well-selected patients.

  4. Prognostic factors for long-term quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy in women with endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Robert; Schnetzke, Lara; Arians, Nathalie; Rief, Harald; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja; Bruckner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for endometrial cancer (EC) may affect patients' quality of life (QoL). There is a paucity of data on prognostic factors for long-term QoL and sexual functioning. This study aimed to investigate such factors and assess the role of the vaginal dilator (VD). QoL was assessed in 112 EC patients 6 years (median) after RT. QoL was compared to normative data, and the influence of age, tumor characteristics, lymphadenectomy, RT, and acute toxicities was assessed. VD use and its effect on subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was analyzed. QoL was reduced, particularly in younger patients. Vaginal brachytherapy only and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) were associated with better global health status and reduced chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Higher acute GI toxicity was associated with increased chronic GI symptoms, particularly diarrhea, and reduced role functioning. Higher acute urinary toxicity was associated with increased chronic urological symptoms, muscular/pelvic pain, and chronic GI symptoms, as well as with reduced emotional/social functioning and reduced global health status. Sexual interest/activity was increased despite vaginal dryness and dyspareunia. Sexual interest/activity increased with age. Only few, mainly younger patients used the VD. VD use >1 year was found in women with higher sexual interest/activity. Acute vaginal toxicity and chronic pain prevented VD use. Subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not reduced in VD users. RT technique and acute toxicities are prognostic for the extent of chronic symptoms and long-term QoL. Sexuality is important even at a higher age. Few patients use the VD and a reduction of subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not achieved. (orig.) [de

  5. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  6. Anthracycline and concurrent radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment of operable breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study in a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Guddari Brahim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT after breast surgery was investigated by few authors and remains controversial, because of concerns of toxicity with taxanes/anthracyclines and radiation. This treatment is not standard and is more commonly used for locally advanced breast cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the concomitant use of anthracycline with radiotherapy (RT. Findings Four hundred women having operable breast cancer, treated by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT and RT in concomitant way between January 2001 and December 2003, were included in this retrospective cohort study. The study compares 2 adjuvant treatments using CCRT, the first with anthracycline (group A and the second with CMF (group B. The CT treatment was repeated every 21 days for 6 courses and the total delivered dose of RT was 50 Gy, divided as 2 Gy daily fractions. Locoregional recurrence free (LRFS, event free (EFS, and overall survivals (OS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival events. Multivariate Cox-regression was used to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics, treatment and survival. In the 2 groups (A+B (n = 400; 249 in group A and 151 in group B, the median follow-up period was 74.5 months. At 5 years, the isolated LRFS was significantly higher in group A compared to group B (98.7% vs 95.3%; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.258; 95% CI, 0.067 to 0.997; log-rank P = .034. In addition, the use of anthracycline regimens was associated with a higher rate of 5 years EFS (80.4% vs 75.1%; HR = 0.665; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.016; log-rank P = .057. The 5 years OS was 83.2% and 79.2% in the anthracycline and CMF groups, respectively (HR = 0.708; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.128; log-rank P = .143. Multivariate analysis confirmed the positive effect of anthracycline regimens on LRFS (HR = 0.347; 95% CI, 0.114 to 1.053; log-rank P = .062, EFS (HR = 0.539; 95% CI, 0.344 to 0.846; P

  7. Adjuvant or radical fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with pituitary functional and nonfunctional macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFRT for patients with pituitary macroadenoma (PMA. Methods and Materials Between March 2000 and March 2009, 27 patients (male to female ratio, 1.25 with PMA underwent SFRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy. Mean age of the patients was 56.5 years (range, 20.3 - 77.4. In all but one patient, SFRT was administered for salvage treatment after surgical resection (transphenoidal resection in 23, transphenoidal resection followed by craniotomy in 2 and multiple transphenoidal resections in another patient. In 10 (37% patients, the PMAs were functional (3 ACTH-secreting, 3 prolactinomas, 2 growth hormone-secreting and 2 multiple hormone-secretion. Three (11.1% and 9 (33.3% patients had PMA abutting and compressing the optic chiasm, respectively. Mean tumor volume was 2.9 ± 4.6 cm3. Eighteen (66.7% patients had hypopituitarism prior to SFRT. The mean follow-up period after SFRT was 72.4 ± 37.2 months. Results Tumor size decreased for 6 (22.2% patients and remained unchanged for 19 (70.4% other patients. Two (7.4% patients had tumor growth inside the prescribed treatment volume. The estimated 5-year tumor growth control was 95.5% after SFRT. Biochemical remission occurred in 3 (30% patients with functional PMA. Two patients with normal anterior pituitary function before SFRT developed new deficits 25 and 65 months after treatment. The 5-year survival without new anterior pituitary deficit was thus 95.8%. Five patients with visual field defect had improved visual function and 1 patient with no visual defect prior to SFRT, but an optic chiasm abutting tumor, had a decline in visual function. The estimated 5-year vision and pituitary function preservation rates were 93.2% and 95.8%, respectively. Conclusions SFRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with PMA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. In this study, approximately 1

  8. Total skin electron beam therapy followed by adjuvant psoralen/ultraviolet-a light in the management of patients with T1 and T2 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros, Peter A.; Jones, Glenn W.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Braverman, Irwin M.; Heald, Peter W.; Edelson, Richard L.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with mycosis fungoides [cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)] may benefit from adjuvant therapy after completing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT). We report the results for (T1(T2)) CTCL patients treated with adjuvant oral psoralen plus ultraviolet light (PUVA) with respect to overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), salvage of recurrence, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1993, TSEBT was administered to a total of 213 patients with CTCL. Records were reviewed retrospectively, and a total of 114 patients were identified as having T1 or T2 disease. Radiotherapy was provided via a 6-MeV linac to a total of 36 Gy, 1 Gy/day, 4 days/week, for 9 weeks. Beginning in 1988, patients were offered adjuvant PUVA within 2 months of completing TSEBT. This was started at 0.5-2 J/m 2 , 1-2 treatments/week, with a taper over 3-6 months. Therapy then continued once per month. There were 39 T1 and 75 T2 patients. Six T1 (15%) and eight T2 (11%) patients were treated with adjuvant PUVA. A further 49% of the 114 patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, 3% received spot external beam, 4% received adjuvant ECP, 2% received topical nitrogen mustard, 22% received a combination of therapies exclusive of PUVA, and 9% received no adjuvant therapy. Patients were balanced in all subgroups based on pre-TSEBT therapy. The median age of the cohort was 58 (range 20-88), with a median follow-up time of 62 months (range 3-179). Results: Within 1 month after completing of TSEBT, 97% of T1, and 87% of T2 patients had achieved a complete remission. Stratified by adjuvant therapy, none of six T1 and one of eight T2 patients who received adjuvant PUVA failed within the first 3 years after completion of TSEBT. A total of 43% of the T1 and T2 patients receiving other or no adjuvant treatment failed within the same time course. The 5-year OS for the entire cohort was 85%. Those who received PUVA had a 5-year OS of 100% versus a 5-year OS for the non

  9. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Urology; Donker, R. [Medical Center Alkmaar (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; McColl, G.M.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-06-15

    Background and purpose: Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients and methods: Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. Results: In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Conclusion: Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved. (orig.)

  10. Use of Polymethyl Methacrylate-Based Cement for Cosmetic Correction of Donor-Site Defect following Transposition of Temporalis Myofascial Flap and Evaluation of Results after Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandlik, Dushyant; Gupta, Karan; Patel, Daxesh; Patel, Purvi; Toprani, Rajendra; Patel, Kaustubh

    2015-11-01

    Temporalis myofascial flap is a versatile flap for reconstruction of the oral cavity defects, but results in an esthetically compromised deformity at the donor site. We used polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement to correct the volume loss defect caused by temporalis myofascial flap and evaluated its results before and after adjuvant radiotherapy. We discuss our experience of using PMMA cement to augment donor-site deformity in 25 patients (17 males, 8 females) between years 2005 and 2009. The primary defect was a result of the ablative surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alveolar and the buccoalveolar sulcus. A modified curved hemicoronal incision was used as an access for better cosmetic outcome. The volume of cement required was decided during the surgery. All patients are in regular follow-up, alive and free of complications at implant site, except one patient who developed wound dehiscence. The condition of the implant was evaluated by postoperative computed tomographic scan, repeated after adjuvant radiotherapy in cases required. There were no radiation-induced changes in the contour and volume of the implants. Cosmetic result of the implant was reported satisfactory by the patients postoperatively.  Restoration of the temporal area defect after the temporalis myofascial flap harvest with the use of PMMA cement is an easy and safe method, with excellent esthetic results. The implant is stable and resistant to any changes in contour and loss of volume even after adjuvant radiotherapy, with no added morbidity to the patients. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Adjuvant stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the resection cavity in recurrent glioblastoma - the GlioCave study (NOA 17 - ARO 2016/3 - DKTK ROG trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Christoph; Scherb, Hagen; Gempt, Jens; Kirschke, Jan; Zimmer, Claus; Schmidt-Graf, Friederike; Meyer, Bernhard; Combs, Stephanie E

    2018-01-03

    Glioblastoma relapses in the vast majority of cases within 1 year. Maximum safe resection of the recurrent glioblastoma can be offered in some cases. Re-irradiation has been established for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, too. In both cases, adjuvant treatment, mostly using temozolomide, can improve PFS and OS after these interventions. However, combining gross tumor resection and adjuvant re-radiotherapy to the resection cavity has not been tested so far. In the multicenter two-armed randomized Phase II GlioCave Study, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to the resection cavity, after gross tumor resection of recurrent glioblastoma, will be compared to observation. Depending on the size of the target volume, a total dose of 46 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction or a total dose if 36 Gy in 3 Gy per fraction will be applied. Progression free survival will be the primary endpoint of the study. Adjuvant treatment after gross tumor resection of recurrent glioblastoma is currently deemed to be limited to chemotherapy. However, re-irradiation has proven safety and tolerability in the treatment of macroscopic disease. Performing re-irradiation as an adjuvant measure after gross tumor resection has not been tested so far. The GlioCave Study will investigate the efficacy and the safety profile of this approach. The trial was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT02715297 , registration date February 29th, 2016). The protocol presented hereby refers to the version 1.2 of the protocol (January 11 th , 2017).

  12. Review of common accidents in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombogo, C.M

    2015-02-01

    This work covers patients protection in Radiotherapy which is a multi step procedure that is complex. Any error in any step has an effect on the patient and therefore the entire process requires attention to details in order to achieve patients protection. This project reviews eight case studies involving accidents that occurred during the process of therapy delivery. Professionalism in case one and two was not practiced in that in case one medical physicist failed to calculate decay data instead relied on incorrect decay graph thus giving wrong dose. While in case two a wrong TPS was approved following a formal written procedure due to new technology. In case three and seven there was a software malfunction due to uniformed choice of TPS and in case four a computer file was not updated in the TPS while in eight the failure is inter look system led to patients recieving high dose than was prescribed. Calibration in case five and six was due to wrong actions in both repairs and interpretation of treatment time than the overdose to patient. The lessen learnt seeks to act as a checklist for ensuring patient protection in radiotherapy and prevention of future accidents. (au)

  13. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  14. Metastatic clival chordoma: a case report of multiple extraneural metastases following resection and proton beam radiotherapy in a 5-year old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Martin J; Birk, Harjus S; Wood, Matthew D; Perry, Arie; Nicolaides, Theodore; Ames, Christopher P; Gupta, Nalin

    2017-05-01

    The authors report the case of a 5-year-old boy in whom extraneural metastases developed 5 years after he underwent an occipitocervical fusion and transoral approach to treat a clival chordoma without local recurrence. Following primary resection, the patient's postoperative course was complicated by recurrent meningitis secondary to CSF leak, which responded to antibiotics, and communicating hydrocephalus, for which a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed. The patient then underwent postoperative proton beam radiotherapy. Five years following his initial presentation, surveillance imaging revealed a new asymptomatic lung mass for which the patient underwent thoracotomy and resection of the mass. Histological examination of the lung mass revealed findings consistent with a de-differentiated chordoma, confirming extraneural metastasis from the original tumor without evidence of local recurrence. Chest wall and scalp metastases subsequently developed, and the patient was started on an adjuvant chemotherapy regimen that included imatinib and rapamycin followed by subsequent nivolumab and an EZH2 inhibitor for recurrent, disseminated disease. Despite this patient's remote and distant metastases, primary gross-total resection for chordoma remains a critical treatment objective, followed by proton beam radiotherapy. This case illustrates the importance of interval posttreatment imaging and the emerging potential to treat chordoma with molecularly targeted therapies.

  15. Postoperative External Beam Radiotherapy for Retroperitoneal Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Na Yong; Kim, Il Han; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas treated by postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 23 patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas, who underwent postoperative radiotherapy between 1985 and 2003, were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 77 months (range, 8-240 months). A total of 21 patients presented with primary disease, and two patients presented with recurrent disease. Liposarcomas and leiomyosarcomas represented 78% of the diagnosed tumor cases. Moreover, 17 cases were of high grade (grade 2 or 3). The median tumor size was 13 cm (range, 3-50 cm). Complete excision was achieved in 65% of patients. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0 to 59.4 Gy), with conventional fractionation. The 5-year overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 68%, 58%, and 71%, respectively. Eleven patients experienced local recurrence, while 9 patients experienced distant metastasis. The most common site for distant metastasis was the liver. A univariate analysis revealed that adjacent organ invasion and age (>60 years) as the significant risk factors contributing to the prediction of poor overall survival. Moreover, multivariate analyses indicated that adjacent organ invasion remained significantly associated with a higher risk of death. In addition, patient age (>60 years) was the other identified risk factor for local recurrence by univariate and multivariate analyses. Except for one case of grade 3 diarrhea, no patient suffered grade 3 or higher complications. Our results were comparable to previous reports in that adjacent organ invasion and patient age (>60 years) were significant predictors of poor survival and tumor recurrence, respectively.

  16. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  17. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of pain from metastatic carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.C. Jr.; Hasan, S.M.; Jones, A.G.; Schlise, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy often is used for palliation of bone pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate but an objective evaluation of its efficacy in a large series of patients is unavailable. We report the results of external beam irradiation in 62 patients who had bone pain secondary to stage D carcinoma of the prostate. The variables used to judge pain before and after radiotherapy included subjective evaluation of pain, status of activity and quantitation of analgesic use. Complete relief of pain was achieved in 26 patients (42 per cent), partial relief in 22 (35 per cent) and no relief in 14 (23 per cent). On the basis of our experience external beam irradiation is useful palliative therapy for pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate

  18. Dose-individualized stereotactic body radiotherapy for T1-3N0 non-small cell lung cancer: Long-term results and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongshun; Guo Wenhao; Lu You; Zou Bingwen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of dose-individualized stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and adjuvant chemotherapy in stage T1-3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Sixty-five patients with T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated by SBRT between April 2001 and August 2005 were included. Twenty patients were CT-staged at stage T1, 34 at stage T2, and 11 at stage T3. All patients underwent no elective nodal irradiation. SBRT total doses ranged from 71.8 to 115.2 Gy of biological equivalent dose (BED) in 3.6 to 8.0 Gy daily fractions. Seventeen patients were offered cisplatin-containing adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: The overall response rate was 90.6% at six months. The 3- and 5-year overall survival rates for all patients were 57.3% and 35.1%, respectively, and for stage T1-2 patients these were 60.2, 36.5%, respectively. Of all patients, the 3- and 5-year overall survival rates of adjuvant chemotherapy group were 80.5% and 46.0%, respectively, and those of patients with SBRT alone were 49.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who accepted adjuvant chemotherapy had a lower relapse rate and better overall survival. Acute toxicities were mild, and no long-term toxicity was observed. Conclusions: Patients treated with the dose-individualization strategy of SBRT showed excellent local control and improved survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the frequency of relapse and increase overall survival in stage at T1-3N0M0 NSCLC patients

  19. External beam radiotherapy boosted with high dose rate brachytherapy in completely resected uterine sarcomas. Is this a treatment option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogarolli, Ricardo; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sarcoma (US) is a relative rare tumor, which accounts for only about 3-5% of all uterine cancers. Aggressive cytoreductive surgery at the time of the initial diagnosis with maximum tumor debulking may lead to a prolonged survival or cure. Objective: to identify and review the role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the management of patients presenting US with complete resection. Material and methods: this study is a retrospective analysis of 23 patients with US treated from 10/92 to 03/03, with surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB). The inclusion criteria for study participation included: histologically proven and graded US, completely resection of tumor, Karnofsky status 60-100, absence of significant infection, and recovery from recent surgery. Results: The median age of patients was 62 years (range 39-84); ten-year actuarial disease-free and overall survivals were 42.2% and 63.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictive factors for disease-free survival (DFS) were age at initial presentation (p=0.0268), parity (p=0.0441), tumor grade (p= 0.0095), cervical or vaginal invasion (p=0.0014) and node dissection at time of surgery (p= 0.0471). On multivariate analysis, the only predictive factor was cervical or vaginal invasion (p= 0.048), hazard ratio of 4.7. Conclusion: it is quite likely that neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy alone will appreciably improve survival in US. If radiation therapy provides better locoregional tumor control, hematogenous metastases will assume an even greater proportion of treatment failures. Unfortunately, our small and heterogeneous group analyzed precludes any definitive conclusions about the impact of HDRB associated to EBRT radiation therapy on recurrence or survival. (author)

  20. An algorithm for fast beam angle selection in intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitheeswaran, R; Narayanan, V K Sathiya; Bhangle, Janhavi R; Nirhali, Amit; Kumar, Namitha; Basu, Sumit; Maiya, Vikram

    2010-12-01

    This article aims to introduce a novel algorithm for fast beam angle selection in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The algorithm models the optimization problem as a beam angle ranking problem and chooses suitable beam angles according to their rank. A new parameter called "beam intensity profile perturbation score (BIPPS)" is used for ranking the beam angles. The BIPPS-based beam angle ranking implicitly accounts for the dose-volume effects of the involved structures. A simulated phantom case with obvious optimal beam angles is used to verify the validity of the presented technique. In addition, the efficiency of the algorithm was examined in three clinical cases (prostate, pancreas, and head and neck) in terms of DVH and dose distribution. In all cases, the judgment of the algorithm's efficiency was based on the comparison between plans with equidistant beams (equal-angle-plan) and plans with beams obtained using the algorithm (suitable-angle-plan). It is observed from the study that the beam angle ranking function over BIPPS instantly picks up a suitable set of beam angles for a specific case. It takes only about 15 min for choosing the suitable beam angles even for the most complicated cases. The DVHs and dose distributions confirm that the proposed algorithm can efficiently reduce the mean or maximum dose to OARs, while guaranteeing the target coverage and dose uniformity. On the average, about 17% reduction in the mean dose to critical organs, such as rectum, bladder, kidneys and parotids, is observed. Also, about 12% (averaged) reduction in the maximum dose to critical organs (spinal cord) is observed in the clinical cases presented in this study. This study demonstrates that the algorithm can be effectively applied to IMRT scenarios to get fast and case specific beam angle configurations.

  1. Constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbottom, C.G.; Oldham, M.; Webb, S.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology for the constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy treatment planning has been developed and tested on a cohort of five patients with tumours of the brain. The methodology employed a combination of single and multibeam cost functions to produce customized beam orientations. The single-beam cost function was used to reduce the search space for the multibeam cost function, which was minimized using a fast simulated annealing algorithm. The scheme aims to produce well-spaced, customized beam orientations for each patient that produce low dose to organs at risk (OARs). The customized plans were compared with standard plans containing the number and orientation of beams chosen by a human planner. The beam orientation constraint-customized plans employed the same number of treatment beams as the standard plan but with beam orientations chosen by the constrained-customization scheme. Improvements from beam orientation constraint-customization were studied in isolation by customizing the beam weights of both plans using a dose-based downhill simplex algorithm. The results show that beam orientation constraint-customization reduced the maximum dose to the orbits by an average of 18.8 (±3.8, 1SD)% and to the optic nerves by 11.4 (±4.8, 1SD)% with no degradation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution. The mean doses, averaged over the patient cohort, were reduced by 4.2 (±1.1, 1SD)% and 12.4 (±3.1 1SD)% for the orbits and optic nerves respectively. In conclusion, the beam orientation constraint-customization can reduce the dose to OARs, for few-beam treatment plans, when compared with standard treatment plans developed by a human planner. (author)

  2. Study of the alignment of X radiation beam for calibration of chambers used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The activities developed in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation safety, require that the metrological parameters involving these activities have on its results a high degree of reliability, to ensure traceability. To meet the existing demand in Brazil, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying a new tube X-ray beams used in the calibration of the standard rooms, which serve to quality control in hospitals, clinics and industry. (author)

  3. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  4. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-04-19

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 "treatment plans" (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the "target coverage" was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5-2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature's preliminary data are confirming also a

  5. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 “treatment plans” (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the “target coverage” was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5–2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature’s preliminary data are confirming

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Dose calculations for external photon beams in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, Anders; Mania Aspradakis, Maria

    1999-11-01

    Dose calculation methods for photon beams are reviewed in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Following introductory summaries on photon beam characteristics and clinical requirements on dose calculations, calculation methods are described in order of increasing explicitness of particle transport. The simplest are dose ratio factorizations limited to point dose estimates useful for checking other more general, but also more complex, approaches. Some methods incorporate detailed modelling of scatter dose through differentiation of measured data combined with various integration techniques. State-of-the-art methods based on point or pencil kernels, which are derived through Monte Carlo simulations, to characterize secondary particle transport are presented in some detail. Explicit particle transport methods, such as Monte Carlo, are briefly summarized. The extensive literature on beam characterization and handling of treatment head scatter is reviewed in the context of providing phase space data for kernel based and/or direct Monte Carlo dose calculations. Finally, a brief overview of inverse methods for optimization and dose reconstruction is provided.

