WorldWideScience

Sample records for bay wetlands conservation

  1. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  2. 76 FR 22785 - Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0578-AA58 Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, United States.... Background Existing wetland conservation provisions in 7 CFR part 12 require that NRCS' certification of a... Subjects in 7 CFR Part 12 Administrative practices and procedures, Soil conservation, Wetlands. For...

  3. Conservation of wetlands of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Bakobi, B.L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The major wetland systems of Tanzania are described together with specific functions,products and attributes of lakes, rivers, swamps, estuaries, mangroves and coastal areas. Reasons and priorities for the conservation of wetlands are given together with the existingproblems of wetland conservation and their solutions.

  4. Applying science to conservation and restoration of the world's wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsch, W J

    2005-01-01

    The world has an estimated 7 to 9 million km2 of wetlands which can be defined through their hydrology, physiochemical environment, and biota. Many human cultures have lived in harmony with wetland environments for centuries. Many others have not, resulting in drainage or severe impact of wetlands throughout the world. Conservation of wetlands needs to be a priority for the cultural and ecological values they provide. But a more optimistic note is that large-scale restoration and re-creation of wetlands and riverine systems is beginning to happen throughout the world through ecological engineering. Examples of large-scale wetland restoration projects are presented for Delaware Bay, the Skjern River (Denmark), Florida Everglades, Louisiana Delta, the Mississippi River Basin, and the Mesopotamian Marshlands of Iraq.

  5. Wetland Ecology Principles and Conservation, Second Edition

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Smardon

    2014-01-01

    This is a book review of Wetland Ecology Principles and Conservation, second edition, by Paul Keddy. This review focuses on the book’s content as it relates to wetland sustainability for both science and management. Besides overall comments, comparisons are made with the first edition of the book and then very specific chapter-by-chapter relationships to wetland sustainability are made to illustrate specific applications toward wetland sustainability.

  6. 77 FR 74167 - Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland... associated with Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation certification requirements. This.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation Certification....

  7. 75 FR 34479 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA)...

  8. 78 FR 11220 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA)...

  9. 77 FR 71820 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA)...

  10. 77 FR 39252 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA)...

  11. 76 FR 31626 - Meeting Announcement; North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement; North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA)...

  12. Bat response to carolina bays and wetland restoration in the southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Jennifer M.; Michael A. Menzel; John C. Kilgo; W. Mark Ford; ; John W. Edwards.

    2005-09-01

    Abstract: Bat activity in the southeastern United States is concentrated over riparian areas and wetland habitats. The restoration and creation of wetlands for mitigation purposes is becoming common in the Southeast. Understanding the effects of these restoration efforts on wetland flora and fauna is thus becoming increasingly important. Because bats (Order: Chiroptera) consist of many species that are of conservation concern and are commonly associated with wetland and riparian habitats in the Southeast (making them a good general indicator for the condition of wetland habitats), we monitored bat activity over restored and reference Carolina bays surrounded by pine savanna (Pinus spp.) or mixed pine-hardwood habitat types at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In order to determine how wetland restoration efforts affected the bat community, we monitored bat activity above drained Carolina bays pre- and post-restoration. Our results indicate that bat activity was greater over reference (i.e., undrained) than drained bays prior to the restorative efforts. One year following combined hydrologic and vegetation treatment, however, bat activity was generally greater over restored than reference bays. Bat activity was also greater over both reference and restored bays than in random, forested interior locations. We found significantly more bat activity after restoration than prior to restoration for all but one species in the treatment bays, suggesting that Carolina bay restoration can have almost immediate positive impacts on bat activity.

  13. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake...

  14. 山东青岛胶州湾湿地现状、问题及保护对策%Current Status, Problems and Conservation Stra tegies for Jiaozhou Bay Wetland in Qingdao of Shandong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝斋; 陆忠洋; 张磊

    2016-01-01

    Through investigation of the present situation of management and protection of Jiaozhou bay wetland, this paper identifies main problems existing in Jiaozhou Wetland protection, strategies for wetland protection and management were proposed.%阐述了胶州湾湿地管理及保护现状,分析了胶州湾湿地保护面临的主要问题,提出了湿地保护管理对策。

  15. Litchfield Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Litchfield Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  16. 76 FR 69278 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council AGENCY... Conservation Council will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act grant proposals for... accordance with the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (Pub. L. 101-233, 103 Stat. 1968, December...

