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Sample records for beam adjuvant radiotherapy

  1. Role of adjuvant postoperative external beam radiotherapy for well differentiated thyroid cancer

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    Kwon, Jeanny; Wu, Hong Gyun; Youn, Yeo Kyu; Lee, Kyu Eun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Park, Do Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To analyze the outcome of adjuvant postoperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC). We identified 84 patients treated with EBRT for WDTC from February 1981 to December 2010. Among them, we analyzed 39 patients who received EBRT after initial radical surgery. Twenty-four females and 15 males were included. The median age was 49 years (range, 16 to 72 years). There were 34 papillary thyroid carcinomas and 5 follicular thyroid carcinomas. Most patients showed pathologic T3/T4 stage (54%/26%). Ten patients (25.6%) had gross residual tumors. Five patients (12.8%) had tumor cells at the margin. The median EBRT dose and fraction size were 62.6 Gy and 1.8 to 2.0 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up was 73 months (range, 21 to 372 months). The five-year overall survival (OS) and locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) were 97.4% and 86.9%, respectively. Locoregional failures occurred in 5 and all failure sites were the neck node area. In univariate analysis, OS was significantly influenced by invasion of the trachea (p = 0.016) or esophagus (p = 0.006). LRFS was significantly decreased by male (p = 0.020), gross residuum after resection (p = 0.002), close or positive tumor at surgical margin involvement (p = 0.044), and tracheal invasion (p = 0.040). No significant prognostic factor was identified in the multivariate analysis. No patient experienced the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3 or more toxicity. Our locoregional control rate of 87.2% is comparable to historical controls with surgery alone, even though our study had a large proportion of advanced stage. Adjuvant EBRT may an effective and safe treatment option in patients with WDTC.

  2. Adjuvant high-dose-rate brachytherapy after external beam radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, Enis; Yildz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil H.; Atahan, I. Lale

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the local control and survival rates obtained with either external beam radiation therapy (ERT) and adjuvant high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) or ERT alone in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1993 and December 1999, 144 patients (106 male, 38 female) with the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer were treated with either ERT and adjuvant HDR BRT (Group A) or ERT alone (Group B) at our department. BRT was not applied in 38 patients for the following reasons: (1) Unit was unavailable (n=13), (2) Patient was younger than 18 years (n=17), (3) Patient received accelerated hyperfractionated ERT (n=6), and (4) Patient refused BRT (n=2). The median age for whole group was 43 (range: 9-82 years). According to the AJCC-1997 staging system, there were 11 (7.6%), 35 (24.3%), 38 (26.4%), and 60 (41.7%) patients in Stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 57 (39.6%) patients with T1, 41 (28.5%) with T2, 20 (13.9%) with T3, and 26 (18.1%) with T4 tumors. Histopathologic diagnosis was WHO 2-3 in 137 (95.2%) patients. ERT doses ranged between 58.8 and 74 Gy (median: 66 Gy). There were significantly more patients with young age, N2 status, and Stage III disease in Group B and with Stage II disease in Group A. Significantly more patients received chemotherapy in Group B. BRT with an HDR 192 Ir microSelectron afterloading unit was delivered in 106 patients at the conclusion of ERT using a single-channel nasal applicator. Dose was prescribed at 1 cm from the source, and total dose of 12 Gy in 3 fractions on 3 consecutive days was given immediately after ERT. Besides radiotherapy, 82 (56.9%) patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, as well. Follow-up time ranged between 12 and 80 months (median: 32 months). Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of local recurrence, locoregional failure, regional failure, and rate of distant metastasis. Local failure was observed in 11 (10.3%) out of 106

  3. Multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS). Diminished acceptance of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Heinecke, A.; Koepke, W.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: The Multicenter Study Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (MSDS) is an ongoing study in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland on the clinical benefit of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/xMO/x (5th ed. 1997). Methods: MSDS was designed as a prospective randomized trial. Patients receive thyroidectomy, radioiodine therapy (RIT) to ablate the thyroid remnant, and TSH-suppressive L-thyroxine therapy with or without RTx after documented elimination of cervical iodine-131 uptake (http://msds-studie.uni-muenster.de). Results: 311 patients were enrolled between January 2000 and March 2003. 279 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. 45 consented to randomization, of whom 17 were randomized into treatment arm A (RTx) and 18 into arm B (no RTx). Advised by the trial's independent Data Monitoring and Safety Committee, the MSDS steering committee decided to terminate randomization in April 2003 and continue MSDS as a prospective cohort study. 23 of the 234 patients in the observation arm of the trial were prescribed RTx by their physicians. Thus, 14% of the trial cohort were randomized or assigned to receive RTx (intention-to-treat analysis). In contrast, at least 44% of all patients with pT4 papillary DTC in Germany in the nationwide PCES study underwent RTx in 1996 (p 2 -test). Conclusions: Acceptance of external beam RTx as a treatment modality for DTC has receded to a degree that accrual of a sufficient number of patients for a randomized trial has been impossible. Observation of the trial cohort is continued in order to assess clinical event rates with and without RTx and chronic RTx toxicity. (orig.) [de

  4. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A; Johnson, N; Cornes, P; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-04-18

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy) in stage I endometrial cancer following total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH and BSO) remains unclear. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, Physician Data Query (PDQ) of National Cancer Institute. Handsearching was also carried out where appropriate. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer were included. Quality of the studies was assessed and data collected using a predefined data collection form. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence and endometrial cancer death. Data on quality of life (QOL) and morbidity were also collected. A meta-analysis on included trials was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager Software 4.2. The meta-analysis was performed on four trials (1770 patients). The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.44, p ASTEC; Lukka) are awaited. External beam radiotherapy carries a risk of toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  5. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC and NCIC CTG EN.5 randomised trials): pooled trial results, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P; Swart, Ann Marie; Orton, J; Kitchener, H; Whelan, T; Lukka, H; Eisenhauer, E; Bacon, M; Tu, D; Parmar, M K B; Amos, C; Murray, C; Qian, W

    2009-01-10

    Early endometrial cancer with low-risk pathological features can be successfully treated by surgery alone. External beam radiotherapy added to surgery has been investigated in several small trials, which have mainly included women at intermediate risk of recurrence. In these trials, postoperative radiotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of isolated local recurrence but there is no evidence that it improves recurrence-free or overall survival. We report the findings from the ASTEC and EN.5 trials, which investigated adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in women with early-stage disease and pathological features suggestive of intermediate or high risk of recurrence and death from endometrial cancer. Between July, 1996, and March, 2005, 905 (789 ASTEC, 116 EN.5) women with intermediate-risk or high-risk early-stage disease from 112 centres in seven countries (UK, Canada, Poland, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, USA) were randomly assigned after surgery to observation (453) or to external beam radiotherapy (452). A target dose of 40-46 Gy in 20-25 daily fractions to the pelvis, treating five times a week, was specified. Primary outcome measure was overall survival, and all analyses were by intention to treat. These trials were registered ISRCTN 16571884 (ASTEC) and NCT 00002807 (EN.5). After a median follow-up of 58 months, 135 women (68 observation, 67 external beam radiotherapy) had died. There was no evidence that overall survival with external beam radiotherapy was better than observation, hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 0.75-1.48; p=0.77). 5-year overall survival was 84% in both groups. Combining data from ASTEC and EN.5 in a meta-analysis of trials confirmed that there was no benefit in terms of overall survival (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI 0.84-1.29) and can reliably exclude an absolute benefit of external beam radiotherapy at 5 years of more than 3%. With brachytherapy used in 53% of women in ASTEC/EN.5, the local recurrence rate in the observation group at 5 years

  6. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mehee; Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George; Byrne, Richard W.; Diaz, Aidnag Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ondine's curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97 mm Hg. He was diagnosed with Ondine's curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case.

  7. Impact of External Beam Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Endometrial Adenocarcinoma: A Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Mols, Floortje; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Haartsen, Joke E.; Vingerhoets, Ad J.J.M.; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 5-10-year survivors of Stage I-II endometrial (adeno-)carcinoma (EC) treated with surgery alone or surgery with external beam adjuvant radiotherapy (EBRT) and an age-matched norm population. Methods and Materials: A population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted by the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. All patients were included who had been diagnosed with EC between 1994 and 1998 (n = 462). Information from the questionnaires returned was linked to data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry on patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Results: Responses were received from 75% of the patients. The analyses were restricted to women with Stage I-II disease at diagnosis, treated with either surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant EBRT, and without recurrent disease or new primary malignancies (n = 264). The patients who had received adjuvant EBRT (n = 80) had had a significantly higher tumor stage and grade at diagnosis (p < 0.0001) and a longer mean time since diagnosis (p = 0.04). Age, number of comorbid diseases, current marital status, nulliparity, education, and occupation were similar for both treatment groups. On multivariate analyses, adjuvant EBRT was independently and negatively associated with the vitality and physical and social well-being scale scores. The HRQOL scores of both treatment groups, however, were similar to those of an age-matched norm population. Conclusion: In general, the HRQOL of EC survivors is good. EC survivors treated with surgery alone had a better HRQOL than women treated with surgery and adjuvant EBRT, although for both groups, the HRQOL was in the range of the norm population

  8. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  9. Adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy in gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sendler, A.; Feldmann, H.J.; Fink, U.; Molls, M.; Siewert, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    In modern surgical oncology, adjuvant therapies are important complementary strategies. In local advanced carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, 5-year survival data are still disappointing despite standardized surgery. In this context, it has to be differentiated between adjuvant therapy following complete tumor exstirpation (so-called UICC R 0 resection) and additive therapies following incomplete tumor resections (UICC R 1 or R 2 resection). Modalities in the adjuvant setting are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the combined radio-/chemotherapy. In esophageal and gastric cancer there is up to now no benefit of postoperative adjuvant therapy. In pancreatic cancer, there are studies indicating a benefit of combined radio-/chemotherapy after complete tumor resection. A standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment is proven in colon cancer stage III (Dukes C) with levamisole and 5-FU. Completely resected rectal carcinoma should be treated postoperatively with combined radio-/chemotherapy. In the common clinical or practical setting, adjuvant therapy is indicated only in locally advanced gastrointestinal tumors following R 0 resection. Postoperative therapy following incomplete tumor resection has its reason only in a palliative intention. (orig.) [de

  10. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse

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    Choi, Mehee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Byrne, Richard W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Diaz, Aidnag Z., E-mail: aidnag_diaz@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ondine's curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97 mm Hg. He was diagnosed with Ondine's curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case.

  11. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer. Results after 874 patient-years of follow-up in the MSDS-trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, M. [Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Radiology; Pixberg, M.K.; Riemann, B.; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Schuck, A.; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Heinecke, A. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Biometrics; Schmid, K.W. [University Hospital of Essen, West German Cancer Center (Germany). Inst. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Dralle, H. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery

    2009-07-01

    Evaluate the clinical benefit of external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive thyroid carcinoma with follicular cell differentiation (DTC). The Multicentre Study on Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (MSDS) was planned as a prospective multicenter trial on the benefit of adjuvant RTx in locally invasive DTC (pT4; UICC 1997) with or without lymph node metastases and no known distant metastases. All patients were treated with thyroidectomy, {sup 131}I-therapy, and TSH-suppression and were randomized to receive additional RTx or not. In 4/2003 the trial became a prospective cohort study after only 45 of then 311 patients had consented to randomization. 351 of 422 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. Age was 48 {+-} 12 years (mean {+-} SD). 25% were men. Tumours were papillary in 90% and follicular in 10%. Of 47 patients randomized or allocated to RTx, 26 actually received RTx. Mean follow-up was 930 days. In an actual treatment analysis, 96% (25/26) of the RTx-patients reached complete remission (CR) vs. 86% in the non-RTx patients. Recurrences occurred in 0 vs. 3 % of patients: 6 reoperated for regional lymph node metastases, 1 tracheal invasion treated with tracheoplasty, 1 local invasion necessitating laryngectomy, 2 distant metastases (1 lung, 1 lung + bone). Serious chronic RTx toxicity occurred in 1/26 patients. The MSDS trial showed low mortality and recurrence rates and a weak benefit of RTx in terms of local control that did however not reach statistical significance. Routine RTx in locally invasive DTC can no longer be recommended. (orig.)

  12. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer. Results after 874 patient-years of follow-up in the MSDS-trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Riemann, B.; Schober, O.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Heinecke, A.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluate the clinical benefit of external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive thyroid carcinoma with follicular cell differentiation (DTC). The Multicentre Study on Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (MSDS) was planned as a prospective multicenter trial on the benefit of adjuvant RTx in locally invasive DTC (pT4; UICC 1997) with or without lymph node metastases and no known distant metastases. All patients were treated with thyroidectomy, 131 I-therapy, and TSH-suppression and were randomized to receive additional RTx or not. In 4/2003 the trial became a prospective cohort study after only 45 of then 311 patients had consented to randomization. 351 of 422 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. Age was 48 ± 12 years (mean ± SD). 25% were men. Tumours were papillary in 90% and follicular in 10%. Of 47 patients randomized or allocated to RTx, 26 actually received RTx. Mean follow-up was 930 days. In an actual treatment analysis, 96% (25/26) of the RTx-patients reached complete remission (CR) vs. 86% in the non-RTx patients. Recurrences occurred in 0 vs. 3 % of patients: 6 reoperated for regional lymph node metastases, 1 tracheal invasion treated with tracheoplasty, 1 local invasion necessitating laryngectomy, 2 distant metastases (1 lung, 1 lung + bone). Serious chronic RTx toxicity occurred in 1/26 patients. The MSDS trial showed low mortality and recurrence rates and a weak benefit of RTx in terms of local control that did however not reach statistical significance. Routine RTx in locally invasive DTC can no longer be recommended. (orig.)

  13. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriele, A.M.; Boidi Trotti, A.; Tardy, A.

    1987-01-01

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy in high-grade extremity sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Carlos Antonio da Silva; Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Vieira, Sergio Lannes

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the therapies utilized in the authors' institution for management of high-grade extremity sarcomas, analyzing the overall survival rates following multidisciplinary treatment. Materials and methods: retrospective study developed in the period from 1993 to 2007 with 36 patients diagnosed with stages IIb/III, submitted to postoperative external beam radiotherapy, with or without boost dose, utilizing high-dose brachytherapy. Results: thirty-six patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Four patients (11%) received boost dose with brachytherapy, and seven (19%) received chemotherapy. The average dose for radiotherapy was 50 Gy (CI 95%: 47-53 Gy), and the four patients with brachytherapy boost received doses ranging from 16.2 to 35 Gy. Chemotherapy was indicated for seven patients (19%) with positive margins. Fifteen patients (42%) presented local or distant recurrence, and all of them progressed to death. Twenty-one patients (58%) remain with no clinical/radiological evidence of local/distant recurrence. The mean follow-up time was 88 months (IC 95%: 74-102). The overall seven years survival rate was 80%. Conclusion: combined surgery and radiotherapy is an effective treatment with excellent outcomes in cases where brachytherapy is associated, with improved overall survival rates. (author)

  15. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  16. Three-dimensional non-coplanar conformal radiotherapy yields better results than traditional beam arrangements for adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W; Melamud, Alex; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field "box" was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical practice.

  17. Microplanar beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit the investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which replaces the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. In this study using the Monte Carlo method, the lateral and depth dose of a single planar microbeam of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom is investigated. Poster 195. (author)

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy with brachytherapy boost in soft tissue sarcomas

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    Annalisa Cortesi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The standard primary treatment for soft tissue sarcoma (STS is a wide surgical resection, preceded or followed by radiotherapy. Purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy of perioperative brachytherapy (BRT plus postoperative external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with intermediate-high risk STS. Material and methods : BRT delivered dose was 20 Gy. External beam radiation therapy was delivered with 3D-technique using multiple beams. The prescribed dose was 46 Gy to the PTV. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CHT was used in patients with potentially chemosensitive histological subtypes. The primary aim of the study was to analyze overall survival (OS and local control (LC in a large patient population treated with surgery, perioperative BRT, and adjuvant EBRT ± CHT. Secondary objective was to identify prognostic factors for patients outcome in terms of LC, disease-free survival (DFS, and OS. Results : From 2000 to 2011, 107 patients presenting 2-3 grade (FNLCC primary or recurrent STS were treated with surgery, perioperative BRT, and adjuvant EBRT ± CHT. Five-year LC and OS were 80.9% and 87.4%, respectively. At univariate analysis, a higher LC was recorded in primary vs. recurrent tumors (p = 0.015, and in lower limb tumors vs. other sites (p = 0.027. An improved DFS was recorded in patients with lower limb tumors vs. other sites (p = 0.034. Conclusions : The combination of BRT and EBRT was able to achieve satisfactory results even in a patients population with intermediate-high risk STS. Patients with recurrent or other than lower limb sited tumors show a worse LC.

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy with brachytherapy boost in soft tissue sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Annalisa; Galuppi, Andrea; Arcelli, Alessandra; Romani, Fabrizio; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Stefano; Ferraro, Andrea; Farioli, Andrea; Gambarotti, Marco; Righi, Alberto; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Buwenge, Milly; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Donati, Davide; Cammelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The standard primary treatment for soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is a wide surgical resection, preceded or followed by radiotherapy. Purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy of perioperative brachytherapy (BRT) plus postoperative external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-high risk STS. Material and methods BRT delivered dose was 20 Gy. External beam radiation therapy was delivered with 3D-technique using multiple beams. The prescribed dose was 46 Gy to the PTV. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CHT) was used in patients with potentially chemosensitive histological subtypes. The primary aim of the study was to analyze overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) in a large patient population treated with surgery, perioperative BRT, and adjuvant EBRT ± CHT. Secondary objective was to identify prognostic factors for patients outcome in terms of LC, disease-free survival (DFS), and OS. Results From 2000 to 2011, 107 patients presenting 2-3 grade (FNLCC) primary or recurrent STS were treated with surgery, perioperative BRT, and adjuvant EBRT ± CHT. Five-year LC and OS were 80.9% and 87.4%, respectively. At univariate analysis, a higher LC was recorded in primary vs. recurrent tumors (p = 0.015), and in lower limb tumors vs. other sites (p = 0.027). An improved DFS was recorded in patients with lower limb tumors vs. other sites (p = 0.034). Conclusions The combination of BRT and EBRT was able to achieve satisfactory results even in a patients population with intermediate-high risk STS. Patients with recurrent or other than lower limb sited tumors show a worse LC. PMID:28725250

  20. 125I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    125 I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without 125 I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of 125 I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation

  1. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  2. Adjuvant radiotherapy for phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, Arthur W.; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of radiotherapy for the treatment of phyllodes tumors of the breast remains controversial. Adjuvant radiotherapy is often cited in the existing literature as not providing any benefit over surgical treatment alone. The data supporting this belief are anecdotal. There are also anecdotal reports that radiotherapy may have a role in cases wherein the risk of local failure is high. As with breast carcinomas, conservative surgery (wide local excision) for phyllodes tumors is associated with about a 50% local recurrence rate; diffuse or bulky disease and/or malignant histology are also associated with high local failure rates. We are unaware of any series that examines the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of phyllodes tumor of the breast. We present here a retrospective study of eight patients so treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Materials and Methods: Eight patients have been treated with radiotherapy for non-metastatic phyllodes tumor of the breast at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 1988 and August 1993. All patients were female; the median age was 43 years, with a range of 19 to 62 years. All patients presented with a breast mass, which was associated with pain in one patient, and was ulcerative in three. Results: Tumor size ranged from 3.5 to 16 cm, with a median diameter of 10.4 cm. Six patients had tumors in the upper outer quadrant, and two patients had upper inner tumors. Five patients had malignant tumors, two patients were classified as benign, and one was of indeterminate malignant potential. All five of the malignant tumors displayed stromal overgrowth on pathologic review. The remaining benign and indeterminate tumors lacked this feature. One patient with a benign tumor had a history of two prior recurrences. Primary surgery consisted of either lumpectomy in two patients or mastectomy in six patients. Axillary level I/II lymph node dissections were performed in 5 patients and no involvement was seen

  3. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  4. No serious late cardiac effects after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in premenopausal women with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Anita; Bendahl, Pear-Ola; Cwikiel, Magdalena; Eskilsson, Jan; Thapper, Kerstin Leofvander; Pahlm, Olle

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess cardiac mortality, coronary artery disease, myocardial dysfunction, and valvular heart disease in women younger than 65 years of age, at least 10 years after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety women (45-64 years old) with Stage II breast cancer without relapse, included in the South Sweden Breast Cancer Trial (premenopausal arm), with or without adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy ± cyclophosphamide were examined with myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography/Doppler, 10-17 years after radiotherapy. Thirty-four patients had been irradiated for left-sided tumors, 33 for right-sided tumors, and 23 patients had not been treated with radiotherapy. The radiotherapy (conventional roentgen, electron beams, and high-energy photon beams combined, in each patient) included the chest wall and the regional lymph nodes, with a specified target dose of 38-48 Gy, administered in daily fractions of 1.9-2.4 Gy, 5 days/week. Results: No cardiac deaths were found among the original 275 patients randomized to adjuvant therapy. In the 90 patients examined, abnormal findings were recorded for ECG (14 patients), exercise test (5 patients), myocardial scintigraphy (6 patients), thickening of valve cusps (14 patients), and mild valvular regurgitation (20 patients). All patients had normal systolic function. Diastolic dysfunction was observed in 6 patients (abnormal relaxation in 4 patients and restrictive filling abnormality in 2 patients). Although no significant differences were found between the 3 study groups, there was a tendency to more abnormal findings after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Women younger than 50 years of age at the time of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer, had no serious cardiac sequelae 13 years (median) later, despite partly old-fashioned radiation techniques

  5. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  6. Combination of External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) With Intratumoral Injection of Dendritic Cells as Neo-Adjuvant Treatment of High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Steven E., E-mail: steven.finkelstein@moffitt.org [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Iclozan, Cristina; Bui, Marilyn M.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Ahmed, Jamil; Noyes, David R.; Cheong, David; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Heysek, Randy V.; Berman, Claudia; Lenox, Brianna C.; Janssen, William; Zager, Jonathan S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Letson, G. Douglas; Antonia, Scott J. [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Gabrilovich, Dmitry I., E-mail: dmitry.gabrilovich@moffitt.org [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the effect of combination of intratumoral administration of dendritic cells (DC) and fractionated external beam radiation (EBRT) on tumor-specific immune responses in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Material: Seventeen patients with large (>5 cm) high-grade STS were enrolled in the study. They were treated in the neoadjuvant setting with 5,040 cGy of EBRT, split into 28 fractions and delivered 5 days per week, combined with intratumoral injection of 10{sup 7} DCs followed by complete resection. DCs were injected on the second, third, and fourth Friday of the treatment cycle. Clinical evaluation and immunological assessments were performed. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. No patient had tumor-specific immune responses before combined EBRT/DC therapy; 9 patients (52.9%) developed tumor-specific immune responses, which lasted from 11 to 42 weeks. Twelve of 17 patients (70.6%) were progression free after 1 year. Treatment caused a dramatic accumulation of T cells in the tumor. The presence of CD4{sup +} T cells in the tumor positively correlated with tumor-specific immune responses that developed following combined therapy. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells but not regulatory T cells negatively correlated with the development of tumor-specific immune responses. Experiments with {sup 111}In labeled DCs demonstrated that these antigen presenting cells need at least 48 h to start migrating from tumor site. Conclusions: Combination of intratumoral DC administration with EBRT was safe and resulted in induction of antitumor immune responses. This suggests that this therapy is promising and needs further testing in clinical trials design to assess clinical efficacy.

  7. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi [Tochigi Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  8. Pancreatectomy with intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Shoichi; Ogata, Yoshiro; Ozawa, Iwao; Matsui, Junichi

    1999-01-01

    Implications of adjuvant radiotherapy (intraoperative and postoperative) for pancreatic carcinoma were investigated. In the examination of autopsy, it was confirmed that local recurrence was controlled by irradiation, but frequency of local recurrence and liver metastasis was high, and the prognosis was poor. Local recurrence rate was 13.3% in 15 cases which had intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy and 40% in 10 cases of irradiation under 30 Gy. After 1994, postoperative irradiation for whole liver was added to local intraoperative irradiation, and good results were obtained (10 of 19 cases are alive). Liver metastasis rate was 21.1% in whole liver irradiation group, and about 50% in other groups. Recently, local intraoperative irradiation of 30 Gy with whole liver irradiation of 22 Gy was adopted as standard adjuvant radiotherapy and better results were obtained. But it is too early to conclude their effects. (K.H.)

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy and risk of contralateral breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, H.H.; Blettner, M.; Pedersen, J.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and secondary breast cancer, a nested and matched case-control study in the cohort of breast cancer patients in Denmark was conducted. Radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed by medical physicists for each of the 529 cases and 529 controls, 82.4% of each group was treated with radiation. The average breast dose was 2.51 Gy, and a 20% increased risk was expected for this population at average age 51 years. There was no evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of second breast cancer (RR=1.04), although the possibility of a RR as high as 1.46 could not be excluded. There was little indication that the risk varied over categories of radiation dose, time since exposure, or age at exposure. Thus, data provides additional evidence that there is little if any risk of radiation induced breast cancer associated with exposure of breast tissue to low-dose radiation (e.g., from mammographic X-rays or adjuvant radiotherapy) in later life. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  12. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious

  13. Internal hemipelvectomy with intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy in the limb-sparing treatment of a pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, HJ; Szabo, BG

    The case of a patient with an extensive pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma treated with internal hemipelvectomy and intraoperative radiotherapy, followed by adjuvant high-dose external beam radiotherapy, with a successful attempt in achieving long-term local tumor control and limb-sparing treatment is

  14. Less gastrointestinal toxicity after adjuvant radiotherapy on a small pelvic field compared to a standard pelvic field in patients with endometrial carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Renske A.; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Aalders, Jan G.; Slot, Annerie; Timmer, Paul R.; Hollema, Harry; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objective: Radiotherapy is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity. This study compared toxicity rates among patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on a small pelvic field (SmPF) in comparison with a standard pelvic field

  15. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (modified Eilber protocol) versus adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehane, Chris; Parasyn, Andrew; Ho, Frederick; Thompson, Stephen R.; Smee, Robert; Links, David; Crowe, Phil; Lewis, Craig; Friedlander, Michael; Williams, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Local control for extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS) requires surgery combined with radiotherapy, usually given pre-operatively or post-operatively. The modified Eilber protocol, a neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimen, has been reported with excellent local control rates. This retrospective single-centre study compared outcomes for patients treated with the modified Eilber protocol with those treated with standard adjuvant radiotherapy. Twenty-nine patients were treated with modified Eilber protocol. Thirty-four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Three patients (10%) in the Eilber group and five patients (15%) in the Adjuvant group developed local recurrence (P = 0.87). Major acute wound complications were noted in four patients in each group (P = 0.55). One patient (3.4%) in the Eilber group developed Grade 3 or 4 late toxicities after 1 year compared with nine patients (27%) in the Adjuvant group (P = 0.02). Patients with a diagnosis of extremity STS were retrospectively reviewed from the Prince of Wales Hospital Sarcoma Database from 1995 to 2012. Sixty-three patients underwent curative surgery with either neoadjuvant Eilber chemoradiotherapy (Eilber) or adjuvant radiotherapy (Adjuvant). Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (Eilber protocol) provided similar rates of local control when compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. Acute wound complication rates were similar but there was less severe late toxicity in the Eilber group.

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologically advanced prostate cancer a randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian, M.; Thompson, J.R.; Catherine, M.; Tangen, P.H.; Paradelo, J.; Scott Lucia, M.; Miller, G.; Troyer, D.; Messing, E.; Forman, J.; Chin, J.; Swanson, G.; Canby-Hagino, E.; Crawford, E.D

    2008-01-15

    Context - Despite a stage-shift to earlier cancer stages and lower tumor volumes for prostate cancer, pathologically advanced disease is detected at radical prostatectomy in 38% to 52% of patients. However, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is unknown. Objective - To determine whether adjuvant radiotherapy improves metastasis-free survival in patients with stage pT3 NO MO prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients - Randomized, prospective, multi-institutional, US clinical trial with enrollment between August 15, 1988, and January 1, 1997 (with database frozen for statistical analysis on September 21, 2005). Patients were 425 men with pathologically advanced prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Intervention - Men were randomly assigned to receive 60 to 64 Gy of external beam radiotherapy delivered to the prostatic fossa (n = 214) or usual care plus observation (n = 211). Main Outcome Measures - Primary outcome was metastasis-free survival, defined as time to first occurrence of metastatic disease or death due to any cause. Secondary outcomes included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, recurrence-free survival, overall survival, freedom from hormonal therapy, and postoperative complications. Results - Among the 425 men, median follow-up was 10.6 years (inter-quartile range, 9.2-12.7 years). For metastasis-free survival,76 (35.5%) of 214 men in the adjuvant radiotherapy group were diagnosed with metastatic disease or died (median metastasis-free estimate, 14.7 years), compared with 91 (43.1%) of 211 (median metastasis-free estimate, 13.2 years) of those in the observation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02; P = .06). There were no significant between-group differences for overall survival (71 deaths, median survival of 14.7 years for radiotherapy vs 83 deaths, median survival of 13.8 years for observation; HR, 0.80; 95% Cl, 0.58-1.09; P =.16). PSA relapse (median PSA relapse-free survival

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologically advanced prostate cancer a randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ian, M.; Thompson, J.R.; Catherine, M.; Tangen, P.H.; Paradelo, J.; Scott Lucia, M.; Miller, G.; Troyer, D.; Messing, E.; Forman, J.; Chin, J.; Swanson, G.; Canby-Hagino, E.; Crawford, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Context - Despite a stage-shift to earlier cancer stages and lower tumor volumes for prostate cancer, pathologically advanced disease is detected at radical prostatectomy in 38% to 52% of patients. However, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is unknown. Objective - To determine whether adjuvant radiotherapy improves metastasis-free survival in patients with stage pT3 NO MO prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients - Randomized, prospective, multi-institutional, US clinical trial with enrollment between August 15, 1988, and January 1, 1997 (with database frozen for statistical analysis on September 21, 2005). Patients were 425 men with pathologically advanced prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Intervention - Men were randomly assigned to receive 60 to 64 Gy of external beam radiotherapy delivered to the prostatic fossa (n = 214) or usual care plus observation (n = 211). Main Outcome Measures - Primary outcome was metastasis-free survival, defined as time to first occurrence of metastatic disease or death due to any cause. Secondary outcomes included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, recurrence-free survival, overall survival, freedom from hormonal therapy, and postoperative complications. Results - Among the 425 men, median follow-up was 10.6 years (inter-quartile range, 9.2-12.7 years). For metastasis-free survival,76 (35.5%) of 214 men in the adjuvant radiotherapy group were diagnosed with metastatic disease or died (median metastasis-free estimate, 14.7 years), compared with 91 (43.1%) of 211 (median metastasis-free estimate, 13.2 years) of those in the observation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02; P = .06). There were no significant between-group differences for overall survival (71 deaths, median survival of 14.7 years for radiotherapy vs 83 deaths, median survival of 13.8 years for observation; HR, 0.80; 95% Cl, 0.58-1.09; P =.16). PSA relapse (median PSA relapse-free survival

  18. Survival benefit associated with adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy combined with radiotherapy for high- and low-risk patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeliadt, Steven B.; Potosky, Arnold L.; Penson, David F.; Etzioni, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Background: The use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) combined with radiotherapy has become common in low-risk patients, although clinical trials have focused primarily on high-risk patients. This study examines the effectiveness of adjuvant ADT combined with radiotherapy for a wide range of patients treated in the 1990s. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer survival was examined in a population based cohort of 31,643 patients aged 65 to 85 years who were diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer and treated with external beam radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy. Instrumental variable analysis methods were used to control for selection bias. Results: Patients with stage T3/T4 disease who received adjuvant ADT experienced improved 5-year and 8-year survival. No survival advantage was observed for men with T1/T2 disease during this interval. Conclusion: High-risk patients who receive primary radiotherapy have benefited from adjuvant ADT, whereas low-risk patients with disease confined to the prostate have not yet benefited from adjuvant therapy within the first 8 years after treatment. These findings are consistent with practice guidelines, which recommend adjuvant ADT for patients with high-risk disease

  19. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35 o /couch, 312 o . Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  20. Limited advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy over 3D conformal radiation therapy in the adjuvant management of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W

    2009-06-01

    Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 degrees , 53 degrees , 107 degrees , 158 degrees , 204 degrees , 255 degrees , and 306 degrees . Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 degrees , 90 degrees , 315 degrees , and 345 degrees ; a gantry angle of 320 degrees /couch, 30 degrees ; and a gantry angle of 35 degrees /couch, 312 degrees . Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  1. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy in elderly patients with early-stage breast cancer: changes in practice patterns after publication of Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9343.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Palta, Priya; Bhavsar, Nrupen A; Horton, Janet K; Blitzblau, Rachel C

    2015-01-15

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9343 randomized phase 3 trial established lumpectomy and adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen alone, rather than both radiotherapy and tamoxifen, as a reasonable treatment course for women aged >70 years with clinical stage I (AJCC 7th edition), estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. An analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was undertaken to assess practice patterns before and after the publication of this landmark study. The SEER database from 2000 to 2009 was used to identify 40,583 women aged ≥70 years who were treated with breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage I, estrogen receptor-positive and/or progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer. The percentage of patients receiving radiotherapy and the type of radiotherapy delivered was assessed over time. Administration of radiotherapy was further assessed across age groups; SEER cohort; and tumor size, grade, and laterality. Approximately 68.6% of patients treated between 2000 and 2004 compared with 61.7% of patients who were treated between 2005 and 2009 received some form of adjuvant radiotherapy (P < .001). Coinciding with a decline in the use of external beam radiotherapy, there was an increase in the use of implant radiotherapy from 1.4% between 2000 and 2004 to 6.2% between 2005 to 2009 (P < .001). There were significant reductions in the frequency of radiotherapy delivery over time across age groups, tumor size, and tumor grade and regardless of laterality (P < .001 for all). Randomized phase 3 data support the omission of adjuvant radiotherapy in elderly women with early-stage breast cancer. Analysis of practice patterns before and after the publication of these data indicates a significant decline in radiotherapy use; however, nearly two-thirds of women continue to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  2. Definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas: a single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duru Birgi, Sumerya; Teo, Mark; Dyker, Karen E.; Sen, Mehmet; Prestwich, Robin J D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the disease outcomes of patients treated with definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in a single institution. Between 2007–2012 patients were retrospectively identified from electronic databases who had undergone surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy for sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas with curative intent. Fourty three patients with sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma were identified (22 nasal cavity, 21 paranasal sinuses). 31/43 (72 %) had T3 or T4 disease; nodal stage was N0 in 38, N1 in 4, Na/b in 0 and N2c in 1 patient. Median age was 67 years (range 41–86). 18 (42 %) received definitive and 25 (58 %) adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered using either conventional radiotherapy (n = 39) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (n = 4). Elective neck radiotherapy was delivered to two patients. Chemotherapy was delivered to 6/43 (14 %) of patients. Two-year local control, regional control, distant metastases free survival, progression free survival, cause specific survival and overall survival were 81 %, 90 %, 95 %, 71 %, 84 % and 80 % respectively. There was no significant difference in outcome comparing patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with patients receiving definitive radiotherapy (2 year locoregional disease free survival 75 % and 70 % respectively, p = 0.98). Pooly differentiated tumours were significantly associated with inferior disease outcomes. Local, regional, combined local and regional, and distant failure occurred in 7 (16 %), 3 (7 %), 1 (2 %) and 2 (5 %) of patients; all 3 regional recurrences were in patients with nasal cavity squamous cell carcinomas who had not undergone elective neck treatment. Definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy provides an effective treatment for sinonasal malignancies. The main pattern of failure remains local, suggesting the need for investigation of

  3. The effect of short term neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation on erectile function in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer: an analysis of the 4- versus 8-month randomised trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Patricia E

    2012-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common consequence of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. The addition of neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) has an indeterminate additive effect. We examined the long-term effect on erectile function (EF) of two durations (4 months: arm 1 and 8 months: arm 2) of NAD prior to radiation (RT) for patients with localised prostate cancer from the Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group (ICORG 97-01) 4- versus 8-month trial. In this study we aimed to (1) analyse the overall effect on EF of NAD in an EBRT population, (2) compare the probability of retained EF over time in an EBRT population treated with either 4 or 8 months of NAD and (3) identify any variables such as risk group and age which may have an additive detrimental effect. This analysis provides unique long term follow up data.

  4. Adjuvant Versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Adverse Pathological Findings Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. D. Wallis MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing surgery for prostate cancer who have adverse pathological findings experience high rates of recurrence. While there are data supporting adjuvant radiotherapy compared to a wait-and-watch strategy to reduce recurrence rates, there are no randomized controlled trials comparing adjuvant radiotherapy with the other standard of care, salvage radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered at the time of recurrence. Methods: We constructed a health state transition (Markov model employing two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation using a lifetime horizon to compare the quality-adjusted survival associated with postoperative strategies using adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy. Prior to analysis, we calibrated and validated our model using the results of previous randomized controlled trials. We considered clinically important oncological health states from immediately postoperative to prostate cancer–specific death, commonly described complications from prostate cancer treatment, and other causes of mortality. Transition probabilities and utilities for disease states were derived from a literature search of MEDLINE and expert consensus. Results: Salvage radiotherapy was associated with an increased quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE (58.3 months as compared with adjuvant radiotherapy (53.7 months, a difference of 4.6 months (standard deviation 8.8. Salvage radiotherapy had higher QALE in 53% of hypothetical cohorts. There was a minimal difference in overall life expectancy (-0.1 months. Examining recurrence rates, our model showed validity when compared with available randomized controlled data. Conclusions: A salvage radiotherapy strategy appears to provide improved QALE for patients with adverse pathological findings following radical prostatectomy, compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. As these findings reflect, population averages, specific patient and tumor factors, and patient preferences remain central for individualized

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil after curative resection of cancer of the pancreas and periampullary region: phase III trial of the EORTC gastrointestinal tract cancer cooperative group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkenbijl, J. H.; Jeekel, J.; Sahmoud, T.; van Pel, R.; Couvreur, M. L.; Veenhof, C. H.; Arnaud, J. P.; Gonzalez, D. G.; de Wit, L. T.; Hennipman, A.; Wils, J.

    1999-01-01

    The survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil versus observation alone after surgery was investigated in patients with pancreatic head and periampullary cancers. A previous study of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in these cancers by the Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer

  6. Adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: A failure of marketing-based medicine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk patients after radical prostatectomy has been shown to reduce local and metastatic failure, improve overall survival and improve quality of life (QOL). The evidence, based on three randomised studies and a meta-analysis, is so compelling that the national and internatioanl professional bodies, representing urologists and radiation oncologist alike, recommend that high-risk patients be offered immediate adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this being the standard of care, few patients fo on to recive it. This paper looks at the possibilities of why this is so, highlighting that it could possibly be related to poor marketing, communication and delivery of health information to patients and professional alike. It concludes that we need a more coordinated way to increase utilisation of the gold standard adjuvant radiotherapy post-radical prostatectomy, perhaps learning some valuable lessons from the business community.

  7. External beam radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 243 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with radiotherapy is presented. Radiotherapy was combined with 5-fluorouracil, or given alone. Seventy-four patients were treated with radical external beam radiotherapy for recurrent or inoperable rectal adenocarcinoma. One hundred and forty-five patients with advanced pelvic tumours or metastases were treated with palliative pelvic radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients with small-volume residual pelvic tumour or who were felt to be at high risk of pelvic recurrence following radical resection received postoperative radiotherapy. Complete tumour regression was seen in 38% of radically treated patients, and 24% of palliatively treated patients. Partial regression was observed in 56% of radically treated patients, and 58% of palliatively treated patients. Long-term local tumour control was more commonly observed for small tumours (< 5 cm diameter). Fifty-eight % of patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy remained free of local recurrence. Survival was significantly better with small tumours. The addition of 5FU did not appear to improve survival or tumour control. (author)

  8. Side Effects of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Testicular Seminoma Stage I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamulin, M.; Grgic, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study the side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy of testicular seminoma stage I patients were followed up in the period between 13 to 84 months (median 28 months). The most frequent side effects in these patients during radiotherapy were gastrointestinal problems (nausea/vomiting), psychologic and cognitive problems and minor sexual problems. The reported side effects were treated by antimmimetics and anxiolytics. After radiotherapy, the side effects persisted in 6 % of patients but therapy was needed only in few. Healthy children were born to 76 % of patients in the age group 18 - 39 years after radiotherapy. The present study shows that adjuvant irradiation of paraaortal lymph nodes with total a dose of 24 Gy in 16 daily fractions in testicular seminoma patients causes acceptable side effects with acceptable quality of life and fertility, however in conditions of individual approach and family consulting. (author)

  9. Adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy: strong emotions decide but rational studies are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul D; Asher, Anthony L; Farace, Elana

    2008-04-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival.