  7. Adjuvant temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in patients with WHO III astrocytoma. The Mainz experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Arnulf; Schwanbeck, Carina; Stockinger, Marcus; Vaupel, Peter; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Sommer, Clemens [University Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Mainz (Germany); Giese, Alf; Renovanz, Mirjam [University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    It is currently unclear whether adjuvant therapy for WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytomas (AA) should be carried out as combined chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) - analogous to the approach for glioblastoma multiforme - or as radiotherapy (RT) alone. A retrospective analysis of data from 90 patients with AA, who were treated between November 1997 and February 2014. Assessment of overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was performed according to treatment categories: (1) 50 %, RT + TMZ according to protocol, (2) 11 %, RT + TMZ with dose reduction, (3) 26 %, RT alone, and (4) 13 %, individualized, primarily palliative therapy. No dose reduction was necessary in the RT alone group. Median OS was 85, 69, and 43 months for treatment categories 1/2, 3, and 4, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. PFS was 35, 29, 48, and 33 months for categories 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively; again without significant differences between categories. In a subgroup of 39 patients with known IDH1 R132H status, the presence of this mutation correlated with significantly longer OS (p = 0.01) and PFS (p = 0.002). Complete or partial tumor resection and younger age also correlated with a significantly better prognosis, and this influence persisted in multivariate analysis. In the IDH1 R132H subgroup analysis, only this marker retained an independent prognostic value. A general superiority of combined chemoradiotherapy compared to RT alone could not be demonstrated. Biomarkers for predicting the benefits of combination therapy using RT and TMZ are needed for patients with AA. (orig.) [German] Es ist derzeit unklar, ob bei anaplastischen Astrozytomen (AA) vom WHO-Grad III eine adjuvante Therapie analog zur Therapiestrategie beim Glioblastoma multiforme als kombinierte Radiochemotherapie mit Temozolomid (TMZ) oder als alleinige Radiotherapie (RT) durchgefuehrt werden sollte. Retrospektiv wurden die Daten von 90 Patienten mit AA, die zwischen November

  8. Prognostic factors for long-term quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy in women with endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Robert; Schnetzke, Lara; Arians, Nathalie; Rief, Harald; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruckner, Thomas [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Medical Biometry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for endometrial cancer (EC) may affect patients' quality of life (QoL). There is a paucity of data on prognostic factors for long-term QoL and sexual functioning. This study aimed to investigate such factors and assess the role of the vaginal dilator (VD). QoL was assessed in 112 EC patients 6 years (median) after RT. QoL was compared to normative data, and the influence of age, tumor characteristics, lymphadenectomy, RT, and acute toxicities was assessed. VD use and its effect on subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was analyzed. QoL was reduced, particularly in younger patients. Vaginal brachytherapy only and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) were associated with better global health status and reduced chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Higher acute GI toxicity was associated with increased chronic GI symptoms, particularly diarrhea, and reduced role functioning. Higher acute urinary toxicity was associated with increased chronic urological symptoms, muscular/pelvic pain, and chronic GI symptoms, as well as with reduced emotional/social functioning and reduced global health status. Sexual interest/activity was increased despite vaginal dryness and dyspareunia. Sexual interest/activity increased with age. Only few, mainly younger patients used the VD. VD use >1 year was found in women with higher sexual interest/activity. Acute vaginal toxicity and chronic pain prevented VD use. Subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not reduced in VD users. RT technique and acute toxicities are prognostic for the extent of chronic symptoms and long-term QoL. Sexuality is important even at a higher age. Few patients use the VD and a reduction of subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not achieved. (orig.) [German] Eine adjuvante Radiotherapie (RT) kann die Lebensqualitaet von Patientinnen mit Endometriumkarzinom (EC) beeinflussen. Daten zu prognostischen Faktoren fuer die langfristige Lebensqualitaet (QoL) und die Sexualfunktion sind

  9. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marucci Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months, all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area and teleangectasia (2 limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%. Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late

  10. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  11. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was ≥5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were ≤2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation

  12. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy

  13. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  14. The use of beam code in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillerminet, C.; Gschwind, R.; Makovicka, L.

    2003-01-01

    This code, in constant evolution, has several assets because it allows in one hand to better characterize the beams at the energy and angular level of accelerators at medical use; these data being accessible only by simulation and on the other hand to establish a three dimensional dose calculation fro any phantom. The limit factors are the calculation time, the size of voxels need important dimension tables for the data storage, and the compatibility between the code and the different images formats. (N.C.)

  15. A quality audit program for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.F.; Stovall, M. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31

    For more than 25 years, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has had a quality audit program using mailed dosimeters to verify radiation therapy machine output. Two programs, one compulsory and one voluntary, presently monitor therapy beams at more than 1000 megavoltage-therapy facilities. A successful program requires two major components: a high-precision thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system and dedicated staff that interact closely with the users to resolve discrepancies. The TLD system, the logistics used, and the human interaction of these programs are described. Examples show that the programs can identify major discrepancies, exceeding 5 %, as well as discrepancies as small as 3%.

  16. A quality audit program for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, W.F.; Stovall, M.

    1993-01-01

    For more than 25 years, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has had a quality audit program using mailed dosimeters to verify radiation therapy machine output. Two programs, one compulsory and one voluntary, presently monitor therapy beams at more than 1000 megavoltage-therapy facilities. A successful program requires two major components: a high-precision thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system and dedicated staff that interact closely with the users to resolve discrepancies. The TLD system, the logistics used, and the human interaction of these programs are described. Examples show that the programs can identify major discrepancies, exceeding 5 %, as well as discrepancies as small as 3%

  17. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-01

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  18. European developments in radiotherapy with beams of large radiobiological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Kraft, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the European activities in the field of tumour therapy with beams which have a Radio Biological Effectiveness (RBE) larger than 1. Initially neutron beams have been used. Then charged pions promised better cure rates so that their use was pursued in the framework of the ;Piotron' project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland). However both approaches did not meet the expectations and in the 80s the EULIMA project became the flagship of these attempts to improve the effects of the delivery of radiation doses of large RBE with respect to photons, electrons and even protons. The EULIMA ion accelerator was never built and it took more than ten years to see the approval, in Heidelberg and Pavia, of the construction of the HIT and CNAO ;dual' centres for carbon ions and protons. In 2008 they will start treating patients. The developments that brought to these construction projects are described together with the special features of these two facilities. The third European dual centre is being built by Siemens Medical Systems in Marburg, Germany, while other facilities have been approved but not yet fully financed in Wiener Neustadt (Austria), Lyon (France) and Uppsala (Sweden). Finally the collaboration activities of the European Network ENLIGHT are presented together with the recent involvements of European industries in the construction of turn-key dual centres and the development of a new accelerator concept for hadrontherapy, the ;cyclinac'.

  19. VMAT radiation-induced nausea and vomiting in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy: The incidental effect of low-dose bath exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis on low-dose bath exposure related to radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV in adjuvant breast volumetric modulated arch therapy (VMAT. Methods and materials: A total of 106 consecutive breast cancer patients (pts treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT with VMAT from January 2013 to May 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. For each pt, a planning CT was reimported and the coeliac plexus and gastroesophageal junction with gastric mouth (GEJCPs were contoured as a new organ at risk (OAR in the upper abdominal area. RINV was associated with Dmax and Dmean to GEJCPs. Univariate analysis with χ2, t-test, and Pearson’s covariance was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of 106 pts, 64% complained of acute RINV according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.03. RINV was related to Dmax > 10 Gy and Dmean > 3 Gy to GEJCPs (P < 0.005. The radiation breast side and planning target volume (PTV correlated with RINV. Conclusions: RINV in VMAT breast radiotherapy could be a new emerging acute side effect due to a low dose bath to upper abdominal structures such as the GEJCPs. A Dmax < 10 Gy and Dmean < 3 Gy to GEJCPs should be constrained in VMAT planning to minimize RINV risk in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Volumetric modulated arch therapy, Gastroesophageal junction, Coeliac plexus, Nausea, Vomit

  20. European developments in radiotherapy with beams of large radiobiological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.; Kraft, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the European activities in the field of tumour therapy with beams which have a Radio Biological Effectiveness (RBE) larger than 1. Initially neutron beams have been used. Then charged pions promised better cure rates so that their use was pursued in the framework of the 'Piotron' project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland). However both approaches did not meet the expectations and in the 80s the European Light Ion Medical Accelerator (EULIMA) project became the flagship of these attempts to improve the effects of the delivery of radiation doses of large RBE with respect to photons, electrons and even protons. The EULIMA ion accelerator was never built and it took more than ten years to see the approval, in Heidelberg and Pavia, of the construction of the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Centre (HIT) and National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) 'dual' centres for carbon ions and protons. In 2008 they will start treating patients. The developments that brought to these construction projects are described together with the special features of these two facilities. The third European dual centre is being built by Siemens Medical Systems in Marburg, Germany, while other facilities have been approved but not yet fully financed in Wiener Neustadt (Austria), Lyon (France) and Uppsala (Sweden). Finally the collaboration activities of the European Network the European Network for Light Ion Therapy (ENLIGHT) are presented together with the recent involvements of European industries in the construction of turn-key dual centres and the development of a new accelerator concept for hadrontherapy, the 'cyclinac'. (author)

  1. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calugaru, V.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment planning in proton therapy uses a generic value for the Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of 1.1 relative to 60 Co gamma-rays throughout the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). We have studied the variation of the RBE at three positions in the SOBP of the 76 and 201 MeV proton beams used for cancer treatment at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy in Orsay (ICPO) in two human tumor cell lines using clonogenic cell death and the incidence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis without and with endonuclease treatment to reveal clustered lesions as endpoints.The RBE for induced cell killing by the 76 MeV beam increased with depth in the SOBP. However for the 201 MeV protons it was close to that for 137 Cs gamma-rays and did not vary significantly. The incidence of DSBs and clustered lesions was higher for protons than for 137 Cs g-rays, but did not depend on the proton energy or the position in the SOBP. In the second part of our work, we have shown using cell clones made deficient for known repair genes by stable or transient shRNA transfection, that the D-NHEJ pathway determine the response to protons. The response of DNA damages created in the distal part of the 76 MeV SOBP suggests that those damages belong to the class of DNA 'complex lesions' (LMDS). It also appears that the particle fluence is a major determinant of the outcome of treatment in the distal part of the SOBP. (author)

  2. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J.; Boziari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002 - 2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. Materials and Methods: The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. Results: The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside ±3% and 31% outside ±5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and

  3. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J; Boziari, A

    2008-04-01

    Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002--2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside +/-3% and 31% outside +/-5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and discussed in details. This quality audit proved to be a

  4. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 {approx}115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1{approx}3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two

  5. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  6. Clinical application of intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy with photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu

    2005-01-01

    In modern, advanced radiotherapy (e.g. intensity modulated photon radiotherapy, IMXT) the delivery time for each fraction becomes prolonged to 10-20 minutes compared with the conventional, commonly 2-5 minutes. The biological effect of this prolongation is not fully known. The large number of beam directions in IMXT commonly leads to a large integral dose in the patient. Electrons would reduce the integral dose but are not suitable for treating deep-seated tumour, due to their limited penetration in tissues. By combining electron and photon beams, the dose distributions may be improved compared with either used alone. One obstacle for using electron beams in clinical routine is that there is no available treatment planning systems that optimise electron beam treatments in a similar way as for IMXT. Protons have an even more pronounced dose fall-off, larger penetration depth and less penumbra widening than electrons and are therefore more suitable for advanced radiotherapy. However, proton facilities optimised for advanced radiotherapy are not commonly available. In some instances electron beams may be an acceptable surrogate. The first part of this study is an experimental in vitro study where the situation in a tumour during fractionated radiotherapy is simulated. The effect of the prolonged fraction time is compared with the predictions by radiobiological models. The second part is a treatment planning study to analyse the mixing of electron and photon beams for at complex target volume in comparison with IMXT. In the next step a research version of an electron beam optimiser was used for the improvement of treatment plans. The aim was to develop a method for translating crude energy and intensity matrices for optimised electrons into a deliverable treatment plan without destroying the dose distribution. In the final part, different methods of treating the spinal canal in medulloblastoma were explored in a treatment planning study that was evaluated with

  7. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  8. Accuracy of image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the BeamCath urethral catheter technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fokdal, Lars; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the accuracy of the BeamCath urethral catheter technique for prostate localization during radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-four patients were CT scanned twice with the BeamCath catheter, and once without the catheter. The catheter contains radiopaque...

  9. Proton beam radiotherapy as part of comprehensive regional nodal irradiation for locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Iftekaruddin, Zaid; Badar, Nida; Hartsell, William; Han-Chih Chang, John; Gondi, Vinai; Pankuch, Mark; Gao, Ming; Schmidt, Stacey; Kaplan, Darren; McGee, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluates acute toxicity outcomes in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant proton beam therapy (PBT). From 2011 to 2016, 91 patients (93 cancers) were treated with adjuvant PBT targeting the intact breast/chest wall and comprehensive regional nodes including the axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary lymph nodes. Toxicity was recorded weekly during treatment, one month following treatment, and then every 6months according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v4.0. Charts were retrospectively reviewed to verify toxicities, patient parameters, disease and treatment characteristics, and disease-related outcomes. Median follow-up was 15.5months. Median PBT dose was 50.4 Gray relative biological effectiveness (GyRBE), with subsequent boost as clinically indicated (N=61, median 10 GyRBE). Chemotherapy, when administered, was given adjuvantly (N=42) or neoadjuvantly (N=46). Grades 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis occurred in 23%, 72%, and 5%, respectively. Eight percent required treatment breaks owing to dermatitis. Median time to resolution of dermatitis was 32days. Grades 1, 2, and 3 esophagitis developed in 31%, 33%, and 0%, respectively. PBT displays acceptable toxicity in the setting of comprehensive regional nodal irradiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A Preliminary Design Of Application Of Wireless Identification And Sensing Platform On External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heranudin; Bakhri, S.

    2018-02-01

    A linear accelerator (linac) is widely used as a means of radiotherapy by focusing high-energy photons in the targeted tumor of patient. Incorrectness of the shooting can lead normal tissue surrounding the tumor received unnecessary radiation and become damaged cells. A method is required to minimize the incorrectness that mostly caused by movement of the patient during radiotherapy process. In this paper, the Wireless Identification and Sensing Platform (WISP) architecture was employed to monitor in real time the movement of the patient’s body during radiotherapy process. In general, the WISP is a wearable sensors device that can transmit measurement data wirelessly. In this design, the measurement devices consist of an accelerometer, a barometer and an ionizing radiation sensor. If any changes in the body position which resulted in incorrectness of the shooting, the accelerometer and the barometer will trigger a warning to the linac operator. In addition, the radiation sensor in the WISP will detect unwanted radiation and that can endanger the patient. A wireless feature in this device can ease in implementation. Initial analyses have been performed and showed that the WISP is feasible to be applied on external beam radiotherapy.

  11. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  12. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of the absorbed dose in the very small size photon beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derreumaux, S.; Huet, C.; Robbes, I.; Trompier, F.; Boisserie, G.; Brunet, G.; Buchheit, I.; Sarrazin, T.; Chea, M.

    2008-01-01

    After the radiotherapy accident in Toulouse, the French authority of nuclear safety and the French agency of health products safety have asked the IR.S.N. to establish, together with experts from the French society of medical physics and the French society of radiotherapy and oncology, a national protocol on dose calibration for the very small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy. The research and reflexions of the working group 'GT minifaisceaux ' set up by the I.R.S.N. are presented in this final report. A review of the international literature has been performed. A national survey has been done to know the present practices in the dosimetry of small fields. A campaign of measurements of the data needed to characterize the small beams for the different stereotactic systems has started, using different types of detectors acquired by the I.R.S.N.. In this report are presented a deep synthesis on the problems related to the dosimetry of small fields, the results of the national survey, the first results of the campaign of measurements and the recommendations of the GT. (authors)

  14. Calculation of uncertainties in the protocol of dosimetry for Co 60 beams in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez M, S.; Carrera M, F.; Sanchez S, J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective in this work is to show how the uncertainty is possible to know in the determination of the absorbed dose in Co 60 photon beams and to establish in a rational form, tolerance levels for this. It is took as base the spanish protocol of dosimetry in Radiotherapy. We have been centered in a Co 60 beam. We utilized the statistical theory of little samples. We allowed to suggest a new approach about the treatment of the tolerance levels and the uncertainty of the measurement. After two years of experience in the practical hospitable application we have gotten to put around 1 % uncertainty in the absolute dosimetry of the Co 60 beam. The presented protocol allows to execute the accuracy requirements in the determination of absorbed doses. (Author)

  15. Initial clinical outcomes of proton beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Yoo, Gyu Sang; Cho, Sungkoo; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Boram; Kang, Wonseok; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Paik, Yong-Han; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Park, Hee Chul

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the initial outcomes of proton beam therapy (PBT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of tumor response and safety. HCC patients who were not indicated for standard curative local modalities and who were treated with PBT at Samsung Medical Center from January 2016 to February 2017 were enrolled. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Tumor response was evaluated using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). A total of 101 HCC patients treated with PBT were included. Patients were treated with an equivalent dose of 62-92 GyE 10 . Liver function status was not significantly affected after PBT. Greater than 80% of patients had Child-Pugh class A and albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) grade 1 up to 3-months after PBT. Of 78 patients followed for three months after PBT, infield complete and partial responses were achieved in 54 (69.2%) and 14 (17.9%) patients, respectively. PBT treatment of HCC patients showed a favorable infield complete response rate of 69.2% with acceptable acute toxicity. An additional follow-up study of these patients will be conducted.

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy after salvage lymph node dissection because of nodal relapse of prostate cancer versus salvage lymph node dissection only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rischke, Hans Christian [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Kroenig, Malte; Schlager, Daniel; Jilg, Cordula Annette [University of Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Drendel, Vanessa [University of Freiburg, Department of Pathology, Freiburg (Germany); Stegmaier, Petra; Henne, Karl; Volegova-Neher, Natalia; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Krauss, Tobias; Kirste, Simon [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Nodal pelvic/retroperitoneal recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) after primary therapy can be treated with salvage lymph node dissection (salvage-LND) in order to delay disease progression and offer cure for a subset of patients. Whether adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) in affected regions improves the outcome by elimination of residual tumour burden remains unclear. A total of 93 patients with exclusively nodal PCa relapse underwent choline-positron-emission tomography-computed-tomography-directed pelvic/retroperitoneal salvage-LND; 46 patients had surgery only and 47 patients received ART in regions with proven lymph node metastases. In case of subsequent prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression, different imaging modalities were performed to confirm next relapse within or outside the treated region (TR). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Lymphatic tumour burden was balanced between the two groups. Additional ART resulted in delayed relapse within TR (5-year relapse-free rate 70.7 %) versus surgery only (5-year relapse-free rate 26.3 %, p < 0.0001). In both treatment arms, time to next relapse outside the TR was almost equal (median 27 months versus 29.6 months, p = 0.359). With respect to the detection of the first new lesion, regardless if present within or outside the TR, 5 years after the treatment 34.3 % of patients in the group with additional ART were free of relapse, versus 15.4 % in the surgery only group (p = 0.0122). ART had no influence on the extent of PSA reduction at latest follow-up compared to treatment with surgery only. ART after salvage-LND provides stable local control in TR and results in overall significant improved next-relapse-free survival, compared to patients who received surgery only in case of nodal PCa-relapse. (orig.) [German] Das nodal positive Prostatakarzinom(PCa)-Rezidiv nach Primaertherapie kann durch eine Salvage-Lymphadenektomie (Salvage-LND) therapiert werden. Der Krankheitsprogress wird aufgehalten und selektionierte Patienten

  17. Beam angle selection for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer: are noncoplanar beam angles necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D S; Bartlett, G K; Das, I J; Cardenes, H R

    2013-09-01

    External beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT) is widely used for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Noncoplanar (NCP) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and coplanar (CP) IMRT have been reported to lower the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). The purpose of this article is to examine the utility of noncoplanar beam angles in IMRT for the management of pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients who were treated with CRT for unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or neck were re-planned using CP and NCP beams in 3DCRT and IMRT with the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Compared to CP IMRT, NCP IMRT had similar target coverage with slightly increased maximum point dose, 5,799 versus 5,775 cGy (p = 0.008). NCP IMRT resulted in lower mean kidney dose, 787 versus 1,210 cGy (p kidney dose, but did not improve other dose-volume criteria. The use of NCP beam angles is preferred only in patients with risk factors for treatment-related kidney dysfunction.

  18. Supine proton beam craniospinal radiotherapy using a novel tabletop adapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jbuchsba@iupui.edu [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Besemer, Abby; Simmons, Joseph; Hoene, Ted; Simoneaux, Victor; Sandefur, Amy [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Wolanski, Mark; Li, Zhao; Cheng, Chee-Wei [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2013-04-01

    To develop a device that allows supine craniospinal proton and photon therapy to the vast majority of proton and photon facilities currently experiencing limitations as a result of couch design issues. Plywood and carbon fiber were used for the development of a prototype unit. Once this was found to be satisfactory after all design issues were addressed, computer-assisted design (CAD) was used and carbon fiber tables were built to our specifications at a local manufacturer of military and racing car carbon fiber parts. Clinic-driven design was done using real-time team discussion for a prototype design. A local machinist was able to construct a prototype unit for us in <2 weeks after the start of our project. Once the prototype had been used successfully for several months and all development issues were addressed, a custom carbon fiber design was developed in coordination with a carbon fiber manufacturer in partnership. CAD methods were used to design the units to allow oblique fields from head to thigh on patients up to 200 cm in height. Two custom-designed carbon fiber craniospinal tabletop designs now exist: one long and one short. Four are in successful use in our facility. Their weight tolerance is greater than that of our robot table joint (164 kg). The long unit allows for working with taller patients and can be converted into a short unit as needed. An affordable, practical means of doing supine craniospinal therapy with protons or photons can be used in most locations via the use of these devices. This is important because proton therapy provides a much lower integral dose than all other therapy methods for these patients and the supine position is easier for patients to tolerate and for anesthesia delivery. These units have been successfully used for adult and pediatric supine craniospinal therapy, proton therapy using oblique beams to the low pelvis, treatment of various spine tumors, and breast-sparing Hodgkin's therapy.

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy improves overall survival in patients with resected gastric adenocarcinoma: A National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Priscilla K; Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Koshy, Matthew; Sher, David J; Lieu, Christopher H; Schefter, Tracey E; Goodman, Karyn A; Rusthoven, Chad G

    2017-09-01

    For patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma, perioperative chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) are considered standard options. In the current study, the authors used the National Cancer Data Base to compare overall survival (OS) between these regimens. Patients who underwent gastrectomy for nonmetastatic gastric adenocarcinoma from 2004 through 2012 were divided into those treated with perioperative chemotherapy without RT versus those treated with adjuvant CRT. Survival was estimated and compared using univariate and multivariate models adjusted for patient and tumor characteristics, surgical margin status, and the number of lymph nodes examined. Subset analyses were performed for factors chosen a priori, and potential interactions between treatment and covariates were assessed. A total of 3656 eligible patients were identified, 52% of whom underwent perioperative chemotherapy and 48% of whom received postoperative CRT. The median follow-up was 47 months, and the median age of the patients was 62 years. Analysis of the entire cohort demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT on both univariate (median of 51 months vs 42 months; P = .013) and multivariate (hazard ratio, 0.874; 95% confidence interval, 0.790-0.967 [P = .009]) analyses. Propensity score-matched analysis also demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT (median of 49 months vs 39 months; P = .033). On subset analysis, a significant interaction was observed between the survival impact of adjuvant RT and surgical margins, with a greater benefit of RT noted among patients with surgical margin-positive disease (hazard ratio with RT: 0.650 vs 0.952; P for interaction Cancer Data Base analysis, the use of adjuvant RT in addition to chemotherapy was associated with a significant OS advantage for patients with resected gastric cancer. The survival advantage observed with adjuvant CRT was most pronounced among patients with positive surgical margins. Cancer 2017;123:3402-9. © 2017 American

  20. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer with Extrathyroidal Extension: Prognosis and the Role of External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Sia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed to identify variables that affected cause-specific survival (CSS and local relapse-free rate (LRFR in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC and extrathyroid extension (ETE and to examine the role of external beam radiotherapy (XRT. Prognostic factors were similar to those found in studies of all patients with DTC. In patients with postoperative gross residual disease treated with radiotherapy, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 48% and 90%. For patients with no residual or microscopic disease, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 92% and 93%. In patients older than 60 years with T3 ETE but no gross residual disease postoperatively there was an improved LRFR at 5 years of 96%, compared to 87.5% without XRT (P=.02. Patients with gross ETE benefit from XRT and there may be a potential benefit in reducing locoregional failure in patients over 60 years with minimal extrathyroidal extension (T3.