  17. Priority wetland invertebrates as conservation surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, S J; Durance, Isabelle; Terrier, Aurelie; Swanson, Alisa M

    2010-04-01

    Invertebrates are important functionally in most ecosystems, but seldom appraised as surrogate indicators of biological diversity. Priority species might be good candidates; thus, here we evaluated whether three freshwater invertebrates listed in the U.K. Biodiversity Action Plan indicated the richness, composition, and conservation importance of associated wetland organisms as defined respectively by their alpha diversity, beta diversity, and threat status. Sites occupied by each of the gastropods Segmentina nitida, Anisus vorticulus, and Valvata macrostoma had greater species richness of gastropods and greater conservation importance than other sites. Each also characterized species assemblages associated with significant variations between locations in alpha or beta diversity among other mollusks and aquatic macrophytes. Because of their distinct resource requirements, conserving the three priority species extended the range of wetland types under management for nature conservation by 18% and the associated gastropod niche-space by around 33%. Although nonpriority species indicated variations in richness, composition, and conservation importance among other organisms as effectively as priority species, none characterized such a wide range of high-quality wetland types. We conclude that priority invertebrates are no more effective than nonpriority species as indicators of alpha and beta diversity or conservation importance among associated organisms. Nevertheless, conserving priority species can extend the array of distinct environments that are protected for their specialized biodiversity and environmental quality. We suggest that this is a key role for priority species and conservation surrogates more generally, and, on our evidence, can best be delivered through multiple species with contrasting habitat requirements.

  18. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  19. 76 FR 82075 - Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Secretary 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0560-AH97 Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the... (HELC) or wetland conservation (WC) provisions to retain eligibility for USDA program benefits if... persons who failed to apply a conservation system on highly erodible land, or who converted wetlands...

  20. Conservation of Mexican wetlands: role of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M.H.; Ryan, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Mexico's wetlands support a tremendous biological diversity and provide significant natural resource benefits to local communities. Because they are also critical stopover and wintering grounds for much of North America's waterfowl and other migratory birds, Mexico has become an important participant in continental efforts to conserve these resources through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. Funding from the Act has supported partnerships in a number of Mexico's priority wetlands to conduct data analyses and dissemination, mapping, environmental education, wetland restoration, development of sustainable economic alternatives for local people, and reserve planning and management. These partnerships, with the close involvement of Mexico's Federal Government authority, the Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, have advanced conservation in a uniquely Mexican model that differs from that employed in the United States and Canada.

  1. Microbial diversity and carbon cycling in San Francisco Bay wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Wetland restoration efforts in San Francisco Bay aim to rebuild habitat for endangered species and provide an effective carbon storage solution, reversing land subsidence caused by a century of industrial and agricultural development. However, the benefits of carbon sequestration may be negated by increased methane production in newly constructed wetlands, making these wetlands net greenhouse gas (GHG) sources to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of wetland restoration on below-ground microbial communities responsible for GHG cycling in a suite of historic and restored wetlands in SF Bay. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with real-time GHG monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of wetland soil microbial communities. The wetland soils harbor diverse communities of bacteria and archaea whose membership varies with sampling location, proximity to plant roots and sampling depth. Our results also highlight the dramatic differences in GHG production between historic and restored wetlands and allow us to link microbial community composition and GHG cycling with key environmental variables including salinity, soil carbon and plant species.

  2. The Legal Structure of Taiwan’s Wetland Conservation Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yuan Su

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In July of 2013, Taiwan passed its Wetland Conservation Act and will begin the implementation of the Act on 2 February 2015. With this Act, Taiwan has become the second Asian country to have specific legislation on wetland conservation and protection. This new law enables the society to achieve sustainable utilization on wetland ecological services. The core concepts of the Wetland Conversation Act include biological diversity conservation and wise use of wetland resources. Special political circumstances prevent Taiwan from registering its wetlands as a conservation priority under the Ramsar Convention. This new law allows the government to evaluate and assign a specific area as a “Wetland of Importance.” Under this status, any development activities within the designated area shall be prohibited unless the developer prepares a usage plan for review. The usage plan and the original usage of the natural resources within the wetland area shall also follow the “wise use” principle to protect the wetland and biological service system. However, this new law does not provide clear separation between the two different “wise use” standards. If the development is deemed necessary, new law provides compensation mitigation measures to extend the surface of the wetland and provides additional habitats for various species. Wetland conservation and management rely heavily on systematic research and fundamental data regarding Taiwan’s wetlands. Determining how to adopt these scientific methodologies and transfer them into enforceable mechanisms is a sizeable challenge for both biologists and lawyers as the Wetland Conservation Act creates many legal norms without clarifying definitions. This article will review the current wetland regulations from the legal perspective and provide suggestions for enforcement in the future.