  10. Adjuvant Whole Brain Radiotherapy: Strong Emotions Decide But Rational Studies Are Needed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Asher, Anthony L [Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Programs, Carolinas Medical Center and Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, NC (United States); Farace, Elana [Department of Neurosurgery, Pennsylvania State University, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival.

  11. Adjuvant Whole Brain Radiotherapy: Strong Emotions Decide But Rational Studies Are Needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul D.; Asher, Anthony L.; Farace, Elana

    2008-01-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival

  12. Chemotherapy as an adjuvant to Radiotherapy in treatment of Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumours, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermo therapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results.

  13. Guide for External Beam Radiotherapy. Procedures 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bourhis, Jean; Eschwege, Francois; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Barillot, Isabelle; Bey, Pierre; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Olivier; Bolla, Michel; Bourguignon, Michel; Godet, Jean-Luc; Krembel, David; Valero, Marc; Bara, Christine; Beauvais-March, Helene; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Vidal, Jean-Pierre; Drouard, Jean; Sarrazin, Thierry; Lindecker-Cournil, Valerie; Robin, Sun Hee Lee; Thevenet, Nicolas; Depenweiller, Christian; Le Tallec, Philippe; Ortholan, Cecile; Aimone, Nicole; Baldeschi, Carine; Cantelli, Andree; Estivalet, Stephane; Le Prince, Cyrille; QUERO, Laurent; Costa, Andre; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Bourhis, Jean; Calais, Gilles; Lartigau, Eric; Ginot, Aurelie; Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bolla, Michel; Chauvet, Bruno; Maingon, Philippe; Martin, Etienne; Azria, David; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Grehange, Gilles; Hennequin, Christophe; Peiffert, Didier; Toledano, Alain; Belkacemi, Yazid; Courdi, Adel; Belliere, Aurelie; Peignaux, Karine; Mahe, Marc; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Kantor, Guy; Lepechoux, Cecile; Carrie, Christian; Claude, Line

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize quality and security in the delivery of radiation treatment, the French SFRO (Societe francaise de radiotherapie oncologique) is publishing a Guide for Radiotherapy. This guide is realized according to the HAS (Haute Autorite de sante) methodology of 'structured experts consensus'. This document is made of two parts: a general description of external beam radiation therapy and chapters describing the technical procedures of the main tumors to be irradiated (24). For each procedure, a special attention is given to dose constraints in the organs at risk. This guide will be regularly updated

  14. Tolerance of radiotherapy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrafnkelsson, J.; Nilsson, K.; Soederberg, M.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three postmenopausal breast cancer patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy (45 Gy) or the combination of radiotherapy and 6 months of chemotherapy. Forty-three premenopausal patients had postoperative radiotherapy and were randomized to receive one of two different chemotherapy combinations. Pulmonary fibrosis was roentgenologically registered in approximately 70% of the total patient population six months after initiation of therapy. Addition of chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide significantly increased the proportion of patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with patients treated with radiotherapy only or radiotherapy combined with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Premenopausal patients tolerated the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy better than postmenopausal patients of whom approximately 30% did not tolerate 65% or more of prescribed total dose of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  15. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of resectable desmoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goy, Barry W.; Lee, Steve P.; Eilber, Frederick; Dorey, Fred; Eckardt, Jeffrey; Fu, Y.-S.; Juillard, Guy J.F.; Selch, Michael T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Desmoid tumors have a high propensity for local recurrence with surgical resection. There are many reports describing good responses of desmoid tumors to irradiation, but none have clearly proven the indications for adjuvant radiotherapy in treating resectable desmoid tumors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 61 patients with resectable desmoid tumors who were treated at our institution from 1965 to 1992. Fifty-six patients had unifocal disease, of which 34 had positive surgical margins. Forty-five were treated with surgery alone, while 11 received surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Local control was measured from the last day of treatment, and all cases were reviewed by our Department of Pathology. Results: Univariate analysis of 56 patients with unifocal disease revealed that female gender (p=0.025) and positive margins (p=0.032) predicted for local recurrence. Multivariate analysis revealed that only positive margins (p=0.003) independently predicted for local recurrence. Only 3 of 22 patients had local recurrences with clear margins, with a 6 year actuarial local control of 85%. We analyzed 34 patients with positive margins by univariate analysis, and only adjuvant radiotherapy predicted for improved local control (p=0.031). Multivariate analysis of these 34 patients revealed that adjuvant radiotherapy independently predicted for local control (p=0.012), and patients with recurrent disease had a slightly higher risk of local recurrence (p=0.083). The 6 year actuarial local control determined by Kaplan-Meier for patients with unifocal disease and positive margins was 32%(±12%) with surgery alone, and 78%(±14%) with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy (p=0.019). None of the patients who received radiotherapy for unifocal disease developed serious complications, or a secondary malignancy. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated in the treatment of patients with resectable

  16. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy [it

  17. Intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma; Intraoperative und perkutane Radiotherapie des Pankreaskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, M.J. [Abt. Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Maurer, U. [Klinikum der Stadt Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1996-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma are based on the high number of non-resectable cancers, the high relative radioresistance and the high distant metastases rate. Even in curatively resected carcinomas, a locally effective treatment modality is needed because of the risk of microscopical residual disease in the peripancreatic tissue. The efficacy of radiotherapy is dose dependent. Based on an analysis of published data a dose of more than 50 Gy is recommended, resulting in a high morbidity rate with external beam radiotherapy alone. The use of intraoperative radiotherapy allows locally restricted dose escalation without increased perioperative morbidity. In adjuvant and in primary treatment, local tumor control was improved (70-90%). With palliative intent, pain relief was obtained rapidly in over 60% of patients and led to improved patient performance. As a result of the high distant metastases rate, even in curatively resected carcinomas, the overall prognosis could not be significantly improved. Further dose escalation is limited by the increasing incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (20-30%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Therapiestrategien beim Pankreaskarzinom werden bestimmt durch den hohen Anteil primaer nicht resektabler Karzinome, der hohen relativen Strahlenresistenz und der hohen Fernmetastasierungsrate. Selbst kurativ resezierte Karzinome erfordern durch ihre hohe lokale Tumorzellpersistenz eine lokal effektive adjuvante Behandlungsmassnahme. Die Effektivitaet einer Radiotherapie ist dosisabhaengig. Aus der Analyse publizierter Daten wird eine Dosis von >50 Gy, welche bei der alleinigen perkutanen Bestrahlung mit einer hohen Morbiditaet verbunden ist, empfohlen. Mit der intraoperativen Radiotherapie ist eine lokal begrenzte Dosiseskalation ohne erhoehte perioperative Morbiditaet moeglich. Sowohl in der adjuvanten als auch in der primaeren Behandlung kann die lokale Tumorkontrolle deutlich verbessert werden (70-90%). Unter

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, Olivier; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO 2 laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy

  19. When Does Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Really Avoid Radiotherapy? Clinical Predictors of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadia, Andrea; Bellati, Filippo; Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Donfrancesco, Cristina; Gasparri, Maria Luisa; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify clinical variables that may predict the need for adjuvant radiotherapy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective series of cervical cancer patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages IB2-IIB treated with NACT followed by radical surgery was analyzed. Clinical predictors of persistence of intermediate- and/or high-risk factors at final pathological analysis were investigated. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate analysis and using a model based on artificial intelligence known as artificial neuronal network (ANN) analysis. Overall, 101 patients were available for the analyses. Fifty-two (51 %) patients were considered at high risk secondary to parametrial, resection margin and/or lymph node involvement. When disease was confined to the cervix, four (4 %) patients were considered at intermediate risk. At univariate analysis, FIGO grade 3, stage IIB disease at diagnosis and the presence of enlarged nodes before NACT predicted the presence of intermediate- and/or high-risk factors at final pathological analysis. At multivariate analysis, only FIGO grade 3 and tumor diameter maintained statistical significance. The specificity of ANN models in evaluating predictive variables was slightly superior to conventional multivariable models. FIGO grade, stage, tumor diameter, and histology are associated with persistence of pathological intermediate- and/or high-risk factors after NACT and radical surgery. This information is useful in counseling patients at the time of treatment planning with regard to the probability of being subjected to pelvic radiotherapy after completion of the initially planned treatment.

  20. Late cutaneous effects of a local potent steroid during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with a local potent corticosteroid during adjuvant external radiotherapy (ERT) of breast cancer is associated with late skin toxicity. Material and methods: Sixty patients (32 treated with potent corticoid cream versus 28 controls t...

  1. Regional control of melanoma neck node metastasis after selective neck dissection with or without adjuvant radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hooft van Huysduynen, Thijs; Rasch, Coen R. N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of adjuvant radiotherapy on regional control of melanoma neck node metastasis. DESIGN: A single-institution retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary care cancer center. PATIENTS: The study included 64 patients with melanoma neck node metastasis who were treated with

  2. Prospective survey of erectile dysfunction after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Eiji; Ando, Toshiyuki; Nagata, Hirohiko; Miyajima, Akira; Nakagawa, Ken; Oya, Mototsugu; Nakashima, Jun; Marumo, Ken

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the effect of external beam radiotherapy on erectile function in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer using the Japanese version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) survey. From 2000 to 2007, we identified 55 patients who underwent external beam radiotherapy at our institution for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer and could respond to the IIEF survey. The patients did not receive neo- and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and they were followed-up for at least 12 months after radiotherapy. Mean patient age was 69 years and the mean prostate specific antigen (PSA) level before radiotherapy was 24.9 ng/ml. First we evaluated the change of the erectile function domain score over time before and after radiotherapy. The population of severe erectile dysfunction (ED) increased while those with no or mild ED decreased after radiotherapy. The erectile function and intercourse satisfaction domain score of the IIEF declined significantly after radiotherapy, however, the orgasmic function, sexual desire, and overall satisfaction domain scores did not change after external beam radiation. Of the 34 patients who had erectile function at baseline, 10 patients could maintain erectile function 12 months after radiotherapy. Though there were no significant differences in clinical features between patients who could maintain erectile function and those who had worsening erectile function 12 months after radiotherapy, the sexual desire domain score before radiotherapy was significantly higher in patients who could maintain erectile function than their counterparts. Using the IIEF survey, external beam radiation was found to affect erectile function in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer. (author)

  3. Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Sheen, Martin A.; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 88 patients with iris melanoma received proton beam radiotherapy, with 53.1 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: The patients had a mean age of 52 years and a median follow-up of 2.7 years. The tumors had a median diameter of 4.3 mm, involving more than 2 clock hours of iris in 32% of patients and more than 2 hours of angle in 27%. The ciliary body was involved in 20%. Cataract was present in 13 patients before treatment and subsequently developed in another 18. Cataract had a 4-year rate of 63% and by Cox analysis was related to age (p = 0.05), initial visual loss (p < 0.0001), iris involvement (p < 0.0001), and tumor thickness (p < 0.0001). Glaucoma was present before treatment in 13 patients and developed after treatment in another 3. Three eyes were enucleated, all because of recurrence, which had an actuarial 4-year rate of 3.3% (95% CI 0-8.0%). Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma is well tolerated, the main problems being radiation-cataract, which was treatable, and preexisting glaucoma, which in several patients was difficult to control

  4. A limited role for adjuvant radiotherapy after the Wertheim/Okabayashi radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer confined to the cervix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, J.; Samlal, R.; Schilthuis, M. S.; Gonzalez, D. G.; ten Kate, F. J.; Lammes, F. B.

    1999-01-01

    The indications for radiotherapy after radical hysterectomy for early stage cervical cancer are changing. In the past only tumor outside the cervix was considered an indication for radiotherapy. Today adjuvant radiotherapy is also considered for an "intermediate-risk" group with tumor confined to

  5. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing; Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate

  6. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  7. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of resectable desmoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goy, Barry W.; Lee, Steve P.; Eilber, Frederick; Dorey, Fred; Eckardt, Jeffrey; Fu, Yao-Shi; Juillard, Guy J. F.; Selch, Michael T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoid tumors have a high propensity for local recurrence with surgical resection. There are many reports describing good responses of desmoid tumors to irradiation, but none have clearly established the indications for adjuvant radiotherapy in treating resectable desmoid tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 61 patients with resectable desmoid tumor(s) who were treated at our institution from 1965 to February of 1992. Five patients had multifocal disease and are analyzed separately. Fifty-six patients had unifocal disease, of which 34 had positive surgical margins. Forty-five of the 56 patients with unifocal disease were treated with surgery alone, while 11 were treated with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Local control was measured from the last day of treatment, and all cases were reviewed by our Department of Pathology. Results: Multivariate analysis of the 56 patients with unifocal disease revealed that positive margins independently predicted for local recurrence (p ≤ 0.01). Only 3 of 22 patients with clear margins experienced a local recurrence, with a 6-year actuarial local control of 85%. Multivariate analysis of the 34 patients with positive margins revealed that adjuvant radiotherapy independently predicted for improved local control (p 0.01), and patients with recurrent disease had a slightly higher risk of local recurrence (p = 0.08). The 6-year actuarial local control determined by Kaplan-Meier for patients with unifocal disease and positive margins was 32% (±12%) with surgery alone, and 78% (±14%) with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Subgroup analysis of the patients with positive margins and recurrent disease revealed that those treated with surgery alone had a 6-year actuarial local control of 0% vs. 80% for those treated with surgery plus radiotherapy (p ≤ 0.01). Patients with positive margins and primary disease had a trend towards improved local

  8. Monitor tables for electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, G.; Dohm, O.S.

    2007-01-01

    The application of electron beams in radiotherapy is still based on tables of monitor units, although 3-D treatment planning systems for electron beams are available. This have several reasons: The need for 3-D treatment planning is not recognized; there is no confidence in the calculation algorithm; Monte-Carlo algorithms are too time-consuming; and the effort necessary to measure basic beam data for 3-D planning is considered disproportionate. However, the increasing clinical need for higher dosimetric precision and for more conformal electron beams leads to the requirement for more sophisticated tables of monitor units. The present paper summarizes and discusses the main aspects concerning the preparation of tables of monitor units for electron beams. The measurement equipment and procedures for measuring basic beam data needed for tables of monitor units for electron beams are described for a standard radiation therapy linac. The design of tables of monitor units for standard electron applicators is presented; this design can be extended for individual electron inserts, to variable applicator surface distances, to oblique beam incidence, and the use of bolus material. Typical data of an Elekta linac are presented in various tables. (orig.)

  9. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Sjoeden, P.-O.

    1991-01-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author)

  10. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)); Sjoeden, P.-O. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1991-09-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author).

  11. Adjuvant Ab Interno Tumor Treatment After Proton Beam Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Ira; Riechardt, Aline I; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Joussen, Antonia M

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to show long-term outcomes concerning globe preservation in uveal melanoma patients after proton beam therapy with the main focus on outcomes according to different adjuvant ab interno surgical procedures. Retrospective cohort study. All patients treated with primary proton beam therapy for choroidal or ciliary body melanoma between June 1998 and June 2015 were included. A total of 2499 patients underwent primary proton beam therapy, with local tumor control and globe preservation rates of 95.9% and 94.8% after 5 years, respectively. A total of 110 (4.4%) patients required secondary enucleation. Unresponsive neovascular glaucoma was the leading cause of secondary enucleation in 78 of the 2499 patients (3.1%). The 5-year enucleation-free survival rate was 94.8% in the endoresection group, 94.3% in the endodrainage group, and 93.5% in the comparator group. The log-rank test showed P = .014 (comparator group vs endoresection group) and P = .06 (comparator group vs endodrainage-vitrectomy group). Patients treated with endoresection or endodrainage-vitrectomy developed less radiation retinopathy (30.5% and 37.4% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .048 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) and less neovascular glaucoma (11.6% and 21.3% after 5 years, P = .001 and P = .01 [Kaplan-Meier], respectively) compared with the comparator group (52.3% radiation retinopathy and 57.8% neovascular glaucoma after 5 years). This study suggests that in larger tumors the enucleation and neovascular glaucoma rates might be reduced by adjuvant surgical procedures. Although endoresection is the most promising adjuvant treatment option, the endodrainage-vitrectomy is recommended in patients who are ineligible for endoresection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD 10 ), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the in plane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43 and 0.75 % respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10 % changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2 % level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, d max , is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD 10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD 10 , and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant.

  13. Role of adjuvant radiotherapy in granulosa cell tumors of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-03-01

    To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p=.02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p=.004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of levamisole immunotherapy as an adjuvant to radiotherapy in oral cancer. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaram, P.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Vasudevan, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy and adjuvant levamisole immunotherapy on the lymphocyte subpopulations was investigated. Comparisons were made between groups receiving levamisole, those receiving placebo, and normal healthy controls. The results of a thirty-month follow-up are reported. Radiotherapy caused leukopenia and lymphopenia affecting all the subsets (T, B, T G and T M ); T lymphocytes were affected to a greater extent. This study demonstrates that levamisole does accelerate the restoration of T lymphocytes, with the T M lymphocytes showing a faster repopulation in comparison with the T G lymphocytes. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 39 refs

  15. External beam radiotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nishio, Masamichi; Narimatsu, Naoto; Ogawa, Hajime; Betsuyaku, Takashi; Hirata, Kouji; Ikeda, Shigeyuki (Sapporo National Hospital (Japan). Hokkaido Cancer Center)

    1992-04-01

    Between 1980 to 1989, 24 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (10 with localized tumor alone and 14 with distant metastases) have been treated with external beam radiation at Sapporo National Hospital, Hokkaido Cancer Center. Response rate of pancreatic tumor treated with external beam radiation was 33.3% (7/21) with no complete response. Median survival time of the patients with localized tumor was 10 months and that of the patients with distant metastases was 3 months. Relief of pain occurred in 92.9% (12/13) of patients having pain due to pancreatic tumor and in 75% (3/4) of patients having pain due to bone metastases. Major complication was gastric ulcer which developed in 5 patients of 21 patients given stomach irradiation. We concluded that unresectable pancreatic cancer would be frequently indicated for radiotherapy. (author).

  16. Gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I malignant teratoma of the testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.R.; Horwich, A.; Peckham, M.J.; Bliss, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Between January 1963 and December 1983, 248 patients with stage I teratoma were managed by the Testicular Tumour Unit of the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH). Before 1979, these patients were treated with adjuvant irradiation to the abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes (142 patients) to a mid-plane dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. In 1979, a surveillance policy was adopted (106 patients) and relapsing patients treated with chemotherapy. By 2 years post-orchidectomy, seven patients (4.9%) in the irradiated group developed duodenal ulceration compared to none in the surveillance group (p = 0.05). A past medical history of duodenal ulcer was a significant risk factor for ulceration after radiotherapy (p = 0.04) whereas a past history of abdominal surgery was not (p = 0.8). It is concluded that adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I teratoma may increase the risk of peptic ulceration. 14 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  17. Conventional external beam radiotherapy for central nervous system malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, E.C.; Burger, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Fractionated external beam photon radiotherapy is an important component of the clinical management of malignant disease of the central nervous system. The practicing neurologist or neurosurgeon frequently relies on the consultative and treatment skills of a radiotherapist. This article provides a review for the nonradiotherapist of the place of conventional external beam radiotherapy in neuro-oncology. 23 references

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil after curative resection of cancer of the pancreas and periampullary region: phase III trial of the EORTC gastrointestinal tract cancer cooperative group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.G. Klinkenbijl (Jean); J. Wils; J. Jeekel (Hans); T. Sahmoud; R. van Pel; M.L. Couvreur; C.H. Veenhof; J.P. Arnaud; D. González González (Dionisio); L.Th. de Wit (Laurens); A. Hennipman

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil versus observation alone after surgery was investigated in patients with pancreatic head and periampullary cancers. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A previous study of adjuvant

  19. Ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy: wave of the future or a fool's errand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Atif J; Dale, Roger G; Arthur, Douglas W; Haffty, Bruce G; Todor, Dorin A; Vicini, Frank A

    2012-04-15

    In accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), the most commonly used fractionation schemes include 340 or 385 centigrays delivered in a twice daily administration. A further progression of the APBI literature has been the recent interest in extremely short courses of adjuvant radiotherapy, usually delivered by intraoperative radiotherapy techniques. This newer area of single-fraction radiotherapy approaches remains highly contentious. In particular, the recently reported TARGIT trial has been the subject of both praise and scorn, and a critical examination of the trial data and the underlying hypotheses is warranted. Short-term outcomes of the related Italian ELIOT approach have also been reported. Although the assumptions of linear quadratic formalism are likely to hold true in the range of 2 to 8 grays, equating different schedules beyond this range is problematic. A major problem of current single-fraction approaches is that the treatment doses are chosen empirically, or are based on tolerability, or on the physical dose delivery characteristics of the chosen technology rather than radiobiological rationale. This review article summarizes the current data on ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy and highlights both the promise and the potential pitfalls of the abbreviated treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  20. Optimization of dose distributions for adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy of gastric cancer by IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Dobler, B.; Mai, S.; Hermann, B.; Tiefenbacher, U.; Wieland, P.; Steil, V.; Wenz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Locoregional relapse is a problem frequently encountered with advanced gastric cancer. Data from the randomized Intergroup trial 116 suggest effectiveness of adjuvant radiochemotherapy, albeit with significant toxicity. The potential of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce toxicity by significantly reducing maximum and median doses to organs at risk while still applying sufficient dose to the target volume in the upper abdomen was studied. Patient and Methods: For a typical configuration of target volumes and organs, a step-and-shoot IMRT plan (eight beam orientations), developed as a class solution for treatment of tumors in the upper abdomen (Figures 1 to 3), a conventional plan, a combination of the conventional plan with a kidney-sparing boost plan, and a conventional plan with noncoplanar ap and pa fields for improved kidney sparing were compared with respect to coverage of target volume and dose to organs at risk with a dose of 45 Gy delivered as the median dose to the target volume. Results: When using the conventional three-dimensionally planned box techniques, the right kidney could be kept below tolerance, but median dose to the left kidney amounted to between 14.8 and 26.9 Gy, depending on the plan. IMRT reduced the median dose to the left kidney to 10.5 Gy, while still keeping the dose to the right kidney 90% of prescription dose were delivered to > 90% of target volume with IMRT (Table 1). Conclusion: IMRT has the potential to deliver efficient doses to target volumes in the upper abdomen, while delivering dose to organs at risk in a more advantageous fashion than a conventional technique. For clinical implementation, the possibility of extensive organ motion in the upper abdomen has to be taken into account for treatment planning and patient positioning. The multitude of potential risks related to its application has to be the subject of thorough follow-up and further studies. (orig.)

  1. c-erbB-2 expression and benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staal, O.; Sullivan, S.; Wingren, S.; Skoog, L.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Nordenskjoeld, B.; Carstensen, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Frozen tissue from primary tumours of 152 premenopausal breast cancer patients, who participated in a trial comparing radiotherapy with adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, CMF), was analysed for c-erbB-2 protein expression, measured by flow cytometry. The relative risk of distant recurrence or death in the chemotherapy group as compared with the radiotherapy group was 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-7.8) for patients whose tumours showed high c-erbB-2 levels and 0.87 (95% CI 0.43-1.7) for those with tumours with low levels of c-erbB-2 protein. Patients with highly proliferative tumours that did not overexpress c-erbB-2 benefited most, in terms of survival, from CMF. In addition, we found an increased risk of locoregional recurrence for tumours overexpressing c-erbB-2 when radiotherapy was replaced by chemotherapy. (author)

  2. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Hirokawa, Naoki [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  3. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  4. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors’ opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks

  5. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  6. Heavy Particle Beams in Tumor Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, M.

    1999-01-01

    Using heavy particles beam in the tumor radiotherapy is advantageous to the conventional radiation with photons and electrons. One of the advantages of the heavy charged particle is the energy deposition processes which give a well defined range in tissue, a Bragg peak of ionization in the depth-dose distribution and slow scattering, while the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue in the vicinity is minimized. These processes can show the relation between the heavy particle and the conventional radiation is illustrated with respect to the depth dose and the relative dose. The usage of neutrons (Thermal or epithermal) in therapy necessitates implementation of capture material leading to the production of heavy charged particles (a-particles) as a result of the nuclear interaction in between. Experimentally it is found that 80% of the absorbed dose is mainly due to the presence of capture material

  7. A comparison of protocols for external beam radiotherapy beam calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed Al-Ahbabi, Salma; Bradley, D.A.; Beyomi, M.; Alkatib, Z.; Adhaheri, S.; Darmaki, M.; Nisbet, A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of codes of practice (CoP) for electron and photon radiotherapy beam dosimetry are currently in use. Comparison is made of the more widely used of these, specifically those of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM 2003). All are based on calibration of ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, each seeking to reduce uncertainty in delivered dose, providing an even stronger system of primary standards than previous air-kerma based approaches. They also provide a firm, traceable and straight-forward formalism. Included in making dose assessments for the three CoP are calibration coefficients for a range of beam quality indices. Measurements have been performed using clinical photon and electron beams, the absorbed dose to water being obtained following the recommendations given by each code. Electron beam comparisons have been carried out using measurements for electron beams of nominal energies 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. Comparisons were also carried out for photon beams of nominal energies 6 and 18 MV. For photon beams use was made of NE2571 cylindrical graphite walled ionization chambers, cross-calibrated against an NE2611 Secondary Standard; for electron beams, PTW Markus and NACP-02 plane-parallel chambers were used. Irradiations were made using Varian 600C/2100C linacs, supported by water tanks and Virtual Water™ phantoms. The absorbed doses for photon and electron beams obtained following these CoP are all in good agreement, with deviations of less than 2%. A number of studies have been carried out by different groups in different countries to examine the consistency of dosimetry codes of practice or protocols. The aim of these studies is to confirm that the goal of those codes is met, namely uniformity in establishment of dosimetry of all radiation beam types used in cancer therapy in the world

  8. Optimisation of cancer therapy : glucose antimetabolites as adjuvants in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Inhibiting the repair of radiation damage in the neoplastic cells and thus differentially increasing radiation damage can be one of the ways to improve efficiency of radiotherapy of cancer. The glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) which is known to inhibit glycolysis and ATP production in different cell systems, has been studied as to its effects on energy supply and repair of radiation damage in wild type yeast cells which are analogous to normal cells, and in respirator-deficient (RD) mutants which are analogous to hypoxic tumour cells. Results indicate that : (1) 2-DG/glucose in molar cencentration ratio of 1 completely inhibits the repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in RD mutants, (2) 2-DG enhances repair of sublethal radiation damage in wild-type yeast cells, (3) 2-DG induces a sharp fall in ATP level in RD-mutants as compared to that in wild type cells, (4) 2-DG inhibits repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, (5) 2-DG induces greater cell loss from the hypoxic as well as euoxic tumour cell population of sarcoma tumour-180 in mice, and (6) 2-DG increases the survival of normal mice when given whole-body gamma irradiaition. These results, therefore, show that 2-DG may differentially inhibit the repair process in tumours while enhancing repair in normal tissues. (M.G.B.)

  9. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P V50 (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin V40 and skin V30 (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT.

  10. Testicular cancer: seminoma. Stage I. Adjuvant radiotherapy. Results at 3 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Ticera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate the results achieved with adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and methods: We analyzed 40 medical records of patients diagnosed with stage I of testicular cancer, all of them received adjuvant radiotherapy between April 1992 and May 2004. The histological type was classical seminoma (95%) and spermatocytes (5%). Diagnosis and staging were performed with testicular ultrasound, determination of tumor markers, computed tomography of abdomen - pelvis and chest radiographs. Radiotherapy: Patients were treated with 60 Co unit and a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Volumes: Group I: lumboaortic lymph node region and ipsilateral pelvis. Group II: lumboaortic only. Daily dose: 1.8 Gy, total dose: 30.6 Gy. Patient in supine position, 2 parallel fields and opposed, DFP: 80 cm, calculated from midplane. They were followed for 3 years with chest X-ray, CAT scan of abdomen and pelvis at 12 months and then a full clinical control 1 time per year. Results: We defined the rate of ipsilateral pelvic node recurrence (group I: 0% vs. Group II: 6.25%), progression at distance (group I: 8.3% vs. Group II: 0%) and global survival (GS) (group I: 100% vs. group II: 100%) at 3 years of follow up. Conclusions: Our result is similar to that published in the international literature. Given the small number of patients, no evidence of changes in GS with the addition of radiotherapy to ipsilateral pelvic node. Radiation therapy to lumboaortic lymph nodes is the usual treatment, being necessary to optimize the modality of radiotherapy (RC3D - IRMT) to reduce toxicity in a long term. (authors) [es

  11. Long-term outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of central neurocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Li, Wen-Bin; Feng, Jin; Qiu, Xiao-Guang

    2014-01-01

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy for central neurocytomas (CNs) is not clear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the clinical outcomes of treating histologically confirmed CNs with adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Sixty-three CN patients were retrospectively evaluated: 24 patients underwent gross total resection (GTR); 28, subtotal resection (STR); 9, partial resection (PR), and 2, biopsy (Bx). They underwent adjuvant RT after surgery (median dose, 54 Gy). The median follow-up was 69 months (15–129 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) were 94.4% and 95% after GTR + RT, 96.4% and 100% after STR + RT, and 100% and 90.9% after PR + RT. Only three patients had tumor recurrence: at the primary site at 30 and 24 months in two GTR + PR patients, and dissemination to the spinal cord at 75 months in one STR + RT patient. Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients experienced late neurotoxicity (28, grade 1; 7, grade 2; 3, grade 3). Short-term memory impairment was the most common toxicity. RT after incomplete resection (IR) led to OS and PFS comparable to those for GTR. Considering the excellent outcomes and limited late toxicity, adjuvant RT maybe a good option for CN patients who undergo IR

  12. External Beam Radiotherapy in Metastatic Bone Pain from Solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Bone, metastasis, radiotherapy, pain, control randomized ... described the efficacy of external beam radiotherapy in pain .... life of patients with multiple myeloma. Eur. J. ... Rades D, Jeremic B, Hoskin PJ: The Role of ... randomised multicenter trial on single fraction ... "The subjective experience of acute pain. An.

  13. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yidong; Feng Qinfu; Lu Haizhen; Mao Yousheng; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Wang Mei; Zhao Jun; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Chen Dongfu; Liang Jun; Zhai Yirui; Wang Luhua; He Jie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  14. Role of levamisole immunotherapy as an adjuvant to radiotherapy in oral cancer - Immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaram, P.; Remani, P.; Padmanabhan, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to assess the effect of levamisole immunotherapy as an adjuvant to radiotherapy, on the immune response of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Parameters assessed were leukocyte migration inhibition, response to PPD and oral cancer extract (OCA), lymphocyte transformation to PHA, circulating antibodies to OCA and circulating immune complexes (CIC). Comparisons were made between groups receiving levamisole, those receiving placebo and normal controls. The results of a thirty-month follow-up are presented. Radiotherapy resulted in a depression of cell-mediated functions, reduction in antibody titre also showed a gradual increase with time of follow-up. Levamisole, however, appeared to reduce the levels of CIC. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 38 refs

  15. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field 60 Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with 99m Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy in gastrointestinal tumors; Adjuvante Chemo- und Strahlentherapie bei gastrointestinalen Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendler, A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Feldmann, H.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Fink, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Siewert, J.R. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1995-04-21

    In modern surgical oncology, adjuvant therapies are important complementary strategies. In local advanced carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, 5-year survival data are still disappointing despite standardized surgery. In this context, it has to be differentiated between adjuvant therapy following complete tumor exstirpation (so-called UICC R{sub 0} resection) and additive therapies following incomplete tumor resections (UICC R{sub 1} or R{sub 2} resection). Modalities in the adjuvant setting are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the combined radio-/chemotherapy. In esophageal and gastric cancer there is up to now no benefit of postoperative adjuvant therapy. In pancreatic cancer, there are studies indicating a benefit of combined radio-/chemotherapy after complete tumor resection. A standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment is proven in colon cancer stage III (Dukes C) with levamisole and 5-FU. Completely resected rectal carcinoma should be treated postoperatively with combined radio-/chemotherapy. In the common clinical or practical setting, adjuvant therapy is indicated only in locally advanced gastrointestinal tumors following R{sub 0} resection. Postoperative therapy following incomplete tumor resection has its reason only in a palliative intention. (orig.) [Deutsch] Adjuvante Therapiestrategien sind wichtige flankierende Massnahmen der modernen onkologischen Chirurgie, da u.a. die 5-Jahres-Ueberlebensquoten bei lokal fortgeschrittenen Tumoren des Gastrointestinaltraktes nach wie vor unbefriedingend sind. Dabei muss grundsaetzlich zwischen adjuvanten Behandlungen nach kompletter Tumorexstirpation (UICC-R{sub 0}-Resektion) und der additiven Therapie nach palliativer Resektion (UICC-R{sub 1}- oder -R{sub 2}-Resektion) unterschieden werden. Als Modalitaeten kommen Chemotherapie, Strahlentherapie und ihre Kombination in Frage. Bei Oesophagus- und Magenkarzinomen kann derzeit keine gueltige Empfehlung zur adjuvanten Therapie gegeben werden. Die Radio

  17. Prognostic Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients with One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour Ansari; Behnam Kadkhodaei; Mehdi Shariat; Abdolrasoul Talei; Majid Akrami; Vahid Zangouri; Niloofar Ahmadloo; Mohammad Mohammadianpanah; Sayed Hasan Hamedi; Hamid Nasrolahi; Shapour Omidvari; Ahmad Mosalaei

    2018-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy, as an adjuvant treatment, plays a well-known role in prevention of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients. This study aims to investigate the impact of radiotherapy in patients with N1 disease. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the characteristics and treatment outcomes of 316 patients with a biopsy proven diagnosis of breast carcinoma and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes. The patients received treatment between 1995 and 201...

  18. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  19. Exclusive and adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Ali, David; Stevens, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and the European Concerted Action on survival and Care of Cancer Patients (EUROCARE) project indicate that about 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer have stage IV disease, representing about 12 600 new cases per year in the United States in 2005. Historically, local therapy of the primary tumor in this setting has been aimed solely at symptom palliation. However, several studies suggest that surgical excision of the primary tumor can prolong these patients' survival. Exclusive locoregional radiotherapy is an alternative form of locoregional treatment in this setting and may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Here we discuss current issues regarding exclusive and adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Several studies suggest that surgery or exclusive irradiation of the primary tumor is associated with better survival in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases and that exclusive locoregional radiotherapy may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Results of well-designed prospective studies are needed to re-evaluate treatment of the primary breast tumor in patients with metastases at diagnosis, and to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit

  20. Physical properties of charged particle beams for use in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The physical properties of the possible charged particle beams used for cancer radiotherapy are reviewed. Each property is discussed for all interesting particles (π, p, α, Ne ion) and the differences are emphasized. This is followed by a short discussion of the several beam delivery systems used in particle therapy today, emphasizing the differences in the problems for the several different radiations, particularly the differences between the accelerated particle beams and those of a secondary nature. Dose calculation techniques are described

  1. Radiotherapy plus concomitant adjuvant temozolomide for glioblastoma: Japanese mono-institutional results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Oike

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and survival benefits of combined treatment with radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ, which has been covered by the national health insurance in Japanese patients with glioblastoma since September 2006. Between September 2006 and December 2011, 47 patients with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed glioblastoma received radiotherapy for 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Among them, 45 patients (TMZ group received concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m(2/day, every day and adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m(2/day, 5 days during each 28-days. All 36 of the glioblastoma patients receiving radiotherapy between January 1988 and August 2006 were analyzed as historical controls (control group. All patients were followed for at least 1 year or until they died. The median survival was 15.8 months in the TMZ group and 12.0 months in the control group after a median follow-up of 14.0 months. The hazard ratio for death in the TMZ group relative to the control group was 0.52 (P<0.01; the 2-year survival rate was 27.7% in the TMZ group and 14.6% in the control group. Hematologic toxicity of grade 3 and higher was observed in 20.4% in the TMZ group. Multivariate analysis showed that extent of surgery had the strongest impact on survival (P<0.01, while the use of TMZ had the second largest impact on survival (P = 0.035. The results indicate that combined treatment with radiotherapy and TMZ has a significant survival benefit for Japanese patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma with slightly higher toxicities than previously reported.

  2. Safety of concurrent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greto, Daniela; Loi, Mauro; Saieva, Calogero; Muntoni, Cristina; Delli Paoli, Camilla; Becherini, Carlotta; Ciabatti, Cinzia; Perna, Marco; Campanacci, Domenico; Terziani, Francesca; Beltrami, Giovanni; Scoccianti, Guido; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Meattini, Icro; Desideri, Isacco; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Mangoni, Monica; Livi, Lorenzo

    2018-04-01

    This retrospective study analyzes the safety and feasibility of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in adjuvant treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (STS). A total of 158 patients with STS were retrospectively analyzed. Anthracycline-based computed tomography was performed in high-risk patients. Acute radiotherapy toxicity and chemotherapy-related toxicity were assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0; late radiotherapy toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Fifty-four (34.2%) patients received CRT. Mean follow up was 5.4 years (range .2-21.1 years). Local DFS-recurrence-free survival, distant DFS-relapse-free survival, and overall survival were 79.1%, 76.4%, and 64.6%, respectively, at last follow-up. Leukopenia occurred in 11.4% of patients. Skin acute toxicity developed in 60.1% of patients and determined interruption of radiotherapy treatment in 19 (12%) patients. Nineteen patients (12%) experienced moderate fibrosis (grade 2). Mild and moderate joint stiffness was recorded in 16 (10.1%) patients. Size ≥5 cm was the only predictor of local recurrence at multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] 9.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-72.83, p = .028). Age and stage resulted as independent distant relapse predictors (HR 4.77, 95% CI 1.81-12.58, p = .002 and HR 4.83, CI 1.41-16.57, p = .012, respectively). At Cox regression univariate analysis, Karnofsky Performance Status, size, and stage were significant survival predictors (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.02-4.87, p = .045; HR 2.88, 95% CI 1.10-7.52, p = .031; HR 2.59, 95% CI 1.11-6.04, p = .028). Concurrent CRT is a well-tolerated treatment option with no additional toxicity compared to exclusive radiotherapy or sequential CRT.

  3. Prospective and comparative assessment of toxicity of adjuvant concomitant chemo-radiotherapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer; evaluation prospective et comparative de la toxicite de la chimioradiotherapie concomitante adjuvante apres chimiotherapie neoadjuvante dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, V.; Angelergues, A.; Gobaux, V.; Kirova, Y.M.; Campana, F.; Dendale, R.; Reyal, F.; Pierga, J.Y.; Fourquet, A.; Bollet, M.A. [Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a prospective assessment of toxicity a treatment comprising an adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and a comparison with a treatment comprising only radiotherapy. Two sets of patients have been treated for a breast cancer between 1997 and 2002 by association of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Late toxicity has been assessed prospectively according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Acute toxicity has been noticed in medical files. The analysis of 142 treatments reveals that the concomitant administration of chemotherapy to radiotherapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and surgery is associated with an increase of acute toxicity without increase of long term toxicity. Short communication

  4. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit; Siu, Lillian; Knox, Jennifer J.; Wong, Rebecca; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Moore, Malcolm; Ringash, Jolie

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study

  5. Treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma with high-dose external beam supervoltage radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brufman, G.; Weshler, Z.; Prosnitz, L.R.; Fuks, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1978, 87 patients with locally advanced Tsub(3-4)Nsub(0-3)M 0 carcinoma of the breast were treated with 5,000 to 8,000 rad of external beam supervoltage radiotherapy. Initial clinical eradication of the tumour was observed in 76 of 87 cases (87%), but the actuarial probability of local control at 5 yr was only 53%. Furthermore, the actuarial probability of disease-free survival was 25% at 5 yr and 13% at 10 yr. Most of the patients eventually succumbed to metastatic breast carcinoma and the actuarial survival at 5 yr was 43% and at 10 yr, 16%. The addition of adjuvant low-dose chemotherapy, given to 13 patients, did not affect the rates of local control, survival or disease-free survival. The most common long-term complication was extensive and deforming radiation-induced fibrosis of the treated breast. The actuarial probability of 10-yr survival without a local recurrence and without severe fibrosis of the treated breast was only 17.5%. The role of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma and the possible use of improved radiotherapy techniques to achieve a more effective long-term local control and a more desirable cosmetic end result are discussed. (author)

  6. Adaptive radiotherapy for long course neo-adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Marijnen, Corrie; Herk, Marcel van; Triest, Baukelien van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the potential margin reduction with adaptive radiotherapy (ART) during neo-adjuvant treatment of locally-advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Repeat CT scans were acquired for 28 patients treated with 25 × 2 Gy, daily during the first week, and followed by weekly scans. The CTV was delineated on all scans, and shape variation was estimated. Five ART strategies were tested, consisting of an average CTV over the planning CT and one to five repeat CTs. Required PTV margins were calculated for adapted and non-adapted treatment. The strategy with the least PTV volume over the whole treatment was selected and bowel area dose reduction was estimated. Results: Substantial systematic and random shape variation demanded for a PTV margin up to 2.4 cm at the upper-anterior part of the CTV. Plan adaptation after fraction 4 resulted in a maximum 0.7 cm margin reduction and a significant PTV reduction from 1185 to 1023 cc (p < 0.0001). The bowel area volume receiving 15, 45, and 50 Gy was reduced from 436 to 402 cc, 111 to 81 cc, and 49 to 29 cc, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: With adaptive radiotherapy, maximum required PTV margins can be reduced from 2.4 to 1.7 cm, resulting in significantly less dose to the bowel area.