  1. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Physics Department, University of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A. [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  2. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  3. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  4. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  5. External beam radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagerman, R.H.; Chun, H.C.; King, G.A.; Chung, C.T.; Dalal, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    Five hundred nineteen patients with prostate cancer were seen in the Radiation Oncology Division of the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center, Syracuse, New York, between 1969 and 1981. The results for the 239 patients treated with radical intent are reported here. All patients received 60 to 70 Gy to the prostate with megavoltage beam irradiation; 142 with a small field (10 X 10 cm) 360 degrees rotational technique for Stage A, B, or C disease and 69 with a four-field pelvic brick technique (followed by a boost to the prostate) for Stage A through C and D1 disease. Twenty-eight patients were treated postoperatively for residual disease after radical prostatectomy or for recurrent tumor. The minimum follow-up time was 5 years. Actuarial 5-year and 7-year survival rates for Stage A (n = 34), B (n = 100), C (n = 63), and D1 (n = 14) were 91% and 76%, 86% and 75%, 67% and 40%, and 46% and 36%, respectively. The corresponding 5-year and 7-year relapse-free survival rates were 72% and 65%, 77% and 60%, 46% and 28%, and 38% and 25%. The local tumor control rates at 5 years were 91%, 85%, 77%, and 62% for Stage A, B, C, and D1, respectively. In our experience, there was no significant difference in relapse-free survival rates for patients who underwent transurethral resection (TURP) versus those who did not (67% versus 78% for Stage B [P greater than 0.25] and 38% versus 47% for Stage C [P greater than 0.25], respectively). Also there was no significant difference in relapse-free survival rates between large and small field techniques (64% versus 77% for Stage B [P greater than 0.25] and 56% versus 41% for Stage C [P greater than 0.25], respectively). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial survival rates were 90% and 71%, respectively, for the 15 patients with residual tumor and 58% and 33%, respectively, for the 13 patients treated for postprostatectomy recurrence

  6. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  7. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  8. The role of radiotherapy in the management of extrahepatic bile duct cancer: an analysis of 145 consecutive patients treated with intraluminal and/or external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroya; Takamura, Akio; Nojima, Takayuki; Okushiba, Shun-Ichi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of high dose radiotherapy and to evaluate its role in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1991, 145 consecutive patients with EHBD cancer were treated by low dose rate intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation (ILRT) either alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Among the primarily irradiated, 77 patients unsuitable for surgical resection, 54 were enrolled in radical radiotherapy, and 23 received palliative radiotherapy. Fifty-nine received postoperative radiotherapy, and the remaining 9 preoperative radiotherapy. The mean radiation dose was 67.8 Gy, ranging from 10 to 135 Gy. Intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation was indicated in 103 patients, and 85 of them were combined with EBRT. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis (EMBE) was used in 32 primarily irradiated patients (31 radical and 1 palliative radiotherapy) after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 145 patients were 55%, 18%, and 10%, for the 54 patients treated by radical radiotherapy (mean 83.1 Gy), 56%, 13%, and 6% [median survival time (MST) 12.4 months], and for the 59 patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (mean 61.6 Gy), 73%, 31%, and 18% (MST 21.5 months), respectively. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis was useful for the early establishment of an internal bile passage in radically irradiated patients and MST of 14.9 months in these 31 patients was significantly longer than that of 9.3 months in the remaining 23 patients without EMBE placement (p < 0.05). Eighteen patients whose surgical margins were positive in the hepatic side bile duct(s) showed significantly better survival compared with 15 patients whose surgical margins were positive in the adjacent structure(s) (44% vs. 0% survival at 3 years, p < 0.001). No survival benefit was obtained in patients given palliative or preoperative radiotherapy

  9. Proton beam radiotherapy for uveal melanoma: Results of Curie Institut-Orsay Proton Therapy Center (ICPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendale, Remi; Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia; Noel, Georges; Feuvret, Loic; Levy, Christine; Delacroix, Sabine; Meyer, Anne; Nauraye, Catherine; Mazal, Alejandro; Mammar, Hamid; Garcia, Paul; D'Hermies, Francois; Frau, Eric; Plancher, Corine; Asselain, Bernard; Schlienger, Pierre; Mazeron, Jean Jacques; Desjardins, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study reports the results of proton beam radiotherapy based on a retrospective series of patients treated for uveal melanoma at the Orsay Center. Methods and Materials: Between September 1991 and September 2001, 1,406 patients with uveal melanoma were treated by proton beam radiotherapy. A total dose of 60 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) was delivered in 4 fractions on 4 days. Survival rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Prognostic factors were determined by multivariate analysis using the Cox model. Results: The median follow-up was 73 months (range, 24-142 months). The 5-year overall survival and metastasis-free survival rates were 79% and 80.6%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate was 96%. The 5-year enucleation for complications rate was 7.7%. Independent prognostic factors for overall survival were age (p < 0.0001), gender (p < 0.0003), tumor site (p < 0.0001), tumor thickness (p = 0.02), tumor diameter (p < 0.0001), and retinal area receiving at least 30 CGE (p = 0.003). Independent prognostic factors for metastasis-free survival were age (p = 0.0042), retinal detachment (p = 0.01), tumor site (p < 0.0001), tumor volume (p < 0.0001), local recurrence (p < 0.0001), and retinal area receiving at least 30 CGE (p = 0.002). Independent prognostic factors for local control were tumor diameter (p = 0.003) and macular area receiving at least 30 CGE (p = 0.01). Independent prognostic factors for enucleation for complications were tumor thickness (p < 0.0001) and lens volume receiving at least 30 CGE (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: This retrospective study confirms that proton beam radiotherapy ensures an excellent local control rate. Further clinical studies are required to decrease the incidence of postirradiation ocular complications

  10. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  11. The effect of antiemetics and reduced radiation fields on acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage I seminoma of the testis: a randomized pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, V.S.; Rainford, K.; Horwich, A.; Dearnaley, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma of the testis. Ten Stage I patients receiving para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodal (dog-leg) RT provided a toxicity baseline (group A). Twenty Stage I patients randomized to dog-let RT or para-aortic RT (10 per group) were further randomized to received prophylactic ondansetron or expectant therapy with metoclopramide (group B). Daily patient-completed questionnaires evaluated acute toxicity. Dog-leg RT for Stage I seminomas is associated with readily demonstrable gastrointestinal tract (GIT) toxicity. The number of patients in this study is too small to produce definitive results, but there appears to be reduced GIT toxicity with prophylactic antiemetics. The effect of reduced RT fields has been assessed further in the MRC randomized tiral of field sizes (TE10). (Author)

  12. The target volume concept at the recording of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Glaeser, L.

    1981-01-01

    With the aim of complete, exact and reproducible manual recording and documentation of external beam radiotherapy a concept is proposed providing treatment planning and recording related to space and time for target volumes of different order corresponding to Ist, IInd or IIIrd part of treatment course, regarding all dose limiting organs at risk. The record consists of the dosage plan for medical treatment planning, the treatment plan for physical dose distribution planning and the treatment record of absorbed doses delivered as well as a checklist for patient and machine set-up, and labels for intended actions during treatment development. A clear arrangement of the record form in logical order was found, demanding exact specification of target(s) and beam(s) and their relation in space and time; asking for verbal and graphical description of target volumes, organs at risk, patient positioning, beam portals and dose reference points in terms of patients' anatomy; emphasizing the most important medical data by marked areas and leaving enough empty space for additional data, remarks or comments. During several years of clinical use these record forms proved to be suitable for all cases of external beam therapy, for complex situations of target volumes and treatment-scheduling, for all treatment techniques and radiation qualities and for all ways of physical treatment planning. They can be extended to automatic treatment verification, monitoring and recording as well as to the application of in-vivo-measurements of absorbed doses. (orig.) [de

  13. Metal Artifact Reduction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpics, Mark; Johnson, Paul; Patel, Rakesh; Surucu, Murat; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a method for reducing metal artifacts, arising from dental fillings, on cone-beam computed tomography images. A projection interpolation algorithm is applied to cone-beam computed tomography images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings. This technique involves identifying metal regions in individual cone-beam computed tomography projections and interpolating the surrounding values to remove the metal from the projection data. Axial cone-beam computed tomography images are then reconstructed, resulting in a reduction in the streak artifacts produced by the metal. Both phantom and patient imaging data are used to evaluate this technique. The interpolation substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in all cases. Corrected images had fewer or no streak artifacts compared to their noncorrected counterparts. Quantitatively, regions of interest containing the artifacts showed reduced variance in the corrected images versus the uncorrected images. Average pixel values in regions of interest around the metal object were also closer in value to nonmetal regions after artifact reduction. Artifact correction tended to perform better on patient images with less complex metal objects versus those with multiple large dental fillings. The interpolation substitution is potentially an efficient and effective technique for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings on cone-beam computed tomography image. This technique may be effective in reducing such artifacts in patients with head and neck cancer receiving daily image-guided radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-01-01

    would be enabled by real-time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Conclusions: Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

  15. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdoaburas, Mohamad M; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Bezin, Jérémi Vũ; Veres, Atilla; de Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects.

  16. Electron beam radiotherapy for the management of recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia with orbital extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Murthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN with orbital invasion can be successfully managed with external radiotherapy using electrons resulting in eye and vision salvage. We report a case of right eye recurrent OSSN in an immunocompetent adult Indian male, with extensive orbital involvement. The patient had two previous surgical excisions with recurrent disease. At this stage, conventionally exenteration is considered the treatment modality. However, he was treated with 5040 cGy radiotherapy (15eV electrons resulting in complete disease regression. At the end of 3 years follow-up, the patient was disease free, maintained a vision of 20/25, with mild dry eye, well-managed with topical lubricants. Extensive OSSN with orbital invasion does not always need exenteration. External beam electron radiotherapy provides a noninvasive cure with organ and vision salvage and should be considered in extensive OSSN not amenable to simple excision biopsies. Long-term studies to evaluate the effect of radiation on such eyes are suggested.

  17. Electron beam radiotherapy for the management of recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia with orbital extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ramesh; Gupta, Himika; Krishnatry, Rahul; Laskar, Siddhartha

    2015-08-01

    Recurrent extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) with orbital invasion can be successfully managed with external radiotherapy using electrons resulting in eye and vision salvage. We report a case of right eye recurrent OSSN in an immunocompetent adult Indian male, with extensive orbital involvement. The patient had two previous surgical excisions with recurrent disease. At this stage, conventionally exenteration is considered the treatment modality. However, he was treated with 5040 cGy radiotherapy (15eV electrons) resulting in complete disease regression. At the end of 3 years follow-up, the patient was disease free, maintained a vision of 20/25, with mild dry eye, well-managed with topical lubricants. Extensive OSSN with orbital invasion does not always need exenteration. External beam electron radiotherapy provides a noninvasive cure with organ and vision salvage and should be considered in extensive OSSN not amenable to simple excision biopsies. Long-term studies to evaluate the effect of radiation on such eyes are suggested.

  18. Inhomogeneities in high energy photon beams used in radiotherapy. Experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappas, K.

    1986-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the influence of the human body inhomogeneities on the dose distribution for high energy photons beams used in Radiotherapy. It consists in an experimental part and a theoretical analysis leading to original models of calculation. We study essentially, - the beam quality of the machines used and its influence on some basic dosimetric quantities and on the response of an ionization chamber. - The dose perturbation due to off-axis heterogeneous volumes at off-axis points of measurement; a model is suggested to take into account the perturbation of the multiple scatter. The perturbation of the dose in the transition region, between water equivalent medium and heterogeneous medium (air) is also investigated. The last part is devoted to computer applications of the proposed correction methods and to a comparison between the different computerized treatment planning systems which take into account of inhomogeneities [fr

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of an ipsilateral intensity modulated radiotherapy beam arrangement for parotid malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yirmibesoglu, Eda; Fried, David V.; Kostich, Mark; Rosenman, Julian; Shockley, William; Weissler, Mark; Zanation, Adam; Chera, Bhishamjit

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a dosimetric comparison of an ipsilateral beam arrangement for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with off-axis beams. Six patients who received post-operative radiotherapy (RT) for parotid malignancies were used in this dosimetric study. Four treatment plans were created for each CT data set (24 plans): 1) ipsilateral 4-field off-axis IMRT (4fld-OA), 2) conventional wedge pair (WP), 3) 7 field co-planar IMRT (7fld), and 4) ipsilateral co-planar 4-field quartet IMRT (4fld-CP). Dose, volume statistics for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and planning risk volumes (PRVs) were compared for the four treatment techniques. Wedge pair plans inadequately covered the deep aspect of the PTV. The 7-field IMRT plans delivered the largest low dose volumes to normal tissues. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid was highest for 7 field IMRT. Mean dose to the contralateral submandibular gland was highest for 7 field IMRT and WP. 7 field IMRT plans had the highest dose to the oral cavity. The mean doses to the brainstem, spinal cord, ipsilateral temporal lobe, cerrebellum and ipsilateral cochlea were similar among the four techniques. For postoperative treatment of the parotid bed, 4-field ipsilateral IMRT techniques provided excellent coverage while maximally sparing the contralateral parotid gland and submandibular gland

  20. Boosting runtime-performance of photon pencil beam algorithms for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggel, M; Ziegenhein, P; Nill, S; Oelfke, U

    2012-10-01

    Pencil beam algorithms are still considered as standard photon dose calculation methods in Radiotherapy treatment planning for many clinical applications. Despite their established role in radiotherapy planning their performance and clinical applicability has to be continuously adapted to evolving complex treatment techniques such as adaptive radiation therapy (ART). We herewith report on a new highly efficient version of a well-established pencil beam convolution algorithm which relies purely on measured input data. A method was developed that improves raytracing efficiency by exploiting the capability of modern CPU architecture for a runtime reduction. Since most of the current desktop computers provide more than one calculation unit we used symmetric multiprocessing extensively to parallelize the workload and thus decreasing the algorithmic runtime. To maximize the advantage of code parallelization, we present two implementation strategies - one for the dose calculation in inverse planning software, and one for traditional forward planning. As a result, we could achieve on a 16-core personal computer with AMD processors a superlinear speedup factor of approx. 18 for calculating the dose distribution of typical forward IMRT treatment plans. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The use of Monte-Carlo codes for treatment planning in external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alan, E.; Nahum, PhD.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport is a very powerful technique. There are basically no exact solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Even, the 'straightforward' situation (in radiotherapy) of an electron beam depth-dose distribution in water proves to be too difficult for analytical methods without making gross approximations such as ignoring energy-loss straggling, large-angle single scattering and Bremsstrahlung production. monte Carlo is essential when radiation is transport from one medium into another. As the particle (be it a neutron, photon, electron, proton) crosses the boundary then a new set of interaction cross-sections is simply read in and the simulation continues as though the new medium were infinite until the next boundary is encountered. Radiotherapy involves directing a beam of megavoltage x rays or electrons (occasionally protons) at a very complex object, the human body. Monte Carlo simulation has proved in valuable at many stages of the process of accurately determining the distribution of absorbed dose in the patient. Some of these applications will be reviewed here. (Rogers and al 1990; Andreo 1991; Mackie 1990). (N.C.)

  2. External beam radiotherapy for subretinal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration: is this treatment efficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staar, Susanne; Krott, Ralf; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Heimann, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Control of the natural course of sub retinal neovascularization (SRNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is difficult. Only a subset of patients is suitable for laser coagulation. This prospective study aimed to determine the efficacy and individual benefit of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The prospective trial included 287 patients with subfoveal neovascularization due to AMD which was verified by fluorescein angiography. Patients have been treated between January 1996 and October 1997. All patients received a total dose of 16 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions with 5-6 MeV photons based on computerized treatment planning in individual head mask fixation. This first analysis is based on 73 patients (50 women, 23 men, median age 74.3 years), with a median follow-up of 13.3 months and a minimum follow-up of 11 months. Results: All patients completed therapy and tolerability was good. First clinical control with second angiography was performed 6 weeks after irradiation, then in 3-month intervals. Eighteen patients with SRNV refusing radiotherapy served as a control group and were matched with 18 irradiated patients. After 7 months median visual acuity (VA) was 20/160 for the irradiated and 20/400 for the untreated patients. One year after radiotherapy final median VA was 20/400 in both groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that 16 Gy of conventionally fractionated external beam irradiation slows down the visual loss in exudative AMD for only a few months. Patients' reading vision could not be saved for a long-term run

  3. A prospective randomized trial comparing the sequence of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy following curative resection of stage II, III rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Je Hwan; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yu, Chang Sik [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the side effects, pattern of failure, and survival rate according to the sequence of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, patients with stages II and III rectal cancer who had undergone curative resection were randomized to early radiotherapy group(am II), then we intend to determine the most effective sequence of the radiotherapy and chemotherapy. From January 1996 to March 1999, 313 patients with curatively resected stages II and III rectal cancer have been randomized to 'early' or 'late' radiation therapy group and received combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m{sup 2}, IV bolus daily D1-5, 8 cycles) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 with first cycle of chemotherapy and arm II received radiation therapy from day 57 with third cycle of chemotherapy after completion of first two cycles. Preliminary analysis was performed with 228 patients registered up to Jun 1998. Two out of the 228 patients were excluded because of double primary cancer. Median follow-up period was 23 months. Local recurrence occurred in 11 patients (9.7%) for arm l and 9 patients (8%) for arm II. There was no significant difference between both groups (p=0.64). However, distant metastasis was found in 22 patients (19.5%) for arm l and 35 patients (31.0%) for arm II and which showed statistically significant difference between the two groups (p=0.046). And neither 3-year disease-free survival (70.2% vs 59.2%, p=0.2) nor overall survival (89.4% vs 88.0%, p=0.47) showed significant differences. The incidence of leukopenia during radiation therapy and chemotherapy was 78.3% and 79.9% respectively but leukopenia more than RTOG grade 3 was only 2.1% and 6.0% respectively. The incidence of diarrhea more than 10 times per day was significantly higher in the patients for arm k than for arm II (71.2% vs 41.6%, p=0.02) but this complication was controlled with supportive cares

  4. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, T. Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@houstonprecisioncc.com [Houston Precision Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  5. The international protocol for the dosimetry of external radiotherapy beams based on standards of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    2001-01-01

    An International Code of Practice (CoP, or dosimetry protocol) for external beam radiotherapy dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water has been published by the IAEA on behalf of IAEA, WHO, PAHO and ESTRO. The CoP provides a systematic and internationally unified approach for the determination of the absorbed dose to water in reference conditions with radiotherapy beams. The development of absorbed-dose-to-water standards for high-energy photons and electrons offers the possibility of reducing the uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. Many laboratories already provide calibrations at the radiation quality of 60Co gamma-rays and some have extended calibrations to high-energy photon and electron beams. The dosimetry of kilovoltage x-rays, as well as that of proton and ion beams can also be based on these standards. Thus, a coherent dosimetry system based on the same formalism is achieved for practically all radiotherapy beams. The practical use of the CoP as simple. The document is formed by a set of different CoPs for each radiation type, which include detailed procedures and worksheets. All CoPs are based on ND,w chamber calibrations at a reference beam quality Qo, together with radiation beam quality correction factors kQ preferably measured directly for the user's chamber in a standards laboratory. Calculated values of kQ are provided together with their uncertainty estimates. Beam quality specifiers are 60Co, TPR20,10 (high-energy photons), R50 (electrons), HVL and kV (x-rays) and Rres (protons and ions) [es

  6. Dose distribution of chest wall electron beam radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yetong; Chen Dawei; Bai Lan; Zhou Yinhang; Piao Yongfeng; Wang Xi; Qu Yaqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose distribution of different bolus after different energy electron beam irradiation to different chest wall radiotherapy for the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The paper simulated the dose distribution of women's left breast cancer after radical mastectomy by 6 and 9 MeV electron beam irradiation, and TLD was used to measure. Results: The dose of skin became higher and the dose of lung was less when 0.5 and 1.0 cm bolus were used on the body; with the increasing of the energy of electron beam, the high dose field became larger; and with the same energy of electron beam, the high dose field moved to surface of the body when the bolus was thicker. Conclusion: When different energy electron ray irradiates different thickness bolus, the dosage of skin surface increases and the dosage of anterior margin of lung reduces. With electron ray energy increasing, the high dosage field is widen, when the electron ray energy is identity, the high dosage field migrates to the surface after adding bolus. Using certain depth bolus may attain the therapeutical dose of target area. (authors)

  7. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Elizabeth; Booth, Jeremy; Leech, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam׳s central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Materials and methods: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. Results: For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p = 0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p = 0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. Conclusions: At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI

  9. Dose-volume histogram evaluation of prone and supine patient position in external beam radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Gagel, Bernd; Demirel, Cengiz; Schmachtenberg, Axel; Asadpour, Branka; Eble, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient positioning on dose-volume histograms of organs at risk in external beam radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: In 20 patients scheduled for definitive (7) or postoperative (13) external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis treatment planning CT scans were performed in supine and prone (belly board) positions. After volume definition of target and organs at risk treatment plans were calculated applying the four-field box technique. The dose-volume histograms of organs at risk were compared. Results: Radiotherapy in prone position causes a reduction of the bladder portion (mean 15%, p<0.001) and an increase of the rectum portion (mean 11%, p<0.001) within the 90% isodose. A reduction of the bowel portion could only be observed in postoperatively treated patients (mean 13%, p<0.001). In definitive radiotherapy the target volume increases in supine position (mean 7%, p=0.02) due to an anterior tumour/uterus movement, so that bowel portions within the 90% isodose are similar. The bladder filling correlates with a reduction of bladder and bowel (postoperatively treated patients) dose. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy of the pelvis should be performed in prone position in postoperative patients because of best bowel protection. Considering the additional HDR brachytherapy rectum protection takes the highest priority in definitive treatment--the requirements are best met in supine position. An adequate bladder filling is important to reduce the irradiated bladder and bowel volumes

  10. Measurement and properties of the dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilä, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-06-01

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of the beam quality parameter, i.e. the tissue-phantom ratio or TPR20,10, using a conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio, or DAPR20,10. With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) using a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging that are present when using a point detector. In this study, the properties of the DAPR20,10 of a cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained using two LAC detectors, PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP using EBT3 film and a Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of the DAPR20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy using cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4-40 mm, based on the results of the two LACs, the MC calculations and the Razor diode. The measurements indicated a constant DAPR20,10 value for fields 20-40 mm in diameter, with a maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20-4 mm in diameter for the PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for the studied 4-40 mm cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams. This has the consequence that there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area with the reported DAPR20,10 value.

  11. Measurement and properties of the dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilä, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-06-21

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of the beam quality parameter, i.e. the tissue-phantom ratio or TPR 20,10 , using a conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio, or DAPR 20,10 . With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) using a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging that are present when using a point detector. In this study, the properties of the DAPR 20,10 of a cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained using two LAC detectors, PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP using EBT3 film and a Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of the DAPR 20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy using cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4-40 mm, based on the results of the two LACs, the MC calculations and the Razor diode. The measurements indicated a constant DAPR 20,10 value for fields 20-40 mm in diameter, with a maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20-4 mm in diameter for the PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR 20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for the studied 4-40 mm cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams. This has the consequence that there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area with the reported DAPR 20,10 value.