  3. 75 FR 9380 - Cooperative Conservation Partners Initiative; Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Commodity Credit Corporation Cooperative Conservation Partners Initiative; Wetlands... (CCRP), Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), or Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP) proposed or... to help enhance conservation outcomes on wetlands and adjacent lands. The purpose of WREP as part...

  4. 78 FR 33857 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; 91100-3740-GRNT 7C] Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical... meetings. SUMMARY: The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) will meet to select North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA) grant proposals for recommendation to the Migratory...

  5. 77 FR 73 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program AGENCY: Natural Resources... improvements will be accomplished through a conservation systems approach to address water quality, wetland... habitat, and wetland restoration; (e) Provide innovation in approved conservation practices,...

  6. Flora characteristics of Chenier Wetland in Bohai Bay and biogeographic relations with adjacent wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Lu, Zhaohua; Liu, Jingtao; Hu, Shugang

    2017-01-01

    A key step towards the restoration of heavily disturbed fragile coastal wetland ecosystems is determining the composition and characteristics of the plant communities involved. This study determined and characterized the community of higher plants in the Chenier wetland of Bohai Bay using a combination of field surveys, quadrat approaches, and multivariate statistical analyses. This community was then compared to other adjacent wetlands (Tianjin, Qinhuangdao, Laizhouwan, Jiaozhouwan, and Yellow River Delta wetland) located near the Huanghai and Bohai Seas using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). Results showed a total of 56 higher plant species belonging to 52 genera from 20 families in Chenier wetland, the majority of which were dicotyledons. Single-species families were predominant, while larger families, including Gramineae, Compositae, Leguminosae, and Chenopodiaceae contained a higher number of species (each⩾6 species). Cosmopolitan species were also dominant with apparent intrazonality. Abundance (number of species) of temperate species was twice that of tropical taxa. Species number of perennial herbs, such as Gramineae and Compositae, was generally higher. Plant diversity in the Chenier wetland, based on the Shannon-Wiener index, was observed to be between the Qinhuangdao and Laizhouwan indices, while no significant difference was found in other wetlands using the Simpson index. Despite these slight differences in diversity, PCoA based on species abundance and composition of the wetland flora suggest that the Bohai Chenier community was highly similar to the coastal wetlands in Tianjin and Laizhouwan, further suggesting that these two wetlands could be important breeding grounds and resources for the restoration of the plant ecosystem in the Chenier wetland.

  7. Bridging the conservation design and delivery gap for wetland bird habitat maintenance and restoration in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Potter, B.; Soulliere, G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's adoption of Strategic Habitat Conservation is intended to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of conservation delivery by targeting effort in areas where biological benefits are greatest. Conservation funding has not often been allocated in accordance with explicit biological endpoints, and the gap between conservation design (the identification of conservation priority areas) and delivery needs to be bridged to better meet conservation goals for multiple species and landscapes. We introduce a regional prioritization scheme for North American Wetlands Conservation Act funding which explicitly addresses Midwest regional goals for wetland-dependent birds. We developed decision-support maps to guide conservation of breeding and non-breeding wetland bird habitat. This exercise suggested ~55% of the Midwest consists of potential wetland bird habitat, and areas suited for maintenance (protection) were distinguished from those most suited to restoration. Areas with greater maintenance focus were identified for central Minnesota, southeastern Wisconsin, the Upper Mississippi and Illinois rivers, and the shore of western Lake Erie and Saginaw Bay. The shores of Lakes Michigan and Superior accommodated fewer waterbird species overall, but were also important for wetland bird habitat maintenance. Abundant areas suited for wetland restoration occurred in agricultural regions of central Illinois, western Iowa, and northern Indiana and Ohio. Use of this prioritization scheme can increase effectiveness, efficiency, transparency, and credibility to land and water conservation efforts for wetland birds in the Midwestern United States.