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy for mesothelioma. Prospective analysis of a multi-institutional series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoli, Sandro; Vitali, Paola; Scotti, Vieri; Bertoni, Filippo; Spiazzi, Luigi; Ghedi, Barbara; Buonamici, Fabrizio Banci; Marrazzo, Livia; Guidi, Gabriele; Meattini, Icro; Bastiani, Paolo; Amichetti, Maurizio; Schwarz, Marco; Magrini, Stefano Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate survival, locoregional control and toxicity in a series of 56 mesothelioma patients treated from May 2005 to May 2010 with post-operative radiotherapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) in three Italian Institutions (Brescia, Florence, and Modena). Material and methods: Fifty-six patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after EPP were analyzed. Four patients were treated with 3DCRT, 50 with IMRT and two with helical tomotherapy. Forty-five to 50 Gy in 25 fractions were given to the affected hemithorax and to ipsilateral mediastinum, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the sites of microscopically involved margins up to 60 Gy in 20/56 cases. Results: Three year locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis free (DMF), disease free (DF), disease specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates are 90%, 66%, 57%, 62%, and 60%, respectively. Conclusion: Postoperative RT with modern techniques is an effective method to obtain excellent local control and cure rates in mesothelioma patients submitted to EPP.

  8. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  9. Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Yang Haihua; Shao Minghai; Wang Biyun; Wang Jianhua; Wu Sufang; Wu Shixiu; Jin Lihui; Ma, Charlie C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and materials: Between 2004 and 2007, 54 patients with locally advanced NPC were included in this protocol. Patient characteristics: median age 48; 69% male; 52% World Health Organization (WHO) III; 50% stage III, 50% stage IV. The patients underwent a course of definitive conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks with 2 Gy/fraction), with concurrent weekly paclitaxel 35 mg/m 2 from the first to the sixth week of radiation. AC was started 4 weeks after the end of the radiotherapy (RT), paclitaxel 135 mg/m 2 on day 1 and cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 on days 1-3 were administered every 4 weeks for two cycles. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months. Eighty-five percentage of complete response and 15% partial response were achieved at the time of one month after AC. The 3-year actuarial rate of local regional control was 86%; distant metastases-free survival, progression-free survival and overall survival at 3 years were 81%, 69% and 76%, respectively. Forty-nine (91%) patients completed six courses of concurrent chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel, and 4 (7%) patients delayed at the second cycle of AC. No patient developed severe acute toxicities. Conclusions: Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent RT followed by AC is a potentially effective and toxicity tolerable method for locally advanced NPC. Further studies are needed to identify the optimal dose of weekly paclitaxel in this strategy.

  10. Breast cancer in female carriers of ATM gene alterations: outcome of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; John, Esther; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: We analyzed the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients carrying sequence variants in the ATM gene who received postoperative radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery to test whether an increased cellular radiosensitivity may translate into enhanced tumor cell killing and thereby result in an improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Patients and methods: We investigated a cohort of 138 breast cancer patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservative surgery for T1 and T2 tumors. Genomic DNA samples of these patients had previously been scanned for mutations in the ATM gene. Follow-up data were available in 135 patients, with a median follow-up of 87 months. Local relapse-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were compared between carriers and non-carriers of a sequence variant in the ATM gene. Results: Twenty patients were found to carry a sequence variant in the ATM gene (truncating, 7; missense, 13). The actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival of carriers vs. non-carriers were 88 vs. 94% (P=0.34). Actuarial metastasis-free and overall survival after 7 years were 63 vs. 85% (P=0.01) and 73 vs. 89% (P=0.055), respectively. However, the presence of a variant in the ATM gene did not remain a significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (P=0.068). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis that breast cancer patients carrying a sequence variant in the ATM gene differentially benefit from postoperative radiotherapy. These findings have to be verified using larger number of cases to clarify the clinical consequences of sequence variants in the ATM gene

  11. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deshpande, Vikram [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Warshaw, Andrew L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: Tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  12. Beam monitoring in radiotherapy and hadron-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontbonne, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have evolved over the past twenty years. For photon beams, the development of tools such as multi leaf collimators, machines such as Cyberknife or tomo-therapy, have improved the conformation of treatments to the tumor volume and lowered maximum dose to healthy tissue. In another register, the use of proton-therapy is expanding in all countries and the development of carbon ions beams for hadron-therapy is also increasing. If techniques improve, the control requirements for the monitoring of the dose administered to patients are always the same. This document presents, first, the ins and outs of the different techniques of external beam radiotherapy: photon treatments, protons and hadrons. Starting from the basis of clinical requirements, it sets the variables to be measured in order to ensure the quality of treatment for the different considered modalities. It then describes some implementations, based on precise and rigorous specifications, for the monitoring and measurement of beams delivered by external beam radiotherapy equipments. Two instrumental techniques are particularly highlighted, plastic scintillators dosimetry for the control of megavoltage photon beams and ionization chamber dosimetry applied to proton-therapy or radiobiology experiments conducted at the GANIL facility. Analyzes and perspectives, based on the recent developments of treatment techniques, are delivered in conclusion and can serve as guide for future instrumental developments. (author)

  13. Shielding in electron beams used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentenac, Irenee.

    1979-01-01

    The interactions of electron beams with initial energies between 7 and 30 MeV have been studied in various materials including polystyrene, aluminium, copper and lead. The following experimental results have been found: estimation of measurement point displacement in a cylindrical chamber and of its variations with electron beam energy, empirical relations between the energy at the surface and the practical range of the electrons in various materials, an estimation of the relative ionisation due to the 'bremsstrahlung' measured behind different materials with beam complete shielding. Improvement of electron beam collimation is suggested after analysis of the dose distribution behind partial shielding [fr

  14. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.A.R.M.; Glas, U.; Fornander, T.; Rosfors, S.; Bevegard, S.; Wennberg, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Study comparing sequential (neo-adjuvant) versus concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Karasawa, Kumiko; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Tanaka, Makiko; Kita-Okawa, Midori; Ishii, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy is still used for standard treatment in patients with locally advanced unresectable cancer. A study was undertaken to compare a sequential (neo-adjuvant) with a simultaneous (concurrent) chemotherapy and radiotherapy program. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1) and 5FU (600 mg/m 2 continuous i.v. day 1-5) every 3 weeks prior to definitive conventional radiotherapy (60-65 Gy), or cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1-5) and 5FU (250 mg/m 2 continuous i.v. infusion. day 1-14) were given simultaneously for same radiotherapy. Complete response rate was 45% in the sequential treatment and 43% in the simultaneous arm. Leukopenia and other adverse effects were slightly more frequent in the simultaneous arm, but there were no significant differences. These results suggested that individualization of treatment planning and establishment of optimum treatment were most important for combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Bilateral Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment during External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Hidaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of nontraumatic bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD during external beam radiotherapy for nonocular tumor, presented as an observational case study in conjunction with a review of the relevant literature. A 65-year-old male was referred to our hospital due to bilateral RRD. He underwent a biopsy for a tumor of the left frontal lobe 4 months prior to presentation, and the tumor had been diagnosed as primary central nerve system B-cell type lymphoma. He received chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy for 1 month. There were no traumatic episodes. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred during a series of radiotherapies. Simultaneous nontraumatic bilateral retinal detachment is rare. The effects of radiotherapy on ocular functionality, particularly in cases involving retinal adhesion and vitreous contraction, may include RRD. Thus, it is necessary to closely monitor the eyes of patients undergoing radiotherapy, particularly those undergoing surgery for retinal detachment and those with a history of photocoagulation for retinal tears, a relevant family history, or risk factors known to be associated with RRD.

  17. Human papilloma virus and survival of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglie, Martina A; Soltermann, Alex; Haile, Sarah R; Huber, Gerhard F; Stoeckli, Sandro J

    2015-07-01

    Impact of p16 protein, a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus induced cancer, p53 and EGFR as well as clinical factors on survival in a patient cohort with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated by surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) ± concomitant chemotherapy (CT). This is a retrospective analysis of patient's charts and tumor tissue. 57 patients were consecutively included and their tumor tissue assembled on a tissue microarray following immunohistochemical analysis. Survival times were estimated by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis. The importance of clinical and immunohistochemical factors for outcome was estimated by cox proportional hazard models. With 88% 5-year overall survival, 91% 5-year disease-specific survival and 91% 5-year disease-free survival, respectively, we found excellent survival rates in this surgically treated patient cohort of mainly advanced OPSCC (93% AJCC stage III or IV). The only factors positively influencing survival were p16 overexpression as well as p53 negativity and even more pronounced the combination of those biomarkers. Survival analysis of patients classified into three risk categories according to an algorithm based on p16, smoking, T- and N-category revealed a low, intermediate and high-risk group with significant survival differences between the low and the high-risk group. Patients with OPSCC can be successfully treated by surgery and adjuvant RT ± CT with a clear survival benefit of p16 positive, p53 negative patients. We recommend considering a combination of immunohistochemical (p16, p53) and clinical factors (smoking, T- and N-category) for risk stratification.

  18. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [de

  19. Adjuvant single-fraction radiotherapy is safe and effective for intractable keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Changhoon; Wu, Honggyun; Chang, Hak; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of high-dose, single-fraction electron beam radiotherapy for therapy-resistant keloids. Before 2010, intractable keloids were treated at our institution with post-operative irradiation of 6-15 Gy in 3-5 fractionations. For convenience and cost effectiveness, we have changed our treatment protocol to high-dose single-fraction radiotherapy. A total of 12 patients with 16 keloid lesions were treated from January 2010 to January 2013 in our department. A 10-Gy dose of electron irradiation was given within 72 h of the surgical excision. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. Treatments were well tolerated, and there was no recurrence in any of the patients. Severe adverse effects were not observed. Surgical excision of the keloid, followed by immediate, single-fraction, high-dose radiotherapy, is both safe and effective in preventing recurrence of therapy-resistant keloids. (author)

  20. Simultaneous adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage I and II breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, D.; Dady, P. [Wellington Hospital, Wellington, (New Zealand); Atkinson, C. [Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, (New Zealand); Joseph, D. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, (Australia); O`Brien, P.; Ackland, S.; Bonaventura, A.; Hamilton, C.; Stewart, J.; Denham, J. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Waratah, NSW (Australia); Spry, N. [Geelong Hospital, Geelong, VIC (Australia)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate treatment outcome after conservative breast surgery or mastectomy followed by simultaneous adjuvant radiotherapy and cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF) therapy. Two hundred and sixty eight (268) patients were treated at two Australian and two New Zealand centres between 1981 and July 1995. One hundred and sixty-nine patients underwent conservation surgery and 99 had mastectomies. Median follow-up was 53 months. Conventionally fractionated radiation was delivered simultaneously during the first two cycles of CMF, avoiding radiation on the Fridays that the intravenous components of CMF were delivered. In conservatively treated patients, 5-year actuarial rates of any recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were 34.5 {+-} 5.2%, 25.4 {+-} 4.5% and 75.5 {+-} 4.8%, respectively. Crude incidence of local relapse at 4 years was 6.3% and at regional/distant sites was 26.3%. Highest grades of granulocyte toxicity (< 0.5 x 10{sup 9}/L), moist desquamation, radiation pneumonitis and persistent breast oedema were recorded in 10.7, 8.5, 8.9 and 17.2%, respectively. In patients treated by mastectomy, 5-year actuarial rates of any recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were 59.7 {+-} 7.3%, 56.7 {+-} 7.4% and 50.1 {+-} 7%. The crude incidence of local relapse at 4 years was 5.6% and at regional/distant sites it was 45.7%. The issue of appropriate timing of adjuvant therapies has become particularly important with the increasing acknowledgement of the value of anthracycline-based regimens. For women in lower risk categories (e.g. 1-3 nodes positive or node negative), CMF may offer a potentially better therapy, particularly where breast-conserving surgical techniques have been used. In such cases CMF allows the simultaneous delivery of radiotherapy with the result of optimum local control, without compromise or regional or systemic relapse rates. Further randomized trials that directly address

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and unacceptable late toxicity in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzari G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Lazzari,1 Maria Iole Natalicchio,2 Angela Terlizzi,3 Francesco Perri,4 Giovanni Silvano1 1Radiation Oncology Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Taranto, 2Molecular Biology Laboratory, Pathological Anatomy Department, Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia, 3Medical Physic Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, 4Medical Oncology Unit, Presidio Ospedaliero Centrale - Santissima Annunziata, Taranto, Italy Background: There has recently been a strong interest in the inter-individual variation in normal tissue and tumor response to radiotherapy (RT, because tissue radiosensitivity seems to be under genetic control. Evidence is accumulating on the role of polymorphic genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could influence normal tissue response after radiation. The most studied SNPs include those in genes involved in DNA repair (single- and double-strand breaks, and base excision and those active in the response to oxidative stress.Case report: We present the case report of a 60-year-old woman with early breast cancer who underwent adjuvant hormone therapy and conventional radiotherapy, and subsequently developed unacceptable cosmetic toxicities of the irradiated breast requiring a genetic test of genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. The patient was found to be heterozygous for G28152A (T/C and C18067T (A/G mutations in X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 and 3 (XRCC3, respectively, homozygous for A313G (G/G mutation in glutathione S transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1, and wild-type for A4541G (A/A in XRCC3 and G135C (G/G in RAD51 recombinase.Conclusion: The role of SNPs should be taken into account when a severe phenomenon appears in normal tissues after radiation treatment, because understanding the molecular basis of individual radiosensitivity may be useful for identifying moderately or extremely radiosensitive patients who may need tailored therapeutic strategies. Keywords: radiosensitivity, SNPs, fibrosis, DNA repair

  2. Prognostic Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients with One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ansari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiotherapy, as an adjuvant treatment, plays a well-known role in prevention of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients. This study aims to investigate the impact of radiotherapy in patients with N1 disease. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the characteristics and treatment outcomes of 316 patients with a biopsy proven diagnosis of breast carcinoma and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes. The patients received treatment between 1995 and 2014. The patients had a median follow-up of 60 (range: 6-182 months. Results: This study was conducted on 316 patients with a median age of 48 (range: 26-86 years. Among patients, 215 underwent modified radical mastectomy and 101 had breast-conserving surgery before adjuvant treatment. Indeed, 259 patients received radiotherapy (radiation group and 57 did not (control group. There was locoregional recurrence in one control group patient and two patients in the radiation group. Multivariate analysis results indicated hormone receptor status as an independent prognostic factor for the 5-year disease-free survival rate. Estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity (HR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.02-3.19, P=0.043 also had a negative influence on the 5-year disease-free survival rate. However, radiotherapy had no significant effect on disease-free survival (P=0.446 and overall survival (P=0.058 rates. Conclusion: The results showed that adjuvant radiotherapy had no prognostic impacts on locoregional and distant disease control in breast cancer patients with N1 disease.

  3. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  4. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-01-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods

  5. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanuma, A. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  6. Intrinsic subtypes and benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy - results from two independent randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Tramm, Trine; Nielsen, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer has revealed differences among them in terms of prognosis and response to chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. However, the ability of intrinsic subtypes to predict benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy has only been examined...... randomized to adjuvant radiotherapy or not. All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and a subgroup of patients underwent ovarian ablation. Tumors were classified into intrinsic subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Normal-like using the research-based PAM50 classifier. RESULTS...

  7. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  8. Olfactory neural tumours - the role of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slevin, N.J.; Irwin, C.J.R.; Banerjee, S.S.; Path, F.R.C.; Gupta, N.K.; Farrington, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon tumour arising in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. We report the management of nine cases treated with external beam radiotherapy subsequent to surgery, either attempted definitive removal or biopsy only. Recent refinements in pathological evaluation of these tumours are discussed. Seven cases were deemed classical olfactory neuroblastoma whilst two were classified as neuroendocrine carcinoma. The clinical features, radiotherapy technique and variable natural history are presented. Seven of eight patients treated radically were controlled locally, with a minimum follow-up of two years. Three patients developed cervical lymph node disease and three patients died of systemic metastatic disease. Suggestions are made as to which patients should have en-bloc resection rather than definitive radiotherapy. (author)

  9. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Liu Yueping; Wang Weihu; Song Yongwen; Li Tao; Li Ning; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m 2 /day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m 2 , daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles

  10. A case of delayed anastomotic fistula occurred nine years after adjuvant radiotherapy following rectal cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Fukao, Takashi; Kuriyama, Shiho; Ohtawa, Yasuyuki; Waku Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man who underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2007 (RbRa, pT4a, pN1, cM0, pStage 3a). With the surgically stripped surface testing positive, the pelvic cavity was subjected to 50 Gy of radiation as part of adjuvant radiotherapy. In December 2015, the patient presented with anal pain and bloody stool.A CT scan revealed a pelvic abscess accompanied by gas patterns around the anastomotic site, and a colonoscopy detected formation of a fistula at the anastomotic site. Although CT-guided drainage was performed in response, a new abscess was formed promptly. In April 2016, laparoscopic colostomy with double orifices was performed on the transverse colon. Thereafter the abscesses in the buttocks required four sessions of incision and drainage. The condition improved with no purulent discharge after December 2016. As of 11 months after the colostomy, the pelvic abscess is gradually contracting, though some fistulas have remained. The patient has been followed up on an ambulatory basis.This case is considered to be of an intrapelvic abscess associated with the delayed anastomotic fistula occurred after a lapse of 9 years following irradiation. (author)

  11. Ear-lobe keloids: treatment by a protocol of surgical excision and immediate postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoowansi, R; Cornes, P G; Glees, J P; Powell, B W; Moss, A L

    2001-09-01

    There is no universally agreed policy for treating keloid scars of the ear lobe following piercing. We treated 35 patients (34 women) for high-risk ear-lobe keloids; the average age was 24 years (range: 16-44 years). All had failed to respond to prior treatment with massage and silicone, and corticosteroid injection. The keloids were excised extralesionally and the defects were closed with interrupted prolene sutures. The operative scar was covered with topical 2% lignocaine-0.25% chlorhexidine sterile lubricant gel under a transparent adhesive dressing. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy of 10 Gy, applied as 100 kV photons (4 mm high-voltage therapy (HVT) Al), was given within 24 h of surgery. All keloid scars were controlled at 4 weeks' follow-up. At 1 year, three out of 34 cases followed up had relapsed (probability of control: 91.2%). At 5 years, a further four out of the remaining 31 patients had relapsed (cumulative probability of control at 5 years: 79.4%). There were no cases of serious toxicity. Copyright 2001 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  12. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  13. External beam radiotherapy in the management of ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, Marian; Zbigniew, Kojs; Skolyszewski, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1983, 345 patients with ovarian cancer clinical stage I, II and III were irradiated postoperatively. Five-year NED survival was achieved in 41.7% of patients. The most important prognostic factors were histological grade and clinical stage of cancer. Postoperative external beam radiotherapy appeared to be highly efficient for the patients with microscopic residual disease, giving 70% 5-year survival, and moderately efficient for patients with small, i.e. ≤3 cm in diameter residual disease, giving 40% 5-year survival. The optimal technique of irradiation appeared to be the irradiation given to the entire abdominal cavity with additional irradiation coned down to the pelvis. External beam radiotherapy was ineffective in patients with gross residual disease, i.e. >3 cm in diameter, and useless as palliative treatment given to patients with inoperable cancer of the ovary. (author). tabs., figs

  14. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Per J; Marijnen, Corrie AM; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wiggers, Theo; Glimelius, Bengt; Etten, Boudewijn van; Hospers, Geke AP; Påhlman, Lars; Velde, Cornelis JH van de; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beukema, Jannet C; Kapiteijn, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  15. Beam modulation for heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, T.; Minohara, S.; Sudou, M.

    1993-01-01

    The first clinical trial of heavy ion radiation therapy is scheduled in 1994 by using the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In order to start the clinical trial, first, it is necessary to know the physical characteristics of high energy heavy ions in human bodies, for example, dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distribution. Also the knowledge on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions is required. Based on these biophysical properties of heavy ions, monoenergetic heavy ion beam should be modulated so as to make the spread Bragg peak suitable to heavy ion radiation therapy. In order to establish a methodology to obtain the most effective spread Bragg peak for heavy ion radiation therapy, a heavy ion irradiation port at the RIKEN ring cyclotron facility was constructed. By using a 135 MeV/u carbon beam, the biophysical properties of the heavy ions were investigated, and a range modulator was designed to have uniform biological response in the spread Bragg peak. The physical and biological rationality of the spread Bragg peak were investigated. The dose, LET and biological effect of a monoenergetic heavy ion beam, the design of the range modulator, and the distributions of LET and biological dose for the spread Bragg peak are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Monitoring external beam radiotherapy using real-time beam visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Cesare H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Xing, Lei, E-mail: lei@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of a novel radiation therapy monitoring technique that utilizes a flexible scintillating film, common optical detectors, and image processing algorithms for real-time beam visualization (RT-BV). Methods: Scintillating films were formed by mixing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb (GOS) with silicone and casting the mixture at room temperature. The films were placed in the path of therapeutic beams generated by medical linear accelerators (LINAC). The emitted light was subsequently captured using a CMOS digital camera. Image processing algorithms were used to extract the intensity, shape, and location of the radiation field at various beam energies, dose rates, and collimator locations. The measurement results were compared with known collimator settings to validate the performance of the imaging system. Results: The RT-BV system achieved a sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio to enable real-time monitoring of the LINAC beam at 20 fps with normal ambient lighting in the LINAC room. The RT-BV system successfully identified collimator movements with sub-millimeter resolution. Conclusions: The RT-BV system is capable of localizing radiation therapy beams with sub-millimeter precision and tracking beam movement at video-rate exposure.

  17. Physical aspects of heavy charged particle beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    Physical properties of heavy ion beams are discussed to improve the physical dose distributions in view of radiotherapy. Preservation of the structural and functional integrity of adjacent normal tissue is required to achieve great probability of tumor control. This will be accomplished with the reduction of irradiated volume of normal tissues and with greater relative biological effectiveness (RBE) on tumor cells than that on surrounding normal cells. This suggests the use of heavy ion beams as new source of radiation that increases the therapeutic ratio. The basis of the improvement in the physical dose distribution by use of heavy charged particles is due to the finite range of the beams and to the less multiple coulomb scattering of the particles having a heavier atomic mass than proton. The depth dose distributions and dose profiles of heavy particle beams are discussed in this article. The lateral sharpness of heavy charged particles is comparable to the penumbra of high energy photon and electron beams and is not of clinical concern due to less coulomb scattering of heavy ions to lateral direction in traversing a medium. The dose gradient at the end of range of primary beam is dependent upon the energy spread and range straggling of the particles. The magnitude of range straggling is nearly proportional to the range and inversely proportional to the inverse square root of the particle mass. Heavy ion beams also undergo nuclear interactions, in which the primary beam may produce lower atomic number particles. Therefore, the dose beyond the Bragg peak is due to those fragments. Fragmentation increases as a function of the atomic mass to the 2/3 power and with the energy of the particles. Thus, the production of fragments diminishes the depth dose advantages of heavy ions. The choice of ion for radiotherapy may depend on evaluation of important parameter for tumor control. (J.P.N.)

  18. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D., E-mail: jdschoenfeld@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  19. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2–2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  20. The early toxicity of escalated versus standard dose conformal radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression for patients with localised prostate cancer: Results from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, David P.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Langley, Ruth E.; Graham, John D.; Huddart, Robert A.; Syndikus, Isabel; Matthews, John H.L.; Scrase, Christopher D.; Jose, Chakiath C.; Logue, John; Stephens, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Five-year disease-free survival rates for localised prostate cancer following standard doses of conventional radical external beam radiotherapy are around 80%. Conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) raises the possibility that radiotherapy doses can be increased and long-term efficacy outcomes improved, with safety an important consideration. Methods: MRC RT01 is a randomised controlled trial of 862 men with localised prostate cancer comparing Standard CFRT (64 Gy/32 f) versus Escalated CFRT (74 Gy/37 f), both administered with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression. Early toxicity was measured using physician-reported instruments (RTOG, LENT/SOM, Royal Marsden Scales) and patient-reported questionnaires (MOS SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, FACT-P). Results: Overall early radiotherapy toxicity was similar, apart from increased bladder, bowel and sexual toxicity, in the Escalated Group during a short immediate post-radiotherapy period. Toxicity in both groups had abated by week 12. Using RTOG Acute Toxicity scores, cumulative Grade ≥2 bladder and bowel toxicity was 38% and 30% for Standard Group and 39% and 33% in Escalated Group, respectively. Urinary frequency (Royal Marsden Scale) improved in both groups from pre-androgen suppression to 6 months post-radiotherapy (p < 0.001), but bowel and sexual functioning deteriorated. This pattern was supported by patient-completed assessments. Six months after starting radiotherapy the incidence of RTOG Grade ≥2 side-effects was low (<1%); but there were six reports of rectal ulceration (6 Escalated Group), six haematuria (5 Escalated Group) and eight urethral stricture (6 Escalated Group). Conclusions: The two CFRT schedules with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression have broadly similar early toxicity profiles except for the immediate post-RT period. At 6 months and compared to before hormone therapy, bladder symptoms improved, whereas bowel and sexual symptoms worsened. These assessments of early treatment safety will be

  1. External Beam Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Biliary System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of patients of external beam radiotherapy of carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system (EHBS) including gall bladder (GB) and extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBD) and to define the role of radiotherapy for these tumors. Methods and Materials : We retrospectively analyzed the records of 43 patients with carcinoma of the EHBS treated with external beam radiotherapy at our institution between April, 1986 and July, 1994. Twenty three patients had GB cancers and remaining 20 patients did EHBD cancers. Of those 23 GB cancers, 2 had Stage II, 12 did Stage III and 9 did Stage IV disease, respectively. Male to female ratio was 11 to 12. Fifteen patients underwent radical surgery with curative intent and 8 patients did biopsy and bypass surgery alone. Postoperatively 16 patients were irradiated with 4500 cGy or higher doses and 4 patients with 3180 to 4140 cGy. Follow up periods ranged from 8 to 34 months. Results : overall median survival time of patients with GB cancer was 11 months. Median survival time for patients with Stage III and IV disease were 14 months and 5 months, respectively. Corresponding two year survival rates were 36%(4/11) and 13%(1/8), respectively. Those who underwent surgery with curative intent showed significantly better survival at 12 months than those who underwent bypass surgery alone(67% vs 13%). None of the patients died of treatment related complications. Median survival time for entire group of 20 EHBD patients was 10 months. Median survivals of 10 Stage III and 7 Stage IV disease were 10 and 8 months, respectively. Two patients who underwent Whipple's procedure had 11 and 14 month survival and those treated with resection and drainage showed median survival of 10 month. Conclusion : Postoperative external beam radiotherapy for carcinoma of the extrahepatic billary system is well tolerated and might improve survival of patients. especially those with respectable lesions with microscopic or

  2. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  3. Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Adjuvant and Palliative Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (EHC) are rare tumors of the biliary tree because of their low incidence, large randomized studies examining radiotherapy (RT) for EHC have not been performed. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and palliative RT in the treatment of EHC in a large patient population. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 4,758 patients with EHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: Patients underwent surgery (28.8%), RT (10.0%), surgery and RT (14.7%), or no RT or surgery (46.4%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 23-104), 52.5% were men, and 80.7% were white. The median overall survival time was 16 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-17), 9 months (95% CI 9-11), 9 months (95% CI 9-10), and 4 months (95% CI 3-4) for surgery and RT, surgery, RT, and no RT or surgery, respectively. The overall survival was significantly different between the surgery and surgery and RT groups (p < .0001) and RT and no RT or surgery groups (p < .0001) on the log-rank test. The propensity score-adjusted analyses of surgery and RT vs. surgery (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.84-1.05) were not significantly different, but that for RT vs. no RT or surgery (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.54-0.70) was significantly different. Conclusion: These results suggest that palliative RT prolongs survival in patients with EHC. The benefit associated with surgery and RT was significant on univariate analysis but not after controlling for potential confounders using the propensity score. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologic agents for the treatment of EHC.

  4. Associations between adjuvant radiotherapy and different causes of death in a German breast cancer cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, Nadia; Eulenburg, Christine; Seibold, Petra; Eilber, Ursula; Thöne, Kathrin; Behrens, Sabine; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter

    2018-04-01

    Studies of cohorts of breast cancer (BC) patients diagnosed before 1990 showed radiotherapy (RT) to be associated with increased cardiovascular (CVD) and lung cancer mortality many years after diagnosis. In the late 1990s, improvements in RT planning techniques reduced radiation doses to normal tissues. Recent studies did not consistently report higher RT-related mortality for CVD and second cancers. Aim of the study was to analyze specific causes of death after 3D-conformal RT in a recent BC cohort. Stage I-III BC patients diagnosed 2001-2005 and enrolled in the population based MARIEplus study were followed-up for 11.9 years (median). Associations between adjuvant RT and cause-specific mortality were analyzed by using competing risks models, yielding subdistribution hazard ratios (SHR) for RT directly related to cumulative incidences. Models were adjusted for differences in baseline characteristics applying inverse-probability-of-treatment-weighting (IPTW). Of the 2951 patients, 2439 (83.0%) received RT. No significant association of RT with lung cancer mortality (SHR IPTW 0.88, 0.35-2.12), other cancer mortality (SHR IPTW 1.04, 95% CI 0.62-1.73) or cardiac mortality was observed (SHR IPTW 1.57, 0.75-3.29). Mortality from lung and other diseases were significantly lower in irradiated women (SHR IPTW 0.39, 95% CI 0.17-0.90 and SHR IPTW 0.58, 95% CI 0.34-0.97, respectively). In line with recent studies, 3D-conformal RT did not significantly increase mortality from non-BC causes in the German MARIEplus cohort. Since long-term data are still sparse and event rates low in BC-cohorts, who received modern RT, investigation of possible late RT effects on mortality beyond 14 years of follow-up is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The reasonable timing of the adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent: suggestion based on progression patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Bae, Duk Soo

    2013-01-01

    We designed this study to identify and suggest the reasonable timing of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of uterine carcinosarcoma according to the surgical intent and patterns of progression. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 50 carcinosarcoma patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2010. Among these 50 patients, 32 underwent curative surgery and 13 underwent maximal tumor debulking surgery. The remaining five patients underwent biopsy only. Twenty-six patients received chemotherapy, and 15 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 17.3 months. Curative resection (p < 0.001) and stage (p < 0.001) were statistically significant factors affecting survival. During follow-up, 30 patients showed progression. Among these, eight patients (16.0%) had loco-regional progression only. The patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy did not show loco-regional progression, and radiotherapy was a significant negative risk factor for loco-regional progression (p = 0.01). The time to loco-regional progression was much earlier for non-curative than curative resection (range, 0.7 to 7.6 months vs. 7.5 to 39.0 months). Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of carcinosarcoma might be related to a low loco-regional progression rate. Radiotherapy should be considered in non-curatively resected patients as soon as possible.

  6. Radiotherapy in poor risk patients with stage I cancer of the endometrium: results of not giving external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCruze, B; Guthrie, D

    1999-01-01

    Poor prognosis (poorly differentiated and/or deep myometrial invasion) Stage I endometrial cancer can have a relapse rate as high as 50%. Traditionally, most clinical oncologists treat these patients with external beam radiotherapy after surgery but there is no evidence to show that this improves survival. The retrospective study looks at the results of not giving external beam radiotherapy in 25 consecutive patients and compares the results with a group of 13 consecutive patients who did have such treatment. The two groups were comparable with regard to age, degree of differentiation and degree of invasion. Survival was comparable in the two groups. There is no evidence of any obvious decrease in survival from withholding external beam radiotherapy, but this was not a prospective randomized controlled trial. This study illustrates that it is essential that the Medical Research Council ASTEC trial should be supported because this will determine the true place of external beam radiotherapy in such patients.

  7. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  8. External beam radiotherapy alone in advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik; Nam, Taek Keun [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    We performed the retrospective analysis to find the outcome of external beam radiotherapy alone in advanced esophageal cancer patients. One hundred and six patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone between July 1990 and December 1996 were analyzed retrospectively. We limited the site of the lesions to the thoracic esophagus and cell type to the squamous cell carcinoma. Follow-up was completed in 100 patients (94%) and ranged from 1 month to 92 months (median; 6 months). The median age was 62 years old and male to female ratio was 104:2. Fifty-three percent was the middle thorax lesion and curative radiotherapy was performed in 83%. Mean tumor dose delivered with curative aim was 58.6 Gy (55-70.8 Gy) and median duration of the radiation therapy was days. The median survival of all patients was 6 months and 1-year and 2-year overall survival rate was 27% and 12%, respectively. Improvement of dysphagia was obtained in most patients except for 7 patients who underwent feeding gastrostomy. The complete response rate immediately after radiation therapy was 32% (34/106). The median survival and 2-year survival rate of the complete responder was 14 months and 30% respectively, while those of the nonresponder was 4 months and 0% respectively (p=0.000). The median survival and 2-year survival rate of the patients who could tolerate regular diet was 9 months and 16% while those of the patients who could not tolerate regular diet was 3 months and 0%, respectively (p=0.004). The survival difference between the patients with 5 cm or less tumor length and those with more than 5 cm tumor length was marginally statistically significant (p=0.06). However, the survival difference according to the periesophageal invasion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the chest CT imaging study was not statistically significant in this study. In a multivariate analysis, the statistically significant covariates to the survival were complete response to radiotherapy, tumor, length, and

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in triple-negative breast carcinoma: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Mei; Ling, Rui; Xia Yuesheng; Luo Shanquan; Fu Xuehai; Xiao Feng; Li Jianping; Long Xiaoli; Wang Jianguo; Hou Zengxia; Chen Yunxia; Zhou Bin; Xu, Man

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) presents a high risk breast cancer that lacks the benefit from hormone treatment, chemotherapy is the main strategy even though it exists in poor prognosis. Use of adjuvant radiation therapy, which significantly decreases breast cancer mortality, has not been well described among poor TNBC women. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy could significantly increase survival outcomes in TNBC women after mastectomy. Patients and methods: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center study was performed between February 2001 and February 2006 and comprised 681 women with triple-negative stage I-II breast cancer received mastectomy, of them, 315 cases received systemic chemotherapy alone, 366 patients received radiation after the course of chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Simultaneously local and systemic toxicity were observed. Results: After a median follow-up of 86.5 months, five-year RFS rates were 88.3% and 74.6% for adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy alone, respectively, with significant difference between the two groups (HR 0.77 [95% CI 0.72, 0.98]; P = 0.02). Five-year OS significantly improved in adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation group compared with chemotherapy alone (90.4% and 78.7%) (HR 0.79 [95% CI 0.74, 0.97]; P = 0.03). No severe toxicity was reported. Conclusions: Patients received standard adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation therapy was more effective than chemotherapy alone in women with triple-negative early-stage breast cancer after mastectomy.

  10. Clinical experience with routine diode dosimetry for electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy is frequently administered based on clinical setups without formal treatment planning. We felt, therefore, that it was important to monitor electron beam treatments by in vivo dosimetry to prevent errors in treatment delivery. In this study, we present our clinical experience with patient dose verification using electron diodes and quantitatively assess the dose perturbations caused by the diodes during electron beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A commercial diode dosimeter was used for the in vivo dose measurements. During patient dosimetry, the patients were set up as usual by the therapists. Before treatment, a diode was placed on the patient's skin surface and secured with hypoallergenic tape. The patient was then treated and the diode response registered and stored in the patient radiotherapy system database via our in-house software. A customized patient in vivo dosimetry report showing patient details, expected and measured dose, and percent difference was then generated and printed for analysis and record keeping. We studied the perturbation of electron beams by diodes using film dosimetry. Beam profiles at the 90% prescription isodose depths were obtained with and without the diode on the beam central axis, for 6-20 MeV electron beams and applicator/insert sizes ranging from a 3-cm diameter circular field to a 25 x 25 cm open field. Results: In vivo dose measurements on 360 patients resulted in the following ranges of deviations from the expected dose at the various anatomic sites: Breast (222 patients) -20.3 to +23.5% (median deviation 0%); Head and Neck (63 patients) -21.5 to +14.8% (median -0.7%); Other sites (75 patients) -17.6 to +18.8% (median +0.5%). Routine diode dosimetry during the first treatment on 360 patients (460 treatment sites) resulted in 11.5% of the measurements outside our acceptable ±6% dose deviation window. Only 3.7% of the total measurements were outside ±10% dose deviation. Detailed

  11. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valérie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2–3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  12. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A; Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed.