  12. [Follow-up study of clinical effects of californium-252 neutron intracavitary radiotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in endometrial cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xin; Shan, Jin-lu; Tang, Cheng; Zhao, Ke-wei

    2007-11-01

    To observe the three year local control rate, overall survival rate, complications and prognostic factors of endometrial cancer treated with (252)Cf neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Forty endometrial cancer patients staged Ib - IVa by the standard of Federation of International Gynecologic Organization (FIGO), who had not received any treatment were enrolled in this study. Treatment schedules were: (252)Cf ICBT, 10 - 13 Gy(i)/fraction per week, the total dose to point A and point F 35 - 45 Gy(i) and 38 - 50 Gy(i) respectively in 4 fractions. The EBRT was given to the whole pelvic field, with 6 MV or 8 MV X-ray, 2 Gy per fraction, 4 times per week. The total dose was 45 to 50 Gy (the field was blocked 4 cm after 20 - 30 Gy), the total treatment time was 5 - 6 weeks. The follow-up time was 36 - 96 months, with an average of 42 months. The three year local control and overall survival rate was 88% (35/40) and 75% (30/40) respectively for all patients. Of those patients of stage Ib, they were 93% (14/15) and 87% (13/15), respectively, higher than stage II [80% (12/15), 87% (13/15); P > 0.05], significantly higher than stage III, IV [60% (6/10), 50% (5/10); P 252)Cf ICBT and EBRT may be safe and effective for advanced endometrial cancer. The most important prognostic factors were stage, pathological type and differentiation of endometrial cancer.

  13. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hans T.; Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives ≥45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans

  14. Proliferation Index Predicts Survival after Second Craniotomy within 6 Months of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for High-grade Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzell, C; Wheeler, H; Huang, D; Gaur, P; Chen, J; Kastelan, M; Back, M

    2016-03-01

    To determine pathological features that predict survival in patients having repeat craniotomy within 6 months of radiotherapy for high-grade glioma (HGG). HGG patients (World Health Organization grade 3/4) managed with repeat craniotomy within 6 months of completing radiotherapy between 2008 and 2012 were included. Based on the presence of residual tumour cells, the pathology was reported as pathological progression or pathological pseudoprogression. The proliferation index (Ki67) was reported and compared with initial pathology as a percentage change. Tumour necrosis was estimated as a percentage of the specimen. Overall survival was calculated in months. Of 327 patients managed with HGG, 27 patients underwent repeat craniotomy within 6 months of radiotherapy. The median survival after reoperation was 11 months (95% confidence interval 1-22). Ki67 at reoperation of 0%, 1-9% and >10% was associated with survival with a median survival of 13, 13 and 3 months, respectively (P = 0.007). Change in Ki67 was also associated with median survival, with 80% reduction median survival 13 months, P = 0.02. Widespread treatment-related necrosis improved outcome, with >80% necrosis having a median survival of 13 months versus 3 months in those with craniotomy within 6 months of radiotherapy is not an independent indicator of prognosis. Patients with residual tumour that had a low Ki67 had a similar median survival as those with only treatment necrosis. Reduced proliferation of residual tumour cells and widespread necrosis may be more important indicators for future outcome. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of national dosimetric standards for external beam radiotherapy: application to conformal irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new treatment modalities such as IMRT and stereotactic radiotherapy has led to an increasing use of complex fields composed of small beams with multiple incidence angles. These new treatment conditions are very far from classical reference conditions on which international dosimetry protocols are based. In this work, we propose to realize dosimetric standards for radiation fields smaller than the standard 10 * 10 cm 2 field, namely 4 * 4 and 2 * 2 cm 2 . The calibration coefficients of an ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water for these radiation fields were compared in the 6 MV (with and without flattening filter) and 12 MV beams of LNHB medical linac. The references were established from a graphite calorimetry measurement. A graphite calorimeter of small sensitive volume was built specifically for the 2 * 2 cm 2 field. In addition, an ionization chamber suitable to this field size was looked for. We showed that, for the studied beams, the reference chamber's calibration coefficient is independent of the radiation field size between 10 * 10 and 2 * 2 cm 2 , within uncertainties (about 0.4 % at one standard deviation). (author) [fr

  16. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  17. Utilization of thermoluminescent dosimetry in total skin electron beam radiotherapy of mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, John A.; Cundiff, Jackson H.; Ha, Chul S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to discuss the utilization of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) in total skin electron beam (TSEB) radiotherapy to: (a) compare patient dose distributions for similar techniques on different machines, (b) confirm beam calibration and monitor unit calculations, (c) provide data for making clinical decisions, and (d) study reasons for variations in individual dose readings. Methods and Materials: We report dosimetric results for 72 cases of mycosis fungoides, using similar irradiation techniques on two different linear accelerators. All patients were treated using a modified Stanford 6-field technique. In vivo TLD was done on all patients, and the data for all patients treated on both machines was collected into a database for analysis. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were computed for all locations. Scatter plots of doses vs. height, weight, and obesity index were generated, and correlation coefficients with these variables were computed. Results: The TLD results show that our current TSEB implementation is dosimetrically equivalent to the previous implementation, and that our beam calibration technique and monitor unit calculation is accurate. Correlations with obesity index were significant at several sites. Individual TLD results allow us to customize the boost treatment for each patient, in addition to revealing patient positioning problems and/or systematic variations in dose caused by patient variability. The data agree well with previously published TLD results for similar TSEB techniques. Conclusion: TLD is an important part of the treatment planning and quality assurance programs for TSEB, and routine use of TLD measurements for TSEB is recommended

  18. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forde, Elizabeth, E-mail: eforde@tcd.ie [Discipline of Radiation Therapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Booth, Jeremy [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Leech, Michelle [Discipline of Radiation Therapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam's central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued.

  19. An alternative approach to compensators design for photon beams used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.; Zauhar, G.; Bistrovic, M.; Faj, D.; Kaliman, Z.; Smilovic Radojcic, D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of compensators in order to achieve desired dose distribution has a long history and is a well-established technique in radiation therapy planning. There are several different calculation methods for determining a compensator's thickness. An alternative method that is based on the Cunningham's modification of Clarkson's method to calculate scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section is proposed. It is well known that the total dose distribution of radiotherapy photon beam consists of the contributions of the primary beam, attenuated by the tissue layer, and the scattered radiation generated by the primary radiation in single and multiple photon scatter events. The scattered component can be represented as a function of the primary radiation. The central point of our method is the numerical estimation of the primary distribution required to achieve the desired total distribution. Now using the calculated primary distribution, the shape of the modulator could be determined. In this way the contribution of the scattered component is validated in a more accurate way than using effective attenuation coefficients, which is a common practice. The method is verified in various clinical situations and compared with the standard method. The accuracy, although dependent on geometry, was improved by at least 2%. With more complex geometries there is an even higher gain in accuracy with our method when compared to the standard method

  20. Analysis of prognostic factors in 1180 patients with oral cavity primary cancer treated with definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study identifies the prognostic factors influencing oral cancers in a large cohort of patients treated at a single institute. Materials and Methods: This is an audit of 1180 patients treated from 1990 to 2004 in the service setting with prospective data collection. Patients were treated with radical radiotherapy or were planned for surgery and post operative radiotherapy (PORT. None of the patients received postoperative concurrent chemoradiation. For analysis, patients were divided into Group 1 and Group 2 based on the oral cavity subsite. Results: Of the entire cohort, 810 patients had tumors of the Gingivo-alveolo-buccal complex, lip and hard palate (Group 1 and 370 patients had primaries in tongue and floor of mouth (Group 2. Three year locoregional control for the entire cohort was 58%. The three year local control (LC, locoregional control (LRC and disease free survival (DFS for PORT group were 74%, 65% and 60%, respectively, with pathological nodal status, perinodal extension and cut margin status showing statistical significance (P <0.001. In the definitive radiotherapy group, the three year LC, LRC and DFS were 34%, 31% and 30%, respectively, with age, T stage, nodal status and stage being significant. Group 1 patients showed significantly better LC, LRC and DFS than Group 2 patients for the entire cohort. Conclusion: The results indicate superior outcomes with PORT particularly in advanced stages of oral cancer and inferior outcomes in tongue and floor of mouth subsites. There is scope for improving outcomes by adopting treatment intensification strategies.

  1. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  2. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-01-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley® 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus® linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX®) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX® the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 , with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  3. Development of a diamond dosimeter for measuring the absorbed dose in small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsolat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a relatively recent technique used for the treatment of small benign and malignant tumors with small radiation beams. The clinical efficiency of this technique has been proved. However, the measurement of absolute and relative dose in small beams is not possible currently due to the lack of suited detectors for these measurements. In small beam dosimetry, the detector has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and exhibit a small detection volume due to the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Characteristics of diamond (water equivalent material Z=6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. In this thesis, we developed a dosimeter prototype for small beams, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond. The diamond samples were characterized optically and their detection properties were investigated under X-rays and alpha-particles. First diamond dosimeter prototypes were tested with small beams produced by several stereotactic machines. Studies using Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to optimize the parameters involved in the detector response in small beams. This leaded to a final diamond dosimeter prototype that respects all radiotherapy centers requirements, in both standard and small beams. (author) [fr

  4. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 μm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media

  7. Monte Carlo dose calculation in photon beam radiotherapy: a dosimetric characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccia, B.; Frustagli, G.; Valentini, S.; Petetti, E.; Andenna, C.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy requires improved dose evaluation procedures in order to better exploit novel, high-performance techniques. This is the case with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) where high gradients of dose are the result of highly conformed dose releases. Among all the methods for dose calculation, the Monte Carlo approach is considered the best one in terms of accuracy, but it is very time consuming and requires varied and specialised expertise. In the present paper, Monte Carlo beam models have been developed for a Varian Clinac 2100 medical accelerator. A GEANT4-based model and a distributed computing environment on a Beowulf cluster have been used to perform the simulations. The behaviour of the model was investigated with the use of two phantoms. A good agreement was obtained upon comparing the depth dose profiles simulated for both phantoms with experimental measurements. We consider this a first step towards a more complete model capable of accounting for more complex phantoms and irradiation conditions. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  9. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2007-01-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were inter compared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 99m Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  10. Salvage external beam radiotherapy for clinical failure after cryosurgery for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonough, Michael J.; Feldmeier, John J.; Parsai, Ishmael; Dobelbower, Ralph R.; Selman, Steven H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as salvage treatment of prostate cancer after cryosurgery failure. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 1998, 6 patients underwent EBRT with curative intent for local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery. All 6 patients had biopsy-proven recurrence and palpable disease on digital rectal examination at the time of EBRT. The median follow-up was 34 months (range 8-46). The median prostate-specific antigen level was 2.3 ng/mL (range 0.8-4.1). No patient had evidence of metastatic disease. Two patients received hormonal therapy before beginning EBRT. No patient received hormonal therapy after EBRT completion. The median elapsed time between cryosurgery and EBRT was 3 years (range 1.5-4). The median delivered dose was 66 Gy (range 62-70.2) using a 10-MeV photon beam. An in-house-developed three-dimensional treatment planning system was used to plan delivery of the prescribed dose with conformal radiotherapy techniques. Results: After EBRT, all patients had complete resolution of palpable disease. Four patients (66%) were disease free at the time of the last follow-up. Two patients developed biochemical failure as defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition. One of these patients had a prostate-specific antigen level of 97 ng/mL before cryosurgery. No patient developed distant metastasis during follow-up. Two patients (33%) developed proctitis; 1 case resolved with Rowasa suppositories and 1 required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that EBRT can render a significant number of patients biochemically free of disease and can cause complete resolution of clinically palpable disease after initial cryosurgery. The results also showed that EBRT can be given without excessive morbidity. EBRT should be considered as a treatment option in these potentially curable cases

  11. Evaluation of a plane-parallel ionization chamber for low-energy radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 6.3 cm{sup 3}, developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI), was utilized to verify the possibility of its application in low-energy X-ray beam qualities for radiotherapy (T-qualities). This homemade ion chamber was manufactured using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) coated with graphite, and co-axial cables. In order to evaluate the performance of this ionization chamber, some characterization tests were performed: short- and medium-term stability, leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and linearity of response. The maximum value obtained in the short-term stability test was 0.2%, in accordance with the limit value of 0.3% provided by the IEC 60731 standard. The saturation curve was obtained varying the applied voltage from -400 V to +400 V, in steps of 50 V, using the charge collecting time of 20 s. From the saturation curve two other characteristics were analyzed: the polarity effect and the ion collection efficiency, with results within the international recommendations. The leakage current of the ionization chamber was measured in time intervals of 20 minutes, before and after its irradiations, and all the results obtained were in agreement with the IEC 60731 standard. The linearity of response was verified utilizing the T-50(b) radiation quality, and the ionization chamber was exposed to different air kerma rates. The response of the ionization chamber presented a linear behavior. Therefore, all results were considered satisfactory, within international recommendations, indicating that this homemade ionization chamber presents potential routine use in dosimetry of low-energy radiotherapy beams. (author)

  12. Evaluation of a plane-parallel ionization chamber for low-energy radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2014-01-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 6.3 cm 3 , developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI), was utilized to verify the possibility of its application in low-energy X-ray beam qualities for radiotherapy (T-qualities). This homemade ion chamber was manufactured using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) coated with graphite, and co-axial cables. In order to evaluate the performance of this ionization chamber, some characterization tests were performed: short- and medium-term stability, leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and linearity of response. The maximum value obtained in the short-term stability test was 0.2%, in accordance with the limit value of 0.3% provided by the IEC 60731 standard. The saturation curve was obtained varying the applied voltage from -400 V to +400 V, in steps of 50 V, using the charge collecting time of 20 s. From the saturation curve two other characteristics were analyzed: the polarity effect and the ion collection efficiency, with results within the international recommendations. The leakage current of the ionization chamber was measured in time intervals of 20 minutes, before and after its irradiations, and all the results obtained were in agreement with the IEC 60731 standard. The linearity of response was verified utilizing the T-50(b) radiation quality, and the ionization chamber was exposed to different air kerma rates. The response of the ionization chamber presented a linear behavior. Therefore, all results were considered satisfactory, within international recommendations, indicating that this homemade ionization chamber presents potential routine use in dosimetry of low-energy radiotherapy beams. (author)

  13. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Langone Medical Center, New York University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Langone Medical Center, New York University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  14. On the clinical applicability of large-area 2-D TL dosimetry for verifying small photon radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabat, D.; Nahajowski, D.; Gora, E.; Rozwadowska-Bogusz, B.; Lesiak, J.; Polak, B. [Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow Branch, Garncarska 11, 31-115 Krakow (Poland); Czopyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland); Waligorski, M.P.R. [Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow Branch, Garncarska 11, 31-115 Krakow (Poland); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: z5waligo@cyf-kr.edu.pl

    2008-02-15

    A two-dimensional (2-D) thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry system consisting of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N)-ETFE (Teflon)-based TL foils and a large-area TLD reader equipped with a CCD camera, has been developed at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN). At our radiotherapy department we tested the applicability of this system to verify 2-D dose distributions in a multileaf collimator-shaped 6 MV radiotherapy beam of size about 3x3cm{sup 2}. Water-immersible TL foils, of size 50x50mm{sup 2}, c. 0.2 mm thickness and density 1.95g/cm{sup 3} were placed in a water phantom and exposed at different depths, across or along the beam axis, read out using a 2-D TL reader equipped with a CCD camera and processed by reader software, yielding respective beam dose profiles in digital matrix form. We were also able to further process these matrices with the software of the therapy planning system (TPS) which we use routinely for clinical purposes. Satisfactory agreement found between dose distributions measured as percent depth dose or transverse beam profiles at different depths and respective distributions calculated by the TPS, confirms that the 2-D TL dosimetry is a promising technique for quality assurance of radiotherapy beams where steep dose gradients may occur over small field areas.

  15. Quality control of radiotherapy centres in the Slovak Republic: a dosimetry intercomparison of photon and electron beams under reference conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomola, I.; Kralik, G.; Laginova, V.; Van Dam, J.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is a dosimetry intercomparison of photon and electron beams under reference conditions as well as quality control of radiotherapy centres in the Slovak Republic. The results obtained in the first check shows that only about 60% of beams are within the acceptance limit. The reasons of discrepancies were traced, in some cases by an on site visit of experts from the NRC, and unacceptable deviations were corrected. The results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of the external dosimetry checks performed with the mailed thermoluminescent dosimeters. Standard deviation of the distribution of the results decreased from SD=4.3% to SD=I.8% for checked photon beams and from SD=8.6% to SD=2.4% for electron beams, respectively, at the end of the project. The dosimetry audits which are performed in regular intervals significantly decreasing a possibility of mistreatment (under-dosage or over-dosage ) of patients due to wrong calibration of radiation therapy beams. In order to keep the reached level of dosimetry precision, it is necessary to establish the external audit in radiotherapy at the national level based on postal TLD dosimetry by transferring the know-how from the international program on quality assurance in radiotherapy dosimetry with the assistance of the IAEA. (authors)

  16. An interactive beam-weight optimization tool for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burba, S.; Gardey, K.; Nadobny, J.; Stalling, D.; Seebass, M.; Beier, J.; Wust, P.; Budach, V.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A computer software tool has been developed to aid the treatment planner in selecting beam weights for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning. An approach to plan optimization has been made that is based on the use of an iterative feasibility search algorithm combined with a quadratic convergence method that seeks a set of beam weights which satisfies all the dose constraints set by the planner. Materials and Methods: A FORTRAN module for dose calculation for radiotherapy (a VOXELPLAN modification) has been integrated into an object-oriented Silicon Graphics TM platform in an IRIS Inventor environment on basis of the OpenGL which up to now has been exclusively used for the calculation of E-field distributions in hyperthermia (HyperPlan TM ). After the successful calculation and representation of the dose distribution in the Silicon Graphics TM platform, an algorithm involving the minimization method according to the principle of quadratic convergence was developed for optimizing beam weights of a number of pre-calculated fields. The verification of the algorithms for dose calculation and dose optimization has been realized by use of a standardized interface to the program VIRTUOS as well as by the collapsed cone algorithm implemented in the commercial treatment planning system Helax TMS TM . Results: The search algorithm allows the planner to incorporate relative importance weightings to target volumes and anatomical structures, specifying, for example, that a dose constraint to the spinal cord is much more crucial to the overall evaluation of a treatment plan than a dose constraint to otherwise uninvolved soft tissue. In most cases the applied minimization method according to the model of Davidon-Fletcher-Powell showed ultimate fast convergence for a general function f(x) with continuous second derivatives and fast convergence for a positive definite quadratic function. In other cases, however, the absence of an acceptable solution may indicate

  17. Adjuvant therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, P.

    2009-01-01

    Outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) in high risk prostate cancer are suboptimal. Intensification of local therapy as well as early administration of systemic treatment adjuvant to RP is subject of clinical research. Results of randomised studies are presented. Improvement in overall survival has been reported in adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in pT3 (extracapsular extension and seminal vesicles invasion) or positive resection margin (R1) and in adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in pN+ disease. (author)

  18. On the feasibility of dose quantification with in-beam PET data in radiotherapy with 12C and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, K.

    2004-11-01

    The physical advantages of light ions in combination with technological advances like intensity controlled raster scanning offer a unique tool for high precision radiotherapy. This is particularly applied to delicate clinical situations of inoperable tumours growing in close proximity to critical organs. The potential benefit of such a high selectivity of ion beam therapy demands the complex and strictly conformal dose delivery to be monitored in-situ and non-invasively in three dimensions. In contrast to conventional photon radiation, light ions exhibit a well defined range which determines the position of the maximum dose delivery in the inhomogeneous tumour target. This requires a monitoring technology along the ion trajectory offering millimetre precision. Additionally, accurate control of the lateral position of the irradiation field within the patient can be a crucial issue for the frequent case of portals passing adjacent to organs at risk. At present, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the only feasible method fulfilling these requirements. For this purpose a dedicated in-beam positron camera has been completely integrated into the experimental heavy ion treatment site at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. This allows to measure the minor amount of β + -activity produced in nuclear reactions between the projectiles and the target nuclei of the tissue simultaneously to the tumour irradiation. The emitted signal is correlated but not directly proportional to the spatial pattern of the delivered dose. Hence, therapy control is achieved by comparing the measured β + -activity distribution with a prediction based on the treatment plan and the specific time course of the particular irradiation. (orig.)

  19. A dosimetric comparison of fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for treating intermediate intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Xia Ping; Verhey, Lynn J.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate treatment plans for the fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy and the Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treating medium-size intracranial lesions (range 4-25 cm 3 ). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were developed for the Leksell Gamma Knife and a fan-beam inverse treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons were carried out using dose-volume histogram (DVH), tissue-volume ratio (TVR), and maximum dose to the prescription dose (MDPD) ratio. The study was carried out for both simulated targets and clinical targets with irregular shapes and at different locations. Results: The MDPD ratio was significantly greater for the Gamma Knife plans than for the fan-beam IMRT plans. The Gamma Knife plans produced equivalent TVR values to the fan-beam IMRT plans. Based on the DVH comparison, the fan-beam IMRT delivered significantly more dose to the normal brain tissue than the Gamma Knife. The results of the comparison were found to be insensitive to the target locations. Conclusion: The Gamma Knife is better than the fan-beam IMRT in sparing normal brain tissue while producing equivalent tumor dose conformity for treating medium-size intracranial lesions. However, the target dose homogeneity is significantly better for the fan-beam IMRT than for the Gamma Knife

  20. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapatero, Almudena, E-mail: azapatero.hlpr@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano [Department of Urology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  1. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Stern, Robin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Boone, John M., E-mail: jmboone@ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform

  2. An experimental feasibility study on the use of scattering foil free beams for modulated electron radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, T; Alexander, A; Evans, M; Seuntjens, J

    2012-06-07

    The potential benefit of using scattering foil free beams for delivery of modulated electron radiotherapy is investigated in this work. Removal of the scattering foil from the beamline showed a measured bremsstrahlung tail dose reduction just beyond R(p) by a factor of 12.2, 6.9, 7.4, 7.4 and 8.3 for 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV beams respectively for 2 × 2 cm(2) fields defined on-axis when compared to the clinical beamline. Monte Carlo simulations were matched to measured data through careful tuning of source parameters and the modification of certain accelerator components beyond the manufacturer's specifications. An accelerator model based on the clinical beamline and one with the scattering foil removed were imported into a Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system (McGill Monte Carlo Treatment Planning). A treatment planning study was conducted on a test phantom consisting of a PTV and two distal organs at risk (OAR) by comparing a plan using the clinical beamline to a plan using a scattering foil free beamline. A DVH comparison revealed that for quasi-identical target coverage, the volume of each OAR receiving a given dose was reduced, thus reducing the dose deposited in healthy tissue.