  8. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Characterization of Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIvor, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Tidal wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida, consist of mangrove forests and salt marshes. Wetlands buffer storm surges, provide fish and wildlife habitat, and enhance water quality through the removal of water-borne nutrients and contaminants. Substantial areas of both mangroves and salt marshes have been lost to agricultural, residential, and industrial development in this urban estuary. Wetlands researchers are characterizing the biological components of tidal wetlands and examining the physical factors such as salinity, tidal flushing, and sediment deposition that control the composition of tidal wetland habitats. Wetlands restoration is a priority of resource managers in Tampa Bay. Baseline studies such as these are needed for successful restoration planning and evaluation.

  9. Prof. Cai Shuming Receives 2005 Wetland Conservation Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Cai Shuming, an expert in wetland studies from the CAS Institute of Geodesy & Geophysics, has been honored with a Ramsar Wetland Conservation Award in 2005. The announcement was made by the Standing Committee of the Ramsar Convention on June 10 in Gland,Switzerland.

  10. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: North Dakota Wetland Management Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on North Dakota Wetland Management Districts for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  11. Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines...

  12. Characterization and Placement of Wetlands for Integrated Conservation Practice Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constructed wetlands have been recognized as an efficient and cost-effective conservation practice to protect water quality through reducing the transport of sediments and nutrients from upstream croplands to downstream water bodies. The challenge resides in targeting the strateg...

  13. St. Croix Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on St. Croix Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  14. The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Monitoring the Effect of Wetland Conservation Practices on Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) brings together an interdisciplinary group of experts and resources from multiple federal agencies and the University of Maryland to assess the ability of native, restored, and prior-converted wetlands on cropland to impro...

  15. Conversion or conservation? Understanding wetland change in northwest Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Amy E; Cumming, Graeme S

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands are more threatened than any other ecosystem type, with losses exceeding 50% of their original extent worldwide. Despite the small portion of the Earth's surface that they comprise, wetlands contribute significantly to global ecosystem services. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the location and rate of change in wetland amount in the Tempisque Basin of northwest Costa Rica is predictable from landscape setting. Our results demonstrate that a strong potential exists for developing predictive models of wetland conversion based on an understanding of wetland location and surrounding trends of land use. We found that topography was the single most important predictor of wetland conversion in this area, entraining other conversion processes, and that spatial patterns of wetland loss could consistently be predicted from landscape-level variables. Areas with highest probabilities of conversion were found in the most accessible, non-protected regions of the landscape. While Palo Verde National Park made a substantial contribution to wetland conservation, our results highlight the dependence of lower-lying protected areas on upland processes, adding a little-addressed dimension of complexity to the dialogue about protected area management. Conservation strategies aimed at reducing wetland loss in tropical habitats will benefit from careful analysis of the dominant land use system(s) at a relatively broad scale, and the subsequent development of management and policy responses that take into account dynamic opportunities and constraints in the landscape.

  16. NEW ZEALAND'S WETLANDS: CONSERVATION AND WISE USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Maranhão

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand is unique when it comes to landscapes and biodiversity, being one of the countries which has the highest numbers of endemism. With such vast diversity, wetlands play a key role maintaining many of these species and also providing essential ecosystem services for the local communities. However, New Zealand has been largely degraded on wetland areas in the last two hundred years, remaining only 10% of the original composition which brings a special attention to the country. In this case, this review provides an overview of New Zealand’s wetlands highlighting aspects such as definitions, uses, values, threats and management.

  17. Tampa Bay coastal wetlands: nineteenth to twentieth century tidal marsh-to-mangrove conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, mangroves dominate the tidal wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida, but an examination of historic navigation charts revealed dominance of tidal marshes with a mangrove fringe in the 1870s. This study's objective was to conduct a new assessment of wetland change in Tampa Bay by digitizing nineteenth century topographic and public land surveys and comparing these to modern coastal features at four locations. We differentiate between wetland loss, wetland gain through marine transgression, and a wetland conversion from marsh to mangrove. Wetland loss was greatest at study sites to the east and north. Expansion of the intertidal zone through marine transgression, across adjacent low-lying land, was documented primarily near the mouth of the bay. Generally, the bay-wide marsh-to-mangrove ratio reversed from 86:14 to 25:75 in 125 years. Conversion of marsh to mangrove wetlands averaged 72 % at the four sites, ranging from 52 % at Old Tampa Bay to 95 % at Feather Sound. In addition to latitudinal influences, intact wetlands and areas with greater freshwater influence exhibited a lower rate of marsh-to-mangrove conversion. Two sources for nineteenth century coastal landscape were in close agreement, providing an unprecedented view of historic conditions in Tampa Bay.