  13. Combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy for irresectable Klatskin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, U.M. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Staatz, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Alzen, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Abt. Kinderradiologie, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Andreopoulos, D. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); BOC Oncology Centre, Nikosia (Cyprus)

    2002-12-01

    Background: In most cases of proximal cholangiocarcinoma, curative surgery is not possible. Radiotherapy can be used for palliative treatment. We report our experience with combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy of advanced Klatskin's tumors. Patients and Methods: 30 patients were treated for extrahepatic proximal bile duct cancer. Our schedule consisted for external beam radiotherapy (median dose 30 Gy) and a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost (median dose 40 Gy) delivered in four or five fractions, which could be applied completely in twelve of our patients. 15 patients in the brachytherapy and nine patients in the non-brachytherapy group received additional low-dose chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Results: The brachytherapy boost dose improved the effect of external beam radiotherapy by increasing survival from a median of 3.9 months in the non-brachytherapy group to 9.1 months in the brachytherapy group. The effect was obvious in patients receiving a brachytherapy dose above 30 Gy, and in those without jaundice at the beginning of radiotherapy (p<0.05). Conclusions: The poor prognosis in patients with advanced Klatskin's tumors may be improved by combination therapy, with the role of brachytherapy and chemotherapy still to be defined. Our results suggest that patients without jaundice should be offered brachytherapy, and that a full dose of more than 30 Gy should be applied. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei den meisten Patienten mit proximalen Cholangiokarzinomen ist eine kurative Operation nicht mehr moeglich. Im Rahmen der Palliativbehandlung kann die Strahlentherapie eingesetzt werden. Wir berichten ueber unsere Erfahrungen mit der Kombination aus perkutaner und intraluminaler Strahlentherapie fortgeschrittener Klatskin-Tumoren. Patienten und Methode: 30 Patienten wurden wegen extrahepatischer proximaler Gallengangskarzinome behandelt. Unser Therapieschema umfasste eine perkutane Strahlentherapie (mediane Dosis: 30 Gy) sowie einen

  14. Simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbottom, Carl Graham; Khoo, Vincent S.; Webb, Steve

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for the concurrent optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in conformal radiotherapy treatment planning has been developed and tested on a cohort of five patients. The algorithm is based on a beam-weight optimization scheme with a downhill simplex optimization engine. The use of random voxels in the dose calculation provides much of the required speed up in the optimization process, and allows the simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights in a reasonable time. In the implementation of the beam-weight optimization algorithm just 10% of the original patient voxels are used for the dose calculation and cost function evaluation. A fast simulated annealing algorithm controls the optimization of the beam arrangement. The optimization algorithm was able to produce clinically acceptable plans for the five patients in the cohort study. The algorithm equalized the dose to the optic nerves compared to the standard plans and reduced the mean dose to the brain stem by an average of 4.4% (±1.9, 1 SD), p value=0.007. The dose distribution to the PTV was not compromised by developing beam arrangements via the optimization algorithm. In conclusion, the simultaneous optimization of beam orientations and beam weights has been developed to be routinely used in a realistic time. The results of optimization in a small cohort study show that the optimization can reliably produce clinically acceptable dose distributions and may be able to improve dose distributions compared to those from a human planner

  15. Absorbed dose optimization in the microplanar beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Jaric, J.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate, small divergence and sharply defined microbeam margins permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams for radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the repair mechanism hypothesis of capillary endothelial cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated capillaries. Unlike a pencil beam, more accurate dose calculation, beam width and spacing are essential to minimise radiation damage to normal tissue cells outside the target. The absorbed dose between microbeam zones should be kept below the threshold for irreversible radiation damage. Thus the peak-to-valley ratio for the dose distribution should be optimized. The absorbed dose profile depends on the energy of the incident beam and the composition and density of the medium. Using Monte Carlo computations, the radial absorbed dose of single 24 x 24 μm 2 cross-section X-ray beams of different energies in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom was investigated. The results indicated that at 100 keV, closely spaced square cross-sectional microbeams can be applied to the lung. A bundle of parallel 24 μm-wide planar microbeams spaced at 200 μm intervals provides much more irradiation coverage of tissue than is provided by a bundle of parallel, square cross-sectional microbeam, although the former is associated with much smaller Peak (maximum absorbed dose on the beam axis) -to-Valley ( minimum interbeam absorbed dose ) ratios than the latter. In this study the lateral and depth dose of single and multiple microplanar beams with beam dimensions of width 24 μm and 48 μm and height 2-20 cm with energy of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom are investigated. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depths and bundles of beams (2 x 2 cm 2 to 20 x 20 cm 2 square cross section) with a 150 μm 200 μm and

  16. Treatment results and prognostic analysis of 47 patients with urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ke; Hou Xiaorong; Shen Jie; Lian Xin; Sun Shuai; Zhang Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors of 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: From October 1998 to October 2008, 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients had stage T 3 /T 4 disease, 7 had lymph node metastasis. Thirty-nine patients had G3 tumor, 13 had stump-positive. The median radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (36-64 Gy). 81% patients (38/47) were treated with regional irradiation. Results: The median follow-up time was 21 months (6 -88 months). The follow-up rate was 92%. The median overall survival time was 35 months (5 -88 months). The 2-and 5-year overall survival rates were 57% and 49%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the median overall survival time was better in patients with stage T 1 or T 2 compared with stage T 3 or T 4 tumor (42 months vs. 19 months, χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), with age of ≤65 years compared with >65 years (28 mouths vs 18 months,χ 2 =8.23, P =0.004). There was no significant difference in the long term survival in patients with non-radical surgery compared with radical mastectomy (21 months vs. 20 months, χ 2 = 0.90, P = 0.344). In multivariate analysis, the stage T 3 or T 4 (χ 2 = 7.89, P =0.005), >65 years old (χ 2 = 4.85, P = 0.028), renal pelvis involvement (χ 2 = 5.65, P = 0.018), and tumor located in the mid or inferior segment (χ 2 =6.08,P =0.014) were factors associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions: Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve the efficacy of patients with locally advanced urethral transitional cell carcinoma. Advanced T stage and > 65 years age are associated with poorer prognosis. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo based simulation of LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator along with beam shaper applicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Heidarloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is one of the radiotherapy methods that delivers a high single fraction of radiation dose to the patient in one session during the surgery. Beam shaper applicator is one of the applicators that is recently employed with this radiotherapy method. This applicator has a considerable application in treatment of large tumors. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam produced by LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator in conjunction with this applicator have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation by MCNP code. The results showed that the electron beam produced by the beam shaper applicator would have the desirable dosimetric characteristics, so that the mentioned applicator can be considered for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the good agreement between the results of simulation and practical dosimetry, confirms the applicability of Monte Carlo method in determining the dosimetric parameters of electron beam  intraoperative radiotherapy

  18. Radiotherapy for ocular lesions by electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaishi, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    Radiotherapy can be very significant as the treatment for ocular lesions, eyes need to be preserved as properly as possible on their functions and cosmetics. The appliance of conventional X ray therapy has been gradually abandaned as conventional X ray therapy ceased to be accepted as the general treatment for malignant tumors. Consequently the necessity of electron beam therapy has been rising even as the substituted method for conventional X ray therapy. The department of radiology of Gunma University was obliged to establish a new therapy for ocular lesions, and has been trying electron beam therapy since 1973; It is concluded that electron beam therapy is not at all inferior to conventional X ray therapy as reported above. Basic therapeutic methods for ocular lesions are the following: 1) For epidermoid carcinoma, 600 rads at a time, 3600 - 4200 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 2) For malignant melanoma, 1000 rads at a time, 4000 - 5000 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 3) For orbitar lymphoid neoplasm, Cobalt-60 γ ray or Linac X ray is applied together with electron beam. 4) For embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, adenoid cystic cancer etc., the therapy for whole body is necessary. 5) For benign tumors, a small dose at a time is applied for a long time. (author)

  19. The role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma invading the trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Sik [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the effect of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on local failure-free survival rate (LFFS) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) invading the trachea. Fifty-six patients with locally advanced PTC invading the trachea were treated with surgical resection. After surgery, 21 patients received adjuvant EBRT and radioactive iodine therapy (EBRT group) and 35 patients were treated with radioactive iodine therapy (control group). The age range was 26–87 years (median, 56 years). The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 4 to 145 months). EBRT doses ranged from 50.4 to 66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Esophagus invasion and gross residual disease was more frequent in the EBRT group. In the control group, local recurrence developed in 9 (9/35, 26%) and new distant metastasis in 2 (2/35, 6%) patients, occurring 4 to 68 months (median, 37 months) and 53 to 68 months (median, 60 months) after surgery, respectively. Two patients had simultaneous local recurrence and new distant metastasis. There was one local failure in the EBRT group at 18 months after surgery (1/21, 5%). The 5-year LFFS was 95% in the EBRT group and 63% in the control group (p = 0.103). In the EBRT group, one late grade 2 xerostomia was developed. Although, EBRT group had a higher incidence of esophagus invasion and gross residual disease, EBRT group showed a better 5-year LFFS. Adjuvant EBRT may have contributed to the better LFFS in these patients.

  20. Performance of EPI diodes as dosimeters for photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Thais C. dos; Bizetto, Cesar A., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves-Junior, Wellington F.P.; Haddad, Cecilia M.K. [Hospital Sirio Libanes (HSL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results about the performance of an epitaxial (EPI) diode as on-line dosimeter for photon beam radiotherapy. The diode used was processed at University of Hamburg on n-type 75 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon layer grown on a highly doped n-type 300 {mu}m thick Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrate. The measurements were performed with a diode which not received any type of pre-dose. In order to use this device as a dosimeter, it was enclosed in a black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probe. The diode was connected to an electrometer Keithley 6517B in the photovoltaic mode. During all measurements, the diode was held between PMMA plates, placed at 10.0 cm depth and centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. The short-term repeatability was measured with photon beams of 6 and 18 MV energy by registering five consecutive current signals for the same radiation dose. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diode, characterized by a smallest coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.21%. Furthermore, the dose-response curves of the diode were quite linear with the highest charge sensitivity achieved of 5.0 {mu}C/Gy. It worth noting that still remains to be investigated the pre-dose influence on epitaxial silicon diode response in radiotherapy photon beam dosimetry, the long term stability and the radiation hardness of these diodes for absorbed doses higher than that investigated in this work. All these studies are under way. (author)

  1. Introduction of beam flatness filter for 60Co teletherapy beam and its efficacy in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravichandran, R.; Ravikumar, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the western countries cobalt-60 machines have become obsolete, whereas in India we have about 250 machines operational for clinical radiotherapy. The basic differences of 6 MV x-ray beam and cobalt-60 beam are: a) build-up d max point, b) flatness of beam at depths, and c) sharpness of the beam edge. We looked at the homogeneity of delivered dose in the target volume in a 3 field SAD technique for 60 Co (80 cm, 100 cm) and 6 MV treatments. More dose variations are seen in 60 Co treated volume. The excess curvature of isodose curves of 60 Co at depths may be one of the reasons for this inhomogeneity in dose to target volume. Therefore, there is need for achieving perfect flatness in the isodose curves at desired depths. A flattening filter was fabricated using dental wax impression material to account for depths of curvature of 50% 60 Co isodose curve. The filter was fabricated for the Theratron 780C machine for necessary flatness. The beam flatness with filter was measured with a) ionization and b) TL dosimetry methods. The flattened beam profile was compared with 6 MV x-ray beam (Clinac-1800, M/s Varian, USA). Our measurements show uniform flatness of cobalt-60 isodose curve at desired depth and useful radiation field width comparable to 6 MV x-ray photon profile at full width at half maximum (FWHM). If this concept is extendable to short field widths, it appears that there is scope for use of such filter in the treatments of oesophagus, larynx, and pituitary tumours to achieve dose homogeneity. Using this flatness filter and penumbra trimmer, we may achieve better quality cobalt-60 beam for radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery - a comparative effectiveness research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Stefanie; Niyazi, Maximilian; Niemoeller, Olivier M; Li, Minglun; Roeder, Falk; Eckel, Renate; Schubert-Fritschle, Gabriele; Scheithauer, Heike R; Harbeck, Nadia; Engel, Jutta; Belka, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective outcome study was to validate the effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy (BCT) and to evaluate possible causes for omission of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) in a non-trial population. Data were provided by the population-based Munich Cancer Registry. The study included epidemiological data of 30.811 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2012. The effect of omitting radiotherapy was analysed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression. Variables predicting omission of radiotherapy were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Use of postoperative radiotherapy after BCS was associated with significant improvements in local control and survival. 10-year loco-regional recurrence-free-survival was 90.8% with postoperative radiotherapy vs. 77.6% with surgery alone (pstudy shows a decrease in local control and a survival disadvantage if postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery is omitted in an unselected cohort of primary breast cancer patients. Due to its epidemiological nature, it cannot answer the question in whom postoperative radiotherapy can be safely omitted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer (PORTEC-3) : final results of an international, open-label, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stephanie M.; Powell, Melanie E.; Mileshkin, Linda; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Bessette, Paul; Haie-Meder, Christine; Ottevanger, Petronella B.; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Khaw, Pearly; Colombo, Alessandro; Fyles, Anthony; Baron, Marie-Helene; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilson, Godfrey; Brooks, Susan; Carinelli, Silvestro; Provencher, Diane; Hanzen, Chantal; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Singh, Naveena; Do, Viet; D'Amico, Romerai; Nout, Remi A.; Feeney, Amanda; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W.; Putter, Hein; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    Background Although women with endometrial cancer generally have a favourable prognosis, those with high-risk disease features are at increased risk of recurrence. The PORTEC-3 trial was initiated to investigate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy during and after radiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy)

  4. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer (PORTEC-3) : final results of an international, open-label, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stephanie M.; Powell, Melanie E.; Mileshkin, Linda; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Bessette, Paul; Haie-Meder, Christine; Ottevanger, Petronella B.; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Khaw, Pearly; Colombo, Alessandro; Fyles, Anthony; Baron, Marie Helene; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilson, Godfrey; Brooks, Susan; Carinelli, Silvestro; Provencher, Diane; Hanzen, Chantal; Lutgens, Ludy C.H.W.; Smit, Vincent T.H.B.M.; Singh, Naveena; Do, Viet; D'Amico, Romerai; Nout, Remi A.; Feeney, Amanda; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W.; Putter, Hein; Creutzberg, Carien L.; McCormack, Mary; Whitmarsh, Karen; Allerton, Rozenn; Gregory, Deborah; Symonds, Paul; Hoskin, Peter J.; Adusumalli, Madhavi; Anand, Anjana; Wade, Robert; Stewart, Alexandra; Taylor, Wendy; Kruitwagen, Roy F.P.M.; Hollema, Harry; Pras, Elizabeth; Snyers, An; Stalpers, Lukas; Jobsen, Jan J.; Slot, Annerie; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Stam, Tanja C.; Van Triest, Baukelien; Van der Steen - Banasik, Elzbieta M.; De Winter, Karin A.J.; Quinn, Michael A.; Kolodziej, Ilka; Pyman, Jan; Johnson, Carol; Capp, Anne; Fossati, Roldano; Gribaudo, Sergio; Lissoni, Andrea A.; Ferrero, Annamaria; Artioli, Grazia; Davidson, Cathy; McLachlin, C. Meg; Ghatage, Prafull; Rittenberg, Paula V.C.; Souhami, Luis; Thomas, Gillian; Duvillard, Pierre; Berton-Rigaud, Dominique; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Background: Although women with endometrial cancer generally have a favourable prognosis, those with high-risk disease features are at increased risk of recurrence. The PORTEC-3 trial was initiated to investigate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy during and after radiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy)

  5. Isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melphalan for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma : The value of adjuvant radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssens, KMJ; van Ginkel, RJ; Pras, E; Suurmeijer, AJH; Hoekstra, HJ

    Background: The aim was to investigate the value of adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma after hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (ILP) with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melphalan followed by limb-saving surgery. Methods: From 1991 to 2003, 73 patients (median age, 54

  6. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  7. Biochemical failure after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Kato, Fumio; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Ohguri, Takayuki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biochemical failures after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 143 patients with prostate cancer (5 cases in stage A2, 95 in stage B and 43 in stage C; 18 in low risk group, 37 in intermediate risk group, 67 in high risk group and 21 in unknown group) were included in this study. Patients of stage A2 and B underwent external irradiation of 46 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle and additional 20 Gy to the prostate gland, while patients of stage C underwent external irradiation of 66 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle including 46 Gy to the pelvis. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was done in 66 cases, and long-term hormonal therapy in 75 cases; two cases were treated with radiation therapy alone. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by stage A2, B and C were 100%, 96.7% and 88.1%, respectively. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by low, intermediate and high risk groups were 100%, 92.3% and 89.7%, respectively. Biochemical failure was noted in nine cases during the average observation term of 32.2 months; in this group the median of prostate specific antigen (PSA) value was 2.6 ng/ml, the doubling time was 8.6 months, and the term of biochemical failure was 33.2 months. Six of eight cases with biochemical failure were the neoadjuvant hormonal therapy group, but biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) curve showed no significant difference between neoadjuvant and long-term hormonal groups. It is supposed that unnecessary hormonal therapies were performed based on the nonspecific diagnosis of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy in our group of patients. A precise criterion of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is necessary. (author)

  8. Bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg as adjuvant to radiotherapy in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer: Results from the randomised Early Prostate Cancer Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, Chris J [Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Payne, Heather [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom); See, William A [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); McLeod, David G [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Wirth, Manfred P [Department of Urology, Technical University of Dresden (Germany); Iversen, Peter [Department of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Armstrong, Jon [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Morris, Clive [AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Background and purpose: The ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme is assessing bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with localised or locally advanced prostate cancer (n=8113). This paper presents an exploratory analysis of the subgroup of the EPC programme who received radiotherapy with curative intent (n=1370) in order to determine the efficacy (in terms of progression-free survival [PFS]) and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg in this setting. Patients and methods: 1370 patients with T1-4, M0, any N prostate cancer received bicalutamide 150 mg or placebo adjuvant to radiotherapy of curative intent. This analysis was undertaken at median 5.3 years' follow-up. Results: In patients with locally advanced disease (n=305), bicalutamide adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly increased PFS by 53% (event-time ratio 1.53; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.16, 2.02) compared with placebo and reduced the risk of disease progression by 42% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.84; P=0.00348). In these patients, objective progression was experienced by 33.5% of those randomised to bicalutamide versus 48.6% for those randomised to placebo. The between-group difference in patients with localised disease (n=1065) failed to reach statistical significance (HR 0.80; 95% CI 0.62, 1.03; P=0.088). The most common adverse events were breast pain (74.8%) and gynaecomastia (66.6%), which were mild to moderate in >90% of cases. Conclusions: Bicalutamide 150 mg/day given as adjuvant to radiotherapy significantly improved PFS in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. For patients with localised disease, the results at this stage from the radiotherapy subgroup and the overall EPC programme suggest that adjuvant hormonal therapy is currently not appropriate. There were no unexpected tolerability findings.

  9. Simultaneous optimization of photons and electrons for mixed beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S; Fix, M K; Joosten, A; Henzen, D; Frei, D; Volken, W; Kueng, R; Aebersold, D M; Stampanoni, M F M; Manser, P

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate an inverse treatment planning process (TPP) for mixed beam radiotherapy (MBRT) capable of performing simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures. A simulated annealing based direct aperture optimization (DAO) is implemented to perform simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures, both shaped with the photon multileaf collimator (pMLC). Validated beam models are used as input for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Consideration of photon pMLC transmission during DAO and a weight re-optimization of the apertures after deliverable dose calculation are utilized to efficiently reduce the differences between optimized and deliverable dose distributions. The TPP for MBRT is evaluated for an academic situation with a superficial and an enlarged PTV in the depth, a left chest wall case including the internal mammary chain and a squamous cell carcinoma case. Deliverable dose distributions of MBRT plans are compared to those of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), photon IMRT and if available to those of clinical VMAT plans. The generated MBRT plans dosimetrically outperform the MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans for all investigated situations. For the clinical cases of the left chest wall and the squamous cell carcinoma, the MBRT plans cover the PTV similarly or more homogeneously than the VMAT plans, while OARs are spared considerably better with average reductions of the mean dose to parallel OARs and D 2% to serial OARs by 54% and 26%, respectively. Moreover, the low dose bath expressed as V 10% to normal tissue is substantially reduced by up to 45% compared to the VMAT plans. A TPP for MBRT including simultaneous optimization is successfully implemented and the dosimetric superiority of MBRT plans over MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans is demonstrated for academic and clinical situations including superficial targets with and without deep-seated part.

  10. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  11. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Random iced for Adjuvant Chemotherapy vs. Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do

    1993-01-01

    Since Jan. 1991 a prospective randomized study for Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) has been conducted to evaluate the response rate and tolerance of induction chemotherapy with MVP followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of maintenance chemotherapy in Asan Medical Center. All patients in this study were treated with hypefractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID, 0480 cGy/54 fx) following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy, MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m2, Vinblastin B mg/ m2, Cisplatin 60 Mg/ m2) and then the partial and complete responders from induction chemotherapy were randomized to 3 cycles of adjuvant MVP chemotherapy group and observation group. 48 patients were registered to this study until December 1992; among 48 patients 3 refused further treatment after induction chemotherapy and 6 received incomplete radiation therapy because of patient refusal, 39 completed planned therapy. Twenty-three(58%) patients including 2 complete responders showed response from induction chemotherapy. Among the 21 patients who achieved a partial response after induction chemotherapy, 1 patient rendered complete clearance of disease and 10 patients showed further regression of tumor following hypefractionated radiotherapy. Remaining 10 patients showed stable disease or progression after radiotherapy. Of the sixteen patients judged to have stable disease or progression after induction chemotherapy, seven showed more than partial remission after radiotherapy but nine showed no response in spite of radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients who completed induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 25 patients(64%) including 3 complete responders showed more than partial remission. Nineteen patients were randomized after radiotherapy. Nine patients were allocated to adjuvant chemotherapy group and 4/9 shewed further regression of tumor after adjuvant chemotherapy. For the time being, there is no suggestion of a difference between the adjuvant

  12. Multiple Cutaneous Angiosarcomas after Breast Conserving Surgery and Bilateral Adjuvant Radiotherapy: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast angiosarcomas (BAs are rare but serious events that may arise after radiation exposure. Disease outcome is poor, with high risk of local and distant failure. Recurrences are frequent also after resection with negative margins. The spectrum of vascular proliferations associated with radiotherapy in the setting of breast cancer has expanded, including radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions (AVLs of the breast skin as a rare, but well-recognized, entity. Although pursuing a benign behavior, AVLs have been regarded as possible precursors of postradiation BAs. We report an unusual case of a 71-year-old woman affected by well-differentiated bilateral cutaneous BA, diagnosed 1.9 years after adjuvant RT for synchronous bilateral breast cancer. Whole-life clinical followup is of crucial importance in breast cancer patients.

  13. Preclinical studies on the use of medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum as an adjuvant in radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopakumar, G.; Martin, Femy; Antony, Sherin K.; Pillai, Thulasi G.; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an extract of Ganoderma lucidum occurring in South India possesses significant radioprotective property ex vivo. The present study describes the in vivo radioprotection of normal cells in tumour-bearing mice exposed to gamma radiation. Oral administration of G. lucidum extract (GLE) to tumour-bearing Swiss albino mice along with exposure to gamma radiation resulted in tumour regression. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) on cells of normal and tumour tissues from tumour-bearing animals treated with GEE and radiation, revealed that there was significant reduction in radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA in normal tissues compared to the tumour, indicating preferential protection to normal tissues. The findings suggest the potential use of this mushroom extract as an adjuvant in radiotherapy, for tumour regression and prevention of radiation-induced cellular damages in normal tissues. (author)

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy in stage 1 seminoma: Evaluation of prognostic factors and results of survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasif Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Adjuvant RT resulted in excellent long-term survival and local control in patients with stage-1 seminoma after orchiectomy. During a short follow-up, secondary malignancy (SM and late cardiovascular morbidity were not observed. Despite those results, concern of SM and late cardiovascular morbidity remains.

  15. Breast conserving treatment of breast carcinoma T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy, high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, external beam radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: local control and overall survival analysis; Tratamento conservador do cancer de mama T2 ({<=} 4 cm) e T3 por quimioterapia neoadjuvante, quadrantectomia, braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose como reforco de dose, teleterapia complementar e quimioterapia adjuvante: analise de controle local e sobrevida global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Celia Regina; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Baraldi, Helena Espindola; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: celiarsoares@terra.com.br; Fristachi, Carlos Elias [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Onco-Ginecologia e Mastologia; Paes, Roberto Pinto [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering local control and overall survival. Material and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 88 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIb and IIIa, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, treated from June/1995 to December/2006. Median follow-up was 58 months. Using clinical methods the tumor was evaluated before and after three or four cycles of chemotherapy based on anthracyclines. Overall survival and local control were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: Local control and overall survival in five years were 90% and 73.5%, respectively. Conclusion: local control and overall survival were comparable to other forms of treatment. (author)

  16. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  17. Fluorouracil and high-dose leucovorin with radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giralt, J. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Rubio, D. [Medical Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Maldonado, X. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Naval, J. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Casado, S. [Medical Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Lara, F. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Rosello, J.M. [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Armengol, M. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fluorouracil and high-dose leucovorin (5-FU/LV) with pelvic irradiation as adjuvant therapy for patients with macroscopical resected rectal or recto-sigmoid cancer. Following surgery for stages II-III primary (52) or recurrent rectal cancer (4), 56 patients received 8 cycles of 5-FU/LV and pelvic irradiation. 5-FU doses were 200 mgr/m{sup 2} for cycles 2-3 and 300 mgr/m{sup 2} for cycles 1 and 4-8. LV doses remained fixed at 200 mgr/m{sup 2}. Pelvic radiation was started in the third week, between the first and second cycle. The total dose was 50.4 Gy. No serve complications had been recorded. The incidence of grade 3 diarrhea was 19%. Three patients presented leukopenia grade 3 (5%). In 44 patients (78%) the planned treatment could be administered. The median follow-up was 40 months (range 22-66). Seven patients had a local relapse (13%) and 6 developed distant metastasis (10%). The 3-year disease-free survival was 72% and the overall survival was 76%. These preliminary results show that combined post-operative 5-FU/LV and pelvic radiotherapy are well tolerated and present a reasonable local control and survival rates. This adjuvant treatment should be evaluated in randomized trials. (orig.).

  18. Definite vs adjuvant radiotherapy. Comparative effects on lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.T.; Amendola, B.E.; Diaz, R.; Lovett, E.J. III; Hammerschmidt, R.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent association of alterations in T-lymphocyte subpopulations and impaired cellular immunity prompted an investigation of the effects of radiotherapy (RT) on serial levels of lymphocyte subsets in 30 patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma. Percentage and absolute levels of T3, T4, T6, T8, T10, T11, and Leu 7 cells were measured before, during, and after RT at monthly intervals for six months and compared with levels in 40 normal subjects. Sixteen patients received curative and 14 postoperative adjuvant RT. Before treatment, mean subset levels were similar among the patient and normal groups except for elevated Leu 7 (natural killer) cells in patients with stage I and II disease. There were profound decreases in absolute levels of each subpopulation during and after RT. The percentage of T4 (helper/inducer) cells decreased, whereas that of T8 (cytotoxic/suppressor) and Leu 7 cells tended to increase. Compared with normal values, the mean T4/T8 ratio decreased significantly by six months after RT, when absolute levels of the subsets had rebounded to pretreatment levels in the definitive RT group but remained profoundly decreased in the adjuvant group. The differing recovery patterns suggest that factors other than RT may contribute to persistent immunosuppression following RT

  19. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Minniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Caporello, Paola [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurosurgery, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Arcella, Antonella [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Giangaspero, Felice [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Department of Pathology, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Raut, Nirmal; Arora, Brijesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Dutta, Debnarayan; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Kurkure, Purna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present outcome data in a prospective study of radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed DIPGs were prospectively treated with focal RT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions along with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m 2 , Days 1-42). Four weeks after completing the initial RT-TMZ schedule, adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m 2 , Days 1-5) was given every 28 days to a maximum of 12 cycles. Response was evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. Results: Between March 2005 and November 2006, 20 children (mean age, 8.3 years) were accrued. Eighteen patients have died from disease progression, one patient is alive with progressive disease, and one patient is alive with stable disease. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.15 months and 6.9 months, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity during the concurrent RT-TMZ phase included thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, leucopenia in 2, and vomiting in 7. Transient Grade II skin toxicity developed in the irradiated fields in 18 patients. During the adjuvant TMZ phase, Grade III/IV leucopenia developed in 2 patients and Grade IV thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. Patients with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of a high-grade tumor had worse survival than those with a low-grade tumor (p = 0.001). Patients with neurologic improvement after RT-TMZ had significantly better survival than those who did not (p = 0.048). Conclusions: TMZ with RT has not yielded any improvement in the outcome of DIPG compared with RT alone. Further clinical trials should explore novel treatment modalities.

  1. Influence of site on the therapeutic ratio of adjuvant radiotherapy in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alektiar, Kaled M.; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to improve the therapeutic ratio by increasing local control while minimizing morbidity. Most efforts in trying to improve this ratio have focused on the sequencing of RT and surgery, with little attention to the potential influence of the tumor site. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of tumor site on local control and complications in a group of patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity treated at a single institution with postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: Between July 1982 and December 2000, 369 adult patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity were treated with limb-sparing surgery and postoperative RT. Patients who underwent surgery or RT outside our institution were excluded. The tumor site was the upper extremity (UE) in 103 (28%) and the lower extremity (LE) in 266 (72%). The tumor was ≤5 cm in 98 patients (27%), and the microscopic margins were positive in 44 (12%). Of the 369 patients, 104 (28%) underwent postoperative external beam RT (EBRT), 233 (63%) postoperative brachytherapy (BRT), and 32 underwent a combination (9%); 325 (88%) received a 'conventional' radiation dose, defined as 60-70 Gy for EBRT, 45 Gy for BRT, and 45-50 Gy plus 15-20 Gy for EBRT plus BRT. Complications were assessed in terms of wound complications requiring repeat surgery, fracture, joint stiffness, edema, and Grade 3 or worse peripheral nerve damage. Results: The UE and LE groups were balanced with regard to age, depth, margin status, and type of RT (EBRT vs. BRT ± EBRT). However, more patients in the UE group had tumors ≤5 cm and more received a conventional radiation dose (p = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). With a median follow-up of 50 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control, distant relapse-free survival, and overall survival for the whole population was 82% (95% confidence

  2. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, A Yuriko; Hsu, Annie; La, Trang; Kunz, Pamela; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A; Visser, Brendan; Goodman, Karyn A; Koong, Albert C; Chang, Daniel T

    2010-08-15

    The current study was performed to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Fifty-seven patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer were treated postoperatively: 26 with 3D CRT and 31 with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was capecitabine (n=31), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n=25), or none (n=1). The median radiation dose was 45 Gy. Dose volume histogram parameters for kidney and liver were compared between treatment groups. The 2-year overall survival rates for 3D CRT versus IMRT were 51% and 65%, respectively (P=.5). Four locoregional failures occurred each in the 3D CRT (15%) and the IMRT (13%) patients. Grade>or=2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was found to be similar between the 3D CRT and IMRT patients (61.5% vs 61.2%, respectively) but more treatment breaks were needed (3 vs 0, respectively). The median serum creatinine from before radiotherapy to most recent creatinine was unchanged in the IMRT group (0.80 mg/dL) but increased in the 3D CRT group from 0.80 mg/dL to 1.0 mg/dL (P=.02). The median kidney mean dose was higher in the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (13.9 Gy vs 11.1 Gy; P=.05). The median kidney V20 was lower for the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (17.5% vs 22%; P=.17). The median liver mean dose for IMRT and 3D CRT was 13.6 Gy and 18.6 Gy, respectively (P=.19). The median liver V30 was 16.1% and 28%, respectively (PCancer Society.

  3. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 β-estradiol (E 2 ) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E 2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E 2 , 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  4. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  5. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  6. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H. [Universidad de la Frontera, Centro de Fisica e Ingenieria en Medicina, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Velasquez, J. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Zelada, G. [Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Av. Vitacura 5951, 13132 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Astudillo, R., E-mail: rodolfo.figueroa@ufrontera.cl [Hospital Base de Valdivia, C. Simpson 850, XIV Region de los Rios, Valdivia (Chile)

    2017-10-15

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  7. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H.; Velasquez, J.; Zelada, G.; Astudillo, R.

    2017-10-01

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  8. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologic stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Ten-year update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy (RT) following radical prostatectomy (RP) in a group of patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate followed for a median of 10 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1983, 159 patients underwent RP for newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the prostate and were found to have pathologic Stage T3/4 tumors. Forty-six received adjuvant RT and 113 did not. Radiotherapy usually consisted of 45-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to the prostate bed of 10-15 Gy, to a total dose of 55-65 Gy. Patients were analyzed with respect to survival, disease-free survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastases. A rising prostate-specific antigen in the absence of other evidence of relapse was scored as a separate category of recurrence. Results: Both groups of patients have been followed for a median of 10 years. The actuarial survival at 10 and 15 years was 62% and 62% for the RT group compared to 52% and 37%, respectively, for the RP group (p = 0.18). The disease-free survival for the RT group was 55% and 48% at 10 and 15 years, respectively, compared to 37% and 33% for the RP group (p = 0.16). Similarly, there was no difference in the rate of distant metastases between the two groups. In contrast, the local relapse rate was significantly reduced by the addition of postoperative radiotherapy. The actuarial local control rate at 10 and 15 years was 92% and 82%, respectively, for the RT group vs. 60% and 53% for the RP group (p 0.002). Conclusions: While postoperative pelvic RT significantly improves local control compared to RP alone for pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer, it has no impact on distant metastases and consequently does not improve survival. These data are consistent with the conclusion that many patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer have occult metastases at presentation and will not be cured by local therapies alone

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  10. Hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma and other primitive neuroectodermal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Jeffrey C.; Donahue, Bernadine; DaRosso, Robert; Nirenberg, Anita

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This single-institution Phase I/II study conducted from 1989 to 1995 evaluates the feasibility of a multi-modality protocol combining hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (HFRT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in 23 patients with newly diagnosed primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising in the central nervous system. Methods and Materials: All 23 patients had a histologically confirmed PNET and were over 3 years of age at diagnosis. The eligibility criteria for PNET patients with cerebellar primaries (medulloblastoma) included either a high T stage (T3b or 4) or high M stage (M1-3). All patients with noncerebellar primaries were eligible regardless of T or M stage. The median age of the 23 patients was 9 years (mean 3-25); 11 were female. The primary tumor arose in the cerebellum in 19. Of these medulloblastoma patients, 15 had high T stages (T3b or T4) with large locally invasive tumors and no evidence of metastases (M0), constituting Group 1. Thirteen (86%) of these patients had gross total resections. Four other medulloblastoma patients had both high T and high M stages, constituting Group 2. Group 3 consisted of four other patients with exocerebellar primaries (two brain, one brain stem, and one cauda equina), three of whom were M3. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered within 4 weeks of surgery. Twice-daily 1-Gy fractions were administered separated by 4-6 h. The total dose to the primary intracranial tumor and other areas of measurable intracranial disease was 72 Gy. The prophylactic craniospinal axis dose was 36 Gy, and boosts of 44-56 Gy were administered to metastatic spinal deposits. Following radiotherapy, monthly courses of multiagent chemotherapy were administered sequentially (cyclophosphamide-vincristine followed by cisplatin-etoposide followed by carboplatin-vincristine) for a total of 9 months. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy as planned. Only three patients lost >10% of their body weight. One patient

  11. Risk analysis factors for local recurrence in Ewing's sarcoma: when should adjuvant radiotherapy be administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergo, J I; Gaston, C L L; Parry, M C; Laitinen, M K; Jeys, L M; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A T; Grimer, R J

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse a group of patients with non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma at presentation and identify prognostic factors affecting the development of local recurrence, in order to assess the role of radiotherapy. A retrospective review of all patients with a Ewing's sarcoma treated between 1980 and 2012 was carried out. Only those treated with chemotherapy followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy were included. Patients were grouped according to site (central or limb) for further analysis of the prognostic factors. A total of 388 patients were included in the study. Of these, 60 (15%) developed local recurrence at a mean median of 27 months (sd 24, range 7 to 150) and the five-year local recurrence-free survival (5yrLRFS) was 83%. For central tumours, the size of the tumour and histological response to chemotherapy were found to be significant factors for local recurrence. For limb tumours, local recurrence was affected by intralesional and marginal resections, but not by the histological response to chemotherapy. Radiotherapy in those with a marginal resection reduced the risk of local recurrence (5yrLRFS: 96% versus 81%, p = 0.044). Local recurrence significantly affects the overall survival in patients with a Ewing's sarcoma. For those with a tumour in a limb, radiotherapy reduced the risk of local recurrence, especially in those with a marginal margin of excision, but the effect in central tumours was less clear. Radiotherapy for those who have had a wide margin of resection does not reduce the risk of local recurrence, regardless of the histological response to chemotherapy. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B: 247-55. ©2018 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Postoperative adjuvant MVP Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Since February 1991, a prospective study for non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent radical resection and had a risk factor of positive resection margin or regional lymph node metastasis has been conducted to evaluated the effect of MVP chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the pattern of failure, disease free and overall survival, and tolerance of combined treatment. Materials and Methods : Twenty nine patients were registered to this study until Sep. 1993 ; of these 26 received planned therapy. Within 3 weeks after radical resection, two cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 ) chemotherapy was given with 4 weeks intervals. Radiotherapy (5040 cGy tumor bed dose and 900 cGy boost to high risk area) was started 3 to 4 weeks after chemotherapy. Results : One and two year overall survival rates were 76.5% and 8.6% respectively. Locoregional failure developed in 6 patients (23.1%) and distant failure in 9 patients(34.6%). Number of involved lymph nodes, resection margin positivity showed some correlation with failure pattern but T-stage and N-stage showed no statistical significance. The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. Postoperative combined therapy were well tolerated without definite increase of complication rate, and compliance rate in this study was 90%. Conclusion : 1) MVP chemotherapy showed no effect on locoregional recurrence, ut appeared to decrease the distant metastasis rate and 2) combined treatments were well tolerated in all patients. 3) The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. 4) Addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy failed to increase the overall or disease free survival

  13. Beam shaping for conformal fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: a modeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Fred L.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Bellerive, Marc R.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Leber, Zachary H.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The patient population treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is significantly different than that treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Generally, lesions treated with SRT are larger, less spherical, and located within critical regions of the central nervous system; hence, they offer new challenges to the treatment planner. Here a simple, cost effective, beam shaping system has been evaluated relative to both circular collimators and an ideal dynamically conforming system for effectiveness in providing conformal therapy for these lesions. Methods and Materials: We have modeled a simple system for conformal arc therapy using four independent jaws. The jaw positions and collimator angle are changed between arcs but held fixed for the duration of each arc. Eleven previously treated SRT cases have been replanned using this system. The rectangular jaw plans were then compared to the original treatment plans which used circular collimators. The plans were evaluated with respect to tissue sparing at 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. A plan was also done for each tumor in which the beam aperture was continuously conformed to the beams eye view projection of the tumor. This was used as an ideal standard for conformal therapy in the absence of fluence modulation. Results: For tumors with a maximum extent of over 3.5 cm the rectangular jaw plans reduced the mean volume of healthy tissue involved at the prescription dose by 57% relative to the circular collimator plans. The ideal conformal plans offered no significant further improvement at the prescription dose. The relative advantage of the rectangular jaw plans decreased at lower isodoses so that at 20% of the prescription dose tissue involvement for the rectangular jaw plans was equivalent to that for the circular collimator plans. At these isodoses the ideal conformal plans gave substantially better tissue sparing. Conclusion: A simple and economical field shaping

  14. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and external-beam radiotherapy versus external-beam irradiation alone for prostate cancer. A quality-of-life analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Fischedick, Karin; Siluschek, Jaroslav; Kehl, Mareike; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) on quality of life after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A group of 170 patients (85 with and 85 without NHT) has been surveyed prospectively before EBRT (70.2-72 Gy), at the last day of EBRT, a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Pairs with and without NHT (median treatment time of 3.5 months before EBRT) were matched according to the respective planning target volume and prostate volume. Before EBRT, significantly lower urinary function/bother, sexual function and hormonal function/bother scores were found for patients with NHT. More than 1 year after EBRT, only sexual function scores remained lower. In a multivariate analysis, NHT and adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) versus NHT only (hazard ratio 14; 95% confidence interval 2.7-183; p = 0.02) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists versus antiandrogens (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.1-12; p = 0.04) proved to be independent risk factors for long-term erectile dysfunction (no or very poor ability to have an erection). With the exception of sexual function (additional adjuvant HT and application of LHRH analog independently adverse), short-term NHT was not found to decrease quality of life after EBRT for prostate cancer. (orig.)

  15. DOSE-ESCALATED EXTERNAL BEAM RADIOTHERAPY DURING HORMONO-RADIOTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The introduction of modern technologies of conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT into clinical practice for the treatment of prostate cancer requires proper quality assurance measures as well as a careful analysis of both the efficacy and toxicity data of treatments. The purpose of this study was to inves- tigate tolerance and the immediate efficacy of conformal dose-escalated EBRT during hormono-radiotherapy for prostate cancer. material and methods. The study involved 156 prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT. Among them, 30 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, and in 126 patients the total dose was esca- lated to 72-76 Gy (median total dose - 74.0 Gy. Fifty-nine patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Results. The prescribed course of treatment was completed in all the patients with prostate cancer. Acute radiation-induced bladder reactions (RTOG were observed in 50 (32.1 % patients, of whom 48 (30.8 % experienced grade I reactions, and 2 (1.3 % experienced grade II reactions. Eighteen (11.5 % patients had radiation-induced rectum reactions, not above grade I. The development of grade II dysuric phenomena necessitated treatment interruption only in two patients. Of 9 (5.8 % patients who had late bladder complica- tions (RTOG/EORTC, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and one (0.6 % patient developed grade II complications. Of 11 (7.1 % patients who had rectum complications, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and 3 (1.9 % patients developed grade II complications. No patients experienced the increase in toxicity of treatment during dose escalation up to a total dose exceeding 70 Gy. During the follow-up period, only one patient developed recurrent disease. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest acceptable levels of toxicity following a continuous course of dose-escalated EBRT given in conjunction with hormono-radiotherapy to prostate cancer patients. Further

  16. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, John R.; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT TM ). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT TM algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point

  17. Assessment of the role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant in the treatment of osteosarcomas of the limbs. A trial of the E. O. R. T. C. (Clinical Cooperative Group Radiotherapy/Chemotherapy) and of the S. I. O. P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Schueren, E; Breur, K; Cohen, P [Wilhelmina Gasthuis, Department of Radiotherapy, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Schweisguth, O; Voute, P A; Machin, D

    1979-07-01

    Since the majority of patients with osteosarcomas of the limbs develop lung metastases, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy are used as adjuvant therapy immediately after treatment of the primary. This article questions the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in this instance. A brief review of previous non-randomized studies is made. The overall conclusion seemed to be that although adjuvant chemotherapy resulted in a higher survival of patients with osteosarcoma, in comparison with historical controls, this form of treatment has not proven to be superior to the benefit achieved by lung irradiation. In the light of these studies, the Clinical Cooperative Group Radiotherapy/Chemotherapy (E.O.R.T.C.) and the International Society for Pediatric Oncology (S.I.O.P.) have initiated a prospective, randomized trial comparing chemotherapy, radiotherapy of the lungs and a combination of both treatments. The details of these treatments are given. This trial will try to answer very fundamental questions on adjuvant therapy in osteosarcomas. Active participation of as many medical centres as possible is requested.