  3. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Iacoviello, Giuseppina [Hospital ARNAS-Civico, Medical Physics Department, Palermo (Italy); Panzeca, Salvatore [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Dondi, Daniele [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Chemistry, Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Gueli, Anna Maria [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PH3DRA Laboratories, Catania (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics Department, Novara (Italy); Marrale, Maurizio [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Advanced Technologies Network Center (ATeN Center), Palermo (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered}) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered} is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  4. A feasibility study of using couch-based real time dosimetric device in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Cramb, Jim; Kron, Tomas [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Locked Bag 1, A' Beckett Street, Victoria 8006 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Measurement of actual dose delivered during radiotherapy treatment aids in checking the accuracy of dose delivered to the patient. In this study, a couch-based real time dosimetric device has been proposed to measure the exit or entrance dose to a patient during external beam radiotherapy. The utility and feasibility of such a device using a 2D array of diodes has been demonstrated. Methods: Two MAPCHECK devices: MAPCHECK (1175) and MAPCHECK 2 (both SunNuclear) were embedded in a foam block in the treatment couch of a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. The angular dependence of the detector response for both devices was studied before implementing the MAPCHECKs for experimental purposes. An Alderson Rando head phantom was scanned with the MAPCHECK and MAPCHECK 2 devices separately and four different treatment plans were generated with target volumes at three different positions simulating typical clinical situations. The analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) was used to compute the doses in an Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems). The Rando phantom with the MAPCHECK device was exposed in Clinac 21iX linear accelerator. The measured dose distribution was compared with the calculated dose distribution to check for the accuracy in dose delivery. Results: Measured and computed dose distribution were found to agree with more than 93% of pixels passing at 3% and 3 mm gamma criteria for all the treatment plans. The couch-based real time dosimetry system may also be applied for noncoplanar beams where electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is not practical to measure the dose. Other advantages include checking the beam stability during the patient treatment, performing routine morning quality assurance (QA) tests in the linear accelerator, and to perform pretreatment verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). One of the drawbacks of this system is that it cannot be used for measuring the dose at 90 deg. or 270 deg. gantry

  5. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R., E-mail: hogstrom@lsu.edu; Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, Texas 77005-1827 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  6. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  7. Non-rigid CT/CBCT to CBCT registration for online external beam radiotherapy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, Cornel; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Kotte, Alexis N. T. J.; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Ries, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Image-guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) allows radiation dose deposition with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Guidance is usually achieved by estimating the displacements, via image registration, between cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different stages of the therapy. The resulting displacements are then used to reposition the patient such that the location of the tumor at the time of treatment matches its position during planning. Moreover, ongoing research aims to use CBCT-CT image registration for online plan adaptation. However, CBCT images are usually acquired using a small number of x-ray projections and/or low beam intensities. This often leads to the images being subject to low contrast, low signal-to-noise ratio and artifacts, which ends-up hampering the image registration process. Previous studies addressed this by integrating additional image processing steps into the registration procedure. However, these steps are usually designed for particular image acquisition schemes, therefore limiting their use on a case-by-case basis. In the current study we address CT to CBCT and CBCT to CBCT registration by the means of the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. Contrary to previous approaches, EVolution does not require the integration of additional image processing steps in the registration scheme. Moreover, the algorithm requires a low number of input parameters, is easily parallelizable and provides an elastic deformation on a point-by-point basis. Results have shown that relative to a pure CT-based registration, the intrinsic artifacts present in typical CBCT images only have a sub-millimeter impact on the accuracy and precision of the estimated deformation. In addition, the algorithm has low computational requirements, which are compatible with online image-based guidance of EBRT treatments.

  8. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam radiotherapy. First results of the German phase 2 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Strnad, Vratislav; Stillkrieg, Wilhelm; Fietkau, Rainer; Uter, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of external beam three-dimensional (3D) conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for selected patients with early breast cancer. Between 2011 and 2016, 72 patients were recruited for this prospective phase 2 trial. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer or pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a tumor diameter ≤3 cm, clear resection margins ≥2 mm, no axillary lymph node involvement, no distant metastases, tumor bed clips, and were aged ≥50 years. Patients were excluded if mammography showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, or if they had residual diffuse microcalcifications postoperatively, an extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Patients received 3D conformal external beam APBI with a total dose of 38 Gy in 10 fractions in 1-2 weeks. The trial had been registered at the German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS-ID: DRKS00004417. Median follow-up was 25.5 months (range 1-61 months). Local control was maintained in 71 of 72 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 2.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0-6.1%). Early toxicity (grade 1 radiodermatitis) was seen in 34.7% (25/72). Late side effects ≥ grade 3 did not occur. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 96.7% (59/61). APBI with external beam radiotherapy techniques is feasible with low toxicity and, according to the results of the present and other studies, on the way to becoming a standard treatment option for a selected subgroup of patients. (orig.) [de

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrosso Gianluca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess interfraction translational and rotational setup errors, in patients treated with image-guded hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, immobilized by a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block and positioned using stereotactic coordinates. Methods 37 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with hypofractionated stererotactic radiotherapy. All patients were immobilized with a combination of a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block fixed to a stereotactic frame support. Daily cone-beam CT scans were acquired for every patient before the treatment session and were matched online with planning CT images, for 3D image registration. The mean value and standard deviation of all translational (X, Y, Z and rotational errors (θx, θy, θz were calculated for the matching results of bone matching algorithm. Results A total of 194 CBCT scans were analyzed. Mean +/- standard deviation of translational errors (X, Y, Z were respectively 0.5 +/- 1.6 mm (range -5.7 and 5.9 mm in X; 0.4 +/- 2.7 mm (range -8.2 and 12.1 mm in Y; 0.4 +/- 1.9 mm (range -7.0 and 14 mm in Z; median and 90th percentile were respectively within 0.5 mm and 2.4 mm in X, 0.3 mm and 3.2 mm in Y, 0.3 mm and 2.2 mm in Z. Mean +/- standard deviation of rotational errors (θx, θy, θz were respectively 0.0 degrees+/- 1.3 degrees (θx (range -6.0 degrees and 3.1 degrees; -0.1 degrees +/- 1.1 degrees (θy (range -3.0 degrees and 2.4 degrees; -0.6 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees (θz (range -5.0 degrees and 3.3 degrees. Median and 90th percentile of rotational errors were respectively within 0.1 degrees and 1.4 degrees (θx, 0.0 degrees and 1.2 degrees (θy, 0.0 degrees and 0.9 degrees (θz. Mean +/- SD of 3D vector was 3.1 +/- 2.1 mm (range 0.3 and 14.9 mm; median and 90th percentile of 3D vector was within 2.7 mm and 5.1 mm. Conclusions Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have the significant limitation of uncertainty in interfraction repeatability of the patient

  10. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Keller, Anke; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  11. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Context: the descendants of persons treated for a childhood cancer could have an increased risk of genetic disease because of mutagenic anti cancerous treatments received by their parents. 3963 survivors of cancer in childhood ( born between 12950 and 1984) have been identified from the Danish register of cancer, constituting the 'survivors' cohort. 5657 of their brothers and sisters constituting the 'siblings' cohort have been identified from the Danish central register of the population. All of the live-born children born from these two cohorts have been identified from this register, allowing to include 1715 descendants from the 'survivors' cohort and 6009 descendants from the 'siblings' cohort. The congenital malformations have been found out from the national hospital register. The irradiation doses to the gonads and uterus have been defined by using the usual radiotherapy protocols. Conclusion: This study shows that the anti cancerous treatments for children do not seem increase the risk of congenital malformations in their progeny. (N.C.)

  12. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D clin − D pred . The mean (〈δD r 〉), standard deviation (σ δD r ), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r PTV ) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r PTV ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The average prediction error was less

  13. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  14. Effect of postoperative brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy on functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair after radical parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Qiu, Shan-Shan; Marré, Diego

    2014-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the effect of radiotherapy on facial nerve regeneration. However, the effect of brachytherapy has not been studied. Fifty-three patients underwent total parotidectomy of which 13 were radical with immediate facial nerve repair with sural nerve grafts. Six patients (group 1) did not receive adjuvant treatment whereas 7 patients (group 2) received postoperative brachytherapy plus radiotherapy. Functional outcomes were compared using Facial Clima. Mean percentage of blink recovery was 92.6 ± 4.2 for group 1 and 90.7 ± 5.2 for group 2 (p = .37). Mean percentage of commissural excursion restoration was 78.1 ± 3.5 for group 1 and 74.9 ± 5.9 for group 2 (p = .17). Mean time from surgery to first movement was 5.7 ± 0.9 months for group 1 and 6.3 ± 0.5 months for group 2 (p = .15). Brachytherapy plus radiotherapy does not affect the functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair with nerve grafts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for previously irradiated advanced head and neck malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Schuller, David E.; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Rodriguez-Villalba, Silvia; Grecula, John; Bauer, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective review to evaluate the role of surgery and intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) in the treatment of patients with previously irradiated advanced head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between January 1992 and March 1997, 38 patients (31 males, 7 females; median age of 62 years) with recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with maximal resection and IOERT at the Ohio State University (OSU). All had been previously treated with full-course radiotherapy (median 65.1 Gy, range 50-74.4 Gy). Twenty-nine patients (76%) had previously undergone one or more surgical procedures. After maximal surgery the tumor bed was treated with IOERT (single field in 36 patients and 2 fields in 2 patients), most commonly with 6 MeV electrons (87%). The dose administered (at 90% isodose line) was 15 Gy for close or microscopically positive margins in 34 patients and 20 Gy for gross disease in 1 patient. Further external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was not given. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-39 months), 24 of the 38 patients (66%) recurred within the IOERT field. Median time to IOERT failure was 6 months (95% CI: 4.3-7.7). The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year control rates within the IOERT volume were 41%, 19%, and 13 %, respectively. Thirty of the 38 patients (79%) recurred in locoregional areas. Median time to locoregional failure was 4 months (95% CI: 3.3-4.7). The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year locoregional control rates were 33%, 11%, and 4%, respectively. Distant metastases occurred in 7 patients, 5 in association with IOERT failure and 2 with locoregional failure. Median overall survival was 7 months (95% CI: 4.7-9.3). The 6-month, 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 51%, 21%, 21%, and 8%, respectively. Major treatment-related complications occurred in 6 patients (16%). Conclusion: IOERT alone, at the dose used, is not sufficient for control of recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancers

  16. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ 2  = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  17. The prognostic value of time parameters in adjuvant radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis of 138 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietl, B.; Schaefer, C.; Koelbl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to answer the question, how the parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and overall treatment time (OTT) influenced the endpoints overall (OS), event-free (EFS) and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, who had received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 138 patients were included into a retrospective analysis from 10/1993 to 05/2000. Besides the time parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and OTT, tumor- and therapy-related parameters (T-, N-, R-status, grading, tumor site, surgical technique, and postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl) with potential impact on the endpoints were investigated in the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Individual parameters with a significant impact (p = 0.05) were subjected to a multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: besides a postoperative hemoglobin value < 12 g/dl, in the univariate analysis an OTT ≥ 105 days negatively influenced all endpoints, as well as a radiation treatment time ≥ 60 days. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl and an OTT ≥ 105 days were identified as independent negative prognostic factors for all endpoints. Conclusion: the waiting time should be managed according to the ASARA (as short as reasonably achievable) recommendation, radiation treatment should not be protracted exceeding an overall treatment of 105 days. Generally, time parameters should be routinely included in the standard tumor documentation, thus facilitating further evaluation of these prognostically relevant factors. (orig.)

  18. SWOG S0809: A Phase II Intergroup Trial of Adjuvant Capecitabine and Gemcitabine Followed by Radiotherapy and Concurrent Capecitabine in Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma and Gallbladder Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Guthrie, Katherine A.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Corless, Christopher L.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Thomas, Charles R.; Alberts, Steven R.; Dawson, Laura A.; Micetich, Kenneth C.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Siegel, Abby B.; Blanke, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of postoperative therapy in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) or gallbladder carcinoma (GBCA) is unknown. S0809 was designed to estimate 2-year survival (overall and after R0 or R1 resection), pattern of relapse, and toxicity in patients treated with this adjuvant regimen. Patients and Methods Eligibility criteria included diagnosis of EHCC or GBCA after radical resection, stage pT2-4 or N+ or positive resection margins, M0, and performance status 0 to 1. Patients received four cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8) and capecitabine (1,500 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 14) every 21 days followed by concurrent capecitabine (1,330 mg/m2 per day) and radiotherapy (45 Gy to regional lymphatics; 54 to 59.4 Gy to tumor bed). With 80 evaluable patients, results would be promising if 2-year survival 95% CI were > 45% and R0 and R1 survival estimates were ≥ 65% and 45%, respectively. Results A total of 79 eligible patients (R0, n = 54; R1, n = 25; EHCC, 68%; GBCA, 32%) were treated (86% completed). For all patients, 2-year survival was 65% (95% CI, 53% to 74%); it was 67% and 60% in R0 and R1 patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 35 months (R0, 34 months; R1, 35 months). Local, distant, and combined relapse occurred in 14, 24, and nine patients. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were observed in 52% and 11% of patients, respectively. The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse effects were neutropenia (44%), hand-foot syndrome (11%), diarrhea (8%), lymphopenia (8%), and leukopenia (6%). There was one death resulting from GI hemorrhage. Conclusion This combination was well tolerated, has promising efficacy, and provides clinicians with a well-supported regimen. Our trial establishes the feasibility of conducting national adjuvant trials in EHCC and GBCA and provides baseline data for planning future phase III trials. PMID:25964250

  19. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknelly, Andrew [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (United Kingdom); Day, Jane [Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.day@ucs.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    Xerostomia is the most common side effect of external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et-al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504.]. A survey was carried out in British oncology departments to determine what treatment regimes, to minimise xerostomia, are used for patients with head-and-neck cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was designed that asked departments which of the identified methods they used, why a method might not be currently employed, and whether its use had ever been considered. The study found that there are wide disparities between the techniques employed by oncology departments to avoid and reduce xerostomia in patients with cancers of the head and neck. The National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence, [National Institute for Clinical Health and Excellence (NICE). Improving outcomes in head and neck cancers: the manual. London: Office of Public Sector Information; 2004.] for example, recommends that patients are given dental care and dietary advice but some departments did not appear to be doing this. Less than half of departments stated that they offer complementary therapies and less than 40% prescribed pilocarpine, a saliva-stimulant. Only two respondents stated that they use amifostine, a radioprotector, during radiotherapy treatment to the head and neck. The results also suggested a move toward using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for treating head-and-neck cancers which offers better normal tissue sparing than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia

  20. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macknelly, Andrew; Day, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Xerostomia is the most common side effect of external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et-al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504.]. A survey was carried out in British oncology departments to determine what treatment regimes, to minimise xerostomia, are used for patients with head-and-neck cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was designed that asked departments which of the identified methods they used, why a method might not be currently employed, and whether its use had ever been considered. The study found that there are wide disparities between the techniques employed by oncology departments to avoid and reduce xerostomia in patients with cancers of the head and neck. The National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence, [National Institute for Clinical Health and Excellence (NICE). Improving outcomes in head and neck cancers: the manual. London: Office of Public Sector Information; 2004.] for example, recommends that patients are given dental care and dietary advice but some departments did not appear to be doing this. Less than half of departments stated that they offer complementary therapies and less than 40% prescribed pilocarpine, a saliva-stimulant. Only two respondents stated that they use amifostine, a radioprotector, during radiotherapy treatment to the head and neck. The results also suggested a move toward using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for treating head-and-neck cancers which offers better normal tissue sparing than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia

  1. Randomized, controlled trial of resistance training in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy: results on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorf, K; Schmidt, M E; Klassen, O; Ulrich, C M; Oelmann, J; Habermann, N; Beckhove, P; Owen, R; Debus, J; Wiskemann, J; Potthoff, K

    2014-11-01

    Exercise has been reported to decrease cancer-related fatigue and to increase quality of life (QoL) in various breast cancer (BC) populations. However, studies investigating exercise during radiotherapy or resistance training are scarce. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial (BEST study) to assess the efficacy of 12-week resistance training on fatigue beyond possible psychosocial effects of a group-based intervention. One hundred sixty patients with BC stage 0-III were randomly assigned to a 12-week progressive resistance training (2 times/week) or a 12-week relaxation control (RC, 2 times/week). Both interventions were group-based. The primary end point fatigue was assessed with a 20-item multidimensional questionnaire, QoL with EORTC questionnaires. Statistical analyses were based on analysis of covariance models for the individual changes from baseline to week 13. Adherence to the intervention program as well as the completion rate (97%) for the primary outcome variable fatigue was high. In intention-to-treat analyses for the N = 155 patients, significant between-group mean differences (MD) favoring the exercise group (EX) were observed for general fatigue (P = 0.044), especially for the subscale physical fatigue [MD = -0.8; 95% confidence interval -1.5 to -0.2, P = 0.013], but not for affective (P = 0.91) or cognitive fatigue (P = 0.65). For QoL, significantly larger improvements regarding the role function (P = 0.035) and pain (P = 0.040) were noted among exercisers compared with RCs. Future perspective improved significantly stronger in the RC group compared with the EX group (P = 0.047). The 12-week resistance training program was a safe, feasible and efficacious strategy to improve cancer-related fatigue and components of QoL in BC patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. As exercise was compared with another group-based intervention, results indicate that resistance training effects on fatigue and QoL go beyond psychosocial benefits, and that the

  2. Evaluation of acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer treated with adjuvant radiotherapy in combination with bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sharad; Rao, Malay S; Khan, Atif; Huzzy, Lien; Green, Camille; Haffty, Bruce G

    2011-02-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients received bevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced ≥Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rates and predictors of consideration for adjuvant radiotherapy among high-risk breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotneva, Stanimira; Reidel, Kristen; Nassif, Mohammed; Trabulsi, Nora; Mayo, Nancy; Tamblyn, Robyn; Meguerditchian, Ari N

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) represents the standard for local control of breast cancer (BC). However, variations in practice persist. We aimed to characterize the rate of RT consideration (or referral) after BCS and identify predictors in Quebec, Canada, where universal health insurance is in place. A historical prospective cohort study using the provincial hospital discharge and medical services databases was conducted. All women with incident, non-metastatic BC (stages I-III) undergoing BCS (1998-2005) were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for RT consideration were estimated with a generalized estimating equations regression model, adjusting for clustering of patients within physicians. Of the 27,483 women selected, 90 % were considered for RT and 84 % subsequently received it. Relative to women 50-69 years old, younger and older women were less likely to be considered: ORs of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.73-0.93) and 0.10 (0.09-0.12), respectively. Emergency room visits and hospitalizations unrelated to BC were associated with decreased odds of RT consideration: 0.85 (0.76-0.94) and 0.83 (0.71-0.97). Women with regional BC considered for chemotherapy were more likely to be considered for RT: 3.41 (2.83-4.11). RT consideration odds increased by 7 % (OR of 1.07, 95 % CI 1.03-1.10) for every ten additional BCSs performed by the surgeon in the prior year. Social isolation, comorbidities, and greater distance to a referral center lowered the odds. Demographic and clinical patient-related risk factors, health service use, gaps in other aspects of BC management, and surgeon's experience predicted RT consideration.

  4. Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Uveal Melanomas at Nice Teaching Hospital: 16 Years' Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Mammar, Hamid; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Pinon, Fabien; Herault, Joel; Gastaud, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of uveal melanomas treated at Nice Teaching Hospital. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study included 886 consecutive patients referred to our clinic for the treatment of uveal melanomas by proton beam radiotherapy from June 1991 to December 2007. Survival rates were determined by using Kaplan-Meier estimates, and prognostic factors were evaluated using the log-rank test or Cox model. Results: The number (percent total) of subjects staged according to the TNM classification system (6th edition) of malignant tumors included 39 stage T1 (4.4%), 420 stage T2 (47.40%), 409 stage T3 (46.16%), and 18 stage T4 (2.03%) patients. The median follow-up was 63.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 5 years according to the sixth edition TNM classification was 92% for T1, 89% for T2, 67% for T3, and 62% for T4; and at 10 years, 86% for T1, 78% for T2, 43% for T3, and 41% for T4. Five factors were found to be associated with an increased death rate: advanced age, tumor thickness, largest tumor basal diameter, tumor volume, and tumor volume-to-eyeball volume ratio. The metastasis-free survival rates were 88.3 % at 5 years and 76.4 % at 10 years. The local control rates were 93.9% at 5 years and 92.1% at 10 years. The ocular conservation rates were 91.1% at 5 years and 87.3% at 10 years. Conclusions: We report the results of a large series of patients treated for uveal melanomas with a very long follow-up. Despite the large tumor volume treated, our results were similar to previously published findings relating to proton beam therapy.

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy in early stage endometrial cancer Radioterapia adjuvante para câncer do endométrio estádio inicial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Zuliani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the rates of overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS and toxicity in different techniques of postoperative radiotherapy for stage IA endometrioid adenocarcionoma of endometrium, histological grades 1and 2. METHODS: A historical comparison between treatment regimens was performed, and 133 women with a minimum follow-up of 5 years were included. Teletherapy (TELE group, with 22 patients treated from 1988 to 1996, with a 10 MV linear accelerator, average dose 46.2 Gy. Low dose rate brachytherapy (LDRB group was performed between 1992 and 1995, in 19 women, with an insertion of Cesium 137, at a 60 Gy dose. Fourteen women operated between 1990 and 1996 did not receive radiotherapy (NO RT group. High dose rate brachytherapy was performed in 78 patients (HDRB group, from 1996 to 2004, in five weekly 7 Gy insertions, prescribed at 0.5 cm from the vaginal cylinder. RESULTS: The 5-year disease-free survival was 94.6% for the HDRB group, 94.1% for the LDRB group, 100% for the TELE group and NO RT groups (p = 0.681. The 5-year overall survival was 86.6% for the HDRB group, 89.5% for the LDRB group and 90% for the TELE group and NO RT groups (p = 0.962. Grades 3-5 late toxicity was 5.3% in LDRB group and 27.3% for the TELE group (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Patients submitted to adjuvant teletherapy showed very high toxicity, which contraindicates that treatment for those patients. There may be a role for adjuvant HDRB, but randomized controlled trials are still needed to evaluate its benefit.OBJETIVO: Comparar as taxas de sobrevida global (SG, sobrevida livre de doença (DFS e de toxicidade em diferentes técnicas de radioterapia pós-operatória para adenocarcionoma endometrioide do endométrio estádio IA, graus histológicos 1 e 2. MéTODOS: Realizou-se uma comparação histórica entre regimes de tratamento, incluindo 133 mulheres com seguimento mínimo de cinco anos. Teleterapia (grupo TELE, com 22 pacientes, de 1988 a 1996

  6. Time of Decline in Sexual Function After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siglin, Joshua; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Leiby, Benjamin; Valicenti, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction is one of the most concerning toxicities for patients in the treatment of prostate cancer. The inconsistent evaluation of sexual function (SF) and limited follow-up data have necessitated additional study to clarify the rate and timing of erectile dysfunction after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 143 men completed baseline data on SF before treatment and at the subsequent follow-up visits. A total of 1187 validated SF inventories were analyzed from the study participants. Multiple domains of SF (sex drive, erectile function, ejaculatory function, and overall satisfaction) were analyzed for ≤8 years of follow-up. Results: The median follow-up was 4.03 years. The strongest predictor of SF after EBRT was SF before treatment. For all domains of SF, the only statistically significant decrease in function occurred in the first 24 months after EBRT. SF stabilized 2 years after treatment completion, with no statistically significant change in any area of SF >2 years after the end of EBRT. Conclusion: These data suggest that SF does not have a continuous decline after EBRT. Instead, SF decreases maximally within the first 24 months after EBRT, with no significant changes thereafter.