  18. Randomized study: small cell anaplastic lung cancer treated by combination chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.M.; Woods, R.L.; Brodie, G.N.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    1980-01-01

    Chemotherapy and primary site radiation therapy were compared to chemotherapy alone in a randomized study of 125 patients with small cell cancer of the lung. The sites of initial relapse, as well as disease free and overall survival were analyzed. Radiotherapy to the primary site reduced the rate of local relapse, but median survival was not prolonged in patients with either limited or extensive disease, when the radiation therapy-chemotherapy group was compared to the group that received chemotherapy alone

  19. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug

  20. Does obesity hinder radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients? The implementation of new techniques in adjuvant radiotherapy – focus on obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Moszyńska-Zielińska

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of obesity in Poland and its relation to endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC is resulting in the increasing necessity of treating obese women. Treatment of an overweight patient with EEC may impede not only the surgical procedures but also radiotherapy, especially external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. The problems arise both during treatment planning and when delivering each fraction due to the difficulty of positioning such a patient – it implies the danger of underdosing targets and overdosing organs at risk. Willingness to use dynamic techniques in radiation oncology has increased for patients with EEC, even those who are obese. During EBRT careful daily verification is necessary for both safety and treatment accuracy. The most accurate method of verification is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT with soft tissue assessment, although it is time consuming and often requires a radiation oncologist. In order to improve the quality of such treatment, the authors present the practical aspects of planning and treatment itself by means of dynamic techniques in EBRT. The authors indicate the advantages and disadvantages of different types of on-board imaging (OBI verification images. Considering the scanty amount of literature in this field, it is necessary to conduct further research in order to highlight proper planning and treatment of obese endometrial cancer patients. The review of the literature shows that all centres that wish to use EBRT for gynaecological tumours should develop their own protocols on qualification, planning the treatment and methods of verifying the patients’ positioning.

  1. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  2. Evaluation of beam wobbling methods for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Takei, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Koikegami, Hajime; Tomita, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has extensively studied carbon-ion radiotherapy at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with some positive outcomes, and has established its efficacy. Therefore, efforts to distribute the therapy to the general public should be made, for which it is essential to enable direct application of clinical and technological experiences obtained at NIRS. For widespread use, it is very important to reduce the cost through facility downsizing with minimal acceleration energy to deliver the HIMAC-equivalent clinical beams. For the beam delivery system, the requirement of miniaturization is translated to reduction in length while maintaining the clinically available field size and penetration range for range-modulated uniform broad beams of regular fields that are either circular or square for simplicity. In this paper, we evaluate the various wobbling methods including original improvements, especially for application to the compact facilities through the experimental and computational studies. The single-ring wobbling method used at HIMAC is the best one including a lot of experience at HIMAC but the residual range is a fatal problem in the case of a compact facility. On the other hand, uniform wobbling methods such as the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods are effective and suitable for a compact facility. Furthermore, these methods can be applied for treatment with passive range modulation including respiratory gated irradiation. In theory, the choice between the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods depends on the shape of the required irradiation field. However, we found that it is better to use the zigzag wobbling method with transformation of the wobbling pattern even when a circular uniform irradiation field is required, because it is difficult to maintain the stability of the wobbler magnet due to the rapid change of the wobbler current in the spiral wobbling method. The regulated wobbling method

  3. Therapeutic options and postoperative wound complications after extremity soft tissue sarcoma resection and postoperative external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouarab, Mohamed H; Salem, Iman L; Degheidy, Magdy M; Henn, Dominic; Hirche, Christoph; Eweida, Ahmad; Uhl, Matthias; Kneser, Ulrich; Kremer, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas occur most commonly in the lower and upper extremities. The standard treatment is limb salvage surgery combined with radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is associated with wound complications. This systematic review aims to summarise the available evidence and review the literature of the last 10 years regarding postoperative wound complications in patients who had limb salvage surgical excision followed by direct closure vs flap coverage together with postoperative radiotherapy and to define the optimal timeframe for adjuvant radiotherapy after soft tissue sarcomas resection and flap reconstruction. A literature search was performed using PubMed. The following keywords were searched: limb salvage, limb-sparing, flaps, radiation therapy, radiation, irradiation, adjuvant radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, radiation effects, wound healing, surgical wound infection, surgical wound dehiscence, wound healing, soft tissue sarcoma and neoplasms. In total, 1045 papers were retrieved. Thirty-seven articles were finally selected after screening of abstracts and applying dates and language filters and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Plastic surgery provides a vast number of reconstructive flap procedures that are directly linked to decreasing wound complications, especially with the expectant postoperative radiotherapy. This adjuvant radiotherapy is better administered in the first 3-6 weeks after reconstruction to allow timely wound healing and avoid local recurrence. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamberger, R.C. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD); Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 ..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E/sub 2/ (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E/sub 2/, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  5. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  6. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods: Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  7. Comparison of radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in colon cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, R.R.; Wong, J.F.C.; Kuhn, J.A.; Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D.; Wanek, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy were compared in a nude mouse human colon cancer model. Radioimmunotherapy was delivered by intraperitoneal injection of 90 Y-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-CEA MAB). Single fraction external beam radiotherapy was delivered using a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Control groups received saline, unlabeled anit-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody. Tumor growth suppression was expressed as delay to reach 2g compared to saline controls. Unlabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody had no effect. External beam radiotherapy of 300, 600, 1000 and 2000 cGy produced growth delays of 3, 12, 17, and 22 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy with 120 μCi, 175 μCi, and 225 μCi resulted in growth delays of 20, 34, and 36 days. Estimated absorbed tumor dose was 1750 cGy in the 120 μCi group. Similar comparisons were done with the more radioresistant WiDr human colon carcinoma cell line. External beam radiotherapy doses of 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 cGy resulted in growth delays of 6, 21, 36 and 48 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy of 120 μCi and 175 μCi resulted in growth delays of 9 and 19 days, respectively. The 120 μCi dose delivered an estimated absorbed tumor dose of 1080 cGy to WiDr tumors. In summary, for the radiosensitive LS174T line, radioimmunotherapy produced biologic effects that were comparable to a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. For the more radioresistant WiDr tumor, radioimmunotherapy produced a biologic effect which was less than a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. These studies suggest that a tumor's response to radioimmunotherapy relative to that of external beam radiotherapy is, in part, dependent on tumor radiosensitivity and repair capacity. 23 refs., 5 figs. 4 tabs

  8. The ESTRO-EQUAL quality assurance network for photon and electron radiotherapy beams in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, I.H.; Dutreix, A.; Richter, J.; Bridier, A.; Chavaudra, J.; Svensson, H.

    2001-01-01

    Background: In 1998 an ESTRO Quality Assurance Network for radiotherapy (EQUAL) has been set up for 25 European countries for photon and electron beams in reference and non-reference conditions. Material and Methods: Measurements are done using LiF powder (DTL937-Philitech, France) that is processed with the PCL3 automatic reader (Fimel-PTW). The participating centers irradiate the TLDs with an absorbed dose of 2 Gy according to the clinical routine. Results: Until September 2000 EQUAL has checked 135 photon beams (including the beams rechecked) from 51 radiotherapy centers in Germany out of 86 accepted centers. The results show that 2% of the beam outputs in reference conditions and 3% of the percentage depth doses are outside the tolerance level (deviation > ± 5%). 6% of the beam output variations and of the wedge transmission factors show deviations > ± 5%. The global analysis of results shows deviations > ± 5% in at least one parameter for 18 beams out of the 135 beams checked. Five rechecked beams present one ''real dosimetric'' problem in one or more parameters, corresponding to 4% of the 114 beams for which the deviations cannot be attributed to set-up errors. - The EQUAL network has checked 89 electron beams in Germany. The results show that all beam outputs checked are within the tolerance level. The standard deviation for the beam output in reference conditions is 2.0% and 2.2% for the beam output for the others field sizes. The percentage of deviations > 3% and ≤ 5% for the reference beam output is higher for electron beams than for photon beam checks. Therefore the electron beam calibration and the TPS algorithms should be improved to increase the accuracy of the patient dosimetry for radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy for uterine papillary serous carcinoma: Whole abdominopelvic or pelvic irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, W.; Chen, Y.; DuBeshter, B.; Angel, C.; Dawson, A.; Smudzin, T.; Rubin, P.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The optimum adjuvant therapy for uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC), a rare but clinically aggressive histologic variant of endometrial carcinoma, is a controversial issue. UPSC behaves in a pattern that resembles the papillary serous carcinoma of the ovary with a tendency to spread to the peritoneal surfaces. Whole abdominopelvic irradiation (WAI) has been advocated but it remains unclear if adjuvant pelvic irradiation alone is sufficient for early stage UPSC. We reviewed our experience in the adjuvant radiation treatment for UPSC treated at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between 1985 and 1995, a series of 351 cases of endometrial carcinoma were referred to the department of Radiation Oncology. There were a total of 26 UPSC cases with 25 medical records available for review. Except for one case which received irradiation alone, the remaining 24 cases were all surgically staged with TAH/BSO. These patients were treated with WAI or pelvic irradiation with or without a vaginal cuff boost using brachytherapy. The irradiation treatment fields, dose, the local/regional and distant disease status at last follow-up were recorded. The medium follow-up interval was four years with a range of one to eight years. Kaplan-Meier plots for disease specific survival and local/regional disease free survival were obtained. Results: Of the 25 surgically staged UPSC patients, the stage distribution was as follows: 9 stage I, 4 stage II, 10 stage III, and 2 stage IVB. Twelve patients received WAI (4 stage I disease, and 8 stage III disease), while the remaining patients were treated with pelvic irradiation (XRT). 1.) 13 patients were alive without disease and 3 were alive with disease. Seven patients died of either distant metastasis or abdominal recurrence and two died of intercurrent disease (5 year disease specific survival for the whole group was 43%). Two of 17 patients with stages IIIA and below vs. five of 8 patients with stages IIIB and above died of

  10. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  11. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazekas, J.T.; Sommer, C.; Kramer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage

  12. Adjuvant sequential chemo and radiotherapy improves the oncological outcome in high risk endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Mauro; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; De Ponti, Elena; Grassi, Tommaso; Ponti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the impact of sequential chemoradiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Two hundred fifty-four women with stage IB grade 3, II and III EC (2009 FIGO staging), were included in this retrospective study. Results Stage I, II, and III was 24%, 28.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Grade 3 tumor was 53.2% and 71.3% had deep myometrial invasion. One hundred sixty-five women (65%) underwent pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy and 58 (22.8%) had nodal metastases. Ninety-eight women (38.6%) underwent radiotherapy, 59 (23.2%) chemotherapy, 42 (16.5%) sequential chemoradiotherapy, and 55 (21.7%) were only observed. After a median follow-up of 101 months, 78 women (30.7%) relapsed and 91 women (35.8%) died. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved survival rates in women who did not undergo nodal evaluation (disease-free survival [DFS], p=0.040; overall survival [OS], p=0.024) or pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy (DFS, p=0.008; OS, p=0.021). Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved both DFS (p=0.015) and OS (p=0.014) in stage III, while only a trend was found for DFS (p=0.210) and OS (p=0.102) in stage I-II EC. In the multivariate analysis, only age (≤65 years) and sequential chemoradiotherapy were statistically related to the prognosis. Conclusion Sequential chemoradiotherapy improves survival rates in high risk EC compared with chemotherapy or radiotherapy alone, in particular in stage III. PMID:26197768

  13. Analysis of acute and late toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy in women with cervical and endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warenczak-Florczak, Z.; Roszak, A.; Wlodarczyk, H.; Wojciechowska-Lacka, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In case of pure prognostic factors women with cervical and endometrial cancer after surgical operation need to be treated with radiotherapy . Every radiation treatment may be involved with toxicity, acute and late. Material and methods: Performed was detailed analysis of 173 patients with cervical (38) and endometrial (135) cancer. We evaluated early and late post radiation reactions in all patients. Results: Acute reactions were found in 48.5% and late toxicity was found in 9.8% of patients. Women with endometrial cancer were significantly older then patients with cervical cancer (p < 0.002). Higher percentage of acute and late toxicity was observed from the bowel tah urinary tract (26% and 22.5% - acute; 8.1% and 1.73% - late). Higher percentage of acute side effects was observed in patients with cervical than with endometrial cancer (60.5% and 33.7%). Late post radiation reaction predominate also in patient with cervical cancer (13.2% and 8.9%). The adverse effects were associated with prolonged time of treatment due to breaks in radiotherapy. Higher percentage of breaks was found in older patients, more frequent in patient with endometrial than in cervical cancer group (7.4% and 2.6%).To conclude early postradiation reaction appeared more frequently, than late post radiation reactions. It was stated that early and late post radiation reaction appear more frequently in women with cervical than in endometrial cancer. Interruption in radiation delivery was longer than seven days in group with endometrial cancer that leads to extension of complete radiation treatment. (authors)

  14. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas; Lehner, Burkhard; Kasper, Bernd; Bischof, Marc; Roeder, Falk; Dietrich, Sascha; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wuchter, Patrick; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2011-12-07

    The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m(2) iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2) day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and DFS comparable to previously published

  15. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC] were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5, definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%, 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3, 24% PR (n = 12, 62% SD (n = 31 and 8% PD (n = 4. Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%. Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50, cardiac toxicity (2/50, and CNS toxicity (4/50 leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS

  16. Radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer. A multicenter trial of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Thinh, D.H.Q.; Kato, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for the treatment of N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in Asian countries, especially regions of South and Southeast Asian countries where NPC is endemic. Between 2005 and 2009, 121 patients with NPC (T1-4 N2-3 M0) were registered from Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, The Philippines, China and Bangladesh. Patients were treated with 2D radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 ), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 on Day 1) and fluorouracil (800 mg/m 2 on Days 1-5) for 3 cycles. Of the 121 patients, 56 patients (46%) required interruption of radiotherapy (RT). The reasons for interruption of RT were acute non-hematological toxicities such as mucositis, pain and dermatitis in 35 patients, hematological toxicities in 11 patients, machine break-down in 3 patients, poor general condition in 2 patients, and others in 8 patients. Of the patients, 93% completed at least 4 cycles of weekly cisplatin during radiotherapy, and 82% completed at least 2 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. With a median follow-up time of 46 months for the surviving 77 patients, the 3-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 89%, 74% and 66%, respectively. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Grade 3-4 toxicities of mucositis, nausea/vomiting and leukopenia were observed in 34%, 4% and 4% of the patients, respectively. In conclusion, further improvement in survival and locoregional control is necessary, although our regimen showed acceptable toxicities. (author)

  17. Adjuvant external beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy in the management of gallbladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresl, John J.; Schild, Steven E.; Henning, George T.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Donohue, John; Pitot, Henry; Haddock, Michael G.; Nagorney, David

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the outcome of patients with gallbladder cancer who received postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Curative resection followed by adjuvant combined modality therapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and chemotherapy was attempted in 21 consecutive gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) patients at the Mayo Clinic from 1985 through 1997. All patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil during EBRT. EBRT fields encompassed the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose of 54 Gy in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions). One patient received 15 Gy intraoperatively after EBRT. A retrospective analysis was performed for the end points of local control, distant failure, and overall survival. Results: After maximal resection, 12 patients had no residual disease on pathologic evaluation, 5 had microscopic residual disease, and 4 had gross residual disease. One patient had Stage I disease, and 20 had Stage III-IV disease. With median follow-up of 5 years (range: 2.6-11.5 years), 5-year survival for the entire cohort was 33%. The 5-year survival rate of patients with Stage I-III disease was 65% vs. 0% for those with Stage IV disease (p 54 Gy (microscopic residual, 3 patients; gross residual, 1 patient; negative but narrow margins, 2 patients) vs. 65% for the 15 who received a lower dose (3, gross residual; 2, microresidual; 10, negative margins). Conclusion: Patients with completely resected (negative margins) GBC followed by adjuvant EBRT plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy had a relatively favorable prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of 64%. These results seem to be superior to historical surgical controls from the Mayo Clinic and other institutions, which report 5-year survival rates of approximately 33% with complete resection alone. Both tumor stage and extent of resection seemed to influence survival and local control. More aggressive measures using current cancer therapies and integration

  18. Survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III and IV bladder cancer: results of 170 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Tarek Heikal,2 Hossam Darweish2 1Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Medical Oncology, Damietta Cancer Institute, Ministry of Health, Damietta, Egypt Background: Radical cystectomy (RC with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancers. However, the locoregional recurrence rate is still significantly higher for locally advanced cases post-RC. The underuse of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in such cases after RC is related mainly to a lack of proven survival benefit. Here we are reporting our long-term Egyptian experience with bladder cancer patients treated with up-front RC with or without conformal PORT. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 170 locally advanced bladder cancer (T3–T4, N0/N1, M0 patients who had RC performed with or without PORT at Damietta Cancer Institute during the period of 1998–2006. The treatment outcomes and toxicity profile of PORT were evaluated and compared with those of a non-PORT group of patients. Results: Ninety-two patients received PORT; 78 did not. At median follow-up of 47 months (range, 17–77 months, 33% locoregional recurrences were seen in the PORT group versus 55% in the non-PORT group (P<0.001. The overall distant metastasis rate in the whole group was 39%, with no difference between the two groups. The 5-year disease-free survival for the whole group of patients was 53%±11%, which was significantly affected by additional PORT, and 65%±13% compared with 40%±9% for the non-PORT group (P=0.04. The pathological subtypes did not affect 5-year disease-free survival significantly (P=0.9. The 5-year overall survival was 44%±10%. Using multivariate analysis, PORT, stage, and extravesical extension (positive surgical margins were found to be important prognostic factors for locoregional control. Stage and lymph node status were important prognosticators for distant metastasis

  19. Optimal timing of early versus delayed adjuvant radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Keith J; Gu, Xiangmei; Nguyen, Paul L; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P; Hu, Jim C

    2014-04-01

    Although post-radical prostatectomy (RP) adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) benefits disease that is staged as pT3 or higher, the optimal ART timing remains unknown. Our objective is to characterize the outcomes and optimal timing of early vs. delayed ART. From the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data from 1995 to 2007, we identified 963 men with pT3N0 disease receiving early (statistic approach to determine at what time post-RP ART had the most significant effect on outcomes of interest in men with pT3N0 disease. When compared with delayed ART in men with pT3 disease, early ART was associated with improved PCSM (0.47 vs. 1.02 events per 100 person-years; P = 0.038) and less salvage hormonal therapy (2.88 vs. 4.59 events per 100 person-years; P = 0.001). Delaying ART beyond 5 months is associated with worse PCSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3; P = 0.020), beyond 3 months is associated with more BRE (HR 1.6; P = 0.025), and beyond 4 months is associated higher rates of salvage hormonal therapy (HR 1.6; P = 0.002). ART performed after 9 months was associated with fewer urethral strictures (HR 0.6; P = 0.042). Initiating ART less than 5 months after RP for pT3 is associated with improved PCSM. Early ART is also associated with fewer BRE and less use of salvage hormonal therapy if administered earlier than 3 and 4 months after RP, respectively. However, ART administered later than 9 months after RP is associated with fewer urethral strictures. Our population-based findings complement randomized trials designed with fixed ART timing. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Characterizing a pulse-resolved dosimetry system for complex radiotherapy beams using organic scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Ottosson, Rickard; Lindvold, Lars René

    2011-01-01

    A fast-readout dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators has been developed for the purpose of conducting point measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy beams involving high spatial and temporal dose gradients. The system measures the dose for each linac radiation pulse w...... and quality assurance of complex radiotherapy treatments.......A fast-readout dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators has been developed for the purpose of conducting point measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy beams involving high spatial and temporal dose gradients. The system measures the dose for each linac radiation pulse....... No significant differences between measurements and simulations were observed. The temporal resolution of the system was demonstrated by measuring dose per pulse, beam start-up transients and the quality factor for 6 MV. The precision of dose per pulse measurements was within 2.7% (1 SD) for a 10 cm × 10 cm...

  1. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Palpable Melanoma Metastases to the Groin: When to Irradiate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gojkovič-Horvat, Andreja; Jančar, Boris; Blas, Mateja; Žumer, Barbara; Karner, Katarina; Hočevar, Marko; Strojan, Primož

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of and criteria for postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with palpable melanoma metastases to the groin. Methods and Materials: Patients with palpable metastases to the groin who were treated with therapeutic nodal dissection during 2000 to 2006 were identified in a prospective institutional database. Results: In 101 patients, 103 therapeutic nodal dissections were performed; 37 of these were treated with PORT to a median equivalent dose (eqTD 2 ) of 50.6 Gy (range, 50–72 Gy). In the surgery-only and PORT groups, 2-year regional control rates were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 76–95%) and 91% (95% CI, 81–100%), respectively (p = 0.395). Of five recurrences in radiation-treated patients, four were of dermal type, and in three of these cases, no bolus over the operative scar was used. PORT improved 2-year regional control (46% [95% CI, 11–82%] vs. 82% [95% CI, 63–100%], p = 0.022) among patients in which the sum of risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score) was ≥2. In multivariate analysis, risk-factor score ( 2 <60 Gy and use of bolus over the operative scar are recommended.

  2. Assessment of radiotherapy photon beams: A practical and low cost methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, C.Q.M.; Nicolucci, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of radiation beams used in radiotherapy are directly related to the energy spectrum produced by the treatment unit. Therefore, the development of methodologies to evaluate in a simple and accurate way the spectra of clinical beams can help establishing the quality control of the treatment. The purpose of this study is to present a practical and low cost methodology for determining primary spectra of radiotherapy photon beams from transmission measurements in attenuators of aluminum and using the method of the inverse Laplace transform. Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE code was used in order to evaluate and validate the reconstructed spectra by the calculation of dosimetric parameters that characterize the beam. Percentage depth dose values simulated with a 6 MV reconstructed spectrum shows maximum difference of 4.4% when compared to values measured at the corresponding clinical beam. For a 10 MV beam that difference was around 4.2%. Results obtained in this study confirm the adequacy of the proposed methodology for assessing primary photon beams produced by clinical accelerators. - Highlights: • Primary spectra of radiotherapy photon beams are determined from transmission measurements. • Monte Carlo calculations are used to evaluate the method of the inverse Laplace transform. • The proposed methodology is practical and of low cost for clinical purposes. • Results are in fair agreement with literature and clinical data.

  3. External beam abdominal radiotherapy in patients with seminoma stage I: field type, testicular dose, and spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Kari Dolven; Olsen, Dag Rune; Fossaa, Kristian; Fossaa, Sophie Dorothea

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a predictive model for the estimation of the gonadal dose during adjuvant para-aortic (PA) or dog leg (DL: PA plus ipsilateral iliac) field radiotherapy in patients with testicular seminoma. Methods and Materials: The surface gonadal dose was measured in patients with seminoma Stage I receiving PA or DL radiotherapy. Sperm cell analysis was performed before and 1 year after irradiation. PA and DL radiotherapy were simulated in the Alderson phantom while we measured the dose to the surface and middle of an artificial testicle, varying its position within realistic anatomical constraints. The symphysis-to-testicle distance (STD), field length, and thickness of the patient were experimental variables. The developed mathematical model was validated in subsequent patients. Results: The mean gonadal dose in patients was 0.09 and 0.32 Gy after PA and DL irradiation, respectively (p < 0.001). DL radiotherapy, but not PA irradiation led to significant reduction of the sperm count 1 year after irradiation. The gonadal dose-reducing effect of PA irradiation was confirmed in the Alderson phantom. A significant correlation was found between the STD and the gonadal dose during DL irradiation. A mathematical model was established for calculation of the gonadal dose and confirmed by measurements in patients. Conclusions: During radiotherapy of seminoma, the gonadal dose decreases with increasing STD. It is possible to predict the individual gonadal dose based on delivered midplane dose and STD

  4. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  5. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, David; Ballereau, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given that postprostatectomy recurrence of prostate cancer occurs in 10-40% of patients, the best use of immediate postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in high-risk patients and salvage RT for biochemical recurrence remains a topic of debate. We assessed the levels of evidence (in terms of efficacy, prognostic factors, and toxicity) for the following treatment strategies: immediate postoperative RT alone, salvage RT alone, and the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to the two RT strategies. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature search for controlled randomized trials, noncontrolled trials, and retrospective studies between 1990 and 2008 was performed on PubMed, CancerLit, and MEDLINE. Only relevant articles that had appeared in peer-reviewed journals were selected. We report on the levels of evidence (according to the National Cancer Institute guidelines) supporting the various treatment strategies. Results: Immediate postoperative RT improves biochemical and clinical progression-free survival (Level of evidence, 1.ii) but has no significant effect on metastasis-free survival or overall survival. A pathologic review is of particular importance for correctly analyzing the treatment strategies. Low-grade morbidity has been significantly greater in the postoperative groups, but no severe toxicity has been observed. The influence of immediate postoperative RT on postprostatectomy continence appears to be slight; therefore, immediate postoperative RT should be considered in patients with major risk factors for local relapse (Level of evidence, 1.ii). On the basis of extensive retrospective data, salvage RT is effective in biochemical relapse after prostatectomy; some patients with few adverse prognostic factors might also benefit from salvage RT (Level of evidence, 3.ii). The addition of androgen deprivation therapy to immediate postoperative or salvage RT has only been supported by weak, retrospective data (Level of evidence, 3.ii). Conclusion

  6. External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy: How Significant is the Bleeding Toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kevin S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the bleeding toxicity associated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients receiving anticoagulation (AC) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 568 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Of these men, 79 were receiving AC therapy with either warfarin or clopidogrel. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Bleeding complications were recorded during treatment and subsequent follow-up visits. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 4-year actuarial risk of Grade 3 or worse bleeding toxicity was 15.5% for those receiving AC therapy compared with 3.6% among those not receiving AC (p < .0001). On multivariate analysis, AC therapy was the only significant factor associated with Grade 3 or worse bleeding (p < .0001). For patients taking AC therapy, the crude rate of bleeding was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis within the AC group demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose (p = .0408), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (p = 0.0136), and previous transurethral resection of the prostate (p = .0001) were associated with Grade 2 or worse bleeding toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy was protective against bleeding, with borderline significance (p = 0.0599). Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that Grade 3 or worse bleeding was minimized if the percentage of the rectum receiving ≥70 Gy was <10% or the rectum receiving ≥50 Gy was <50%. Conclusion: Patients taking AC therapy have a substantial risk of bleeding toxicity from external beam radiotherapy. In this setting, dose escalation or intensity-modulated radiotherapy should be used judiciously. With adherence to strict dose-volume histogram criteria and minimizing hotspots, the risk of severe bleeding might be reduced.

  7. Prognostic factors for long-term quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy in women with endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Robert; Schnetzke, Lara; Arians, Nathalie; Rief, Harald; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja; Bruckner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for endometrial cancer (EC) may affect patients' quality of life (QoL). There is a paucity of data on prognostic factors for long-term QoL and sexual functioning. This study aimed to investigate such factors and assess the role of the vaginal dilator (VD). QoL was assessed in 112 EC patients 6 years (median) after RT. QoL was compared to normative data, and the influence of age, tumor characteristics, lymphadenectomy, RT, and acute toxicities was assessed. VD use and its effect on subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was analyzed. QoL was reduced, particularly in younger patients. Vaginal brachytherapy only and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) were associated with better global health status and reduced chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Higher acute GI toxicity was associated with increased chronic GI symptoms, particularly diarrhea, and reduced role functioning. Higher acute urinary toxicity was associated with increased chronic urological symptoms, muscular/pelvic pain, and chronic GI symptoms, as well as with reduced emotional/social functioning and reduced global health status. Sexual interest/activity was increased despite vaginal dryness and dyspareunia. Sexual interest/activity increased with age. Only few, mainly younger patients used the VD. VD use >1 year was found in women with higher sexual interest/activity. Acute vaginal toxicity and chronic pain prevented VD use. Subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not reduced in VD users. RT technique and acute toxicities are prognostic for the extent of chronic symptoms and long-term QoL. Sexuality is important even at a higher age. Few patients use the VD and a reduction of subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not achieved. (orig.) [de

  8. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy after salvage lymph node dissection because of nodal relapse of prostate cancer versus salvage lymph node dissection only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischke, Hans Christian; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Kroenig, Malte; Schlager, Daniel; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Wieser, Gesche; Drendel, Vanessa; Stegmaier, Petra; Henne, Karl; Volegova-Neher, Natalia; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Krauss, Tobias; Kirste, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Nodal pelvic/retroperitoneal recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) after primary therapy can be treated with salvage lymph node dissection (salvage-LND) in order to delay disease progression and offer cure for a subset of patients. Whether adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) in affected regions improves the outcome by elimination of residual tumour burden remains unclear. A total of 93 patients with exclusively nodal PCa relapse underwent choline-positron-emission tomography-computed-tomography-directed pelvic/retroperitoneal salvage-LND; 46 patients had surgery only and 47 patients received ART in regions with proven lymph node metastases. In case of subsequent prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression, different imaging modalities were performed to confirm next relapse within or outside the treated region (TR). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Lymphatic tumour burden was balanced between the two groups. Additional ART resulted in delayed relapse within TR (5-year relapse-free rate 70.7 %) versus surgery only (5-year relapse-free rate 26.3 %, p < 0.0001). In both treatment arms, time to next relapse outside the TR was almost equal (median 27 months versus 29.6 months, p = 0.359). With respect to the detection of the first new lesion, regardless if present within or outside the TR, 5 years after the treatment 34.3 % of patients in the group with additional ART were free of relapse, versus 15.4 % in the surgery only group (p = 0.0122). ART had no influence on the extent of PSA reduction at latest follow-up compared to treatment with surgery only. ART after salvage-LND provides stable local control in TR and results in overall significant improved next-relapse-free survival, compared to patients who received surgery only in case of nodal PCa-relapse. (orig.) [de

  10. Speech-language therapy program for mouth opening in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrafon, Caroline Somera; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Nemr, Katia

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Assess the effectiveness of an orofacial myofunctional therapeutic program in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy through pre- and post-program comparison of maximum mandibular opening. Methods Prospective study involving five adult patients and five elderly patients postoperatively to oral cavity/oropharynx surgery who were awaiting the beginning of radiotherapy or had undergone fewer than five treatment sessions. The study participants had their maximum jaw opening measured using a sliding caliper at the beginning and end of the program. Two mobility exercises and three mandibular traction exercises were selected and weekly monitored presentially for 10 weeks. Descriptive data and pre- and post-therapy comparative measures were statistically analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. Results Ten patients (two women and eight men) with mean age of 58.4 years, median of 57.0 years, completed the therapeutic program. They presented mean maximum mandibular opening of 31.6 ± 11.7 and 36.4 ± 8.0 mm pre- and post-therapy, respectively (p =0.021). Conclusion The proposed orofacial myofunctional therapeutic program increased the maximum jaw opening of patients referred to adjuvant radiotherapy for oral cavity or oropharynx cancer treatment.

  11. Adjuvant or radical fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with pituitary functional and nonfunctional macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFRT for patients with pituitary macroadenoma (PMA. Methods and Materials Between March 2000 and March 2009, 27 patients (male to female ratio, 1.25 with PMA underwent SFRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy. Mean age of the patients was 56.5 years (range, 20.3 - 77.4. In all but one patient, SFRT was administered for salvage treatment after surgical resection (transphenoidal resection in 23, transphenoidal resection followed by craniotomy in 2 and multiple transphenoidal resections in another patient. In 10 (37% patients, the PMAs were functional (3 ACTH-secreting, 3 prolactinomas, 2 growth hormone-secreting and 2 multiple hormone-secretion. Three (11.1% and 9 (33.3% patients had PMA abutting and compressing the optic chiasm, respectively. Mean tumor volume was 2.9 ± 4.6 cm3. Eighteen (66.7% patients had hypopituitarism prior to SFRT. The mean follow-up period after SFRT was 72.4 ± 37.2 months. Results Tumor size decreased for 6 (22.2% patients and remained unchanged for 19 (70.4% other patients. Two (7.4% patients had tumor growth inside the prescribed treatment volume. The estimated 5-year tumor growth control was 95.5% after SFRT. Biochemical remission occurred in 3 (30% patients with functional PMA. Two patients with normal anterior pituitary function before SFRT developed new deficits 25 and 65 months after treatment. The 5-year survival without new anterior pituitary deficit was thus 95.8%. Five patients with visual field defect had improved visual function and 1 patient with no visual defect prior to SFRT, but an optic chiasm abutting tumor, had a decline in visual function. The estimated 5-year vision and pituitary function preservation rates were 93.2% and 95.8%, respectively. Conclusions SFRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with PMA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. In this study, approximately 1

  12. Adjuvant or radical fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with pituitary functional and nonfunctional macroadenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Momjian, Shahan; Pralong, François P; Meyer, Patrick; Villemure, Jean Guy; Pica, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFRT) for patients with pituitary macroadenoma (PMA). Between March 2000 and March 2009, 27 patients (male to female ratio, 1.25) with PMA underwent SFRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Mean age of the patients was 56.5 years (range, 20.3 - 77.4). In all but one patient, SFRT was administered for salvage treatment after surgical resection (transphenoidal resection in 23, transphenoidal resection followed by craniotomy in 2 and multiple transphenoidal resections in another patient). In 10 (37%) patients, the PMAs were functional (3 ACTH-secreting, 3 prolactinomas, 2 growth hormone-secreting and 2 multiple hormone-secretion). Three (11.1%) and 9 (33.3%) patients had PMA abutting and compressing the optic chiasm, respectively. Mean tumor volume was 2.9 ± 4.6 cm 3 . Eighteen (66.7%) patients had hypopituitarism prior to SFRT. The mean follow-up period after SFRT was 72.4 ± 37.2 months. Tumor size decreased for 6 (22.2%) patients and remained unchanged for 19 (70.4%) other patients. Two (7.4%) patients had tumor growth inside the prescribed treatment volume. The estimated 5-year tumor growth control was 95.5% after SFRT. Biochemical remission occurred in 3 (30%) patients with functional PMA. Two patients with normal anterior pituitary function before SFRT developed new deficits 25 and 65 months after treatment. The 5-year survival without new anterior pituitary deficit was thus 95.8%. Five patients with visual field defect had improved visual function and 1 patient with no visual defect prior to SFRT, but an optic chiasm abutting tumor, had a decline in visual function. The estimated 5-year vision and pituitary function preservation rates were 93.2% and 95.8%, respectively. SFRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with PMA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. In this study, approximately 1 patient with visual field defect out of two had an improved

  13. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged ≤30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  14. Recurrent malignant pilomatrixoma invading the cranial cavity: improved local control with adjuvant radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aherne, N. J.; Fitzpatrick, D. A.; Armstrong, J. G.; Gibbons, D.; Collins, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We report the case of a 41-year-old mentally retarded male with recurrent pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which invaded the occipital bone, left cerebellum and left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation the patient had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion with positive margins. He received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had subtotal debulking and was referred for external beam radiotherapy. At 27 months follow-up after adjuvant external beam radiotherapy the intracranial component has not progressed and the patient remains clinically well

  15. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  16. External beam radiotherapy facilities in Ukraine. Trends and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starenkiy, V.P.; Petrichenko, O.O.; Averyanova, L.O.

    2017-01-01

    The most important aspects of technological support of the radiation therapy of Ukraine are considered in accordance with the requirements of the IAEA. The reasons that influence the availability of radiotherapy for cancer patients in Ukraine are analyzed taking into account the experience of Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine.

  17. PLANNING PHASE 2 MULTICENTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF NEOADJUVANT CHEMO-RADIOTHERAPY FOLLOWED BY D2 GASTRECTOMY AND ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Skoropad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognosis for surgical treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer remains disappointing. Neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy is relatively new and the least researched method of treatment, it is attracting more and more attention, mainly abroad in recent years. The aims of neoadjuvant therapy is the earliest start of systemic therapy, damage of the primary tumor and regional metastases, an increase in the percentage of radical operations, improving treatment outcome. Material and methods. The planning study is a multicenter, randomized clinical phase II trial. Patients of the first (experimental group will be treated as the followes: neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (total tumor dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions with the concurrent modified CapOX scheme followed by D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients of the second (control group will be treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy will be carried out under the following schemes (optional for the researchers: CapOX or FOLFOX. Toxicity evaluation of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy will be conducted with NCI CTC Toxicity Scale Version 3.0. The main objectives of the trial are to assess the safety and immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy according to the criteria of the frequency and severity of postoperative complications and mortality, and tumor response. We are planning to include 80 patients with morphologically confirmed gastric cancer сT2–4N1–3, сT3–4N0–3; М0. The proposed trial will be carried out in accordance with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration, it has been approved by local ethic committees of the participated institutions. Results. As a result of this multicenter randomized trial it is planned to show the reproducibility of obtained in MRRC and a number of foreign centers results – that is, the safety and high immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy

  18. Roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Kidney cancer. Stage III. Results to 5 years. Observational, descriptive, retrospective, quantitative and comparative study with data numerical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lione, M.; Tissera, N.; Mandachain, M.

    2007-01-01

    Kidney cancer represents 3 % of the tumors in adults. In the United States, the 45% is diagnosed in early stages. Its natural history is characterized for being absolutely unpredictable and probably related to hormonal, immunologic and unknown factors. There are patients in advanced stage with prolonged or low average survival and even with metastasis declination. These particularities along with the lack of prospective random studies make difficult to establish which is the roll of the adjuvant radiotherapy, being considered not standard since 1997 [es

  19. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver......-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive (106)Ag......, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy...

  20. An assessment of effective dose to staff in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, D.J.; Nicholson, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation safety in external beam radiotherapy is governed by national legislation. Annual doses recorded by radiographers and others associated with external beam radiotherapy are typically much lower than the relevant dose limit. However, it is possible that larger doses might be received as a result of an accidental irradiation. In the event of a significant exposure resulting in a dose at or near a relevant dose limit, an accurate conversion has to be made from the dose meter reading to the limiting quantity. A method was devised to demonstrate ratios of effective dose to personal dose equivalent which might be anticipated in the even of an individual other than the patient being irradiated within a radiotherapy treatment room consisting of a linear accelerator. The variation of ratios obtained under different conditions is discussed. (author)

  1. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl...

  2. Proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma: The Liverpool-Clatterbridge experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using a 62-MeV cyclotron in patients considered unsuitable for other forms of conservative therapy. Methods and Materials A total of 349 patients with choroidal melanoma referred to the Liverpool Ocular Oncology Centre underwent proton beam radiotherapy at Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology (CCO) between January 1993 and December 2003. Four daily fractions of proton beam radiotherapy were delivered, with a total dose of 53.1 proton Gy, and with lateral and distal safety margins of 2.5 mm. Outcomes measured were local tumor recurrence; ocular conservation; vision; and metastatic death according to age, gender, eye, visual acuity, location of anterior and posterior tumor margins, quadrant, longest basal tumor dimension, tumor height, extraocular extension, and retinal invasion. Results The 5-year actuarial rates were 3.5% for local tumor recurrence, 9.4% for enucleation, 79.1% for conservation of vision of counting fingers or better, 61.1% for conservation of vision of 20/200 or better, 44.8% for conservation of vision of 20/40 or better, and 10.0% for death from metastasis. Conclusion Proton beam radiotherapy with a 62 MeV cyclotron achieves high rates of local tumor control and ocular conservation, with visual outcome depending on tumor size and location

  3. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  4. Image-guided radiotherapy in near real time with intensity-modulated radiotherapy megavoltage treatment beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing, Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  5. Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Near Real Time With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Megavoltage Treatment Beam Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Methods and Materials: Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Results: Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. Conclusions: This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  6. The relationship between external beam radiotherapy dose and chronic urinary dysfunction - A methodological critique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosewall, Tara; Catton, Charles; Currie, Geoffrey; Bayley, Andrew; Chung, Peter; Wheat, Janelle; Milosevic, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a methodological critique of the literature evaluating the relationship between external beam radiotherapy dose/volume parameters and chronic urinary dysfunction to determine why consistent associations between dose and dysfunction have not been found. Methods and materials: The radiotherapy literature was reviewed using various electronic medical search engines with appropriate keywords and MeSH headings. Inclusion criteria comprised of; English language articles, published between 1999 and June 2009, incorporating megavoltage external beam photons in standard-sized daily fraction. A methodological critique was then performed, evaluating the factors affected in the quantification of radiotherapy dose and chronic urinary dysfunction. Results: Nine of 22 eligible studies successfully identified a clinically and statistically significant relationship between dose and dysfunction. Accurate estimations of external beam radiotherapy dose were compromised by the frequent use of dosimetric variables which are poor surrogates for the dose received by the lower urinary tract tissue and do not incorporate the effect of daily variations in isocentre and bladder position. The precise categorization of chronic urinary dysfunction was obscured by reliance on subjective and aggregated toxicity metrics which vary over time. Conclusions: A high-level evidence-base for the relationship between external beam radiotherapy dose and chronic urinary dysfunction does not currently exist. The quantification of the actual external beam dose delivered to the functionally important tissues using dose accumulation strategies and the use of objective measures of individual manifestations of urinary dysfunction will assist in the identification of robust relationships between dose and urinary dysfunction for application in widespread clinical practice.

  7. A multi-centre analysis of radiotherapy beam output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Bolt

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Machine beam output measurements were largely within ±2% of 1.00 cGy/MU. Clear trends in measured output over time were seen, with some machines having large drifts which would result in additional burden to maintain within acceptable tolerances. This work may act as a baseline for future comparison of beam output measurements.

  8. Improved genetic algorithm in optimization of beam orientation in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xinye; Yang Jianhua; Sun Suping; Yao Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: At present beam orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is mainly based on empiric knowledge. This study is to evaluate the feasibility of automated beam angle selection. Methods: Genetic algorithm technique which based on beam eye view dose measurement (BEVD-GA) was tested on two clinical cases, including a spine column cancer and a lung cancer. Three plans were obtained under the following different beam configurations: five equiangular-spaced beams, five beams with GA-selected, and five beams with BEVD-GA-selected beams. Then the dose distribution was compared among the three plans. Results: The method, restricting the range of genetic algorithm followed by carrying through genetic operations, not only shortened the optimization time, but also improved the optimization effect. For spine column cancer and lung cancer, the best IMRT plans were obtained with BEVD-GA-selected beams, which used automated beam orientation selection. Conclusions: Comparing with the conventional manual beam orientation selection, beam orientation optimization which is feasible in IMRT planning may significantly improve the efficiency and result. (authors)

  9. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-04-19

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 "treatment plans" (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the "target coverage" was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5-2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature's preliminary data are confirming also a

  10. Whole brain radiotherapy with adjuvant or concomitant boost in brain metastasis: dosimetric comparison between helical and volumetric IMRT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghetti, Paolo; Pedretti, Sara; Spiazzi, Luigi; Avitabile, Rossella; Urpis, Mauro; Foscarini, Federica; Tesini, Giulia; Trevisan, Francesca; Ghirardelli, Paolo; Pandini, Sara Angela; Triggiani, Luca; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Buglione, Michela

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the possible advantages related to the use of VMAT and helical IMRT and two different modalities of boost delivering, adjuvant stereotactic boost (SRS) or simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), in the treatment of brain metastasis (BM) in RPA classes I-II patients. Ten patients were treated with helical IMRT, 5 of them with SRS after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and 5 with SIB. MRI co-registration with planning CT was mandatory and prescribed doses were 30 Gy in 10 fractions (fr) for WBRT and 15Gy/1fr or 45Gy/10fr in SRS or SIB, respectively. For each patient, 4 “treatment plans” (VMAT SRS and SIB, helical IMRT SRS and SIB) were calculated and accepted if PTV boost was included in 95 % isodose and dose constraints of the main organs at risk were respected without major deviations. Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformal Index (CI) and Conformal Number (CN) were considered to compare the different plans. Moreover, time of treatment delivery was calculated and considered in the analysis. Volume of brain metastasis ranged between 1.43 and 51.01 cc (mean 12.89 ± 6.37 ml) and 3 patients had double lesions. V95% resulted over 95 % in the average for each kind of technique, but the “target coverage” was inadequate for VMAT planning with two sites. The HI resulted close to the ideal value of zero in all cases; VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS showed mean CI of 2.15, 2.10, 2.44 and 1.66, respectively (optimal range: 1.5–2.0). Helical IMRT-SRS was related to the best and reliable finding of CN (0.66). The mean of treatment time was 210 s, 467 s, 440 s, 1598 s, respectively, for VMAT-SIB, VMAT-SRS, Helical IMRT-SIB and Helical IMRT-SRS. This dosimetric comparison show that helical IMRT obtain better target coverage and respect of CI and CN; VMAT could be acceptable in solitary metastasis. SIB modality can be considered as a good choice for clinical and logistic compliance; literature’s preliminary data are confirming

  11. Prognostic factors for long-term quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy in women with endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Robert; Schnetzke, Lara; Arians, Nathalie; Rief, Harald; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruckner, Thomas [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Medical Biometry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for endometrial cancer (EC) may affect patients' quality of life (QoL). There is a paucity of data on prognostic factors for long-term QoL and sexual functioning. This study aimed to investigate such factors and assess the role of the vaginal dilator (VD). QoL was assessed in 112 EC patients 6 years (median) after RT. QoL was compared to normative data, and the influence of age, tumor characteristics, lymphadenectomy, RT, and acute toxicities was assessed. VD use and its effect on subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was analyzed. QoL was reduced, particularly in younger patients. Vaginal brachytherapy only and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) were associated with better global health status and reduced chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Higher acute GI toxicity was associated with increased chronic GI symptoms, particularly diarrhea, and reduced role functioning. Higher acute urinary toxicity was associated with increased chronic urological symptoms, muscular/pelvic pain, and chronic GI symptoms, as well as with reduced emotional/social functioning and reduced global health status. Sexual interest/activity was increased despite vaginal dryness and dyspareunia. Sexual interest/activity increased with age. Only few, mainly younger patients used the VD. VD use >1 year was found in women with higher sexual interest/activity. Acute vaginal toxicity and chronic pain prevented VD use. Subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not reduced in VD users. RT technique and acute toxicities are prognostic for the extent of chronic symptoms and long-term QoL. Sexuality is important even at a higher age. Few patients use the VD and a reduction of subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not achieved. (orig.) [German] Eine adjuvante Radiotherapie (RT) kann die Lebensqualitaet von Patientinnen mit Endometriumkarzinom (EC) beeinflussen. Daten zu prognostischen Faktoren fuer die langfristige Lebensqualitaet (QoL) und die Sexualfunktion sind

  12. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Urology; Donker, R. [Medical Center Alkmaar (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; McColl, G.M.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-06-15

    Background and purpose: Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients and methods: Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. Results: In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Conclusion: Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved. (orig.)

  13. Parotid lymph-node metastases from cutaneous squamous-cell carcinomas: treatment outcome and prognostic factors following surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, M.T.; Veness, M.J.; Gebski, V.; Cakir, B.; Tiver, K.W.; Morgan, G.; Shakespeare, T.

    2002-01-01

    Australia has the highest incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the world. The majority of lesions occur in the head and neck, and regional lymph-node metastases from cutaneous SCCs, though uncommon, reflect an aggressive manifestation. Surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy are currently considered best practice. Fifty-two eligible patients during 1980-1997 were identified in a retrospective review of patients treated within the department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney. Relevant data were extracted from the files, referring clinicians and the New South Wales Cancer Council. The median age at diagnosis was 63 years and the majority were men (87%). Unfavourable pathological features were present in many of the patients. Only extranodal spread (P = 0.02) was identified as an independent predictor for locoregional recurrence on multivariate analysis. The cumulative locoregional recurrence rates were 28 and 45% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate in this study was 65%. We conclude that parotid lymph-node metastases from cutaneous SCCs of the head and neck are associated with a high rate of locoregional recurrence and cause-specific mortality despite surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. The role of altered fractionation after surgery as a means to further enhance locoregional control warrants further investigation. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  15. Proton beam radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanomas: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Damien C; Bogner, Joachim; Verwey, Jorn; Georg, Dietmar; Dieckmann, Karin; Escudé, Lluis; Caro, Monica; Pötter, Richard; Goitein, Gudrun; Lomax, Antony J; Miralbell, Raymond

    2005-10-01

    A comparative treatment planning study was undertaken between proton and photon therapy in uveal melanoma to assess the potential benefits and limitations of these treatment modalities. A fixed proton horizontal beam (OPTIS) and intensity-modulated spot-scanning proton therapy (IMPT), with multiple noncoplanar beam arrangements, was compared with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), using a static and a dynamic micromultileaf collimator and intensity-modulated RT (IMRS). A planning CT scan was performed on a brain metastasis patient, with a 3-mm acquisition slice spacing and the patient looking at a luminous spot with the eyes in three different positions (neutral and 25 degrees right and left). Four different gross tumor volumes were defined for each treatment technique. These target scenarios represented different locations (involving vs. not involving the macula and temporal vs. nasal) and volumes (10 x 6 mm vs. 16 x 10 mm) to challenge the proton and photon treatment techniques. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume plus 2 mm laterally and 3 mm craniocaudally for both modalities. A dose homogeneity of 95-99% of the planning target volume was used as the "goal" for all techniques. The dose constraint (maximum) for the organs at risk (OARs) for both the proton and the SRT photon plans was 27.5, 22.5, 20, and 9 CGE-Gy for the optic apparatus, retina, lacrimal gland, and lens, respectively. The dose to the planning target volume was 50 CGE-Gy in 10 CGE-Gy daily fractions. The plans for proton and photon therapy were computed using the Paul Scherrer Institute and BrainSCAN, version 5.2 (BrainLAB, Heimstetten, Germany) treatment planning systems, respectively. Tumor and OARs dose-volume histograms were calculated. The results were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram parameters, conformity index (CI(95%)), and inhomogeneity coefficient. Target coverage of all simulated uveal melanomas was equally conformal with the

  16. Proton beam radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanomas: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Bogner, Joachim; Verwey, Jorn; Georg, Dietmar; Dieckmann, Karin; Escude, Lluis; Caro, Monica; Poetter, Richard; Goitein, Gudrun; Lomax, Antony J.; Miralbell, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A comparative treatment planning study was undertaken between proton and photon therapy in uveal melanoma to assess the potential benefits and limitations of these treatment modalities. A fixed proton horizontal beam (OPTIS) and intensity-modulated spot-scanning proton therapy (IMPT), with multiple noncoplanar beam arrangements, was compared with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), using a static and a dynamic micromultileaf collimator and intensity-modulated RT (IMRS). Method and Materials: A planning CT scan was performed on a brain metastasis patient, with a 3-mm acquisition slice spacing and the patient looking at a luminous spot with the eyes in three different positions (neutral and 25 deg right and left). Four different gross tumor volumes were defined for each treatment technique. These target scenarios represented different locations (involving vs. not involving the macula and temporal vs. nasal) and volumes (10 x 6 mm vs. 16 x 10 mm) to challenge the proton and photon treatment techniques. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume plus 2 mm laterally and 3 mm craniocaudally for both modalities. A dose homogeneity of 95-99% of the planning target volume was used as the 'goal' for all techniques. The dose constraint (maximum) for the organs at risk (OARs) for both the proton and the SRT photon plans was 27.5, 22.5, 20, and 9 CGE-Gy for the optic apparatus, retina, lacrimal gland, and lens, respectively. The dose to the planning target volume was 50 CGE-Gy in 10 CGE-Gy daily fractions. The plans for proton and photon therapy were computed using the Paul Scherrer Institute and BrainSCAN, version 5.2 (BrainLAB, Heimstetten, Germany) treatment planning systems, respectively. Tumor and OARs dose-volume histograms were calculated. The results were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram parameters, conformity index (CI 95% ), and inhomogeneity coefficient. Results: Target coverage of all simulated uveal

  17. Phase-space database for external beam radiotherapy. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote, R.; Jeraj, R.; Ma, C.M.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Sempau, J.; Seuntjens, J.; Siebers, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting assembled to discuss and recommend actions and activities to prepare a Phase-space Database for External Beam Radiotherapy. The new database should serve to disseminate phase-space data of those accelerators and 60 Co units used in radiotherapy through the compilation of existing data that have been properly validated. Both the technical discussions and the resulting work plan are described, along with the detailed recommendations for implementation. The meeting was jointly organized by NAPC-Nuclear Data Section and NAHU-Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section. (author)

  18. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nkanemat@nirs.go.jp [Department of Accelerator and Medical Physics, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-03-07

    A broad-beam-delivery system for radiotherapy with protons or ions often employs multiple collimators and a range-compensating filter, which offer complex and potentially useful beam customization. It is however difficult for conventional pencil-beam algorithms to deal with fine structures of these devices due to beam-size growth during transport. This study aims to avoid the difficulty with a novel computational model. The pencil beams are initially defined at the range-compensating filter with angular-acceptance correction for upstream collimation followed by stopping and scattering. They are individually transported with possible splitting near the aperture edge of a downstream collimator to form a sharp field edge. The dose distribution for a carbon-ion beam was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes of various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will be used in the greater framework of the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for accurate and efficient patient dose calculation.

  19. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-03-07

    A broad-beam-delivery system for radiotherapy with protons or ions often employs multiple collimators and a range-compensating filter, which offer complex and potentially useful beam customization. It is however difficult for conventional pencil-beam algorithms to deal with fine structures of these devices due to beam-size growth during transport. This study aims to avoid the difficulty with a novel computational model. The pencil beams are initially defined at the range-compensating filter with angular-acceptance correction for upstream collimation followed by stopping and scattering. They are individually transported with possible splitting near the aperture edge of a downstream collimator to form a sharp field edge. The dose distribution for a carbon-ion beam was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes of various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will be used in the greater framework of the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for accurate and efficient patient dose calculation.

  20. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  1. Review of common accidents in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombogo, C.M

    2015-02-01

    This work covers patients protection in Radiotherapy which is a multi step procedure that is complex. Any error in any step has an effect on the patient and therefore the entire process requires attention to details in order to achieve patients protection. This project reviews eight case studies involving accidents that occurred during the process of therapy delivery. Professionalism in case one and two was not practiced in that in case one medical physicist failed to calculate decay data instead relied on incorrect decay graph thus giving wrong dose. While in case two a wrong TPS was approved following a formal written procedure due to new technology. In case three and seven there was a software malfunction due to uniformed choice of TPS and in case four a computer file was not updated in the TPS while in eight the failure is inter look system led to patients recieving high dose than was prescribed. Calibration in case five and six was due to wrong actions in both repairs and interpretation of treatment time than the overdose to patient. The lessen learnt seeks to act as a checklist for ensuring patient protection in radiotherapy and prevention of future accidents. (au)

  2. In-vivo (entrance) dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy with aqueous FBX dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, M.K.; Thakur, P.K.; Bansal, A.K.; Vidyasagar, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    FBX aqueous chemical dosimetry system has been found useful in radiotherapy owing to its low dose measuring capability. In the present work, entrance dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy on a telecobalt machine were carried out with the system on 100 patients. Treatments involving simple beam arrangement of open parallel-opposed beams in cranial and pelvic irradiations were selected for this study. In place of a spectrophotometer, a simple and inexpensive colorimeter was used for absorbance measurements. The purpose was to assess the efficacy of the FBX system for in-vivo dose measurements. The results obtained show that the average discrepancy between the measured and expected dose for both categories of patients was 0.2% (standard deviation 3.2%) with a maximum of +1 0.3%. There were 5.5% cases showing more than ± 5% discrepancy. Comparison of the results obtained with published work on entrance dose measurements, with diode detectors, shows that the inexpensive FBX system can be used for in-vivo (entrance) dose measurements for simple beam arrangements in radiotherapy and can thus serve as a useful QA tool. (author)

  3. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Pathologic N2 Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Review of the National Cancer Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cliff G.; Patel, Aalok P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; DeWees, Todd; Waqar, Saiama N.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Baggstrom, Maria Q.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Colditz, Graham A.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of modern postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on overall survival (OS) for patients with N2 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated nationally with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pathologic N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from 2006 to 2010 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base and stratified by use of PORT (≥ 45 Gy). A total of 4,483 patients were identified (PORT, n = 1,850; no PORT, n = 2,633). The impact of patient and treatment variables on OS was explored using Cox regression. Results Median follow-up time was 22 months. On univariable analysis, improved OS correlated with younger age, treatment at an academic facility, female sex, urban population, higher income, lower Charlson comorbidity score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT. On multivariable analysis, improved OS remained independently predicted by younger age, female sex, urban population, lower Charlson score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT (hazard ratio, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.798 to 0.988). Use of PORT was associated with an increase in median and 5-year OS compared with no PORT (median OS, 45.2 v 40.7 months, respectively; 5-year OS, 39.3% [95% CI, 35.4% to 43.5%] v 34.8% [95% CI, 31.6% to 38.3%], respectively; P = .014). Conclusion For patients with N2 NSCLC after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, modern PORT seems to confer an additional OS advantage beyond that achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25667283

  4. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  6. A Bile Duct Cancer Patient Whose Stent Shifted Significantly Over the Course of External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyong Geun

    2011-01-01

    The author reports a bile duct cancer patient whose stent shifted significantly from right to left over the course of radiotherapy. The 80-year-old female patient had a short stature with thoracic kyphosis and mutiple spinal compression fractures. She was also emaciated and very lean. By comparing the weekly scanned computed tomography images, the author found her stent to have shifted by more than 4 cm from right to left over the course of external beam radiotherapy. The results of this case study suggest that for a very lean and emaciated kyphotic bile duct cancer patient, the possibility of large interfractional movement of the bile duct or stent during radiotherapy should be considered.

  7. External beam radiotherapy boosted with high dose rate brachytherapy in completely resected uterine sarcomas. Is this a treatment option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogarolli, Ricardo; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor [Hospital de Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Oncologia de Radiacao]. E-mail: pellizzon@aol.com

    2005-04-15

    Uterine sarcoma (US) is a relative rare tumor, which accounts for only about 3-5% of all uterine cancers. Aggressive cytoreductive surgery at the time of the initial diagnosis with maximum tumor debulking may lead to a prolonged survival or cure. Objective: to identify and review the role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the management of patients presenting US with complete resection. Material and methods: this study is a retrospective analysis of 23 patients with US treated from 10/92 to 03/03, with surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB). The inclusion criteria for study participation included: histologically proven and graded US, completely resection of tumor, Karnofsky status 60-100, absence of significant infection, and recovery from recent surgery. Results: The median age of patients was 62 years (range 39-84); ten-year actuarial disease-free and overall survivals were 42.2% and 63.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictive factors for disease-free survival (DFS) were age at initial presentation (p=0.0268), parity (p=0.0441), tumor grade (p= 0.0095), cervical or vaginal invasion (p=0.0014) and node dissection at time of surgery (p= 0.0471). On multivariate analysis, the only predictive factor was cervical or vaginal invasion (p= 0.048), hazard ratio of 4.7. Conclusion: it is quite likely that neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy alone will appreciably improve survival in US. If radiation therapy provides better locoregional tumor control, hematogenous metastases will assume an even greater proportion of treatment failures. Unfortunately, our small and heterogeneous group analyzed precludes any definitive conclusions about the impact of HDRB associated to EBRT radiation therapy on recurrence or survival. (author)

  8. External beam radiotherapy boosted with high dose rate brachytherapy in completely resected uterine sarcomas. Is this a treatment option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogarolli, Ricardo; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sarcoma (US) is a relative rare tumor, which accounts for only about 3-5% of all uterine cancers. Aggressive cytoreductive surgery at the time of the initial diagnosis with maximum tumor debulking may lead to a prolonged survival or cure. Objective: to identify and review the role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the management of patients presenting US with complete resection. Material and methods: this study is a retrospective analysis of 23 patients with US treated from 10/92 to 03/03, with surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB). The inclusion criteria for study participation included: histologically proven and graded US, completely resection of tumor, Karnofsky status 60-100, absence of significant infection, and recovery from recent surgery. Results: The median age of patients was 62 years (range 39-84); ten-year actuarial disease-free and overall survivals were 42.2% and 63.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictive factors for disease-free survival (DFS) were age at initial presentation (p=0.0268), parity (p=0.0441), tumor grade (p= 0.0095), cervical or vaginal invasion (p=0.0014) and node dissection at time of surgery (p= 0.0471). On multivariate analysis, the only predictive factor was cervical or vaginal invasion (p= 0.048), hazard ratio of 4.7. Conclusion: it is quite likely that neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy alone will appreciably improve survival in US. If radiation therapy provides better locoregional tumor control, hematogenous metastases will assume an even greater proportion of treatment failures. Unfortunately, our small and heterogeneous group analyzed precludes any definitive conclusions about the impact of HDRB associated to EBRT radiation therapy on recurrence or survival. (author)

  9. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  10. Neural Stem Cell-Preserving External-Beam Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barani, Igor J.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Todor, Dorin; Bump, Edward A.; Wu Yan; Chung, Theodore D.; Broaddus, William C.; Lin, Peck-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Recent discoveries have implicated neural stem cells (NSC) as the source of plasticity and repair in the mature mammalian brain. Treatment-induced NSC dysfunction may lead to observed toxicity. This study evaluates the feasibility of NSC-preserving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A single computed tomography (CT) dataset depicting a right periventricular lesion was used in this study as this location reflects the most problematic geometric arrangement with respect to NSC preservation. Conventional and NSC preserving radiotherapy (RT) plans were generated for the same lesion using two clinical scenarios: cerebral metastatic disease and primary high-grade glioma. Disease-specific target volumes were used. Metastatic disease was conventionally treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to 3,750 cGy (15 fractions) followed by a single stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost of 1,800 cGy to gross disease only. High-grade glioma was treated with conventional opposed lateral and anterior superior oblique beams to 4,600 cGy (23 fractions) followed by a 1,400 cGy (7 fractions) boost. NSC preservation was achieved in both scenarios with inverse-planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: Cumulative dose reductions of 65% (metastatic disease) and 25% (high-grade glioma) to the total volume of the intracranial NSC compartments were achieved with NSC-preserving IMRT plans. The reduction of entry and exit dose to NSC niches located contralateral to the target contributed most to NSC preservation. Conclusions: Neural stem cells preservation with current external beam radiotherapy techniques is achievable in context of both metastatic brain disease and high-grade glioma, even when the target is located adjacent to a stem cell compartment. Further investigation with clinical trials is warranted to evaluate whether NSC preservation will result in reduced toxicity

  11. Stability of electron-beam energy monitor for quality assurance of the electron-beam energy from radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Saito, Haruo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Mitsuya, Masatoshi; Sakakida, Hideharu; Yamada, Shogo; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Information on electron energy is important in planning radiation therapy using electrons. The Geske 3405 electron beam energy monitor (Geske monitor, PTW Nuclear Associates, Carle Place, NY, USA) is a device containing nine ionization chambers for checking the energy of the electron beams produced by radiotherapy accelerators. We wondered whether this might increase the likelihood of ionization chamber trouble. In spite of the importance of the stability of such a quality assurance (QA) device, there are no reports on the stability of values measured with a Geske monitor. The purpose of this paper was therefore to describe the stability of a Geske monitor. It was found that the largest coefficient of variation (CV) of the Geske monitor measurements was approximately 0.96% over a 21-week period. In conclusion, the stability of Geske monitor measurements of the energy of electron beams from a linear accelerator was excellent. (author)

  12. Toxicity and quality of life after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer (PORTEC-3) : an open-label, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stephanie M.; Powell, Melanie E.; Mileshkin, Linda; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Bessette, Paul; Haie-Meder, Christine; Ottevanger, Petronella B.; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Khaw, Pearly; Colombo, Alessandro; Fyles, Anthony; Baron, Marie-Helene; Kitchener, Henry C.; Nijman, Hans W.; Kruitwagen, Roy F.; Nout, Remi A.; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W.; Smit, Vincent T.; Putter, Hein; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    Background About 15% of patients with endometrial cancer have high-risk features and are at increased risk of distant metastases and endometrial cancer-related death. We designed the PORTEC-3 trial to investigate the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone for women

  13. Toxicity and quality of life after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer (PORTEC-3): an open-label, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, S.M. de; Powell, M.E.; Mileshkin, L.; Katsaros, D.; Bessette, P.; Haie-Meder, C.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Ledermann, J.A.; Khaw, P.; Colombo, A.; Fyles, A.; Baron, M.H.; Kitchener, H.C.; Nijman, H.W.; Kruitwagen, R.F.; Nout, R.A.; Verhoeven-Adema, K.W.; Smit, V.T.; Putter, H.; Creutzberg, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 15% of patients with endometrial cancer have high-risk features and are at increased risk of distant metastases and endometrial cancer-related death. We designed the PORTEC-3 trial to investigate the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone for women

  14. Influence of more extensive radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy on long-term outcome of early-stage Hodgkin's disease: a meta-analysis of 23 randomized trials involving 3,888 patients. International Hodgkin's Disease Collaborative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Gray, R.G.; Clarke, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effect of more extensive radiotherapy and of adjuvant combination chemotherapy on long-term outcome of early-stage Hodgkin's disease. METHODS: In a collaborative worldwide systematic overview, individual patient data were centrally reviewed on 1,974 patients in eight.......7%; P counterbalanced by a nonsignificant excess of deaths from other...... causes (12.4% v 10.0% 10-year risk). CONCLUSION: More extensive radiotherapy fields or the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy in the initial treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's disease had a large effect on disease control, but only a small effect on overall survival. Recurrences could be prevented...

  15. Study of the alignment of X radiation beam for calibration of chambers used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The activities developed in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation safety, require that the metrological parameters involving these activities have on its results a high degree of reliability, to ensure traceability. To meet the existing demand in Brazil, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying a new tube X-ray beams used in the calibration of the standard rooms, which serve to quality control in hospitals, clinics and industry. (author)

  16. Commissioning and quality assurances of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system for external beam photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K.R.; Anurupa; Soubhagya; Sudhakar; Shiva; Krishnam Raju, A.; Narayana Murthy, P.

    2008-01-01

    The commissioning of XIO treatment planning system (TPS) was carried out by Computerized Medical Devices, USA for Siemens and Elekta linear accelerators. The Commissioning and quality assurance of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system involves many steps, beginning from beam data acquisition and entry into the computerized TPS, through patient data acquisition, to treatment plan generation and the final transfer of data to the treatment machine and quality assurance of TPS

  17. Evaluating uncertainties in the cross-calibration of parallel ion chambers used in electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Ernani; Travassos, Paulo; Ferreira, Max da Silva; Carvalho, Samira Marques de; Silva, Michele Maria da; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira; Salmon Junior, Helio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimative the combined standard uncertainty for a detector parallel plate used for dosimetry of electron beams in linear accelerators for radiotherapy, which has been calibrated by the cross-calibration method. Keeping the combined standard uncertainty next of the uncertainty informed in the calibration certificate of the reference chamber, become possible establish the calibration factor of the detector. The combined standard uncertainty obtained in this study was 2.5 %. (author)

  18. Constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbottom, C.G.; Oldham, M.; Webb, S.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology for the constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy treatment planning has been developed and tested on a cohort of five patients with tumours of the brain. The methodology employed a combination of single and multibeam cost functions to produce customized beam orientations. The single-beam cost function was used to reduce the search space for the multibeam cost function, which was minimized using a fast simulated annealing algorithm. The scheme aims to produce well-spaced, customized beam orientations for each patient that produce low dose to organs at risk (OARs). The customized plans were compared with standard plans containing the number and orientation of beams chosen by a human planner. The beam orientation constraint-customized plans employed the same number of treatment beams as the standard plan but with beam orientations chosen by the constrained-customization scheme. Improvements from beam orientation constraint-customization were studied in isolation by customizing the beam weights of both plans using a dose-based downhill simplex algorithm. The results show that beam orientation constraint-customization reduced the maximum dose to the orbits by an average of 18.8 (±3.8, 1SD)% and to the optic nerves by 11.4 (±4.8, 1SD)% with no degradation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution. The mean doses, averaged over the patient cohort, were reduced by 4.2 (±1.1, 1SD)% and 12.4 (±3.1 1SD)% for the orbits and optic nerves respectively. In conclusion, the beam orientation constraint-customization can reduce the dose to OARs, for few-beam treatment plans, when compared with standard treatment plans developed by a human planner. (author)

  19. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C.J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-01-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25*25 cm 2 . The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification

  20. Beam related response of in vivo diode detectors for external radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baci, Syrja, E-mail: sbarci2013@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Gjirokastra, “Eqrem Çabej” (Albania); Telhaj, Ervis [Department of Medical Physics, Hygeia Hospital Tirana (Albania); Malkaj, Partizan [Department of Physical Engineering, Polytechnic University, Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    In Vivo Dosimetry (IVD) is a set of methods used in cancer treatment clinics to determine the real dose of radiation absorbed by target volume in a patient’s body. IVD has been widely implemented in radiotherapy treatment centers and is now recommended part of Quality Assurance program by many International health and radiation organizations. Because of cost and lack of specialized personnel, IVD has not been practiced as yet, in Albanian radiotherapy clinics. At Hygeia Hospital Tirana, patients are irradiated with high energy photons generated by Elekta Synergy Accelerators. We have recently started experimenting with the purpose of establishing an IVD practice at this hospital. The first set of experiments was aimed at calibration of diodes that are going to be used for IVD. PMMA, phantoms by PTW were used to calibrate p – type Si, semiconductor diode dosimeters, made by PTW Freiburg for entrance dose. Response of the detectors is affected by energy of the beam, accumulated radiation dose, dose rate, temperature, angle against the beam axis, etc. Here we present the work done for calculating calibration factor and correction factors of source to surface distance, field size, and beam incidence for the entrance dose for both 6 MV photon beam and 18 MV photon beam. Dependence of dosimeter response was found to be more pronounced with source to surface distance as compared to other variables investigated.

  1. Beam related response of in vivo diode detectors for external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baci, Syrja; Telhaj, Ervis; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-01-01

    In Vivo Dosimetry (IVD) is a set of methods used in cancer treatment clinics to determine the real dose of radiation absorbed by target volume in a patient’s body. IVD has been widely implemented in radiotherapy treatment centers and is now recommended part of Quality Assurance program by many International health and radiation organizations. Because of cost and lack of specialized personnel, IVD has not been practiced as yet, in Albanian radiotherapy clinics. At Hygeia Hospital Tirana, patients are irradiated with high energy photons generated by Elekta Synergy Accelerators. We have recently started experimenting with the purpose of establishing an IVD practice at this hospital. The first set of experiments was aimed at calibration of diodes that are going to be used for IVD. PMMA, phantoms by PTW were used to calibrate p – type Si, semiconductor diode dosimeters, made by PTW Freiburg for entrance dose. Response of the detectors is affected by energy of the beam, accumulated radiation dose, dose rate, temperature, angle against the beam axis, etc. Here we present the work done for calculating calibration factor and correction factors of source to surface distance, field size, and beam incidence for the entrance dose for both 6 MV photon beam and 18 MV photon beam. Dependence of dosimeter response was found to be more pronounced with source to surface distance as compared to other variables investigated.

  2. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was ≥5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were ≤2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation

  3. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy

  4. The future and progress of proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko

    1994-01-01

    The advantage of proton therapy is reduction of treatment volumes relative to those feasible with conventional photon therapy. The consequence is that the radiation dose to the target can be raised, with a resultant increase in tumor control probability. Proton beams, however, yield no biological gains because their biological properties are similar to conventional low LET radiations. As more sophisticated technologies are needed, there have been many advances which are applicable to photon therapy; 3-D treatment planning, DVH analysis, and systems for positioning, etc. As of January 1994, a total of about 13,000 cases were reported as having had treatments with proton beams in 16 centers world wide. The tumor sites for those include uveal melanoma (30-40%), intra-cranial small targets (40%), and others. Uveal melanomas had been most extensively treated with 70 Gy/5 fx or 60 Gy/4 fx which resulted in local control and survival rates of >96% and 80%, respectively. For chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base and cervical spine, the 5 year local control rates were 65% and 91%, respectively. Promising results are also being obtained for head and neck and pelvic tumors. Deeper-seated tumors have been treated only at Tsukuba University with successful results in some anatomic sites. Among these, inoperable primary hepatocellular carcinomas were effectively treated with a total dose of 75-85 Gy (3.0-4.5 Gy/fx). The 3 year survival rates for all patients, Child A+B patient, and Child A patients were 38%, 47%, and 60%, respectively, which compare favorably to other modalities. These successful results of world wide proton therapy have led us to the conclusion that a hospital-based proton facility will provide opportunities for additional patients to be treated with protons. Thus, new plans are proposed from more than 10 institutions to build a new treatment center or upgrade the energy of currently available proton beams. (author)

  5. Partially wedged beams improve radiotherapy treatment of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig Paul; Hafslund, Rune; Gustafsson, Anders; Smaaland, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Partially wedged beams (PWBs) having wedge in one part of the field only, can be shaped using dynamic jaw intensity modulation. The possible clinical benefit of PWBs was tested in treatment plans for muscle-infiltrating bladder cancer. Material and methods: Three-dimensional treatment plans for 25 bladder cancer patients were analyzed. The originally prescribed standard conformal four-field box technique, which includes the use of lateral ordinary wedge beams, was compared to a modified conformal treatment using customized lateral PWBs. In these modified treatment plans, only the anterior parts of the two lateral beams had a wedge. To analyze the potential clinical benefit of treatment with PWBs, treatment plans were scored and compared using both physical parameters and biological dose response models. One tumour control probability model and two normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were applied. Different parameters for normal tissue radiation tolerance presented in the literature were used. Results: By PWBs the dose homogeneity throughout the target volume was improved for all patients, reducing the average relative standard deviation of the target dose distribution from 2.3 to 1.8%. A consistent reduction in the maximum doses to surrounding normal tissue volumes was also found. The most notable improvement was demonstrated in the rectum where the volume receiving more than the prescribed tumour dose was halved. Treatment with PWBs would permit a target dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in several of the patients analyzed, without increasing the overall risk for complications. The number of patients suitable for dose escalation ranged from 3 to 15, depending on whether support from all or only one of the five applied NTCP model/parameter combinations were required in each case to recommend dose escalation. Conclusion: PWBs represent a simple dose conformation tool that may allow radiation dose escalation in the treatment of muscle

  6. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  7. A quality audit program for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.F.; Stovall, M. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31

    For more than 25 years, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has had a quality audit program using mailed dosimeters to verify radiation therapy machine output. Two programs, one compulsory and one voluntary, presently monitor therapy beams at more than 1000 megavoltage-therapy facilities. A successful program requires two major components: a high-precision thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system and dedicated staff that interact closely with the users to resolve discrepancies. The TLD system, the logistics used, and the human interaction of these programs are described. Examples show that the programs can identify major discrepancies, exceeding 5 %, as well as discrepancies as small as 3%.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation and experimental verification of radiotherapy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.; Deloar, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Based on fundamental physics and statistics, the Monte Carlo technique is generally accepted as the accurate method for modelling radiation therapy treatments. A Monte Carlo simulation system has been installed, and models of linear accelerators in the more commonly used electron beam modes have been built and commissioned. A novel technique for radiation dosimetry is also being investigated. Combining the advantages of both water tank and solid phantom dosimetry, a hollow, thin walled shell or mask is filled with water and then raised above the natural water surface to produce a volume of water with the desired irregular shape.

  9. A quality audit program for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, W.F.; Stovall, M.

    1993-01-01

    For more than 25 years, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has had a quality audit program using mailed dosimeters to verify radiation therapy machine output. Two programs, one compulsory and one voluntary, presently monitor therapy beams at more than 1000 megavoltage-therapy facilities. A successful program requires two major components: a high-precision thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system and dedicated staff that interact closely with the users to resolve discrepancies. The TLD system, the logistics used, and the human interaction of these programs are described. Examples show that the programs can identify major discrepancies, exceeding 5 %, as well as discrepancies as small as 3%

  10. Radiation safety assessment of cobalt 60 external beam radiotherapy using the risk-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumenigo, C; Vilaragut, J.J.; Ferro, R.; Guillen, A.; Ramirez, M.L.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Rodriguez, M.; McDonnell, J.D.; Papadopulos, S.; Pereira, P.P.; Goncalvez, M.; Morales, J.; Larrinaga, E.; Lopez Morones, R.; Sanchez, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Sanchez, C.; Somoano, F.

    2008-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy is the only practice in which humans are placed directly in a radiation beam with the intention to deliver a very high dose. This is why safety in radiotherapy is very critical, and is a matter of interest to both radiotherapy departments and regulatory bodies. Accidental exposures have occurred throughout the world, thus showing the need for systematic safety assessments, capable to identify preventive measures and to minimize consequences of accidental exposure. Risk-matrix is a systematic approach which combines the relevant event features to assess the overall risk of each particular event. Once an event sequence is identified, questions such as how frequent the event, how severe the potential consequences and how reliable the existing safety measures are answered in a risk-matrix table. The ultimate goal is to achieve that the overall risk for events with severe consequences should always be low o very low. In the present study, the risk-matrix method has been applied to an hypothetical radiotherapy department, which could be equivalent to an upper level hospital of the Ibero American region, in terms of safety checks and preventive measures. The application of the method has identified 76 event sequences and revealed that the hypothetical radiotherapy department is sufficiently protected (low risk) against them, including 23 event sequences with severe consequences. The method has revealed that the risk of these sequences could grow to high level if certain specific preventive measures were degraded with time. This study has identified these preventive measures, thus facilitating a rational allocation of resources in regular controls to detect any loss of reliability. The method has proven to have an important practical value and is affordable at hospital level. The elaborated risk-matrix can be easily adapted to local circumstances, in terms of existing controls and safety measures. This approach can help hospitals to identify

  11. Proton beam radiotherapy as part of comprehensive regional nodal irradiation for locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Iftekaruddin, Zaid; Badar, Nida; Hartsell, William; Han-Chih Chang, John; Gondi, Vinai; Pankuch, Mark; Gao, Ming; Schmidt, Stacey; Kaplan, Darren; McGee, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluates acute toxicity outcomes in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant proton beam therapy (PBT). From 2011 to 2016, 91 patients (93 cancers) were treated with adjuvant PBT targeting the intact breast/chest wall and comprehensive regional nodes including the axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary lymph nodes. Toxicity was recorded weekly during treatment, one month following treatment, and then every 6months according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v4.0. Charts were retrospectively reviewed to verify toxicities, patient parameters, disease and treatment characteristics, and disease-related outcomes. Median follow-up was 15.5months. Median PBT dose was 50.4 Gray relative biological effectiveness (GyRBE), with subsequent boost as clinically indicated (N=61, median 10 GyRBE). Chemotherapy, when administered, was given adjuvantly (N=42) or neoadjuvantly (N=46). Grades 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis occurred in 23%, 72%, and 5%, respectively. Eight percent required treatment breaks owing to dermatitis. Median time to resolution of dermatitis was 32days. Grades 1, 2, and 3 esophagitis developed in 31%, 33%, and 0%, respectively. PBT displays acceptable toxicity in the setting of comprehensive regional nodal irradiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-01

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  13. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines

  14. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  15. External beam radiotherapy dose response characteristics of 1127 men with prostate cancer treated in the PSA era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Smith, Lewis G.; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the relationship of radiotherapy dose to prostate cancer patient outcome, with an emphasis on the influence of pretreatment prognostic variables. Methods and Materials: The 1127 Stage T1-T4 prostate cancer patients examined were treated consecutively with definitive external beam radiotherapy at the University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1987 to 1997. All had a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Treatment failure was defined as two consecutive PSA elevations on follow-up. There were 994 patients treated with a four-field box throughout to 60-70 Gy after a small reduction at 46 Gy and 161 treated with a six-field conformal boost after 46 Gy to 74-78 Gy. No patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen ablation. Median follow-up was 51.8 months. Results: Patients were divided into three radiotherapy dose groups consisting of ≤67 Gy (n = 500), >67-77 Gy (n = 495), and >77 Gy (n = 132). Relative to other prognostic factors, there were fewer patients treated to the highest dose level with a pretreatment PSA (PSAB) ≤4 or >20 ng/ml, Stage T3/T4 disease, or a Gleason score of 2-6. Actuarial 4-year freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) rates for the entire cohort were 54%, 71%, and 77% (p 67-77 Gy was associated with improved bNED rates for all PSAB (≤10 and >10), stage (T1/T2 and T3/T4), and Gleason score (2-6 and 7-10) subgroups tested. In contrast, the only prognostic group that benefited from raising dose from >67-77 Gy to >77 Gy was patients with a PSAB >10 ng/ml; although trends were noted for Stage T1/T2 and Gleason 2-6 patients. Patients with the combined features of a PSAB >10 ng/ml and Stage T1/T2 disease had 4-year bNED rates of 61% and 93% at the intermediate- and high-dose levels. A strongly significant linear association between dose (60-78 Gy) and 4-year actuarial bNED was demonstrated for patients with these intermediate-risk features. Conclusion: Prostate cancer dose response to external

  16. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment

  17. Preparation Of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters For External Radiotherapy Beam Audit In Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhayati Abdullah; Siti Sara Deraman; Taiman Kadni; Mohd Taufik Dollah; Norhayati Salleh

    2014-01-01

    The external beam audit is a part of the Quality Assurance Programme (QAP) in radiotherapy that should be carried out to check the accuracy of dose delivered by the radiotherapy treatment units are within the tolerance limit of A ± 5 % as recommended by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report No. 24. In this work, thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in powder form were chosen to be used in the dose quality audit for the radiotherapy treatment units in Malaysia. As a preparation, the characterizations of a new batch of TLD-100 powders were studied. The studies include checks for the response of TLD-100 before and after pre-annealing process, reproducibility and linearity of TL signal. Results show that the response of TLD-100 powder after pre-annealing increases by 65 % compared with before pre-annealing process. These TLD-100 powders also provide reliable and consistent readings for the absorbed dose to water within the range of 150 cGy to 250 cGy with the maximum standard uncertainty of 0.554 μC. Finally, the calibration curves for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams were established. These curves will be used in determining the absorbed dose to water (Dw) from user's irradiated TLDs. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor k=2) of Dw determination was estimated to be 4.1 %. As a conclusion, these TLD-100 powders are ready to be used as a transfer detector for evaluating the accuracy of user's delivery dose in the radiotherapy beam audit program in Malaysia. (author)

  18. RBE and clinical response in radiotherapy with neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, F.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the clinical results reported, when a cyclotron produced neutron beam was used for treatments in the pelvis region, suggested that a constant RBE of 3 should not have been used for all neutron doses. Instead a variable RBE, which increased from approximately 3 to 8 (with decreasing dose), should have been used. Although some of these RBE values are much higher than 3, they have been observed in clinical practice. An ''equivalent photon'' isodose plan was produced by employing a variable RBE and, by taking a TDF limit of 86 for bowel, an isoeffect plan was produced. This shows that in the clinical situation under consideration much of the pelvis was overdosed. Doses to tumour cells and late effects are also briefly considered. It is suggested that, in neutron therapy, both an ''equivalent photon'' isodose plan and an isoeffect plan should be produced prior to treatment. (author)

  19. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calugaru, V.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment planning in proton therapy uses a generic value for the Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of 1.1 relative to 60 Co gamma-rays throughout the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). We have studied the variation of the RBE at three positions in the SOBP of the 76 and 201 MeV proton beams used for cancer treatment at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy in Orsay (ICPO) in two human tumor cell lines using clonogenic cell death and the incidence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis without and with endonuclease treatment to reveal clustered lesions as endpoints.The RBE for induced cell killing by the 76 MeV beam increased with depth in the SOBP. However for the 201 MeV protons it was close to that for 137 Cs gamma-rays and did not vary significantly. The incidence of DSBs and clustered lesions was higher for protons than for 137 Cs g-rays, but did not depend on the proton energy or the position in the SOBP. In the second part of our work, we have shown using cell clones made deficient for known repair genes by stable or transient shRNA transfection, that the D-NHEJ pathway determine the response to protons. The response of DNA damages created in the distal part of the 76 MeV SOBP suggests that those damages belong to the class of DNA 'complex lesions' (LMDS). It also appears that the particle fluence is a major determinant of the outcome of treatment in the distal part of the SOBP. (author)

  20. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 {approx}115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1{approx}3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two

  1. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young

    2008-01-01

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 ∼115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1∼3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two patients (6

  2. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J.; Boziari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002 - 2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. Materials and Methods: The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. Results: The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside ±3% and 31% outside ±5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and

  3. Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdakis, Constantine J; Boziari, A

    2008-04-01

    Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002--2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside +/-3% and 31% outside +/-5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and discussed in details. This quality audit proved to be a

  4. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  5. A Preliminary Design Of Application Of Wireless Identification And Sensing Platform On External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heranudin; Bakhri, S.