  7. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.F., E-mail: ryan.page@bristol.ac.uk [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Abbott, N.L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E.L.; Randles, H.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Velthuis, J.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S.D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P.H. [Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Hugtenburg, R.P.; Tunbridge, V. [Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient. -- Highlights: •A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor was used to measure the shape of an IMRT field. •The sensor was positioned upstream of the patient causing only a ∼ 0.1% attenuation. •Edges of Multileaf Collimators were determined using edge reconstruction techniques. •The reconstructed edge precision was measured to be 52±4μm for a single frame. •Edge positions from the sensor and film are compared and found to be within error.

  8. Precision high-dose radiotherapy with helium-ion beams: treatment of malignant tumors in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, W.S.; Castro, J.R.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Zink, S.R.; Capra-Young, D.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.; Pascale, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages of the Bragg peak and sharp penumbra of the helium-ion beam emphasize its importance in radiotherapy. Perhaps the best example of this type of treatment is that for the treatment of malignant melanoma of the eye. The authors treated 181 such patients, 46 in the last 12 months. They continue to have very encouraging results in this group. Only eight patients have had a recurrence of their tumor, and in all eight a second treatment, usually removal of the eye, has apparently cured the tumor. They have generally been able to preserve the pretreatment visual acuity as long as the edge of the tumor is at least 3-4 mm away from the optic disc or macula. Four different tumor doses have been used since this program was begun. The first 20 patients received 70 GyE; the dose was then raised to 80 GyE for the next 69 patients. The group of patients treated with 80 GyE began to develop an unacceptable incidence of glaucoma in the treated eye, so the dose was then decreased to 60 GyE. So far, 4 of 61 patients (or 7%) in the 60-GyE group have developed glaucoma

  9. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Silvia; Åström, Lennart; Sandin, Fredrik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT). The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity. PMID:22848840

  10. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Johansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT. The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity.

  11. Regional MLEM reconstruction strategy for PET-based treatment verification in ion beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Baselli, Giuseppe; Baroni, Guido; Bauer, Julia; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; De Bernardi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, PET-based treatment verification provides a consistency check of the delivered treatment with respect to a simulation based on the treatment planning. In this work the region-based MLEM reconstruction algorithm is proposed as a new evaluation strategy in PET-based treatment verification. The comparative evaluation is based on reconstructed PET images in selected regions, which are automatically identified on the expected PET images according to homogeneity in activity values. The strategy was tested on numerical and physical phantoms, simulating mismatches between the planned and measured β + activity distributions. The region-based MLEM reconstruction was demonstrated to be robust against noise and the sensitivity of the strategy results were comparable to three voxel units, corresponding to 6 mm in numerical phantoms. The robustness of the region-based MLEM evaluation outperformed the voxel-based strategies. The potential of the proposed strategy was also retrospectively assessed on patient data and further clinical validation is envisioned. (paper)

  12. Perspectives in absorbed dose metrology with regard to the technical evolutions of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvenet, B.; Bordy, J.M.; Barthe, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents several R and D axes in absorbed close metrology to meet the needs resulting from the technical evolutions of external beam radiotherapy. The facilities in operation in France have considerably evolved under the impulse of the plan Cancer launched in 2003: replacements and increase of the number of accelerators, substitution of accelerators for telecobalt almost completed and acquisition of innovative facilities for tomo-therapy and stereotaxy. The increasing versatility of facilities makes possible the rapid evolution of treatment modalities, allowing to better delimit irradiation to tumoral tissues and spare surrounding healthy tissues and organs at risk. This leads to a better treatment efficacy through dose escalation. National metrology laboratories must offer responses adapted to the new need, i.e. not restrict themselves to the establishment of references under conventional conditions defined at international level, contribute to the improvement of uncertainties at all levels of reference transfer to practitioners: primary measurements under conditions as close as possible to those of treatment, characterization of transfer and treatment control dosimeters., metrological validation of treatment planning tools... Those axes have been identified as priorities for the next years in ionizing radiation metrology at the European level and included in the European. Metrology Research Programme. A project dealing with some of those topics has been selected in the frame of the Eranet+ Call EMRP 2007 and is now starting. The LNE-LAM is strongly engaged in it. (authors)

  13. Optimising measles virus-guided radiovirotherapy with external beam radiotherapy and specific checkpoint kinase 1 inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchefeu, Yann; Khan, Aadil A.; Borst, Gerben; Zaidi, Shane H.; McLaughlin, Martin; Roulstone, Victoria; Mansfield, David; Kyula, Joan; Pencavel, Tim; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M.; Clayton, Jamie; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Steve J.; Garrett, Michelle; Collins, Ian; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously reported a therapeutic strategy comprising replication-defective NIS-expressing adenovirus combined with radioiodide, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and DNA repair inhibition. We have now evaluated NIS-expressing oncolytic measles virus (MV-NIS) combined with NIS-guided radioiodide, EBRT and specific checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition in head and neck and colorectal models. Materials and methods: Anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects of individual agents and their combinations were measured by MTS, clonogenic and Western analysis. Viral gene expression was measured by radioisotope uptake and replication by one-step growth curves. Potential synergistic interactions were tested in vitro by Bliss independence analysis and in in vivo therapeutic studies. Results: EBRT and MV-NIS were synergistic in vitro. Furthermore, EBRT increased NIS expression in infected cells. SAR-020106 was synergistic with EBRT, but also with MV-NIS in HN5 cells. MV-NIS mediated 131 I-induced cytotoxicity in HN5 and HCT116 cells and, in the latter, this was enhanced by SAR-020106. In vivo studies confirmed that MV-NIS, EBRT and Chk1 inhibition were effective in HCT116 xenografts. The quadruplet regimen of MV-NIS, virally-directed 131 I, EBRT and SAR-020106 had significant anti-tumour activity in HCT116 xenografts. Conclusion: This study strongly supports translational and clinical research on MV-NIS combined with radiation therapy and radiosensitising agents

  14. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lilie L.; Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23–62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI ≥30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI ≥ 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  15. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23-62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI {>=}25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI {>=}30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI {>=} 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  16. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  17. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  18. Endometrial cancer - reduce to the minimum. A new paradigm for adjuvant treatments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, Heike R; Schulz, Diana S; Belka, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and the extent of lymph node dissection for early stage endometrial cancer are controversial. In order to clarify the current position of the given adjuvant treatment options, a systematic review was performed. Both, Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge database were searched using the following keywords and MESH headings: 'Endometrial cancer', 'Endometrial Neoplasms', 'Endometrial Neoplasms/radiotherapy', 'External beam radiation therapy', 'Brachytherapy' and adequate combinations. Recent data from randomized trials indicate that external beam radiation therapy - particularly in combination with extended lymph node dissection - or radical lymph node dissection increases toxicity without any improvement of overall survival rates. Thus, reduced surgical aggressiveness and limitation of radiotherapy to vaginal-vault-brachytherapy only is sufficient for most cases of early stage endometrial cancer

  19. Treatment planning considerations in contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: energy and beam aperture optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnica-Garza, H M, E-mail: hgarnica@cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional Unidad Monterrey, Via del Conocimiento 201 Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca NL CP 66600 (Mexico)

    2011-01-21

    It has been shown that the use of kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with a contrast agent incorporated into the tumor can lead to acceptable treatment plans with regard to the absorbed dose distribution produced in the target as well as in the tissue and organs at risk surrounding it. In this work, several key aspects related to the technology and irradiation techniques necessary to clinically implement this treatment modality are addressed by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The Zubal phantom was used to model a prostate radiotherapy treatment, a challenging site due to the depth of the prostate and the presence of bony structures that must be traversed by the x-ray beam on its way to the target. It is assumed that the concentration levels of the enhancing agent present in the tumor are at or below 10 mg per 1 g of tissue. The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model a commercial x-ray tube having a tungsten target. X-ray energy spectra for several combinations of peak electron energy and added filtration were obtained. For each energy spectrum, a treatment plan was calculated, with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code, by modeling the irradiation of the patient as 72 independent conformal beams distributed at intervals of 5{sup 0} around the phantom in order to model a full x-ray source rotation. The Cimmino optimization algorithm was then used to find the optimum beam weight and energy for different treatment strategies. It is shown that for a target dose prescription of 72 Gy covering the whole tumor, the maximum rectal wall and bladder doses are kept below 52 Gy for the largest concentration of contrast agent of 10 mg per 1 g of tissue. It is also shown that concentrations of as little as 5 mg per 1 g of tissue also render dose distributions with excellent sparing of the organs at risk. A treatment strategy to address the presence of non-uniform distributions of the contrast agent in the target is also modeled and discussed.

  20. Influence of the electron energy and number of beams on the absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy of deep seated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnica-Garza, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of compact laser-based electron accelerators, there has been some renewed interest on the use of such charged particles for radiotherapy purposes. Traditionally, electrons have been used for the treatment of fairly superficial lesions located at depths of no more than 4 cm inside the patient, but lately it has been proposed that by using very high energy electrons, i.e. those with an energy in the order of 200–250 MeV it should be possible to safely reach deeper targets. In this paper, we used a realistic patient model coupled with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the electron transport in such a patient model to examine the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions as a function of both the electron beam energy as well as the number of beams for a particular type of treatment, namely, a prostate radiotherapy treatment. Each treatment is modeled as consisting of nine, five or three beam ports isocentrically distributed around the patient. An optimization algorithm is then applied to obtain the beam weights in each treatment plan. It is shown that for this particularly challenging case, both excellent target coverage and critical structure sparing can be obtained for energies in the order of 150 MeV and for as few as three treatment ports, while significantly reducing the total energy absorbed by the patient with respect to a conventional megavoltage x-ray treatment. - Highlights: • Technical requirements to be met in VHEET are established for the irradiation of prostate tumors. • Optimization of beam energy as a function of number of beams is provided. • Behavior of the non-tumor integral dose as a function of both energy and number of beams is examined

  1. Development of a new ridge filter with honeycomb geometry for a pencil beam scanning system in particle radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansho, R.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saotome, N.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    A ridge filter (RGF), a beam energy modulation device, is usually used for particle radiotherapy with a pencil beam scanning system. The conventional RGF has a one-dimensional (1D) periodic laterally stepped structure in orthogonal plane with a central beam direction. The energy of a beam passing through the different thicknesses of the stepped RGF is modulated. Although the lateral pencil beam size is required to cover the several stepped RGF units to modulate its energy as designed, the current trend is to decrease lateral beam size to improve the scanning system. As a result, the beam size becomes smaller than the size of the individual RGF unit. The aim of this study was to develop a new RGF with two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb geometry to simultaneously achieve both a decrease in lateral beam size and the desired energy modulation. The conventional 1D-RGF and the 2D-RGF with honeycomb geometry were both designed so that the Bragg peak size of a 79 MeV/u carbon ion pencil beam in water was 1 mm RMS in the beam direction. To validate the design of the 2D-RGF, we calculated depth dose distributions in water using a simplified Monte Carlo method. In the calculations, we decreased the lateral pencil beam size at the entrance of the RGF and investigated the threshold of lateral beam size with which the pencil beam can reproduce the desired Bragg peak size for each type of RGF. In addition, we calculated lateral dose distributions in air downstream from the RGF and evaluated the inhomogeneity of the lateral dose distributions. Using the 2D-RGF, the threshold of lateral beam size with which the pencil beam can reproduce the desired Bragg peak size was smaller than that using the 1D-RGF. Moreover, the distance from the RGF at which the lateral dose distribution becomes uniform was shorter using the 2D-RGF than that using the 1D-RGF. These results indicate that when the periodic length of both RGFs is the same, the 2D-RGF allows use of a pencil beam with smaller lateral

  2. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Via, Riccardo; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used. PMID:20187962

  4. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yali; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jin; Zhong, Renming; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Qinfeng; Wang, Xin; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used

  5. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR, superior-inferior (SI, anterior-posterior (AP directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20% grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15% grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10% grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5% grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used.

  6. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Via, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.via@polimi.it; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133, Italy and CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100, Italy and European Institute of Oncology, Milano 20141 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  7. Influence of the electron energy and number of beams on the absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy of deep seated targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of compact laser-based electron accelerators, there has been some renewed interest on the use of such charged particles for radiotherapy purposes. Traditionally, electrons have been used for the treatment of fairly superficial lesions located at depths of no more than 4cm inside the patient, but lately it has been proposed that by using very high energy electrons, i.e. those with an energy in the order of 200-250MeV it should be possible to safely reach deeper targets. In this paper, we used a realistic patient model coupled with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the electron transport in such a patient model to examine the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions as a function of both the electron beam energy as well as the number of beams for a particular type of treatment, namely, a prostate radiotherapy treatment. Each treatment is modeled as consisting of nine, five or three beam ports isocentrically distributed around the patient. An optimization algorithm is then applied to obtain the beam weights in each treatment plan. It is shown that for this particularly challenging case, both excellent target coverage and critical structure sparing can be obtained for energies in the order of 150MeV and for as few as three treatment ports, while significantly reducing the total energy absorbed by the patient with respect to a conventional megavoltage x-ray treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of thermoluminescent BeO samples in standard radiotherapy beams; Avaliacao de amostras termoluminescentes de BeO em feixes padroes de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela P.; Silva, Jonas O.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: daniela.piai.groppo@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    Beryllium oxide thermoluminescent samples were evaluated in standard radiotherapy beams of low energy. Results for response reproducibility, dose-response curve and energy dependence were obtained. The lower detection limit was determined. The pellets of BeO showed their usefulness for beam dosimetry. (author)

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is an option for patients with localized breast recurrences after previous external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Schoeber, Carola; Schaefer, Joerg; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    For patients suffering of recurrent breast cancer within the irradiated breast, generally mastectomy is recommended. The normal tissue tolerance does not permit a second full-dose course of radiotherapy to the entire breast after a second breast-conserving surgery (BCS). A novel option is to treat these patients with partial breast irradiation (PBI). This approach is based on the hypothesis that re-irradiation of a limited volume will be effective and result in an acceptable frequency of side effects. The following report presents a single center experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during excision of recurrent breast cancer in the previously irradiated breast. Between 4/02 and 11/06, 15 patients were treated for in-breast recurrences at a median of 10 years (3–25) after previous EBRT (10 recurrences in the initial tumor bed, 3 elsewhere in-breast failures, 2 invasive recurrences after previous DCIS). Additional 2 patients were selected for IORT with new primary breast cancer after previous partial breast EBRT for treatment of Hodgkin's disease. IORT with a single dose of 14.7 – 20 Gy 50 kV X-rays at the applicator surface was delivered with the Intrabeam™-device (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany). After a median follow-up of 26 months (1–60), no local recurrence occurred. 14 out of 17 patients are alive and free of disease progression. Two patients are alive with distant metastases. One patient died 26 months after BCS/IORT due to pulmonary metastases diagnosed 19 months after BCS/IORT. Acute toxicity after IORT was mild with no Grade 3/4 toxicities and cosmetic outcome showed excellent/good/fair results in 7/7/3 cases. IORT for recurrent breast cancer using low energy X-rays is a valuable option for patients with recurrent breast cancer after previous radiotherapy

  10. Pain flare following external beam radiotherapy and meaningful change in pain scores in the treatment of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Edward; Ling, Alison; Davis, Lori; Panzarella, Tony; Danjoux, Cyril

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine the incidence of pain flare following external beam radiotherapy and to determine what constitutes a meaningful change in pain scores in the treatment of bone metastases. Patients and methods: Patients with bone metastases treated with external beam radiotherapy were asked to score their pain on a scale of 0-10 before the treatment (baseline), daily during the treatment and for 10 days after completion of external beam radiation. Pain flare was defined as a two-point increase from baseline pain in the pain scale of 0-10 with no decrease in analgesic intake or a 25% increase in analgesic intake employing daily oral morphine equivalent with no decrease in pain score. To distinguish pain flare from progression of pain, we required the pain score and analgesic intake to return back to baseline levels after the increase/flare. They were also asked to indicate if their pain changed during that time compared to pre-treatment level. The change in pain score was compared with patient perception. Results: Eighty-eight patients were evaluated in this study. There were 49 male and 39 female patients with the median age of 70 years. Twelve of 88 patients (14%) had pain flare on day 1. The overall incidence of pain flare during the study period ranged from 2 to 16%. A total of 797 pain scorings were obtained. Patients perceived an improvement in pain when their self-reported pain score decreased by at least two points. Conclusions: Our study confirms the occurrence of pain flare following the external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases. Further studies are required to predict who are at risk for flare. Appropriate measures can be taken to alleviate the pain flare. The finding in the meaningful change in pain scores supports the investigator-defined partial response used in some clinical trials

  11. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Pyo, Hong Ryull

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [de

  12. Unified registration framework for cumulative dose assessment in cervical cancer across external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharmili; Totman, John J.; Choo, Bok A.

    2016-03-01

    Dose accumulation across External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Brachytherapy (BT) treatment fractions in cervical cancer is extremely challenging due to structural dissimilarities and large inter-fractional anatomic deformations between the EBRT and BT images. The brachytherapy applicator and the bladder balloon, present only in the BT images, introduce missing structural correspondences for the underlying registration problem. Complex anatomical deformations caused by the applicator and the balloon, different rectum and bladder filling and tumor shrinkage compound the registration difficulties. Conventional free-form registration methods struggle to handle such topological differences. In this paper, we propose a registration pipeline that first transforms the original images to their distance maps based on segmentations of critical organs and then performs non-linear registration of the distance maps. The resulting dense deformation field is then used to transform the original anatomical image. The registration accuracy is evaluated on 27 image pairs from stage 2B-4A cervical cancer patients. The algorithm reaches a Hausdorff distance of close to 0:5 mm for the uterus, 2:2 mm for the bladder and 1:7 mm for the rectum when applied to (EBRT,BT) pairs, taken at time points more than three months apart. This generalized model-free framework can be used to register any combination of EBRT and BT images as opposed to methods in the literature that are tuned for either only (BT,BT) pair, or only (EBRT,EBRT) pair or only (BT,EBRT) pair. A unified framework for 3D dose accumulation across multiple EBRT and BT fractions is proposed to facilitate adaptive personalized radiation therapy.

  13. A new strategy for online adaptive prostate radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Lohr, Frank; Wolff, Dirk; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg

    2009-01-01

    Interfractional organ motion and patient positioning errors during prostate radiotherapy can have deleterious clinical consequences. It has become clinical practice to re-position the patient with image-guided translational position correction before each treatment to compensate for those errors. However, tilt errors can only be corrected with table corrections in six degrees of freedom or ''full'' adaptive treatment planning strategies. Organ shape deformations can only be corrected by ''full'' plan adaptation. This study evaluates the potential of instant treatment plan adaptation (fast isodose line adaptation with real-time dose manipulating tools) based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to further improve treatment quality. Using in-house software, CBCTs were modified to approximate a correct density calibration. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions based on CBCTs were compared with dose distributions calculated on conventional planning CTs (PCT) for four datasets (one inhomogeneous phantom, three patient datasets). To determine the potential dosimetric benefit of a ''full'' plan adaptation over translational position correction, dose distributions were re-optimized using graphical ''online'' dose modification tools for three additional patients' CT-datasets with a substantially distended rectum while the original plans have been created with an empty rectum (single treatment fraction estimates). Absolute dose deviations of up to 51% in comparison to the PCT were observed when uncorrected CBCTs were used for replanning. After density calibration of the CBCTs, 97% of the dose deviations were ≤3% (gamma index: 3%/3 mm). Translational position correction restored the PTV dose (D 95 ) to 73% of the corresponding dose of the reference plan. After plan adaptation, larger improvements of dose restoration to 95% were observed. Additionally, the rectal dose (D 30 ) was further decreased by 42 percentage points (mean of three patient datasets). An accurate dose

  14. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki

    2016-01-01

    , which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy...

  15. Development of silicon monolithic arrays for dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisello, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.bisello@iba-group.com [IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen—Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Menichelli, David [IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Scaringella, Monica [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); INFN—Florence Division, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Talamonti, Cinzia; Zani, Margherita; Bucciolini, Marta [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Unversitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, Mara [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); INFN—Florence Division, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    New tools for dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy have been developed during last years in the framework of the collaboration among the University of Florence, INFN Florence and IBA Dosimetry. The first step (in 2007) was the introduction in dosimetry of detector solutions adopted from high energy physics, namely epitaxial silicon as the base detector material and a guard ring in diode design. This allowed obtaining state of the art radiation hardness, in terms of sensitivity dependence on accumulated dose, with sensor geometry particularly suitable for the production of monolithic arrays with modular design. Following this study, a 2D monolithic array has been developed, based on 6.3×6.3 cm{sup 2} modules with 3 mm pixel pitch. This prototype has been widely investigated and turned out to be a promising tool to measure dose distributions of small and IMRT fields. A further linear array prototype has been recently design with improve spatial resolution (1 mm pitch) and radiation hardness. This 24 cm long device is constituted by 4×64 mm long modules. It features low sensitivity changes with dose (0.2%/kGy) and dose per pulse (±1% in the range 0.1–2.3 mGy/pulse, covering applications with flattened and unflattened photon fields). The detector has been tested with very satisfactory results as a tool for quality assurance of linear accelerators, with special regards to small fields, and proton pencil beams. In this contribution, the characterization of the linear array with unflattened MV X-rays, {sup 60}Co radiation and 226 MeV protons is reported. - Highlights: • A silicon monolithic 1D array with 1 mm pixel pitch was developed. • The detector was characterized with {sup 60}Co, unflattened MV X-rays, 226 MeV protons. • Dose linearity in clinical relevance range and dose profiles were measured. • The detector performs good agreement with reference detectors. • The technology is suitable in dose profiling in MV X-ray and proton therapy.