    2018-02-01

    A linear accelerator (linac) is widely used as a means of radiotherapy by focusing high-energy photons in the targeted tumor of patient. Incorrectness of the shooting can lead normal tissue surrounding the tumor received unnecessary radiation and become damaged cells. A method is required to minimize the incorrectness that mostly caused by movement of the patient during radiotherapy process. In this paper, the Wireless Identification and Sensing Platform (WISP) architecture was employed to monitor in real time the movement of the patient’s body during radiotherapy process. In general, the WISP is a wearable sensors device that can transmit measurement data wirelessly. In this design, the measurement devices consist of an accelerometer, a barometer and an ionizing radiation sensor. If any changes in the body position which resulted in incorrectness of the shooting, the accelerometer and the barometer will trigger a warning to the linac operator. In addition, the radiation sensor in the WISP will detect unwanted radiation and that can endanger the patient. A wireless feature in this device can ease in implementation. Initial analyses have been performed and showed that the WISP is feasible to be applied on external beam radiotherapy.

  6. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  7. Clinical application of intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy with photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu

    2005-01-01

    In modern, advanced radiotherapy (e.g. intensity modulated photon radiotherapy, IMXT) the delivery time for each fraction becomes prolonged to 10-20 minutes compared with the conventional, commonly 2-5 minutes. The biological effect of this prolongation is not fully known. The large number of beam directions in IMXT commonly leads to a large integral dose in the patient. Electrons would reduce the integral dose but are not suitable for treating deep-seated tumour, due to their limited penetration in tissues. By combining electron and photon beams, the dose distributions may be improved compared with either used alone. One obstacle for using electron beams in clinical routine is that there is no available treatment planning systems that optimise electron beam treatments in a similar way as for IMXT. Protons have an even more pronounced dose fall-off, larger penetration depth and less penumbra widening than electrons and are therefore more suitable for advanced radiotherapy. However, proton facilities optimised for advanced radiotherapy are not commonly available. In some instances electron beams may be an acceptable surrogate. The first part of this study is an experimental in vitro study where the situation in a tumour during fractionated radiotherapy is simulated. The effect of the prolonged fraction time is compared with the predictions by radiobiological models. The second part is a treatment planning study to analyse the mixing of electron and photon beams for at complex target volume in comparison with IMXT. In the next step a research version of an electron beam optimiser was used for the improvement of treatment plans. The aim was to develop a method for translating crude energy and intensity matrices for optimised electrons into a deliverable treatment plan without destroying the dose distribution. In the final part, different methods of treating the spinal canal in medulloblastoma were explored in a treatment planning study that was evaluated with

  8. Measurement of the absorbed dose in the very small size photon beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derreumaux, S.; Huet, C.; Robbes, I.; Trompier, F.; Boisserie, G.; Brunet, G.; Buchheit, I.; Sarrazin, T.; Chea, M.

    2008-01-01

    After the radiotherapy accident in Toulouse, the French authority of nuclear safety and the French agency of health products safety have asked the IR.S.N. to establish, together with experts from the French society of medical physics and the French society of radiotherapy and oncology, a national protocol on dose calibration for the very small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy. The research and reflexions of the working group 'GT minifaisceaux ' set up by the I.R.S.N. are presented in this final report. A review of the international literature has been performed. A national survey has been done to know the present practices in the dosimetry of small fields. A campaign of measurements of the data needed to characterize the small beams for the different stereotactic systems has started, using different types of detectors acquired by the I.R.S.N.. In this report are presented a deep synthesis on the problems related to the dosimetry of small fields, the results of the national survey, the first results of the campaign of measurements and the recommendations of the GT. (authors)

  9. Accuracy of image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the BeamCath urethral catheter technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fokdal, Lars; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the accuracy of the BeamCath urethral catheter technique for prostate localization during radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-four patients were CT scanned twice with the BeamCath catheter, and once without the catheter. The catheter contains radiopaque...

  10. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  11. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Seemed Not to Have Survival Benefit in Rectal Cancer Patients with ypTis-2N0 After Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgery from a Population-Based Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, San-Jun

    2018-04-19

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently offered routinely, as standard, after radical resection for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation. However, the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 has not been documented to the same extent, and the survival benefit remained controversial. The purpose of this work was to determine the role of chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 classification. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database ( n  = 4,217). A propensity score model was utilized to balance baseline covariates. Of the 4,217 included patients, 335 with ypTis-2N0M0 did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There were comparable cancer-specific survivals (CSS) between those undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or not (log-rank test = 0.136, p  = .712) in the overall sample. After propensity score matching, the cancer-specific survival did not differ between the chemotherapy and observation groups (log-rank test = 0.089, p  = .765). Additionally, the Cox model did not demonstrate adjuvant chemotherapy as the prognostic factor, with hazard ratio = 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.32) for CSS. Furthermore, the 10-year cumulative CSS was 78.7% and 79.4% between the chemotherapy and observation groups, indicating no significance, and no impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival was observed in different subgroups stratified by T stage, histological grade, histology, lymph nodes, and tumor size. Patients with ypTis-2N0 rectal cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative radiology and radical surgery in this cohort study. These results provided new insight into the routine use of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer with completed neo-adjuvant radiotherapy and curative surgery. Inconsistent recommendations for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation are offered by clinical guidelines. Adjuvant

  12. Initial clinical outcomes of proton beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Yoo, Gyu Sang; Cho, Sungkoo; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Boram; Kang, Wonseok; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Paik, Yong-Han; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Park, Hee Chul

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the initial outcomes of proton beam therapy (PBT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of tumor response and safety. HCC patients who were not indicated for standard curative local modalities and who were treated with PBT at Samsung Medical Center from January 2016 to February 2017 were enrolled. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Tumor response was evaluated using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). A total of 101 HCC patients treated with PBT were included. Patients were treated with an equivalent dose of 62-92 GyE 10 . Liver function status was not significantly affected after PBT. Greater than 80% of patients had Child-Pugh class A and albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) grade 1 up to 3-months after PBT. Of 78 patients followed for three months after PBT, infield complete and partial responses were achieved in 54 (69.2%) and 14 (17.9%) patients, respectively. PBT treatment of HCC patients showed a favorable infield complete response rate of 69.2% with acceptable acute toxicity. An additional follow-up study of these patients will be conducted.

  13. Calculation of uncertainties in the protocol of dosimetry for Co 60 beams in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez M, S.; Carrera M, F.; Sanchez S, J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective in this work is to show how the uncertainty is possible to know in the determination of the absorbed dose in Co 60 photon beams and to establish in a rational form, tolerance levels for this. It is took as base the spanish protocol of dosimetry in Radiotherapy. We have been centered in a Co 60 beam. We utilized the statistical theory of little samples. We allowed to suggest a new approach about the treatment of the tolerance levels and the uncertainty of the measurement. After two years of experience in the practical hospitable application we have gotten to put around 1 % uncertainty in the absolute dosimetry of the Co 60 beam. The presented protocol allows to execute the accuracy requirements in the determination of absorbed doses. (Author)

  14. Supine proton beam craniospinal radiotherapy using a novel tabletop adapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; Besemer, Abby; Simmons, Joseph; Hoene, Ted; Simoneaux, Victor; Sandefur, Amy; Wolanski, Mark; Li, Zhao; Cheng, Chee-Wei

    2013-01-01

    To develop a device that allows supine craniospinal proton and photon therapy to the vast majority of proton and photon facilities currently experiencing limitations as a result of couch design issues. Plywood and carbon fiber were used for the development of a prototype unit. Once this was found to be satisfactory after all design issues were addressed, computer-assisted design (CAD) was used and carbon fiber tables were built to our specifications at a local manufacturer of military and racing car carbon fiber parts. Clinic-driven design was done using real-time team discussion for a prototype design. A local machinist was able to construct a prototype unit for us in <2 weeks after the start of our project. Once the prototype had been used successfully for several months and all development issues were addressed, a custom carbon fiber design was developed in coordination with a carbon fiber manufacturer in partnership. CAD methods were used to design the units to allow oblique fields from head to thigh on patients up to 200 cm in height. Two custom-designed carbon fiber craniospinal tabletop designs now exist: one long and one short. Four are in successful use in our facility. Their weight tolerance is greater than that of our robot table joint (164 kg). The long unit allows for working with taller patients and can be converted into a short unit as needed. An affordable, practical means of doing supine craniospinal therapy with protons or photons can be used in most locations via the use of these devices. This is important because proton therapy provides a much lower integral dose than all other therapy methods for these patients and the supine position is easier for patients to tolerate and for anesthesia delivery. These units have been successfully used for adult and pediatric supine craniospinal therapy, proton therapy using oblique beams to the low pelvis, treatment of various spine tumors, and breast-sparing Hodgkin's therapy

  15. Supine proton beam craniospinal radiotherapy using a novel tabletop adapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jbuchsba@iupui.edu [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Besemer, Abby; Simmons, Joseph; Hoene, Ted; Simoneaux, Victor; Sandefur, Amy [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Wolanski, Mark; Li, Zhao; Cheng, Chee-Wei [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2013-04-01

    To develop a device that allows supine craniospinal proton and photon therapy to the vast majority of proton and photon facilities currently experiencing limitations as a result of couch design issues. Plywood and carbon fiber were used for the development of a prototype unit. Once this was found to be satisfactory after all design issues were addressed, computer-assisted design (CAD) was used and carbon fiber tables were built to our specifications at a local manufacturer of military and racing car carbon fiber parts. Clinic-driven design was done using real-time team discussion for a prototype design. A local machinist was able to construct a prototype unit for us in <2 weeks after the start of our project. Once the prototype had been used successfully for several months and all development issues were addressed, a custom carbon fiber design was developed in coordination with a carbon fiber manufacturer in partnership. CAD methods were used to design the units to allow oblique fields from head to thigh on patients up to 200 cm in height. Two custom-designed carbon fiber craniospinal tabletop designs now exist: one long and one short. Four are in successful use in our facility. Their weight tolerance is greater than that of our robot table joint (164 kg). The long unit allows for working with taller patients and can be converted into a short unit as needed. An affordable, practical means of doing supine craniospinal therapy with protons or photons can be used in most locations via the use of these devices. This is important because proton therapy provides a much lower integral dose than all other therapy methods for these patients and the supine position is easier for patients to tolerate and for anesthesia delivery. These units have been successfully used for adult and pediatric supine craniospinal therapy, proton therapy using oblique beams to the low pelvis, treatment of various spine tumors, and breast-sparing Hodgkin's therapy.

  16. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer with Extrathyroidal Extension: Prognosis and the Role of External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Sia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed to identify variables that affected cause-specific survival (CSS and local relapse-free rate (LRFR in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC and extrathyroid extension (ETE and to examine the role of external beam radiotherapy (XRT. Prognostic factors were similar to those found in studies of all patients with DTC. In patients with postoperative gross residual disease treated with radiotherapy, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 48% and 90%. For patients with no residual or microscopic disease, 10-year CSS and LRFR were 92% and 93%. In patients older than 60 years with T3 ETE but no gross residual disease postoperatively there was an improved LRFR at 5 years of 96%, compared to 87.5% without XRT (P=.02. Patients with gross ETE benefit from XRT and there may be a potential benefit in reducing locoregional failure in patients over 60 years with minimal extrathyroidal extension (T3.

  17. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  18. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, T. Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@houstonprecisioncc.com [Houston Precision Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  19. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid–based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid–based gel for reducing the development of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid–based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop

  20. Evaluation of dose coverage to target volume and normal tissue sparing in the adjuvant radiotherapy of gastric cancers: 3D-CRT compared with dynamic IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Kk; Shukeili, Ka; Kumar, Ss; Davis, Ca; Chandran, Rr; Namrata, S

    2010-01-01

    To assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric carcinoma. In a retrospective study, for plan comparison, dose distribution was recalculated in 15 patients treated with 3D-CRT on the contoured structures of same CT images using an IMRT technique. 3D-conformal plans with three fields and four-fields were compared with seven-field dynamic IMRT plans. The different plans were compared by analyzing the dose coverage of planning target volume using TV(95), D(mean), uniformity index, conformity index and homogeneity index parameters. To assess critical organ sparing, D(mean), D(max), dose to one-third and two-third volumes of the OARs and percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were compared. The average dose coverage values of PTV with 3F-CRT and 4F-CRT plans were comparable, where as IMRT plans achieved better target coverage(p3D-CRT plans. The doses to the liver and bowel reduced significantly (p3D-CRT plans. For all OARs the percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were reduced with the IMRT plans. This study showed that a better target coverage and significant dose reduction to OARs could be achieved with the IMRT plans. The IMRT can be preferred with caution for organ motion. The authors are currently studying organ motion in the upper abdomen to use IMRT for patient treatment.

  1. Beam angle selection for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer: are noncoplanar beam angles necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D S; Bartlett, G K; Das, I J; Cardenes, H R

    2013-09-01

    External beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT) is widely used for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Noncoplanar (NCP) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and coplanar (CP) IMRT have been reported to lower the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). The purpose of this article is to examine the utility of noncoplanar beam angles in IMRT for the management of pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients who were treated with CRT for unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or neck were re-planned using CP and NCP beams in 3DCRT and IMRT with the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Compared to CP IMRT, NCP IMRT had similar target coverage with slightly increased maximum point dose, 5,799 versus 5,775 cGy (p = 0.008). NCP IMRT resulted in lower mean kidney dose, 787 versus 1,210 cGy (p kidney dose, but did not improve other dose-volume criteria. The use of NCP beam angles is preferred only in patients with risk factors for treatment-related kidney dysfunction.

  2. External beam radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagerman, R.H.; Chun, H.C.; King, G.A.; Chung, C.T.; Dalal, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    Five hundred nineteen patients with prostate cancer were seen in the Radiation Oncology Division of the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center, Syracuse, New York, between 1969 and 1981. The results for the 239 patients treated with radical intent are reported here. All patients received 60 to 70 Gy to the prostate with megavoltage beam irradiation; 142 with a small field (10 X 10 cm) 360 degrees rotational technique for Stage A, B, or C disease and 69 with a four-field pelvic brick technique (followed by a boost to the prostate) for Stage A through C and D1 disease. Twenty-eight patients were treated postoperatively for residual disease after radical prostatectomy or for recurrent tumor. The minimum follow-up time was 5 years. Actuarial 5-year and 7-year survival rates for Stage A (n = 34), B (n = 100), C (n = 63), and D1 (n = 14) were 91% and 76%, 86% and 75%, 67% and 40%, and 46% and 36%, respectively. The corresponding 5-year and 7-year relapse-free survival rates were 72% and 65%, 77% and 60%, 46% and 28%, and 38% and 25%. The local tumor control rates at 5 years were 91%, 85%, 77%, and 62% for Stage A, B, C, and D1, respectively. In our experience, there was no significant difference in relapse-free survival rates for patients who underwent transurethral resection (TURP) versus those who did not (67% versus 78% for Stage B [P greater than 0.25] and 38% versus 47% for Stage C [P greater than 0.25], respectively). Also there was no significant difference in relapse-free survival rates between large and small field techniques (64% versus 77% for Stage B [P greater than 0.25] and 56% versus 41% for Stage C [P greater than 0.25], respectively). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial survival rates were 90% and 71%, respectively, for the 15 patients with residual tumor and 58% and 33%, respectively, for the 13 patients treated for postprostatectomy recurrence

  3. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  4. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  6. The role of radiotherapy in the management of extrahepatic bile duct cancer: an analysis of 145 consecutive patients treated with intraluminal and/or external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroya; Takamura, Akio; Nojima, Takayuki; Okushiba, Shun-Ichi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of high dose radiotherapy and to evaluate its role in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1991, 145 consecutive patients with EHBD cancer were treated by low dose rate intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation (ILRT) either alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Among the primarily irradiated, 77 patients unsuitable for surgical resection, 54 were enrolled in radical radiotherapy, and 23 received palliative radiotherapy. Fifty-nine received postoperative radiotherapy, and the remaining 9 preoperative radiotherapy. The mean radiation dose was 67.8 Gy, ranging from 10 to 135 Gy. Intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation was indicated in 103 patients, and 85 of them were combined with EBRT. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis (EMBE) was used in 32 primarily irradiated patients (31 radical and 1 palliative radiotherapy) after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 145 patients were 55%, 18%, and 10%, for the 54 patients treated by radical radiotherapy (mean 83.1 Gy), 56%, 13%, and 6% [median survival time (MST) 12.4 months], and for the 59 patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (mean 61.6 Gy), 73%, 31%, and 18% (MST 21.5 months), respectively. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis was useful for the early establishment of an internal bile passage in radically irradiated patients and MST of 14.9 months in these 31 patients was significantly longer than that of 9.3 months in the remaining 23 patients without EMBE placement (p < 0.05). Eighteen patients whose surgical margins were positive in the hepatic side bile duct(s) showed significantly better survival compared with 15 patients whose surgical margins were positive in the adjacent structure(s) (44% vs. 0% survival at 3 years, p < 0.001). No survival benefit was obtained in patients given palliative or preoperative radiotherapy

  7. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  8. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elisa K; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p=0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p=0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Materials and methods: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. Results: For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p = 0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p = 0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. Conclusions: At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI

  10. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study

  11. The target volume concept at the recording of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Glaeser, L.

    1981-01-01

    With the aim of complete, exact and reproducible manual recording and documentation of external beam radiotherapy a concept is proposed providing treatment planning and recording related to space and time for target volumes of different order corresponding to Ist, IInd or IIIrd part of treatment course, regarding all dose limiting organs at risk. The record consists of the dosage plan for medical treatment planning, the treatment plan for physical dose distribution planning and the treatment record of absorbed doses delivered as well as a checklist for patient and machine set-up, and labels for intended actions during treatment development. A clear arrangement of the record form in logical order was found, demanding exact specification of target(s) and beam(s) and their relation in space and time; asking for verbal and graphical description of target volumes, organs at risk, patient positioning, beam portals and dose reference points in terms of patients' anatomy; emphasizing the most important medical data by marked areas and leaving enough empty space for additional data, remarks or comments. During several years of clinical use these record forms proved to be suitable for all cases of external beam therapy, for complex situations of target volumes and treatment-scheduling, for all treatment techniques and radiation qualities and for all ways of physical treatment planning. They can be extended to automatic treatment verification, monitoring and recording as well as to the application of in-vivo-measurements of absorbed doses. (orig.) [de

  12. Similar-Case-Based Optimization of Beam Arrangements in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Assisting Treatment Planners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki Magome

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a similar-case-based optimization method for beam arrangements in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT to assist treatment planners. Methods. First, cases that are similar to an objective case were automatically selected based on geometrical features related to a planning target volume (PTV location, PTV shape, lung size, and spinal cord position. Second, initial beam arrangements were determined by registration of similar cases with the objective case using a linear registration technique. Finally, beam directions of the objective case were locally optimized based on the cost function, which takes into account the radiation absorption in normal tissues and organs at risk. The proposed method was evaluated with 10 test cases and a treatment planning database including 81 cases, by using 11 planning evaluation indices such as tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP. Results. The procedure for the local optimization of beam arrangements improved the quality of treatment plans with significant differences (P<0.05 in the homogeneity index and conformity index for the PTV, V10, V20, mean dose, and NTCP for the lung. Conclusion. The proposed method could be usable as a computer-aided treatment planning tool for the determination of beam arrangements in SBRT.

  13. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-12-01

    -time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

  14. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-01-01

    would be enabled by real-time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Conclusions: Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

  15. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hans T.; Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives ≥45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans

  16. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdoaburas, Mohamad M; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Bezin, Jérémi Vũ; Veres, Atilla; de Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects.

  17. External beam radiotherapy of localized prostatic adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of conformal therapy, field number and target margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Rikner, G.; Letocha, H.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors of importance in the planning of external beam radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Seven patients with urogenital cancers were planned for external radiotherapy of the prostate. Four different techniques were used, viz. a 4-field box technique and four-, five- or six-field conformal therapy set-ups combined with three different margins (1-3 cm). The evaluations were based on the doses delivered to the rectum and the urinary bladder. A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for each plan using Lyman's dose volume reduction method. The most important factors that resulted in a decrease of the dose delivered to the rectum and the bladder were the use of conformal therapy and smaller margins. Conformal therapy seemed more important for the dose distribution in the urinary bladder. Five- and six-field set-ups were not significantly better than those with four fields. NTCP calculations were in accordance with the evaluation of the dose volume histograms. To conclude, four-field conformal therapy utilizing reduced margins improves the dose distribution to the rectum and the urinary bladder in the radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  18. Gas in the rectum tends to reduce during radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Mizuno, Norifumo; Endo, Haruna; Ogita, Mami; Kawamori, Jiro; Sekigucho, Kenji; Hatanaka, Shogo; Takahashi, Osamu; Tamaki, Seiichi; Shikama, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the time-course of gas accumulation in the rectum during treatment as guidance for the management of rectal volumes. We reviewed 2042 sets (35.2 sets per patient) of anteroposterior and right–left mega voltage (MV) images obtained for daily set-up from 58 patients who underwent radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer. The patients were instructed to take magnesium oxide tablets during radiotherapy. They were also encouraged to avoid foods that might cause intestinal gas during radiotherapy. Gas accumulation in the rectum was graded into three classes by the same radiation oncologist. If no gas was seen in the rectum, it was classified as grade 0. A small amount of gas was classified as grade 1, whereas a marked amount of gas that required removal was classified as grade 2. Of the 2042 sets of MV images, grades 1 and 2 gas accumulation were seen in 332 (16%) and 156 (8%), respectively. By the trend test, gas accumulation significantly decreased towards the end of treatment (P=0.02 for grade 1 or 2 and P=0.02 for grade 2). On multivariate analysis, we did not identify any significant independent predictors for either baseline gas accumulation or gas reduction. Gas accumulation tended to decrease until the end of treatment. This tendency should be reconfirmed by other institutions.

  19. Health-related quality of life after adjuvant and salvage postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer - A prospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the study was to analyze health-related quality of life changes after postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: A group of 101 patients has been surveyed prospectively before (time A), at the last day (B), two months after (C) and >1 year after (D) RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) with urinary, bowel, sexual and hormonal domains. The prostatic fossa was treated with a four-field box technique up to a total dose of 66.6 Gy. Results: While median urinary scores reached baseline levels already two months after radiotherapy (function/bother scores at time A-B-C-D: 94/89-89/75-94/89-94/89; A vs. B: p 1 year, only minor HRQOL changes occurred in comparison to baseline scores

  20. Evaluation of surface and shallow depth dose reductions using a Superflab bolus during conventional and advanced external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Xie, Yibo; Zhang, Rui

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a methodology to reduce scatter and leakage radiations to patients' surface and shallow depths during conventional and advanced external beam radiotherapy. Superflab boluses of different thicknesses were placed on top of a stack of solid water phantoms, and the bolus effect on surface and shallow depth doses for both open and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams was evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters and ion chamber measurements. Contralateral breast dose reduction caused by the bolus was evaluated by delivering clinical postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) plans to an anthropomorphic phantom. For the solid water phantom measurements, surface dose reduction caused by the Superflab bolus was achieved only in out-of-field area and on the incident side of the beam, and the dose reduction increased with bolus thickness. The dose reduction caused by the bolus was more significant at closer distances from the beam. Most of the dose reductions occurred in the first 2-cm depth and stopped at 4-cm depth. For clinical PMRT treatment plans, surface dose reductions using a 1-cm Superflab bolus were up to 31% and 62% for volumetric-modulated arc therapy and 4-field IMRT, respectively, but there was no dose reduction for Tomotherapy. A Superflab bolus can be used to reduce surface and shallow depth doses during external beam radiotherapy when it is placed out of the beam and on the incident side of the beam. Although we only validated this dose reduction strategy for PMRT treatments, it is applicable to any external beam radiotherapy and can potentially reduce patients' risk of developing radiation-induced side effects. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Radiation dose to laterally transposed ovaries during external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michael; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiation dose to laterally transposed ovaries from external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Dose measurements were performed in a modified humanoid phantom using a 6 MV photon beam. The dependence of the ovarian dose upon the field size, the distance from the primary irradiation field and the presence of wedges or gonadal shielding was determined. For a tumor dose of 45 Gy, ovarian dose was 0.88-8.51 Gy depending on the field size employed and the location of the transposed ovary in respect to the treatment field. Positioning of 7 cm thick shielding reduced the dose to ovary by less than 19%. The use of wedges increased the ovarian dose by a factor up to 1.5. Accurate radiographic localization of the ovaries allows the use of the presented dosimetric results to obtain a reasonable prediction of the ovarian dose

  2. Inhomogeneities in high energy photon beams used in radiotherapy. Experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappas, K.

    1986-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the influence of the human body inhomogeneities on the dose distribution for high energy photons beams used in Radiotherapy. It consists in an experimental part and a theoretical analysis leading to original models of calculation. We study essentially, - the beam quality of the machines used and its influence on some basic dosimetric quantities and on the response of an ionization chamber. - The dose perturbation due to off-axis heterogeneous volumes at off-axis points of measurement; a model is suggested to take into account the perturbation of the multiple scatter. The perturbation of the dose in the transition region, between water equivalent medium and heterogeneous medium (air) is also investigated. The last part is devoted to computer applications of the proposed correction methods and to a comparison between the different computerized treatment planning systems which take into account of inhomogeneities [fr

  3. Prognostic significance of CD24 protein expression in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical hysterectomy for cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Chang Ohk; Park, Won; Choi, Yoon-La; Ahn, Geunghwan; Song, Sang Yong; Huh, Seung Jae; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Je Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The CD24 marker is expressed in various carcinomas and is associated with shorter survival rates. We evaluated the prognostic significance of CD24 protein overexpression in patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy (RT) after surgery, and its prognostic significance and specific role stratified by adjuvant treatment modalities. Materials and methods: We determined the CD24 expression status of 140 patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with RT alone or with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after radical hysterectomy procedures. Results: CD24 expression was detected in 59 patients (42%) and was significantly associated with locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS) (p = 0.0218), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.0001), and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0053). In the multivariate analysis, CD24 positivity was also significantly associated with DMFS (p = 0.025) and OS (p = 0.045). CD24 expression stratified by post-operative treatments (CRT or RT alone) was associated with DMFS (p = 0.0001) but not with LRFFS (p = 0.4423) in the CRT group. However, CD24 expression was associated with LRFFS (p = 0.0198) but not with DMFS (p = 0.5269) in the RT alone group. Conclusions: CD24 expression is an independent prognostic marker in patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma, even adjuvant treatment after surgery. And this study reveals different prognostic role of CD24 expression in two subgroups treated differently after surgery. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies targeting CD24 expression stratified by subgroups might have important clinical implications.

  4. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  6. The use of Monte-Carlo codes for treatment planning in external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alan, E.; Nahum, PhD.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport is a very powerful technique. There are basically no exact solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Even, the 'straightforward' situation (in radiotherapy) of an electron beam depth-dose distribution in water proves to be too difficult for analytical methods without making gross approximations such as ignoring energy-loss straggling, large-angle single scattering and Bremsstrahlung production. monte Carlo is essential when radiation is transport from one medium into another. As the particle (be it a neutron, photon, electron, proton) crosses the boundary then a new set of interaction cross-sections is simply read in and the simulation continues as though the new medium were infinite until the next boundary is encountered. Radiotherapy involves directing a beam of megavoltage x rays or electrons (occasionally protons) at a very complex object, the human body. Monte Carlo simulation has proved in valuable at many stages of the process of accurately determining the distribution of absorbed dose in the patient. Some of these applications will be reviewed here. (Rogers and al 1990; Andreo 1991; Mackie 1990). (N.C.)

  7. Configuration space analysis of common cost functions in radiotherapy beam-weight optimization algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbottom, Carl Graham [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Webb, Steve [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-07

    The successful implementation of downhill search engines in radiotherapy optimization algorithms depends on the absence of local minima in the search space. Such techniques are much faster than stochastic optimization methods but may become trapped in local minima if they exist. A technique known as 'configuration space analysis' was applied to examine the search space of cost functions used in radiotherapy beam-weight optimization algorithms. A downhill-simplex beam-weight optimization algorithm was run repeatedly to produce a frequency distribution of final cost values. By plotting the frequency distribution as a function of final cost, the existence of local minima can be determined. Common cost functions such as the quadratic deviation of dose to the planning target volume (PTV), integral dose to organs-at-risk (OARs), dose-threshold and dose-volume constraints for OARs were studied. Combinations of the cost functions were also considered. The simple cost function terms such as the quadratic PTV dose and integral dose to OAR cost function terms are not susceptible to local minima. In contrast, dose-threshold and dose-volume OAR constraint cost function terms are able to produce local minima in the example case studied. (author)

  8. The results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers. Influence of radiation beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Joja, Ikuo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of various parameters on the results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer by assessing the outcomes of 60 patients with this cancer who received definitive radiotherapy between 1985 and 1994. Seven patients were treated with a cobalt-60 unit, and the other 53 with a linear accelerator (26 patients at 3-MV, 10 at 6-MV, and 17 at 10-MV). Of the 17 patients treated at 10-MV, 4 also received part of their treatment with a cobalt-60 unit. The total radiation dose ranged from 56 Gy to 70 Gy (mean, 61 Gy). The total radiation dose of 51 patients (85%) was 60 Gy. The factors found to influence local control were the strength of the radiation beam energy and whether or not there was gross tumor invasion of the anterior commissure. The local control rate was 71% in the patients treated with a 10-MV linear accelerator, 56% in those treated with a 6-MV linear accelerator and, 97% in those treated with a cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator (P=0.0173). The local control rate was 43% in the patients with gross anterior commissure invasion and 88% in those without (P=0.0075). We conclude that low energy photon beams are more suitable for the treatment of early glottic cancers, especially if the lesion grossly invades the anterior commissure. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer with or without intensity modulated beams: a planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, Gert O. de; Vakaet, Luc A.M.L.; Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Wagter, Carlos de; Naeyer, Bart de; Neve, Wilfried de

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) by static segmented beams allows the dose to the main portion of the prostate target to escalate while keeping the maximal dose at the anterior rectal wall at 72 Gy. The value of such IMRT plans was analyzed by comparison with non-IMRT plans using the same beam incidences. Methods and Materials: We performed a planning study on the CT data of 32 consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Three fields in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0 deg. , 116 deg. , and 244 deg. were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume (prostate and seminal vesicles). The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view autocontouring of the target volume with a margin of 1.5 cm. In study 1, the beam weights were determined by a human planner (3D-man) or by computer optimization using a biological objective function with (3D-optim-lim) or without (3D-optim-unlim) a physical term to limit target dose inhomogeneity. In study 2, the 3 beam incidences mentioned above were used and in-field uniform segments were added to allow IMRT. Plans with (IMRT-lim) or without (IMRT-unlim) constraints on target dose inhomogeneity were compared. In the IMRT-lim plan, target dose inhomogeneity was constrained between 15% and 20%. After optimization, plans in both studies were normalized to a maximal rectal dose of 72 Gy. Biological (tumor control probability [TCP], normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]) and physical indices for tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities were computed, as well as the probability of the uncomplicated local control (P+). Results: The IMRT-lim plan was superior to all other plans concerning TCP (p =no. 89%). For bladder, maximal bladder dose was significantly higher in the IMRT-unlim plan compared to all other plans (p no. <=no. 0.0001). P+ was significantly higher in both IMRT-plans than in all other plans. The 3D

  10. External beam radiotherapy for subretinal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration: is this treatment efficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staar, Susanne; Krott, Ralf; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Heimann, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Control of the natural course of sub retinal neovascularization (SRNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is difficult. Only a subset of patients is suitable for laser coagulation. This prospective study aimed to determine the efficacy and individual benefit of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The prospective trial included 287 patients with subfoveal neovascularization due to AMD which was verified by fluorescein angiography. Patients have been treated between January 1996 and October 1997. All patients received a total dose of 16 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions with 5-6 MeV photons based on computerized treatment planning in individual head mask fixation. This first analysis is based on 73 patients (50 women, 23 men, median age 74.3 years), with a median follow-up of 13.3 months and a minimum follow-up of 11 months. Results: All patients completed therapy and tolerability was good. First clinical control with second angiography was performed 6 weeks after irradiation, then in 3-month intervals. Eighteen patients with SRNV refusing radiotherapy served as a control group and were matched with 18 irradiated patients. After 7 months median visual acuity (VA) was 20/160 for the irradiated and 20/400 for the untreated patients. One year after radiotherapy final median VA was 20/400 in both groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that 16 Gy of conventionally fractionated external beam irradiation slows down the visual loss in exudative AMD for only a few months. Patients' reading vision could not be saved for a long-term run

  11. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  12. Radiobiological characterization of different energy-photon beams used in radiotherapy from linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elata, A.; Hassan, A. M. E.; Ali, E.; Calzolari, P.; Bettega, D.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a radiobiological characterization of different energy photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, and comparison of different treatment modalities, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Using two end points, cell survival and micronucleus induction, in the biological system (Chines hamster V79 cell line). Chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beams and immediately after irradiation were counted and re seeded in different numbered for each dose. For evaluation of surviving fraction samples were incubated at 37o C for 6 days, five samples were counted for each dose. At the same time three samples were seeded for the micronuclei frequency and incubated at 37o C after 24 hours cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis. The survival curve showed similar curves for the two beams and decreased with dose. The micronuclei frequency was positively correlated with dose and the energy of the photon. This indicates the presence of low dose of photoneutrons produced by using high energy photon beams. (Author)

  13. Dose distribution of chest wall electron beam radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yetong; Chen Dawei; Bai Lan; Zhou Yinhang; Piao Yongfeng; Wang Xi; Qu Yaqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose distribution of different bolus after different energy electron beam irradiation to different chest wall radiotherapy for the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The paper simulated the dose distribution of women's left breast cancer after radical mastectomy by 6 and 9 MeV electron beam irradiation, and TLD was used to measure. Results: The dose of skin became higher and the dose of lung was less when 0.5 and 1.0 cm bolus were used on the body; with the increasing of the energy of electron beam, the high dose field became larger; and with the same energy of electron beam, the high dose field moved to surface of the body when the bolus was thicker. Conclusion: When different energy electron ray irradiates different thickness bolus, the dosage of skin surface increases and the dosage of anterior margin of lung reduces. With electron ray energy increasing, the high dosage field is widen, when the electron ray energy is identity, the high dosage field migrates to the surface after adding bolus. Using certain depth bolus may attain the therapeutical dose of target area. (authors)

  14. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  15. The international protocol for the dosimetry of external radiotherapy beams based on standards of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    2001-01-01

    An International Code of Practice (CoP, or dosimetry protocol) for external beam radiotherapy dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water has been published by the IAEA on behalf of IAEA, WHO, PAHO and ESTRO. The CoP provides a systematic and internationally unified approach for the determination of the absorbed dose to water in reference conditions with radiotherapy beams. The development of absorbed-dose-to-water standards for high-energy photons and electrons offers the possibility of reducing the uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. Many laboratories already provide calibrations at the radiation quality of 60Co gamma-rays and some have extended calibrations to high-energy photon and electron beams. The dosimetry of kilovoltage x-rays, as well as that of proton and ion beams can also be based on these standards. Thus, a coherent dosimetry system based on the same formalism is achieved for practically all radiotherapy beams. The practical use of the CoP as simple. The document is formed by a set of different CoPs for each radiation type, which include detailed procedures and worksheets. All CoPs are based on ND,w chamber calibrations at a reference beam quality Qo, together with radiation beam quality correction factors kQ preferably measured directly for the user's chamber in a standards laboratory. Calculated values of kQ are provided together with their uncertainty estimates. Beam quality specifiers are 60Co, TPR20,10 (high-energy photons), R50 (electrons), HVL and kV (x-rays) and Rres (protons and ions) [es

  16. Monitoring the response of breast cancer to radiotherapy and adjuvant therapy using breast cancer antigen CA 15-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bafarag, Saeed Mohamed Ibrahim

    2001-05-01

    In this study 35 breast cancer patients were followed during their treatment in Radiation and Isotope Center of Khartoum (RICK) using breast cancer antigen CA 15-3 as an indicator of tumor marker. They were classified into three categories of CA 15-3 concentration level as stated by Colomer and Genolla (1989) as follows: normal level less than 40 UI/ml, moderate level more than 40 UI/ml and less than 60 UI/ml, and high level, more than 60 UI/ml to 3000 UI/ml. A 5 ml of venous blood samples' were collected using sterile syringes from patients with different stage of breast cancer. The sample size were thirty-five cases, one of the cases is rejected because the patient discontinued the treatment. The blood samples were collected as follows: before starting the treatment course, at the mid time of treatment course, after completion the treatment course, and after one month of completion of the treatment course. The patients classified into two groups according to their treatment protocol. The first group received only external radiation therapy treatment and those were 18 patients out of 35, while the second group received combined therapy and those were 16 patients out of 35. For those whom received external radiation radiation therapy only, the results showed that the mean value of CA 15-3 concentration level decreased at the mid of the treatment as follows: 26±3 UI/ml, 24±3 UI/ml, 22±3 UI/ml respectively, while the mean value of CA 15-3 concentration level before starting the treatment was found to be 46±14 UI/ml. The number of the patients in the normal concentration level of CA 15-3 increased by 11% at the mid of external radiotherapy treatment and by 13% at the mid combined therapy, while the moderate level decreased by 6% for both external radiotherapy and combined therapy, while the number of patients within the high level decreased by 5% for external radiotherapy and 7% for combined therapy. After completion and after one month of completion of external

  17. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  18. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  19. Beam Characterisation of the Australian Synchrotron Imaging and medical beamline for microbeam radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Midgley, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Ackerly, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) has been developed at synchrotrons around the world over the last two decades. Previous studies have shown normal tissue to be extremely tolerant to MRT at doses normally considered toxic in conventional radiotherapy whilst having a palliative and even curative effect on animal tumours. Our MRT research team has attempted to characterise the beam spectrum of the imaging and medical beamline (TMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. We also carried out film dosimetry to quantify the peak-to-valley dose ratio for three fixed geometry MRT collimators. The source of X-rays on the IMBL is a 1.4 T wiggler at a distance of 20 m from the sample stage. In vacuo and in-air metal absorbers were used to remove soft X-rays hardening the beam to between 30 and 160 keY. Filters used were 1.5 mm C, 2.5 mm AI, 0.5 mm Be and 0.75 mm Cu. Free air ion chamber measurements and half value layer measurements in conjunction with predictions from a theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean energy of the microbeam of 57 keV with a half value layer of approximately 0.29 mm Cu. The measured air kerma rate was 120 Gy/s. Measurements of the MRT beams created with tungsten/kapton multi-slit collimators on radiographic films were compared with Monte Carlo simulations of the microbeam arrays. The peak-to-valley-dose ratios were found to be 3-4 times lower than predicted by the Monte Carlo model. Imperfections in the manufacturing of the collimators may explain the observed discrepancy. (author)

  20. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Eng-Yen; Liang, Ji-An; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations

  1. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapatero, Almudena, E-mail: azapatero.hlpr@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano [Department of Urology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  2. Measurement and properties of the dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilä, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-06-21

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of the beam quality parameter, i.e. the tissue-phantom ratio or TPR 20,10 , using a conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio, or DAPR 20,10 . With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) using a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging that are present when using a point detector. In this study, the properties of the DAPR 20,10 of a cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained using two LAC detectors, PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP using EBT3 film and a Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of the DAPR 20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy using cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4-40 mm, based on the results of the two LACs, the MC calculations and the Razor diode. The measurements indicated a constant DAPR 20,10 value for fields 20-40 mm in diameter, with a maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20-4 mm in diameter for the PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR 20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for the studied 4-40 mm cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams. This has the consequence that there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area with the reported DAPR 20,10 value.

  3. Measurement and properties of the dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Jarkko; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilä, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-06-01

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of the beam quality parameter, i.e. the tissue-phantom ratio or TPR20,10, using a conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio, or DAPR20,10. With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) using a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging that are present when using a point detector. In this study, the properties of the DAPR20,10 of a cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained using two LAC detectors, PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP using EBT3 film and a Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of the DAPR20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy using cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4-40 mm, based on the results of the two LACs, the MC calculations and the Razor diode. The measurements indicated a constant DAPR20,10 value for fields 20-40 mm in diameter, with a maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20-4 mm in diameter for the PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for the studied 4-40 mm cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams. This has the consequence that there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area with the reported DAPR20,10 value.

  4. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams; Controlli di qualita' essenziali in radioterapia con fasci esterni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy. [Italian] Il gruppo di studio Assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' presenta le linee guida per la stesura dei protocolli di controllo di qualita' essenziali necessari a garantire un adeguato livello di accuratezza del trattamento radiante e rappresenta pertanto una parte essenziale del contributo fisico-dosimetrico globale di assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia con fasci esterni.

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  6. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  7. Selection and determination of beam weights based on genetic algorithms for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Zunliang Wang

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the selection of beam weights for external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. A fitness function is defined, which includes a difference function to achieve a least-square fit to doses at preselected points in a planning target volume, and a penalty item to constrain the maximum allowable doses delivered to critical organs. Adjustment between the dose uniformity within the target volume and the dose constraint to the critical structures can be achieved by varying the beam weight variables in the fitness function. A floating-point encoding schema and several operators, like uniform crossover, arithmetical crossover, geometrical crossover, Gaussian mutation and uniform mutation, have been used to evolve the population. Three different cases were used to verify the correctness of the algorithm and quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and three-dimensional dose distributions were given. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm presented here has considerable potential. (author)

  8. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  9. An alternative approach to compensators design for photon beams used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.; Zauhar, G.; Bistrovic, M.; Faj, D.; Kaliman, Z.; Smilovic Radojcic, D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of compensators in order to achieve desired dose distribution has a long history and is a well-established technique in radiation therapy planning. There are several different calculation methods for determining a compensator's thickness. An alternative method that is based on the Cunningham's modification of Clarkson's method to calculate scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section is proposed. It is well known that the total dose distribution of radiotherapy photon beam consists of the contributions of the primary beam, attenuated by the tissue layer, and the scattered radiation generated by the primary radiation in single and multiple photon scatter events. The scattered component can be represented as a function of the primary radiation. The central point of our method is the numerical estimation of the primary distribution required to achieve the desired total distribution. Now using the calculated primary distribution, the shape of the modulator could be determined. In this way the contribution of the scattered component is validated in a more accurate way than using effective attenuation coefficients, which is a common practice. The method is verified in various clinical situations and compared with the standard method. The accuracy, although dependent on geometry, was improved by at least 2%. With more complex geometries there is an even higher gain in accuracy with our method when compared to the standard method

  10. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  11. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-01-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley® 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus® linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX®) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX® the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 , with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  12. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-01

    Radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy are irradiation techniques that use small diameter photon beams for treating intracranial lesions such as pituitary adenomas, acoustic tumors and arterio-venous malformations which are inaccessible for surgery. These treatment techniques are characterized by the use of very small radiation beams which deliver a precisely measured dose to the target volume, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Treatment can be performed by using multiple 60 Co gamma-ray sources (in the so-called 'Gamma Knife'), charged particles or X-ray beams produced by linear accelerators. The prescribed dose can be given in a single session or in multiple fractions, as in conventional radiotherapy. The success of the treatment depends, among other factors, of the accurate determination of the parameters that characterize the radiation beam produced by the equipment, as well as, of a well designed quality assurance program. In this study, the dosimetric parameters of a set of collimating cones of a Radionics TM treatment system applied to two 6 MV- photon beams (Clinac 600C - Varian TM , and Mevatron MD2 - Siemens TM ) were evaluated by using a water filled PMMA simulator. Measurements were carried out for photon beam diameters ranging from 12.5 to 40.0 mm for the Clinac-600C and from 5.0 to 50.0 mm for the Mevatron MD2. The parameters were evaluated by using a parallel plate ionization chamber (Markus), Kodak X-Omat V dosimetric films, thermoluminescent dosemeters (Harschaw, TLD-100) and photodiodes. The maximum tissue-ratio, the off-axis profile and the output factors were determined and the results were compared to those reported elsewhere. A study of the dosimetric characteristics of some commercially available phototransistors was also carried out. The results showed that these electronic components can be successfully used for measuring the dosimetric parameters of small diameter photon beans used in radiosurgery. Measurements were also

  13. Multiobjective optimization with a modified simulated annealing algorithm for external beam radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, Jean-Francois; Beaulieu, Frederic; Sevigny, Caroline; Beaulieu, Luc; Tremblay, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Inverse planning in external beam radiotherapy often requires a scalar objective function that incorporates importance factors to mimic the planner's preferences between conflicting objectives. Defining those importance factors is not straightforward, and frequently leads to an iterative process in which the importance factors become variables of the optimization problem. In order to avoid this drawback of inverse planning, optimization using algorithms more suited to multiobjective optimization, such as evolutionary algorithms, has been suggested. However, much inverse planning software, including one based on simulated annealing developed at our institution, does not include multiobjective-oriented algorithms. This work investigates the performance of a modified simulated annealing algorithm used to drive aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy inverse planning software in a multiobjective optimization framework. For a few test cases involving gastric cancer patients, the use of this new algorithm leads to an increase in optimization speed of a little more than a factor of 2 over a conventional simulated annealing algorithm, while giving a close approximation of the solutions produced by a standard simulated annealing. A simple graphical user interface designed to facilitate the decision-making process that follows an optimization is also presented

  14. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Hole, Eli Olaug [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 {mu}m thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  15. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 μm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media

  18. A digital fluoroscopic imaging system for verification during external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Michikatsu

    1990-01-01

    A digital fluoroscopic (DF) imaging system has been constructed to obtain portal images for verification during external beam radiotherapy. The imaging device consists of a fluorescent screen viewed by a highly sensitive video camera through a mirror. The video signal is digitized and processed by an image processor which is linked on-line with a host microcomputer. The image quality of the DF system was compared with that of film for portal images of the Burger phantom and the Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using 10 MV X-rays. Contrast resolution of the DF image integrated for 8.5 sec. was superior to the film resolution, while spatial resolution was slightly inferior. The DF image of the Alderson phantom processed by the adaptive histogram equalization was better in showing anatomical landmarks than the film portal image. The DF image integrated for 1 sec. which is used for movie mode can show patient movement during treatment. (author)

  19. Evaluation of a plane-parallel ionization chamber for low-energy radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2014-01-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 6.3 cm 3 , developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI), was utilized to verify the possibility of its application in low-energy X-ray beam qualities for radiotherapy (T-qualities). This homemade ion chamber was manufactured using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) coated with graphite, and co-axial cables. In order to evaluate the performance of this ionization chamber, some characterization tests were performed: short- and medium-term stability, leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and linearity of response. The maximum value obtained in the short-term stability test was 0.2%, in accordance with the limit value of 0.3% provided by the IEC 60731 standard. The saturation curve was obtained varying the applied voltage from -400 V to +400 V, in steps of 50 V, using the charge collecting time of 20 s. From the saturation curve two other characteristics were analyzed: the polarity effect and the ion collection efficiency, with results within the international recommendations. The leakage current of the ionization chamber was measured in time intervals of 20 minutes, before and after its irradiations, and all the results obtained were in agreement with the IEC 60731 standard. The linearity of response was verified utilizing the T-50(b) radiation quality, and the ionization chamber was exposed to different air kerma rates. The response of the ionization chamber presented a linear behavior. Therefore, all results were considered satisfactory, within international recommendations, indicating that this homemade ionization chamber presents potential routine use in dosimetry of low-energy radiotherapy beams. (author)

  20. Salvage external beam radiotherapy for clinical failure after cryosurgery for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonough, Michael J.; Feldmeier, John J.; Parsai, Ishmael; Dobelbower, Ralph R.; Selman, Steven H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as salvage treatment of prostate cancer after cryosurgery failure. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 1998, 6 patients underwent EBRT with curative intent for local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery. All 6 patients had biopsy-proven recurrence and palpable disease on digital rectal examination at the time of EBRT. The median follow-up was 34 months (range 8-46). The median prostate-specific antigen level was 2.3 ng/mL (range 0.8-4.1). No patient had evidence of metastatic disease. Two patients received hormonal therapy before beginning EBRT. No patient received hormonal therapy after EBRT completion. The median elapsed time between cryosurgery and EBRT was 3 years (range 1.5-4). The median delivered dose was 66 Gy (range 62-70.2) using a 10-MeV photon beam. An in-house-developed three-dimensional treatment planning system was used to plan delivery of the prescribed dose with conformal radiotherapy techniques. Results: After EBRT, all patients had complete resolution of palpable disease. Four patients (66%) were disease free at the time of the last follow-up. Two patients developed biochemical failure as defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition. One of these patients had a prostate-specific antigen level of 97 ng/mL before cryosurgery. No patient developed distant metastasis during follow-up. Two patients (33%) developed proctitis; 1 case resolved with Rowasa suppositories and 1 required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that EBRT can render a significant number of patients biochemically free of disease and can cause complete resolution of clinically palpable disease after initial cryosurgery. The results also showed that EBRT can be given without excessive morbidity. EBRT should be considered as a treatment option in these potentially curable cases

  1. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ 2  = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  2. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2007-01-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were inter compared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 99m Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  3. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were intercompared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 99m Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  4. Prognostic significance of several histological features in intermediate and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent using surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, K.; Bernshaw, D.; Quinn, M.; Allen, D.; Rejeki, V.; Herschtal, A.; Jobling, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of the present study was to explore the prognostic significance of several histological features with respect to lymph node metastasis, failure-free survival (FeS), and overall survival (Os) in intermediate and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent. One hundred and eighty patients with endometrial cancer were treated with hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The mean follow-up period was 4.25 years (range 0.44-10.45 years). In multifactor analysis, fractional myometrial invasion (MI) (P = 0.047), histology (P < 0.001) and lymph-vascular space invasion (LVSI) (P = 0.025) were significant predictors for FFS when nodal status was not included. When lymph node status was known, histology (P - 0.007) and LVSI (P = 0.014) remained significant factors for FFS. For OS, histology (P < 0.001) and fractional MI (P = 0.004) were the significant factors. Lymph node status could be predicted by tumour grading (P = 0.016) and absolute MI (P 0.002). Histology type and the presence of LVSI were the most important prognostic factors in high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Absolute MI and tumour grading were useful predictors of nodal spread.

  5. An interactive beam-weight optimization tool for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burba, S.; Gardey, K.; Nadobny, J.; Stalling, D.; Seebass, M.; Beier, J.; Wust, P.; Budach, V.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A computer software tool has been developed to aid the treatment planner in selecting beam weights for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning. An approach to plan optimization has been made that is based on the use of an iterative feasibility search algorithm combined with a quadratic convergence method that seeks a set of beam weights which satisfies all the dose constraints set by the planner. Materials and Methods: A FORTRAN module for dose calculation for radiotherapy (a VOXELPLAN modification) has been integrated into an object-oriented Silicon Graphics TM platform in an IRIS Inventor environment on basis of the OpenGL which up to now has been exclusively used for the calculation of E-field distributions in hyperthermia (HyperPlan TM ). After the successful calculation and representation of the dose distribution in the Silicon Graphics TM platform, an algorithm involving the minimization method according to the principle of quadratic convergence was developed for optimizing beam weights of a number of pre-calculated fields. The verification of the algorithms for dose calculation and dose optimization has been realized by use of a standardized interface to the program VIRTUOS as well as by the collapsed cone algorithm implemented in the commercial treatment planning system Helax TMS TM . Results: The search algorithm allows the planner to incorporate relative importance weightings to target volumes and anatomical structures, specifying, for example, that a dose constraint to the spinal cord is much more crucial to the overall evaluation of a treatment plan than a dose constraint to otherwise uninvolved soft tissue. In most cases the applied minimization method according to the model of Davidon-Fletcher-Powell showed ultimate fast convergence for a general function f(x) with continuous second derivatives and fast convergence for a positive definite quadratic function. In other cases, however, the absence of an acceptable solution may indicate

  6. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm 3 (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm 3 (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  7. Association of Fatigue with Perceived Stress in Chinese Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer Awaiting Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Kwan, Tracy T C; Cheung, Irene K M; Chan, Caitlin K P; Lo, Phyllis H Y; Yip, Paul S F; Luk, Mai-Yee; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2015-08-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is common in women with breast cancer, but little is known of its relationship with perceived stress. We conducted a cross-sectional study to explore the associations of CRF with perceived stress, anxiety, depression, pain and sleep quality in 133 Chinese women (aged 25-68 years) with early stage breast cancer. The majority of women had completed surgery and chemotherapy and were awaiting radiotherapy. Self-administered questionnaires consisting of the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale-10, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used to collect data. Forty-five per cent of the women were severely fatigued. Compared with local healthy women and US breast cancer patients, the group's mean perceived stress score was significantly higher (both p stress (β = 0.18, p = 0.032), higher anxiety (β = 0.30, p stress was partially mediated by anxiety, suggesting a possible pathway from cancer and cancer treatment to CRF via stress appraisals and emotional distress. The findings indicate the importance of monitoring the psychological status of patients during treatment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The prognostic value of time parameters in adjuvant radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis of 138 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietl, B.; Schaefer, C.; Koelbl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to answer the question, how the parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and overall treatment time (OTT) influenced the endpoints overall (OS), event-free (EFS) and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, who had received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 138 patients were included into a retrospective analysis from 10/1993 to 05/2000. Besides the time parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and OTT, tumor- and therapy-related parameters (T-, N-, R-status, grading, tumor site, surgical technique, and postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl) with potential impact on the endpoints were investigated in the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Individual parameters with a significant impact (p = 0.05) were subjected to a multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: besides a postoperative hemoglobin value < 12 g/dl, in the univariate analysis an OTT ≥ 105 days negatively influenced all endpoints, as well as a radiation treatment time ≥ 60 days. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl and an OTT ≥ 105 days were identified as independent negative prognostic factors for all endpoints. Conclusion: the waiting time should be managed according to the ASARA (as short as reasonably achievable) recommendation, radiation treatment should not be protracted exceeding an overall treatment of 105 days. Generally, time parameters should be routinely included in the standard tumor documentation, thus facilitating further evaluation of these prognostically relevant factors. (orig.)

  9. On the feasibility of dose quantification with in-beam PET data in radiotherapy with 12C and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, K.

    2004-11-01

    The physical advantages of light ions in combination with technological advances like intensity controlled raster scanning offer a unique tool for high precision radiotherapy. This is particularly applied to delicate clinical situations of inoperable tumours growing in close proximity to critical organs. The potential benefit of such a high selectivity of ion beam therapy demands the complex and strictly conformal dose delivery to be monitored in-situ and non-invasively in three dimensions. In contrast to conventional photon radiation, light ions exhibit a well defined range which determines the position of the maximum dose delivery in the inhomogeneous tumour target. This requires a monitoring technology along the ion trajectory offering millimetre precision. Additionally, accurate control of the lateral position of the irradiation field within the patient can be a crucial issue for the frequent case of portals passing adjacent to organs at risk. At present, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the only feasible method fulfilling these requirements. For this purpose a dedicated in-beam positron camera has been completely integrated into the experimental heavy ion treatment site at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. This allows to measure the minor amount of β + -activity produced in nuclear reactions between the projectiles and the target nuclei of the tissue simultaneously to the tumour irradiation. The emitted signal is correlated but not directly proportional to the spatial pattern of the delivered dose. Hence, therapy control is achieved by comparing the measured β + -activity distribution with a prediction based on the treatment plan and the specific time course of the particular irradiation. (orig.)

  10. A dosimetric comparison of fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for treating intermediate intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Xia Ping; Verhey, Lynn J.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate treatment plans for the fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy and the Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treating medium-size intracranial lesions (range 4-25 cm 3 ). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were developed for the Leksell Gamma Knife and a fan-beam inverse treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons were carried out using dose-volume histogram (DVH), tissue-volume ratio (TVR), and maximum dose to the prescription dose (MDPD) ratio. The study was carried out for both simulated targets and clinical targets with irregular shapes and at different locations. Results: The MDPD ratio was significantly greater for the Gamma Knife plans than for the fan-beam IMRT plans. The Gamma Knife plans produced equivalent TVR values to the fan-beam IMRT plans. Based on the DVH comparison, the fan-beam IMRT delivered significantly more dose to the normal brain tissue than the Gamma Knife. The results of the comparison were found to be insensitive to the target locations. Conclusion: The Gamma Knife is better than the fan-beam IMRT in sparing normal brain tissue while producing equivalent tumor dose conformity for treating medium-size intracranial lesions. However, the target dose homogeneity is significantly better for the fan-beam IMRT than for the Gamma Knife

  11. Rates and predictors of consideration for adjuvant radiotherapy among high-risk breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotneva, Stanimira; Reidel, Kristen; Nassif, Mohammed; Trabulsi, Nora; Mayo, Nancy; Tamblyn, Robyn; Meguerditchian, Ari N

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) represents the standard for local control of breast cancer (BC). However, variations in practice persist. We aimed to characterize the rate of RT consideration (or referral) after BCS and identify predictors in Quebec, Canada, where universal health insurance is in place. A historical prospective cohort study using the provincial hospital discharge and medical services databases was conducted. All women with incident, non-metastatic BC (stages I-III) undergoing BCS (1998-2005) were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for RT consideration were estimated with a generalized estimating equations regression model, adjusting for clustering of patients within physicians. Of the 27,483 women selected, 90 % were considered for RT and 84 % subsequently received it. Relative to women 50-69 years old, younger and older women were less likely to be considered: ORs of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.73-0.93) and 0.10 (0.09-0.12), respectively. Emergency room visits and hospitalizations unrelated to BC were associated with decreased odds of RT consideration: 0.85 (0.76-0.94) and 0.83 (0.71-0.97). Women with regional BC considered for chemotherapy were more likely to be considered for RT: 3.41 (2.83-4.11). RT consideration odds increased by 7 % (OR of 1.07, 95 % CI 1.03-1.10) for every ten additional BCSs performed by the surgeon in the prior year. Social isolation, comorbidities, and greater distance to a referral center lowered the odds. Demographic and clinical patient-related risk factors, health service use, gaps in other aspects of BC management, and surgeon's experience predicted RT consideration.

  12. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Rao, Malay S.; Khan, Atif; Huzzy, Lien; Green, Camille; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced ≥Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  13. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23-62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI {>=}25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI {>=}30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI {>=} 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  14. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  15. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lilie L.; Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23–62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI ≥30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI ≥ 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  16. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan; Iacoviello, Giuseppina; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna; Dondi, Daniele; Gueli, Anna Maria; Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora; Marrale, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 registered ) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 registered is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. A deterministic iterative least-squares algorithm for beam weight optimization in conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yan; Michalski, Darek; Houser, Christopher; Galvin, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, inverse treatment planning in conformal radiotherapy is, in part, a trial-and-error process due to the interplay of many competing criteria for obtaining a clinically acceptable dose distribution. A new method is developed for beam weight optimization that incorporates clinically relevant nonlinear and linear constraints. The process is driven by a nonlinear, quasi-quadratic objective function and the solution space is defined by a set of linear constraints. At each step of iteration, the optimization problem is linearized by a self-consistent approximation that is local to the existing dose distribution. The dose distribution is then improved by solving a series of constrained least-squares problems using an established method until all prescribed constraints are satisfied. This differs from the current approaches in that it does not rely on the search for the global minimum of a specific objective function. Essentially, our proposed objective function can be construed as a functional that comprises a class of dose-based quadratic objective functions. Empirical adjustment for appropriate model parameters in the construction of objective function is minimized, since these parameters are in effect adaptively adjusted during optimization. The method is robust in solving difficult clinical cases using either aperture or pencil beam based planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy. (author)

  18. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Iacoviello, Giuseppina [Hospital ARNAS-Civico, Medical Physics Department, Palermo (Italy); Panzeca, Salvatore [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Dondi, Daniele [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Chemistry, Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Gueli, Anna Maria [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PH3DRA Laboratories, Catania (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics Department, Novara (Italy); Marrale, Maurizio [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Advanced Technologies Network Center (ATeN Center), Palermo (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered}) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered} is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Design and test of a scintillation dosimeter for dosimetry measurements of high energy radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontbonne, J.M.

    2002-12-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of the performances of a scintillation dosimeter developed for the dosimetry of radiation beams used in radiotherapy. The dosimeter consists in a small plastic scintillator producing light which is guided by means of a plastic optical fiber towards photodetectors. In addition to scintillation, high energy ionizing radiations produce Cerenkov light both in the scintillator and the optical fiber. Based on a wavelength analysis, we have developed a deconvolution technique to measure the scintillation light in the presence of Cerenkov light. We stress the advantages that are anticipated from plastic scintillator, in particular concerning tissue or water equivalence (mass stopping power, mass attenuation or mass energy absorption coefficients). We show that detectors based on this material have better characteristics than conventional dosimeters such as ionisation chambers or silicon detectors. The deconvolution technique is exposed, as well as the calibration procedure using an ionisation chamber. We have studied the uncertainty of our dosimeter. The electronics noise, the fiber transmission, the deconvolution technique and the calibration errors give an overall combined experimental uncertainty of about 0,5%. The absolute response of the dosimeter is studied by means of depth dose measurements. We show that absolute uncertainty with photons or electrons beams with energies ranging from 4 MeV to 25 MeV is less than ± 1 %. Last, at variance with other devices, our scintillation dosimeter does not need dose correction with depth. (author)

  20. Endometrial cancer - reduce to the minimum. A new paradigm for adjuvant treatments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, Heike R; Schulz, Diana S; Belka, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and the extent of lymph node dissection for early stage endometrial cancer are controversial. In order to clarify the current position of the given adjuvant treatment options, a systematic review was performed. Both, Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge database were searched using the following keywords and MESH headings: 'Endometrial cancer', 'Endometrial Neoplasms', 'Endometrial Neoplasms/radiotherapy', 'External beam radiation therapy', 'Brachytherapy' and adequate combinations. Recent data from randomized trials indicate that external beam radiation therapy - particularly in combination with extended lymph node dissection - or radical lymph node dissection increases toxicity without any improvement of overall survival rates. Thus, reduced surgical aggressiveness and limitation of radiotherapy to vaginal-vault-brachytherapy only is sufficient for most cases of early stage endometrial cancer

  1. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R., E-mail: hogstrom@lsu.edu; Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, Texas 77005-1827 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  2. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  3. Integral dose investigation of non-coplanar treatment beam geometries in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dan; Dong, Peng; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Automated planning and delivery of non-coplanar plans such as 4π radiotherapy involving a large number of fields have been developed to take advantage of the newly available automated couch and gantry on C-arm gantry linacs. However, there is an increasing concern regarding the potential changes in the integral dose that needs to be investigated. Methods: A digital torso phantom and 22 lung and liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients were included in the study. The digital phantom was constructed as a water equivalent elliptical cylinder with a major axis length of 35.4 cm and minor axis of 23.6 cm. A 4.5 cm diameter target was positioned at varying depths along the major axis. Integral doses from intensity modulated, non-coplanar beams forming a conical pattern were compared against the equally spaced coplanar beam plans. Integral dose dependence on the phantom geometry and the beam number was also quantified. For the patient plans, the non-coplanar and coplanar beams and fluences were optimized using a column generation and pricing approach and compared against clinical VMAT plans using two full (lung) or partial coplanar arcs (liver) entering at the side proximal to the tumor. Both the average dose to the normal tissue volume and the total volumes receiving greater than 2 Gy (V2) and 5 Gy (V5) were evaluated and compared. Results: The ratio of integral dose from the non-coplanar and coplanar plans depended on the tumor depth for the phantom; for tumors shallower than 10 cm, the non-coplanar integral doses were lower than coplanar integral doses for non-coplanar angles less than 60°. Similar patterns were observed in the patient plans. The smallest non-coplanar integral doses were observed for tumor 6–8 cm deep. For the phantom, the integral dose was independent of the number of beams, consistent with the liver SBRT patients but the lung SBRT patients showed slight increase in the integral dose when more beams were used. Larger

  4. Breast cancer in patients carrying a germ-line CHEK2 mutation: Outcome after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Women carrying mutations in the CHEK2 gene are at an increased breast cancer risk. Data about outcome and prognosis for these patients after standard multimodality treatment are scarce at present. Materials and methods: One-hundred and fifty (150) patients with non-metastasized early-stage breast cancer (T1-2) receiving postoperative radiotherapy following breast-conservative surgery at our department were included in this analysis. Carriers were identified using mutation-specific restriction enzyme-based screening assays in previous investigations. Twenty-five breast cancer patients were heterozygous for one of three CHEK2 gene mutations (I157T, n = 13; 1100delC, n = 10; IVS2+1G > A, n = 2). The comparison group consisted of 125 early-stage breast cancer patients without a CHEK2 gene mutation (non-carriers). Median follow-up was 87 months for the total cohort of patients. Results: Local recurrences occurred in 13 patients (carriers, 3 (12%); non-carriers, 10 (8%)) and distant metastases occurred in 27 patients (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 19 (15%)). Twenty-five patients had deceased (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 17 (14%)) with all but 3 deaths related to breast cancer. Actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival was 86% in carriers versus 90% in non-carriers (p = 0.48). Actuarial metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival at 7 years were 64% vs. 84% (p = 0.045), 59% vs. 78% (p = 0.07) and 69% vs. 87% (p = 0.10), respectively. In a multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis presence of a CHEK2 mutation remained a borderline significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.048; OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-1.0) next to T-stage (p = 0.001; OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6). Conclusions: Heterozygosity for a germline CHEK2 mutation appears to represent an adverse prognostic factor in patients with early-stage breast cancer. If confirmed in larger studies these data may serve as a basis for future surveillance and treatment

  5. Initial patient imaging with an optimised radiotherapy beam for portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flampouri, Stella; McNair, Helen A.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Evans, Philip M.; Partridge, Mike; Verhaegen, Frank; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility and the advantages of a portal-imaging mode on a medical accelerator, consisting of a thin low-Z bremsstrahlung target and a thin Gd 2 O 2 S/film detector, for patient imaging. Patients and methods: The international code of practice for high-energy photon dosimetry was used to calibrate dosimetry instruments for the imaging beam produced by 4.75 MeV electrons hitting a 6 mm thick aluminium target. Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom were taken with a mammography film system and the dose in the phantom was measured with TLDs calibrated for this beam. The first head and neck patient images are compared with conventional images (taken with the treatment beam on a film radiotherapy verification detector). Visibility of structures for six patients was evaluated. Results: Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom, taken with both imaging systems showed that the contrast increased dramatically for the new system while the dose required to form an image was less than 10 -2 Gy. The patient images taken with the new and the conventional systems showed that air-tissue interfaces were better defined in the new system image. Anatomical structures, visible on both films, are clearer with the new system. Additionally, bony structures, such as vertebrae, were clearly visible only with the new system. The system under evaluation was significantly better for all features in lateral images and most features in anterior images. Conclusions: This pilot study of the new portal imaging system showed the image quality is significantly improved

  6. Non-rigid CT/CBCT to CBCT registration for online external beam radiotherapy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, Cornel; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Kotte, Alexis N. T. J.; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Ries, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Image-guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) allows radiation dose deposition with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Guidance is usually achieved by estimating the displacements, via image registration, between cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different stages of the therapy. The resulting displacements are then used to reposition the patient such that the location of the tumor at the time of treatment matches its position during planning. Moreover, ongoing research aims to use CBCT-CT image registration for online plan adaptation. However, CBCT images are usually acquired using a small number of x-ray projections and/or low beam intensities. This often leads to the images being subject to low contrast, low signal-to-noise ratio and artifacts, which ends-up hampering the image registration process. Previous studies addressed this by integrating additional image processing steps into the registration procedure. However, these steps are usually designed for particular image acquisition schemes, therefore limiting their use on a case-by-case basis. In the current study we address CT to CBCT and CBCT to CBCT registration by the means of the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. Contrary to previous approaches, EVolution does not require the integration of additional image processing steps in the registration scheme. Moreover, the algorithm requires a low number of input parameters, is easily parallelizable and provides an elastic deformation on a point-by-point basis. Results have shown that relative to a pure CT-based registration, the intrinsic artifacts present in typical CBCT images only have a sub-millimeter impact on the accuracy and precision of the estimated deformation. In addition, the algorithm has low computational requirements, which are compatible with online image-based guidance of EBRT treatments.

  7. Some aspects of the design of intensity modulated beams for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, PM; Hansen, VN; Swindell, W

    1995-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging system has been used to design intensity modulated beams to achieve compensation for missing tissue and tissue heterogeneity in tangential irradiation of the breast. A portal image of the breast is calibrated for radiological thickness and an estimate of the outline of lung and soft tissue is made. This is used with the desired dose prescription to design intensity modulated beams, IMBs. The practical implementation of the IMBs may be achieved using a multileaf collimator, MLC. The leaves of the MLC may be scanned dynamically or a set of multiple static fields may be used. We have compared the uniformity of the achievable dose distribution for both cases. In the static case, the effects of varying the number of fields and their relative intensities have been investigated. The use of scanning leaves yields a dose distribution which is close to optimal. Multiple static fields produce results close to optimal if a large number, typically 30 are used. However, even for the more practicable case of 5 fields, the hot and cold spots are significantly reduced compared to a simple wedge. When studying the optimum intensity distribution for the set of static fields, it was found that having the first field with a large intensity irradiating the whole target volume and a set of 'top-up' fields of equal magnitude was best. This study suggests that an MLC may indeed be used to deliver IMBs for radiotherapy of the breast. We can presently deliver the multiple static field technique. For the small number of beams which are presently deliverable, an improvement of dosimetry over the use of a simple wedge is indicated. In the future, with the scanning leaves technique, dose distributions with greatly reduced dose inhomogeneities should be achievable

  8. Effect of postoperative brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy on functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair after radical parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Qiu, Shan-Shan; Marré, Diego

    2014-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the effect of radiotherapy on facial nerve regeneration. However, the effect of brachytherapy has not been studied. Fifty-three patients underwent total parotidectomy of which 13 were radical with immediate facial nerve repair with sural nerve grafts. Six patients (group 1) did not receive adjuvant treatment whereas 7 patients (group 2) received postoperative brachytherapy plus radiotherapy. Functional outcomes were compared using Facial Clima. Mean percentage of blink recovery was 92.6 ± 4.2 for group 1 and 90.7 ± 5.2 for group 2 (p = .37). Mean percentage of commissural excursion restoration was 78.1 ± 3.5 for group 1 and 74.9 ± 5.9 for group 2 (p = .17). Mean time from surgery to first movement was 5.7 ± 0.9 months for group 1 and 6.3 ± 0.5 months for group 2 (p = .15). Brachytherapy plus radiotherapy does not affect the functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair with nerve grafts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Thoracic External Beam Radiotherapy After Airway Stenting in Malignant Airway Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie, E-mail: nrochet@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hauswald, Henrik; Schmaus, Martina; Hensley, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter [Department of Radiotherapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix J. [Department of Pulmonology and Respiratory Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Neuhof, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome and toxicity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after airway stents were placed in patients treated for malignant airway obstruction. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2009, we performed airway stenting followed by EBRT in 43 patients for symptomatic primary lung cancer (n = 31) or other thoracic malignancies (n = 12). The median time interval between stent placement and first irradiation was 14 days. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had reduced performance status (Karnofsky performance score, {<=}70). Results: EBRT had to be stopped prematurely in 16 patients (37%), at a median total dose of 17 Gy, for various reasons. In this group of patients, the survival was poor, with a median overall survival (OS) of only 21 days. Twenty-seven patients (63%) completed radiotherapy as planned, with a median OS of 8.4 months. Fourteen of 43 patients (33%) developed at least one Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event of grade 3 to 5. The most common event was a malignant restenosis of the stent leading to asphyxia (n = 7), followed by fistula formation (n = 4), necrosis (n = 3), mediastinitis with abscess (n = 1), secondary nonmalignant airway stenosis (n = 1), and hemoptysis (n = 1). With the exception of one event, all events were associated with a local progression of the tumor. Conclusions: Although the long-term prognosis for patients with malignant airway obstruction is poor, airway stenting combined with EBRT offers a possible therapeutic option, achieving fast relief of acute respiratory distress with an associated antitumor effect, resulting in a potential survival benefit. However, due to local advanced tumor growth, increased rates of adverse events are to be expected, necessitating careful monitoring.

  10. Safety and Efficacy of Thoracic External Beam Radiotherapy After Airway Stenting in Malignant Airway Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Hauswald, Henrik; Schmaus, Martina; Hensley, Frank; Huber, Peter; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix J.; Debus, Juergen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome and toxicity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after airway stents were placed in patients treated for malignant airway obstruction. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2009, we performed airway stenting followed by EBRT in 43 patients for symptomatic primary lung cancer (n = 31) or other thoracic malignancies (n = 12). The median time interval between stent placement and first irradiation was 14 days. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had reduced performance status (Karnofsky performance score, ≤70). Results: EBRT had to be stopped prematurely in 16 patients (37%), at a median total dose of 17 Gy, for various reasons. In this group of patients, the survival was poor, with a median overall survival (OS) of only 21 days. Twenty-seven patients (63%) completed radiotherapy as planned, with a median OS of 8.4 months. Fourteen of 43 patients (33%) developed at least one Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event of grade 3 to 5. The most common event was a malignant restenosis of the stent leading to asphyxia (n = 7), followed by fistula formation (n = 4), necrosis (n = 3), mediastinitis with abscess (n = 1), secondary nonmalignant airway stenosis (n = 1), and hemoptysis (n = 1). With the exception of one event, all events were associated with a local progression of the tumor. Conclusions: Although the long-term prognosis for patients with malignant airway obstruction is poor, airway stenting combined with EBRT offers a possible therapeutic option, achieving fast relief of acute respiratory distress with an associated antitumor effect, resulting in a potential survival benefit. However, due to local advanced tumor growth, increased rates of adverse events are to be expected, necessitating careful monitoring.

  11. Cone beam CT dose reduction in prostate radiotherapy using Likert scale methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Keith A; Newton, Louise A; Jordan, Suzanne; Smith, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    To use a Likert scale method to optimize image quality (IQ) for cone beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue matching for image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate. 23 males with local/locally advanced prostate cancer had the CBCT IQ assessed using a 4-point Likert scale (4 = excellent, no artefacts; 3 = good, few artefacts; 2 = poor, just able to match; 1 = unsatisfactory, not able to match) at three levels of exposure. The lateral separations of the subjects were also measured. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine if the IQ was associated with the exposure level. We used the point-biserial correlation and a χ(2) test to investigate the relationship between the separation and IQ. The Friedman test showed that the IQ was related to exposure (p = 2 × 10(-7)) and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test demonstrated that the IQ decreased as exposure decreased (all p-values <0.005). We did not find a correlation between the IQ and the separation (correlation coefficient 0.045), but for separations <35 cm, it was possible to use the lowest exposure parameters studied. We can reduce exposure factors to 80% of those supplied with the system without hindering the matching process for all patients. For patients with lateral separations <35 cm, the exposure factors can be reduced further to 64% of the original values. Likert scales are a useful tool for measuring IQ in the optimization of CBCT IQ for soft-tissue matching in radiotherapy image guidance applications.

  12. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Keller, Anke; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  13. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Derived Adaptive Radiotherapy for Radical Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brooks, Corrinne; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for reduction in normal tissue irradiation by creating a patient specific planning target volume (PTV) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging acquired in the first week of radiotherapy for patients receiving radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Patients receiving radical RT for carcinoma of the esophagus were investigated. The PTV is defined as CTV(tumor, nodes) plus esophagus outlined 3 to 5 cm cranio-caudally and a 1.5-cm circumferential margin is added (clinical plan). Prefraction CBCT are acquired on Days 1 to 4, then weekly. No correction for setup error made. The images are imported into the planning system. The tumor and esophagus for the length of the PTV are contoured on each CBCT and 5 mm margin is added. A composite volume (PTV1) is created using Week 1 composite CBCT volumes. The same process is repeated using CBCT Week 2 to 6 (PTV2). A new plan is created using PTV1 (adaptive plan). The coverage of the 95% isodose of PTV1 is evaluated on PTV2. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for lungs, heart, and cord for two plans are compared. Results: A total of 139 CBCT for 14 cases were analyzed. For the adaptive plan the coverage of the 95% prescription isodose for PTV1 = 95.6% ± 4% and the PTV2 = 96.8% ± 4.1% (t test, 0.19). Lungs V20 (15.6 Gy vs. 10.2 Gy) and heart mean dose (26.9 Gy vs. 20.7 Gy) were significantly smaller for the adaptive plan. Conclusions: A reduced planning volume can be constructed within the first week of treatment using CBCT. A single plan modification can be performed within the second week of treatment with considerable reduction in organ at risk dose.

  14. Implementation of single-breath-hold cone beam CT guided hypofraction radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Renming; Lu, You; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Jidan; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Nianyong; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of active breath control (ABC), the lung tumor reproducibility and the rationale for single-breath-hold cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided hypofraction radiotherapy. Single-breath-hold CBCT images were acquired using ABC in a cohort of 83 lung cancer patients (95 tumors) treated with hypofraction radiotherapy. For all alignments between the reference CT and CBCT images (including the pre-correction, post-correction and post-treatment CBCT images), the tumor reproducibility was evaluated via online manual alignment of the tumors, and the vertebral bone uncertainties were evaluated via offline manual alignment of the vertebral bones. The difference between the tumor reproducibility and the vertebral bone uncertainty represents the change in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone. The relative tumor positions along the coronal, sagittal and transverse axes were measured based on the reference CT image. The correlations between the vertebral bone uncertainty, the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility were evaluated using the Pearson correlations. Pre-correction, the systematic/random errors of tumor reproducibility were 4.5/2.6 (medial-lateral, ML), 5.1/4.8 (cranial-caudal, CC) and 4.0/3.6 mm (anterior-posterior, AP). These errors were significantly decreased to within 3 mm, both post-correction and post-treatment. The corresponding PTV margins were 4.7 (ML), 7.4 (CC) and 5.4 (AP) mm. The changes in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone displayed systematic/random errors of 2.2/2.0 (ML), 4.1/4.4 (CC) and 3.1/3.3 (AP) mm. The uncertainty of the vertebral bone significantly correlated to the reproducibility of the tumor position (P < 0.05), except in the CC direction post-treatment. However, no significant correlation was detected between the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility (P > 0.05). Using ABC for single-breath-hold CBCT guidance is an

  15. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  16. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D clin − D pred . The mean (〈δD r 〉), standard deviation (σ δD r ), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r PTV ) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r PTV ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The average prediction error was less

  17. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff.

  18. Influence of boost technique (external beam radiotherapy or brachyth