  16. A simple technique for treating age-related macular degeneration with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Francis, J. Winston; Newnham, W. John

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple external beam photon radiotherapy technique to treat age-related macular degeneration without the need for simulation, planning computed tomography (CT) or computer dosimetry. Methods and Materials: The goal was to enable the treatment to be set up reliably on the treatment machine on Day 1 with the patient supine in a head cast without any prior planning. Using measurements of ocular globe topography from Karlsson et al. (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1996; 33: 705-712), we chose a point 1.5 cm behind the anterior surface of the upper eyelid (ASUE) as the isocentre of a half-beam, blocked, 5.0 x 3.0-cm, angled lateral field to treat the involved eye. This would position the isocentre about 0.5 cm behind the posterior surface of the lens, and a little over 1 cm in front of the macula, according to Karlsson et al. The setup requires initial adjustment of the gantry from horizontal (to account for any asymmetry of position of the eyes), then angling 15 deg. posteriorly to avoid the contralateral eye. Finally, the couch is raised to position the isocentre 1.5 cm behind the ASUE. Results: To verify the applicability of the technique, we performed CT and computer dosimetry on the first 11 eyes so treated. Our CT measurements were in good agreement with Karlsson et al. The lens dose was < 5% and the macula was within the 95% isodose curve in each case (6-MV linac). Treatment setup time is approximately 10 min each day. The 11 patients were treated with 5 x 2.00 Gy (2 patients) or 5 x 3.00 Gy (9 patients), and subjective response on follow-up over 1 to 12 months (median 4 months) was comparable to previously reported results, with no significant acute side effects. Conclusion: Our technique is easy to set up and reliably treats the macula, with sparing of the lens and contralateral eye. It enables treatment to commence rapidly and cost-effectively without the need for simulation or CT computer planning

  17. TU-EF-304-04: A Heart Motion Model for Proton Scanned Beam Chest Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, B; Kiely, J Blanco; Lin, L; Freedman, G; Both, S; Vennarini, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To model fast-moving heart surface motion as a function of cardiac-phase in order to compensate for the lack of cardiac-gating in evaluating accurate dose to coronary structures. Methods: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a breath-hold, cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine heart surface motion. Radial and planar views of the heart were resampled into a 3-dimensional volume representing one heartbeat. A multi-resolution optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac-cycle. The surface of the heart was modeled as a thin membrane comprised of voxels perpendicular to a pencil beam scanning (PBS) beam. The membrane’s out-of-plane spatial displacement was modeled as a harmonic function with Lame’s equations. Model accuracy was assessed with the root mean squared error (RMSE). The model was applied to a cohort of six chest wall irradiation patients with PBS plans generated on phase-sorted 4DCT. Respiratory motion was separated from the cardiac motion with a previously published technique. Volumetric dose painting was simulated and dose accumulated to validate plan robustness (target coverage variation accepted within 2%). Maximum and mean heart surface dose assessed the dosimetric impact of heart and coronary artery motion. Results: Average and maximum heart surface displacements were 2.54±0.35mm and 3.6mm from the end-diastole phase to the end-systole cardiac-phase respectively. An average RMSE of 0.11±0.04 showed the model to be accurate. Observed errors were greatest between the circumflex artery and mitral valve level of the heart anatomy. Heart surface displacements correspond to a 3.6±1.0% and 5.1±2.3% dosimetric impact on the maximum and mean heart surface DVH indicators respectively. Conclusion: Although heart surface motion parallel to beam’s direction was substantial, its maximum dosimetric impact was 5.1±2.3%. Since PBS delivers low doses to coronary structures relative to

  18. Dosimetric characterization of VIPARnd gel by optical analysis to high-energy photon beam used in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Juliana R.; Lima, Renata S.; Lopes, Roseany de V. Vieira; Ceschin, Artemis Marti

    2015-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been proposed as a possibility for measurements of dose distribution in radiotherapy. This work aims to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a VIPARnd for 6 MV photon beam used in radiotherapy using optical investigations. The absorbance spectrum of irradiated gel dosimeter was optical evaluated with spectrophotometer techniques and with CMOS camera readout for dose range of 0 to 50 Gy. Data shows that the VIPARnd has a maximum absorbance at 300 to 320 nm depending on the absorbed dose. The CMOS camera readouts were obtained in RGB color, the absorbance measurements suggest a major response of dose for blue matrix verified with data. The dose-response curve for blue component showed interval of linearity from 1 Gy to 20 Gy. (author)

  19. Chemoradiation in cervical cancer with cisplatin and high-dose rate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results of a phase-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.G.; Laban, C.; Puschmann, D.; Koelbl, H. [Dept. of Gynecology, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: In 1999, five randomized studies demonstrated that chemoradiation with cisplatin and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has a benefit in locally advanced cervical cancer and for surgically treated patients in high-risk situations. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiation with cisplatin and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Patients and Method: 27 patients were included in our phase-II trial: 13 locally advanced cases (group A) and 14 adjuvant-therapy patients in high-risk situations (group B). A definitive radiotherapy was performed with 25 fractions of external beam therapy (1.8 Gy per fraction/middle shielded after eleven fractions). Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with 7 Gy in point A per fraction (total dose 35 Gy) in FIGO Stages IIB-IIIB. The total dose of external and brachytherapy was 70 Gy in point A and 52-54 Gy in point B. All patients in stage IVA were treated without brachytherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 1.8 Gy single-dose up to 50.4 Gy. Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with two fractions of 5 Gy only in patients with tumor-positive margins or tumor involvement of the upper vagina. The chemotherapeutic treatment schedule provided six courses of cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly recommended in the randomized studies GOG-120 and -123. Results: A total of 18/27 patients (66.7%) completed all six courses of chemotherapy. Discontinuation of radiotherapy due to therapy-related morbidity was not necessary in the whole study group. G3 leukopenia (29.6%) was the only relevant acute toxicity. There were no differences in toxicity between group A and B. Serious late morbidity occurred in 2/27 patients (7.4%). 12/13 patients (92.3%) with IIB-IVA cervical cancer showed a complete response (CR). 13/14 adjuvant cases (92.8%) are free of recurrence (median follow up: 19.1 months). Conclusion: Concomitant

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugom, A.J.; Gijn, W. van; Muller, E.W.; Berglund, A; Broek, C.B. van den; Fokstuen, T.; Gelderblom, H.; Kapiteijn, E.; Leer, J.W.H.; Marijnen, C.A.; Martijn, H.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Pahlman, L.; Punt, C.J.A.; Putter, H.; Roodvoets, A.G.; Rutten, H.J.; Steup, W.H.; Glimelius, B.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugom, A. J.; van Gijn, W.; Muller, E. W.; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C. B. M.; Fokstuen, T.; Gelderblom, H.; Kapiteijn, E.; Leer, J. W. H.; Marijnen, C. A. M.; Martijn, H.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Påhlman, L.; Punt, C. J. A.; Putter, H.; Roodvoets, A. G. H.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Steup, W. H.; Glimelius, B.; van de Velde, C. J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with

  2. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  3. High-dose-rate iridium-192 afterloading therapy combined with external beam radiotherapy for T1c-T3bN0M0 prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yoshimasa; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Fujii, Tomohiro; Takenaka, Atsushi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2004-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for T1c-T3bN0M0 prostate cancer in a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam RT and fractionated iridium-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Included in the study were 98 patients with T1c-T3bN0M0 prostate cancer who were diagnosed between October 1997 and September 2002 and underwent high-dose-rate brachytherapy with external beam RT. Treatment consisted of external beam RT (four ports) to the prostate of 16 fractions of 2.3 Gy to a total dose of 36.8 Gy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 4 fractions of 6.0 Gy within 30 hours to a total dose of 24.0 Gy. No patient received adjuvant hormonal therapy after RT. The most recent prostate-specific antigen level was 0.0 to 3.9 ng/mL (median 0.4). Seven patients (7.1%) developed recurrence and treatment was considered a failure (bone metastasis in two and biochemical failure in five). The overall biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rate was 95.9% at 2 years and 92.9% at 5 years. The bDFS rate by T stage was 98.6% at 2 years and 95.9% at 5 years for Stage T1c-T2b and 88.0% and 84.0% for Stage T3a-b, respectively (P = 0.047). The 2-year and 5-year bDFS rate was better in patients with an initial prostate-specific antigen level of less than 20 ng/mL compared with 20 ng/mL or greater (98.6% and 97.1% versus 93.1% and 82.8%, respectively, P = 0.0261). Acute toxicity was mild to moderate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 1-2) and consisted of cystourethritis or proctitis in 29 (29.6%) of 98 patients. With a low complication rate and satisfactory bDFS rates, this combination therapy can be considered an alternative method for clinical Stage T1c-T3b prostate cancer and is expected to improve patient quality of life. Additional long-term follow-up is needed to confirm this treatment.

  4. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for primary and recurrent retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieschen, Holger L.; Spiro, Ira J.; Suit, Herman D.; Ott, Mark J.; Rattner, David W.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Willett, Christopher G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the long-term outcome of patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma treated by preoperative external beam radiotherapy, resection, and intraoperative electron beam radiation (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 37 patients were treated with curative intent for primary or recurrent retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma. All patients underwent external beam radiotherapy with a median dose of 45 Gy. This was followed by laparotomy, resection, and IOERT, if feasible. Twenty patients received 10-20 Gy of IOERT with 9-15 MeV electrons. These patients were compared to a group of 17 patients receiving preoperative irradiation without IOERT. Results: The 5-yr actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival, local control (LC), and freedom from distant disease of all 37 patients was 50%, 38%, 59%, and 54%, respectively. After preoperative irradiation, 29 patients (78%) underwent gross total resection. For 16 patients undergoing gross total resection and IOERT, OS and LC were 74% and 83%, respectively. In contrast, these results were less satisfactory for 13 patients undergoing gross total resection without IOERT. For these patients, OS and LC were 30% and 61%, respectively. Four patients experienced treatment-related morbidity. Conclusions: In selected patients, IOERT results in excellent local control and disease-free survival with acceptable morbidity

  5. Toxicity and quality of life after choline-PET/CT directed salvage lymph node dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy in nodal recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilg, Cordula A; Leifert, Anja; Schnell, Daniel; Kirste, Simon; Volegova-Neher, Natalia; Schlager, Daniel; Wieser, Gesche; Henne, Karl; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Grosu, Anca-L; Rischke, Hans Christian

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that, based on 11 C/ 18 F-choline positron emission tomography-computerized-tomography as a diagnostic tool, salvage lymph node dissection (LND) plus adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) is feasible for treatment of pelvic/retroperitoneal nodal recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the toxicity of this combined treatment strategy has not been systematically investigated before. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the acute and late toxicity and quality of life of ART after LND in pelvic/retroperitoneal nodal recurrent PCa. 43 patients with nodal recurrent PCa were treated with 46 LND followed by ART (mean 49.6 Gy total dose) at the sites of nodal recurrence. Toxicity of ART was analysed by physically examination (31/43, 72.1%), by requesting 15 frequent items of adverse events from the Common-Terminology-Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0-catalogue and by review of medical records. QLQ-C30 (EORTC quality of life assessment) and PR25 (prostate cancer module) questionnaires were used to investigate quality of life. Toxicity was evaluated before starting of ART, during ART (acute toxicity), after ART (mean 2.3 months) and at end of follow up (mean 3.2 years after end of ART) reflecting late toxicity. 71.7% (33/46) of 46 ART were treatment of pelvic, 10.9% (5/46) of retroperitoneal only and 28.3% (13/46) of pelvic and retroperitoneal regions. Overall 52 symptoms representing toxicities were observed before ART, 107 during ART, 88 after end of ART and 52 at latest follow up. Leading toxicities during ART were diarrhoea (19%, 20/107), urinary incontinence (16%, 17/107) and fatigue (16%, 17/107). The spectrum of late toxicities was almost equal to those before beginning of ART. No grade 3 adverse events or chronic lymphedema at extremities were observed. We observed no clear correlation between localisation of treated regions, technique of ART and frequency or severity of toxicities. Mean quality of life at final evaluation

  6. Effect of fractionated regional external beam radiotherapy on peripheral blood cell count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariah, B.; Jacob, S.S.; Gwede, C.; Cantor, A.; Patil, J.; Casey, L.; Zachariah, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for obtaining weekly complete blood count (CBC) values and to identify the pattern of changes in CBC during regional conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of CBC data on 299 adult cancer patients who received definitive conventional radiotherapy to head and neck (n=95), chest (n=96), and pelvis (n=108) was performed. Temporal patterns and magnitude of change in white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets during radiotherapy were examined. Results: There were statistically significant declines in all counts, albeit not clinically significant. Notable differences between disease sites were found. The greatest weekly interval change in counts occurred during the first week of radiotherapy for all groups of patients. The mean WBC nadir values during treatment were 5.8 for head and neck, 6.8 for chest, and 5.4 for pelvis. The nadirs for all counts occurred toward the middle-to-end of radiotherapy. Lymphocytes were found to be more sensitive to radiotherapy than other leukocyte subcomponents. Conclusion: Our study suggests that weekly CBC monitoring is not necessary for all patients undergoing standard fractionated radiotherapy. Baseline blood counts may be used to determine an optimal schedule for monitoring CBCs in patients receiving conventional radiation alone. Reduced monitoring of CBC may result in significant financial savings

  7. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam radiotherapy. First results of the German phase 2 trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Strnad, Vratislav; Stillkrieg, Wilhelm; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Uter, Wolfgang [University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Dept. of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, Matthias W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Gynecology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of external beam three-dimensional (3D) conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for selected patients with early breast cancer. Between 2011 and 2016, 72 patients were recruited for this prospective phase 2 trial. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer or pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a tumor diameter ≤3 cm, clear resection margins ≥2 mm, no axillary lymph node involvement, no distant metastases, tumor bed clips, and were aged ≥50 years. Patients were excluded if mammography showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, or if they had residual diffuse microcalcifications postoperatively, an extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Patients received 3D conformal external beam APBI with a total dose of 38 Gy in 10 fractions in 1-2 weeks. The trial had been registered at the German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS-ID: DRKS00004417. Median follow-up was 25.5 months (range 1-61 months). Local control was maintained in 71 of 72 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 2.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0-6.1%). Early toxicity (grade 1 radiodermatitis) was seen in 34.7% (25/72). Late side effects ≥ grade 3 did not occur. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 96.7% (59/61). APBI with external beam radiotherapy techniques is feasible with low toxicity and, according to the results of the present and other studies, on the way to becoming a standard treatment option for a selected subgroup of patients. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Vertraeglichkeit und Sicherheit der externen, 3-D-konformalen akzelerierten Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) fuer ausgewaehlte Patientinnen mit einem fruehen Mammakarzinom. Von 2011 bis 2016 wurden 72 Patientinnen in diese prospektive Phase-2-Studie eingebracht. Einschlusskriterien waren ein histologisch gesichertes Mammakarzinom oder DCIS, ein Tumordurchmesser ≤ 3 cm, tumorfreie Resektionsraender ≥ 2

  8. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer. (author)

  9. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Letourneau, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1–T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins ± 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9° to 1.6°, respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup

  10. Long-term results of adjuvant hormonal therapy plus radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy for patients with pT3N0 or pT3N1 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Hideaki; Sakai, Iori; Harada Ken-ichi; Eto, Hiroshi; Hara, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant androgen suppression in conjunction with external beam irradiation after radical prostatectomy in patients with pathologically confirmed extraprostatic disease. Between July 1988 and October 1999, 38 patients with pT3N0 or pT3N1 prostate cancer received adjuvant hormonal therapy and external beam irradiation following radical retropubic prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog or castration were initiated as an adjuvant androgen suppression within 4 weeks after surgery, whereas pelvic irradiation was performed at a median dose of 50 G within 3 months after surgery. The prognostic advantage of this combined adjuvant therapy was analyzed. During the median observation period of 92 months, biochemical recurrence occurred in four of the 38 patients and five patients died. Of these five patients, only one died of prostate cancer progression. The 10-year biochemical recurrence-free, cancer-specific and overall survival rates of the 38 patients were 86.7%, 90.9% and 78.7%, respectively. Among several factors examined, only tumor grade was significantly associated with biochemical recurrence-free survival in these patients; however, there were no factors that were independent predictors for biochemical recurrence, based on multivariate analysis. Furthermore, biochemical recurrence-free survival in the 38 patients was significantly superior to that in 54 patients with locally advanced disease who did not receive any postoperative therapies until biochemical recurrence; however, there was no significant difference in cancer-specific and overall survival between these two groups. Despite retrospective analysis with a relatively small number of patients, results of the present study suggest favorable effects of the combined adjuvant treatments with androgen ablation and pelvic irradiation on cancer control for patients with pT3N0 or pT3N1

  11. Application of a tandem ionization chamber in a quality control program of X-ray beams, radiotherapy level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, Maira T.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2008-01-01

    A tandem ionization chamber, developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), for X radiation beams, radiotherapy level, was applied into a quality control program of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. This ionization chamber is composed by two ionization chambers, with a volume of 0.6 cm 3 each one. Its inner plane-parallel electrodes and guard rings are made of different materials: one is made of aluminum and the other is made of graphite. Because of this difference in materials, the ionization chamber forms a tandem system. The relative response of the calibration factors of both sides of the chamber allows an easy verification of the X-ray beam qualities stability. The ionization chamber was submitted to some tests to verify the stability of its response: leakage current before and after exposure, repeatability and reproducibility. The performance of the ionization chamber was satisfactory. (author)

  12. SUPREMO (Selective Use of Postoperative Radiotherapy aftEr MastectOmy) - a phase III randomised trial assessing the role of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in 'intermediate risk' women with operable breast cancer receiving adjuvant systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkler, I.H.; Price, A.; Dixon, M.; Canney, P.; Prescott, R.; Sainsbury, R.; Aird, E.

    2003-01-01

    Danish and Canadian randomised trials of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) have shown the importance of loco-regional control to survival in 'high risk' pre and postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant systemic therapy. The effects of radiotherapy (RT) in terms of improving survival are similar to those of systemic therapy. International consensus now supports the use of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in women with 4 or more involved axillary nodes or primary tumour size=/> 5cm. The role of PMRT in women at intermediate risk' with 1-3 involved nodes or node negative with other risk factors is controversial. The absolute reduction in risk of loco-regional recurrence varies widely (3-23%) in trials of PMRT in women with 1-3 involved nodes receiving systemic therapy. A UK survey of clinical oncologists (Kunkler et al,The Breast 1999;8:235) showed wide variations in opinion on the use of radiotherapy in these subgroups. It is possible that while RT may confer most benefit in loco-regional control, a greater survival benefit might accrue in patients with smaller tumours and fewer involved nodes. The 2000 Oxford overview of randomised trials of postoperative RT identifies non breast cancer deaths from RT related vascular morbidity as counterbalancing the benefits of RT in reducing breast cancer mortality. With the more extensive use of potentially cardiotoxic anthracycline containing adjuvant systemic therapy there are concerns about greater cardiac morbidity in patients receiving PMRT in addition. A large randomised international trial (SUPREMO) is proposed to recruit 3500 patients with (a) 1-3 involved axillary nodes or (b) node negative with other risk factors (grade 3 or lymphovascular invasion) treated by mastectomy, axillary clearance and appropriate systemic therapy for T0-3,N0-1,MO breast cancer. The primary endpoint is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are disease free survival, quality of life, morbidity (including cardiac), cost per life year saved

  13. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams.

  14. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  15. Complete response in a patient with gynecological hidradenocarcinoma treated with exclusive external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Flavio; Chiola, Ilaria; Belgioia, Liliana; Garelli, Stefania; Pastorino, Alice; Marcenaro, Michela; Mammoliti, Serafina; Costantini, Sergio; Bizzarri, Nicolò; Vellone, Valerio; Barra, Salvina; Corvò, Renzo

    2017-12-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma (HC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment of a 60-year-old woman with vulvo-vaginal localization of hidradenocarcinoma treated with external beam radiotherapy delivered by helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), followed by brachytherapy. External beam radiotherapy dose prescription was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, five fractions per week to whole pelvis (planning target volume 1 - PTV1), 60.2 Gy in 28 fractions to SIB1 (fundus of uterus and right inguinal node), and 58.8 Gy in 28 fractions to SIB2 (lower/middle third of vagina, paraurethral region and right inguinal lymph nodes). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 28 Gy in 4 fractions for cervix, fundus of uterus and upper third of vagina (HR-CTV1), and 22 Gy in 4 fractions to middle third of vagina and paraurethral region (HR-CTV2). D 90 for whole treatment was 91.9 Gy and 86.0 Gy for HR-CTV1 and HR-CTV2, respectively. Patient remained 12-months disease-free without treatment related side effects.

  16. Complete response in a patient with gynecological hidradenocarcinoma treated with exclusive external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Giannelli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenocarcinoma (HC is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment of a 60-year-old woman with vulvo-vaginal localization of hidradenocarcinoma treated with external beam radiotherapy delivered by helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB, followed by brachytherapy. External beam radiotherapy dose prescription was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, five fractions per week to whole pelvis (planning target volume 1 – PTV1, 60.2 Gy in 28 fractions to SIB1 (fundus of uterus and right inguinal node, and 58.8 Gy in 28 fractions to SIB2 (lower/middle third of vagina, paraurethral region and right inguinal lymph nodes. Brachytherapy dose prescription was 28 Gy in 4 fractions for cervix, fundus of uterus and upper third of vagina (HR-CTV1, and 22 Gy in 4 fractions to middle third of vagina and paraurethral region (HR-CTV2. D90 for whole treatment was 91.9 Gy and 86.0 Gy for HR-CTV1 and HR-CTV2, respectively. Patient remained 12-months disease-free without treatment related side effects.

  17. 18F-FDG Pet-Guided External Beam Radiotherapy in Iodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Farina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To evaluate the clinical response rate after a postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT in Iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. Material and Methods. Patients with thyroid cancer locally recurrent after total thyroidectomy plus metabolic radiotherapy and treated with radical EBRT were included. Inclusion criteria were detectable thyroglobulin (Tg, negative postmetabolic radiotherapy whole body scintigraphy, and no surgical indications. The pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT resulted positive in all cases (loggia, lymph nodes, and lung. EBRT was delivered with IMRT-SIB technique. A 18F-FDG PET/CT revaluation and Tg dosage were performed 3 months after the treatment. Results. Sixteen consecutive patients were included in this analysis (median follow-up: 6–44 months. Post-EBRT 18F-FDG PET/CT showed CR in 43.7%, PR in 31.2%, SD in 25.0% patients, and PD due to lung metastases in 12.5%. Overall response rate was 75.0% (CI 95%: 41.4–93.3%. Tg levels decreased in 75.0% with a median Δ of 68.0%. Two-year PFS and OS rates were 80.0% and 93.0%, respectively. Acute G3 toxicity occurred in 18.7% and late G2 toxicity in 12.5%. Conclusions.  18F-FDG PET/CT was useful in target definition for radiotherapy planning, identifying positive areas not detected with 131I scintigraphy. IMRT based EBRT was feasible and our results encourage future prospective studies. This clinical trial is registered with ID: NCT03191643.

  18. SU-G-TeP3-06: Nanoparticle-Aided External Beam Radiotherapy Leveraging the Cerenkov Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Z; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School (United States); Liu, B; Sajo, E [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Yasmin-Karim, S [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of exploiting the Cerenkov radiation (CR) present during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for significant therapeutic gain, using titanium dioxide nanoparticles (titania) delivered via a new design of radiotherapy biomaterials. Methods: Recently published work has shown that CR generated by radionuclides during PET imaging could substantially enhance damage to cancer cells in the presence of 0.625 µg/g titania. We hypothesize that equal or greater damage can be achieved during EBRT. To test this hypothesis, Monte Carlo simulation was done using GEANT4 in order to get the total CR yield inside a tumor volume during EBRT compared to that of the radionuclides. We considered a novel approach where a sufficiently potent concentration of the titania was delivered directly into the tumor using radiotherapy biomaterials (e.g. fiducials) loaded with the titania. The intra-tumor distribution/diffusion of titania released from the fiducials was calculated. An in-vitro MTS assay experiment was also carried out to establish the relative non-toxicity of titania for concentrations of up to 1 µg/g. Results: For a radiotherapy biomaterial loaded with 15 µg/g of 2-nm titania, at least 0.625 µg/g could be delivered through out a tumor sub-volume of 2-cm diameter after 14 days. This concentration level could inflict substantial damage to tumor cells during EBRT. The Monte Carlo results showed the CR yield in tumor by 6 MV radiation was higher than the radionuclides and hence potentially greater damage may be obtained during EBRT. No significant cell viability change was observed for 1 µg/g titania. Conclusion: Altogether, these preliminary findings demonstrate a potential new approach that can be used to take advantage of the CR present during megavoltage EBRT to boost damage to tumor cells. The results provide significant impetus for further experimental studies towards development of nanoparticle-aided EBRT powered by the

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy versus observation alone for patients at risk of lymph-node field relapse after therapeutic lymphadenectomy for melanoma : a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmeister, Bryan H.; Henderson, Michael A.; Ainslie, Jill; Fisher, Richard; Di Iulio, Juliana; Smithers, B. Mark; Hong, Angela; Shannon, Kerwin; Scolyer, Richard A.; Carruthers, Scott; Coventry, Brendon J.; Babington, Scott; Duprat, Joao; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Thompson, John F.

    Background The use of radiotherapy after therapeutic lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma at high risk of further lymph-node field and distant recurrence is controversial. Decisions for radiotherapy in this setting are made on the basis of retrospective, non-randomised studies. We did this

  20. Measurement and modeling of the dose distribution in homogenous medium for a proton beam devoted to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oozeer, R.

    1996-12-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the dose distribution in the proton beams of the proton therapy center at Orsay has been investigated. The theoretical study highlighted the prominent interactions of protons used for radiotherapy with the biological media, are the energy loss by inelastic collisions with electrons, and the multiple coulomb diffusions with nuclei. Experimental measurements have been realised with a small size diode in homogenous and heterogenous medium. The measurements in a water phantom lead to the finalizing of a lateral penumbra model for the intra skull beam. The measurements in heterogenous medium highlighted the importance of the fine structure of heterogeneities on the yield in depth curve shape. Concerning the simple fine structure heterogeneities, we defined the notions of equivalence to water for the heterogeneities, specific to protons, concerning the yields in depth and the diffusion. Moreover, a calculation of dose distribution, for a mono energy beam in a phantom of simple geometry, using the mini beam technique and the Highland formalism was implemented. This approach is compatible with a definition of heterogeneities as macroscopic structure. Concerning the heterogeneities of fine structure (equally complex), an analysis of the degradation of yield in depth curves was lead, indicating that it was possible to to take them into account from the scanner images. A such approach implies calculation models using directly the electronic density relative to water of each of voxel intercepted by the radiation. (N.C.)

  1. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis. A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouthos, Iosif [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); Medical Center - Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); J.W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bon, Dimitra [J.W. Goethe University, Institute of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Karagiannis, Efstratios [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); Otto von Guericke University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Magdeburg (Germany); Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a ''matched'' group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. (orig.) [German] Radiotherapie (RT) ist integrativer Bestandteil der multimodalen Therapie beim Mammakarzinom. Strahlentherapieinduzierte Hauttoxizitaet ist dabei das haeufigste unerwuenschte Ereignis; dennoch sind Praevention und Management der

  2. Lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a coplanar versus a non-coplanar beam technique: a comparison of clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bauer, Heather J.; Mayo, Charles S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using a coplanar beam technique was associated with similar outcomes as lung SBRT using a non-coplanar beam technique. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients undergoing lung SBRT between January 2008 and April 2011. SBRT was initially delivered with multiple non-coplanar, non-overlapping beams; however, starting in December 2009, SBRT was delivered predominantly with all coplanar beams in order to reduce treatment time and complexity. Results This analysis included 149 patients; the median follow-up was 21 months. SBRT was delivered for primary (n = 90) or recurrent (n = 17) non-small cell lung cancer, or lung oligometastasis (n = 42). The most common dose (Gy)/fraction (fx) regimens were 48 Gy/4 fx (39%), 54 Gy/3 fx (37%), and 50 Gy/5 fx (17%). The beam arrangement was coplanar in 61 patients (41%) and non-coplanar in 88 patients (59%). In patients treated with 54 Gy/3 fx, the mean treatment times per fraction for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 10 and 14 minutes (p < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier 2-year estimates of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and local control (LC) for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 65% vs. 56% (p = 0.30), 47% vs. 39% (p = 0.71), and 92% and 92% (p = 0.94), respectively. The 1-year estimates of grade 2-5 pulmonary toxicity for the coplanar and non-coplanar cohorts were 11% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.30). On multivariate analysis, beam arrangement was not significantly associated with OS, LC or pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions Patients treated with lung SBRT using a coplanar technique had similar outcomes as those treated with a non-coplanar technique. PMID:29296365

  3. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergy TM linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central 'target zone' and a partially attenuated beam for an outer 'set-up zone'. Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error

  4. External beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy is an acceptable treatment for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zillur Rahman Bhuiyan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical carcinoma is the second most common neoplasm in women worldwide and is the most frequent cancer among women in Bangladesh. In recent years, High Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy in combination with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT has been popular in the management of cancers of uterine cervix.Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and acute toxicity of four fractions high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy following pelvic external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods: Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medi­cal University & NICRH chosen as a research place for EBRT and HOR brachytherapy. A typical radiotherapy treatment involves daily inadiation for several weeks. Whole pelvis was treated with total dose of SO Gy in 5 weeks. Patients were treated once a day, 5 days a week with a daily fraction size of 2.0 Gy. EBRT: Pelvic radiotherapy dose is 50 Gy in 25 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction over 5 weeks. HDR brachytberapy dose is 7 Gy per fraction, total 4 fractions, each in a week over 4 weeks. Results: Ninety-eight patients were entered in the study. Three patients were excluded due to active non-malignant diseases. One patient had active tuberculosis, two patients had severe skin reactions and two patients withdrew following the first HDR application. The remaining Ninety patients were analyzed. Ninety patients completed the prescribed treatment and were evaluated. Eighty had complete response with relief of symptoms, negative Pap-smear and no clinical signs of persistence disease at 3 months. Ten patients had a positive Pap-smear with clinical signs of persis­tence disease. Patients were evaluated before statting treatment with EBRT and before starting treatment with HDR ICBT. Conclusion: It can be easily concluded that 4 fractions of HDR ICBT, 7 Gy each weekly and pelvic EBRT can effectively and safely control locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. So that EBRT and HDR ICBT

  5. Organ localization in fractionated external beam radiotherapy for early stage prostatic adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffray, D.A.; Horwitz, E.M.; Wong, J.W.; Martinez, A.A.; Brabbins, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Trends toward higher target doses and more conformal radiation field shaping place strict requirements on geometric localisation of the target and surrounding normal structures. Daily localization of these structures is not possible on a conventional treatment machine. For this reason, margins must be incorporated in the field shaping to accommodate any target or normal structure displacement. There are few studies which examine the magnitude of these displacements. We hypothesize that these uncertainties can be reduced by daily radiographic imaging of bony anatomy as an alternative to skin tattoos. This hypothesis is tested using multiple (15-19) CT scans on five patients receiving external beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Five patients were CT scanned in treatment position (with immobilization device) on every second day of their initial XRT course (non-boost). Radiopaque markers were placed on the skin tattoos to make them visible in the CT datasets. The scans were collected on a helical CT scanner (SR-7000, 3mm and 5mm slice thickness, 120kVp) and transferred to a workstation for analysis. The structures (prostate, rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles) on all 80 CT datasets were contoured (manually) by two physicians. A reference dataset was chosen for each patient. The 3D transformations between the study datasets and the reference set were determined using an automated technique. A separate transformation was determined for the alignment of (i) bone (excluding femora) and (ii) skin marks. The contours from each dataset were then transformed back to the reference dataset. The resulting contours show the position of organ relative to either the skin marks (tattoos) or the bony anatomy. The displacement and distortion of the organs were parameterized by the displacement of the volume edge (AP, LAT, SUP-INF), volume, and center-of-mass (COM). Each calculation was performed for an individual patient. Population averages were also

  6. Radical prostatectomy versus external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison of treatment outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Lee, Kang Hyun; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-kyung; Lee, Se Byeong [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively compared the treatment outcomes of localized prostate cancer between radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We retrospectively analyzed 738 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent either RP (n = 549) or EBRT (n = 189) with curative intent at our institution between March 2001 and December 2011. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml in the RP group and the nadir of + ≥ 2 ng/ml in the EBRT group. The median (range) follow-up duration was 48.8 months (0.7-133.2 months) and 48.7 months (1.0-134.8 months) and the median age was 66 years (45-89 years) and 71 years (51-84 years; p < 0.001) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Overall, 21, 42, and 36 % of patients in the RP group, and 15, 27, and 58 % of patients in the EBRT group were classified as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively (p < 0.001). Androgen-deprivation therapy was more common in the EBRT group (59 vs. 27 %, respectively; p < 0.001). The 8-year biochemical failure-free survival rates were 44 and 72 % (p < 0.001) and the disease-specific survival rates were 98 % and 97 % (p = 0.543) in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. Although the EBRT group included more high-risk patients than did the RP group, the outcomes of EBRT were not inferior to those of RP. Our data suggest that EBRT is a viable alternative to RP for treating localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Wir vergleichen retrospektiv die Verfahrensergebnisse des lokal begrenzten Prostatakarzinoms zwischen radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) und externer Strahlentherapie (EBRT). Wir analysieren zurueckblickend 738 Patienten mit lokal begrenztem Prostatakarzinom, die zwischen Maerz 2001 und Dezember 2011 in unserem Institut entweder eine RP (n = 549) oder eine EBRT (n = 189) mit kurativer Intention durchliefen. Biochemischer Fehler wurde als prostataspezifisches Antigen (PSA) ≥ 0,2 ng/ml in der RP-Gruppe und ein Nadir +

  7. Radiotherapy of uveal melanomas experiences with proton beam irradiation of high risk parapapillary, paramaculary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideghety, K.; Sauerwein, W.; Fluehs, D.; Sack, H.; Quast

    1999-01-01

    The role of the radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant chorioidal melanomas has been established by means of 106 Ru or 125 I applicators and proton therapy. The rationale of the indication to utilize brachytherapy or proton therapy is presented on the basis of the clinical situation and physical characteristic of the different radiation modalities. (author)

  8. Contribution of secondary particles to the dose in 12C radiotherapy and other heavy ion beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jadrníčková, Iva; Spurný, František; Molokanov, A. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 126, 1-4 (2007), s. 657-659 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : secondery particles * radiotherapy * LET spectrometer Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  9. Conventional external irradiation alone as adjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer; Results of a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, J.F.; Pavy, J.J.; Gillet, M.; Mantuon, G.; Pelissier, E.; Schraub, S. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France))

    1992-07-01

    Between 1/85 and 1/90, 14 consecutive patients were entered into a prospective study of conventional adjuvant post-operative external beam radiotherapy after complete resection for a pancreatic adeno-carcinoma. The surgical procedure was a Whipple resection in 9 patients, a distal pancrea-tectomy in 1 patient. There were 3 T[sub 1b], 8 T[sub 2] and 3 T[sub 3] tumors (UICC 1987); nodal involvement was present in 5 cases. The radiotherapy was delivered using a 4-field box technique with a 23 x MV photon beam. All patients received a total dose of 54 Gy to the tumor bed. The mean treated volume was 900 cm[sup 3]. Acute toxicities consisted mainly of weight loss (mean: 2 kg). Two patients had a grade 2 diarrhea and 2 patients a grade 2 gastritis. Late effects were minimal and only observed in 2 patients. The overall loco-regional recurrence (LR) rate was 50%. The median disease-free survival was 12 months, and the median survival was 23 months. This post-operative conventional radiotherapy treatment gives results that are comparable to the results of GITSG-adjuvant study using a combination of split-course radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). (author). 46 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.

  10. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams; Controlli di qualita' essenziali in radioterapia con fasci esterni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy. [Italian] Il gruppo di studio Assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' presenta le linee guida per la stesura dei protocolli di controllo di qualita' essenziali necessari a garantire un adeguato livello di accuratezza del trattamento radiante e rappresenta pertanto una parte essenziale del contributo fisico-dosimetrico globale di assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia con fasci esterni.

  11. Second primary cancers after adjuvant radiotherapy in early breast cancer patients: A national population based study under the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Mellemkjær, Lene; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the long-term risk of second primary solid non-breast cancer in a national population-based cohort of 46,176 patients treated for early breast cancer between 1982 and 2007. Patients and methods: All patients studied were treated according to the national guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The risk of second primary cancers was estimated by Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among irradiated women compared to non-irradiated. All irradiated patients were treated on linear accelerators. Second cancers were a priori categorized into two groups; radiotherapy-associated- (oesophagus, lung, heart/mediastinum, pleura, bones, and connective tissue) and non-radiotherapy-associated sites (all other cancers). Results: 2358 second cancers had occurred during the follow-up. For the radiotherapy-associated sites the HR among irradiated women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.11–1.61) with significantly increased HRs for the time periods of 10–14 years (HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.08–2.24) and ⩾15 years after treatment (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.14–2.81). There was no increased risk for the non-radiotherapy-associated sites (HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.94–1.1). The estimated attributable risk related to radiotherapy for the radiotherapy-associated sites translates into one radiation-induced second cancer in every 200 women treated with radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy treated breast cancer patients have a small but significantly excess risk of second cancers

  12. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using...

  13. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...

  14. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, A.E.H.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37 o C for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37 o C for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the

  15. Method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiotherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Macey, Daniel J [Birmingham, AL; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2011-11-01

    A method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiation therapy beams is designed to preferentially distinguish and image low energy radiation from high energy secondary radiation emitted from a target as the result of therapeutic beam deposition. A detector having low sensitivity to high energy photons combined with a collimator designed to dynamically image in the region of the therapeutic beam target is used.

  16. Secondary radiation doses of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton beam therapy in patients with lung and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonkyu; Min, Byung Jun; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Sungkoo; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2011-03-01

    To compare the secondary radiation doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) in patients with lung and liver cancer. IMRT and PBT were planned for three lung cancer and three liver cancer patients. The treatment beams were delivered to phantoms and the corresponding secondary doses during irradiation were measured at various points 20-50 cm from the beam isocenter using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and PBT, respectively. The secondary dose per Gy (i.e., a treatment dose of 1Gy) from PBT for lung and liver cancer, measured 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.17 to 0.086 mGy. The secondary dose per Gy from IMRT, however, ranged between 5.8 and 1.0 mGy, indicating that PBT is associated with a smaller dose of secondary radiation than IMRT. The internal neutron dose per Gy from PBT for lung and liver cancer, 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.03 to 0.008 mGy. The secondary dose from PBT is less than or compatible to the secondary dose from conventional IMRT. The internal neutron dose generated by the interaction between protons and body material is generally much less than the external neutron dose from the treatment head. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance evaluation of an algorithm for fast optimization of beam weights in anatomy-based intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, Vaitheeswaran; Sathiya Narayanan, V.K.; Bhangle, Janhavi R.; Gupta, Kamlesh K.; Basu, Sumit; Maiya, Vikram; Joseph, Jolly; Nirhali, Amit

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the performance of a new algorithm for optimization of beam weights in anatomy-based intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The algorithm uses a numerical technique called Gaussian-Elimination that derives the optimum beam weights in an exact or non-iterative way. The distinct feature of the algorithm is that it takes only fraction of a second to optimize the beam weights, irrespective of the complexity of the given case. The algorithm has been implemented using MATLAB with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) option for convenient specification of dose constraints and penalties to different structures. We have tested the numerical and clinical capabilities of the proposed algorithm in several patient cases in comparison with KonRad inverse planning system. The comparative analysis shows that the algorithm can generate anatomy-based IMRT plans with about 50% reduction in number of MUs and 60% reduction in number of apertures, while producing dose distribution comparable to that of beamlet-based IMRT plans. Hence, it is clearly evident from the study that the proposed algorithm can be effectively used for clinical applications. (author)

  18. Performance evaluation of an algorithm for fast optimization of beam weights in anatomy-based intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan Vaitheeswaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the performance of a new algorithm for optimization of beam weights in anatomy-based intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. The algorithm uses a numerical technique called Gaussian-Elimination that derives the optimum beam weights in an exact or non-iterative way. The distinct feature of the algorithm is that it takes only fraction of a second to optimize the beam weights, irrespective of the complexity of the given case. The algorithm has been implemented using MATLAB with a Graphical User Interface (GUI option for convenient specification of dose constraints and penalties to different structures. We have tested the numerical and clinical capabilities of the proposed algorithm in several patient cases in comparison with KonRad® inverse planning system. The comparative analysis shows that the algorithm can generate anatomy-based IMRT plans with about 50% reduction in number of MUs and 60% reduction in number of apertures, while producing dose distribution comparable to that of beamlet-based IMRT plans. Hence, it is clearly evident from the study that the proposed algorithm can be effectively used for clinical applications.

  19. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Joseph; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Horan, Gail; McCloy, Roisin; Buckney, Steve; O'Neill, Louise; Faul, Clare

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  20. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  1. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT

  2. Tumor Localization Using Cone-Beam CT Reduces Setup Margins in Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Li, Jonathan G.; Shi Wenyin; Newlin, Heather E.; Chvetsov, Alexei; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.; Olivier, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether setup margins can be reduced using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to localize tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 lung cancer patients were treated with curative intent with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy using daily image guidance with CBCT. Of these, 13 lung cancer patients had sufficient CBCT scans for analysis (389 CBCT scans). The patients underwent treatment simulation in the BodyFix immobilization system using four-dimensional CT to account for respiratory motion. Daily alignment was first done according to skin tattoos, followed by CBCT. All 389 CBCT scans were retrospectively registered to the planning CT scans using automated soft-tissue and bony registration; the resulting couch shifts in three dimensions were recorded. Results: The daily alignment to skin tattoos with no image guidance resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 3.2-5.6 mm and 2.0-3.5 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced by aligning to skin tattoos with no image guidance was approximately 1-1.6 cm. The difference in the couch shifts obtained from the bone and soft-tissue registration resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 1.5-4.1 mm and 1.8-5.3 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target, instead of localizing the target itself, was 0.5-1.4 cm. Conclusion: Using daily CBCT soft-tissue registration to localize the tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy reduced the required setup margin by up to approximately 1.5 cm compared with both no image guidance and image guidance using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target.

  3. Feasibility study of image guided radiotherapy for lung tumor using online and offline cone-beam CT setup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongsheng; Li Baosheng; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Yu Ningsha; Chen Yiru

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of online and offline cone-beam CT(CBCT) guided radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with lung tumor treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy were investigated. Online kV CBCT scan, image registration and setup correction were performed before and immediately after radiotherapy. CBCT online-guided correction data were used to calculate the population-based CTV-PTV margins under the condition of non-correction and correction in every fraction respectively. The numbers of initial images and the population-based CTV-PTV margins after the offline compensation of the system setup error were evaluated with the permission of 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm maximal residue error, respectively. Results: Under the condition of non-correction, the required margins for total error were 5.7 mm, 8.0 mm and 7.8 mm in the left-right (x axis), cranio-caudal (y axis) and anterior-posterior(z axis) directions, respectively. When the tumor was corrected in every fraction, the required margins for intra-fraction error were 2.4 mm, 2.4 mm and 2.3 mm in x,y and z axes, respectively. To correct the systematic setup error, 9 sets of CBCT images for 3.3 mm, 3.7 mm and 3.6 mm PTV margins, and 7 sets of CBCT images for 3.9 mm, 4.3 mm and 4.3 mm PTV margins in x,y and z axes were necessary when 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm maximal residue error were permitted respectively. Conclusions: Both of the online CBCT correction and the offline adaptive correction can markedly reduce the impact of setup error and reduce the required PTV margins accordingly. It is feasible to deliver the online and offline image guided radiation for patients with lung tumor. (authors)

  4. Residual rotational set-up errors after daily cone-beam CT image guided radiotherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, Louise Vagner; Elstrøm, Ulrik Vindelev; Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig P.; Petersen, Jørgen Baltzer; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Grau, Cai; Tanderup, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the often quite extended treatment fields in cervical cancer radiotherapy, uncorrected rotational set-up errors result in a potential risk of target miss. This study reports on the residual rotational set-up error after using daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to position cervical cancer patients for radiotherapy treatment. Methods and materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer had daily CBCT scans (650 CBCTs in total) prior to treatment delivery. We retrospectively analyzed the translational shifts made in the clinic prior to each treatment fraction as well as the residual rotational errors remaining after translational correction. Results: The CBCT-guided couch movement resulted in a mean translational 3D vector correction of 7.4 mm. Residual rotational error resulted in a target shift exceeding 5 mm in 57 of the 650 treatment fractions. Three patients alone accounted for 30 of these fractions. Nine patients had no shifts exceeding 5 mm and 13 patients had 5 or less treatment fractions with such shifts. Conclusion: Twenty-two of the 25 patients have none or few treatment fractions with target shifts larger than 5 mm due to residual rotational error. However, three patients display a significant number of shifts suggesting a more systematic set-up error.

  5. Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT: comparison of deformable registration and image correction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be inaccurate due to unreliable Hounsfield units (HU) in the CBCT. Deformable image registration of planning CT images to CBCT, and direct correction of CBCT image values are two methods proposed to allow heterogeneity corrected dose calculations based on CBCT. In this paper we compare the accuracy and robustness of these two approaches. CBCT images for 44 patients were used including pelvis, lung and head & neck sites. CBCT HU were corrected using a ‘shading correction’ algorithm and via deformable registration of planning CT to CBCT using either Elastix or Niftyreg. Radiotherapy dose distributions were re-calculated with heterogeneity correction based on the corrected CBCT and several relevant dose metrics for target and OAR volumes were calculated. Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an ‘override ratio’ method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the same image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to the patient’s planning CT as a gold standard. Similar performance is achieved by shading corrected CBCT and both deformable registration algorithms, with mean and standard deviation of dose metric error less than 1% for all sites studied. For lung images, use of deformed CT leads to slightly larger standard deviation of dose metric error than shading corrected CBCT with more dose metric errors greater than 2% observed (7% versus 1%).

  6. Image guided radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (ElektaTM): Experience of the Leon Berard Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, P.; Gassa, F.; Lafay, F.; Claude, L.

    2009-01-01

    Image guide radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (C.B.C.T.-kV) developed by Elekta has been implemented at the centre Leon Berard in November 2006. The treatment procedure is presented and detailed for prostate cancer I.G.R.T. and non small cell lung cancer (N.S.C.L.C.) stereotactic radiotherapy (S.R.T.). C.B.C.T.-kV is routinely used for S.R.T., selected paediatric cancers, all prostate carcinomas, primitive brain tumours and head and neck cancers that do not require nodes irradiation. Thirty-five to 40 patients are treated within a daily 11-hours period. The general procedure for 3-dimensional images acquisition and their analysis is described. The C.B.C.T.-kV permitted to identify about 10% of prostate cancer patients for whom a positioning with bone-based 2-dimensional images only would have led to an unacceptable dose distribution for at least one session. S.R.T. is now used routinely for inoperable N.S.C.L.C.. The easiness of implementing C.B.C.T.-kV imaging and its expected medical benefit should lead to a rapid diffusion of this technology that is also submitted to prospective and multi centric medico-economical evaluations. (authors)

  7. Radiation for skull base meningiomas: review of the literature on the approach to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fabio Y; Chung, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Skull base meningiomas (SBM) pose unique challenges for radiotherapy as these tumors are often in close proximity to a number of critical structures and may not be surgically addressed in many cases, leaving the question about the tumor grade and expected biological behaviour. External beam radiotherapy and radiosurgery are longstanding treatments for meningioma that are typically used as upfront primary therapy, for recurrent tumors and as adjuvant therapy following surgical resection. There is controversy regarding the optimal timing and approach for radiation therapy in various clinical settings such as the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for completely resected grade 2 tumours. Despite the use of radiotherapy for many decades, the evidence to guide optimal radiation treatment is limited largely to single institution series of EBRT, SRS and particle therapy. In this article, we review the published data to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, proton radiotherapy and single and multi-fraction radiosurgery for SBM. We also highlight the areas of potential research and need for clinical improvement, including the growing awareness and effort to improve cognitive function in this patient