  18. Leopold Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This CCP articulates the management direction for the Leopold Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. Through goals, objectives, and strategies, this CCP...

  19. CULTURAL VALUES OF WETLANDS IN BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN NEPAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirat Kamal Sampang Rai

    2006-01-01

    Nepal is rich in wetlands and its biodiversity due to diverse geography, ecology, ecosystem, and cultures. Participatory research methodology was used. More than 59 different traditional societies reside in various geographical belts with diverse and distinct language, culture, custom, religion, beliefs, social norms, knowledge and practices have significant roles in the protection and wise use of wetland biodiversity. Wetland ecology, landscape and cultural values may be accordance with the geographic and human dimension. The bio - cultural diversity supports to enhance wetlands and biodiversity richness from millennia. Traditional cultural, religious, spiritual values, customary lore, folklore, knowledge of the societies are playing important responsibility in wetland ecology, landscapes and biodiversity restoration, conservation and sustainable use, and they should be recognised, respected in National legislation.Themes of CBD, and RAMSAR should be respected and implemented to protect the cultural, religious, ritual, and customary contribution of the society.

  20. Wetland Habitats for Wildlife of the Chesapeake Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report reviews wildlife that use these three general wetland habitats; shallow water wetlands, forested wetlands and emergent wetlands. Wildlife discussed are...

  1. Wetlands Conservation and Use. Issue Pac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview stresses the significance of wetland habitats in all 50 states. The needs of wildlife and humans are also considered in respect to…

  2. Estuarine, intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types in Klag Bay, Chichagof Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six major estuarine intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types were identified within the inner basin of Klag Bay. These habitat types are mapped in Fig. 3. The...

  3. Monitoring wetland inundation dynamics in response to weather variability in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands provide a broad range of ecosystem services, including flood control, water purification, groundwater replenishment, and biodiversity support. The provision of these services, which are especially valued in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, is largely controlled by varying levels of wetness. ...

  4. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wass, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of bromide, a conservative tracer, and rhodamine WT (RWT), a photodegrading tracer, was evaluated in three wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage. Coupled sodium bromide and RWT tracer tests were performed to establish conservative transport and reactive parameters in constructed wetlands with water losses ranging from (1) relatively impermeable (15%), (2) moderately leaky (45%), and (3) significantly leaky (76%). RWT first-order photolysis rates and sorption coefficients were determined from independent field and laboratory experiments. Individual wetland hydraulic profiles influenced the extent of transient storage interaction in stagnant water areas and consequently RWT removal. Solute mixing and transient storage interaction occurred in the impermeable wetland, resulting in 21% RWT mass loss from main channel and storage zone photolysis (10%) and sorption (11%) reactions. Advection and dispersion governed solute transport in the leaky wetland, limiting RWT photolysis removal (1.2%) and favoring main channel sorption (3.6%). The moderately leaky wetland contained islands parallel to flow, producing channel flow and minimizing RWT losses (1.6%).

  5. Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in groundwater withdrawals from Northern Tampa Bay well fields were initiated in mid-2002 to improve the hydrologic condition of wetlands in these areas by allowing surface and groundwater levels to recover to previously higher levels. Following these reductions, water levels at some long-term wetland monitoring sites have recovered, while others have not recovered as expected. To understand why water levels for some wetlands have not increased, nine wetlands with varying impacts from well field pumping were examined based on four factors known to influence the hydrologic condition of wetlands in west-central Florida. These factors are the level of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer underlying the wetland, recent karst activity near and beneath the wetland, permeability of the underlying sediments, and the topographic position of the wetland in the landscape.

  6. 75 FR 73027 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... will be accomplished through a conservation systems approach to address water quality, wetland, and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Commodity Credit Corporation Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and Natural...

  7. Resilience of coastal wetlands to extreme hydrologic events in Apalachicola Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahsin, Subrina; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Singh, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Extreme hydrologic events such as hurricanes and droughts continuously threaten wetlands which provide key ecosystem services in coastal areas. The recovery time for vegetation after impact from these extreme events can be highly variable depending on the hazard type and intensity. Apalachicola Bay in Florida is home to a rich variety of saltwater and freshwater wetlands and is subject to a wide range of hydrologic hazards. Using spatiotemporal changes in Landsat-based empirical vegetation indices, we investigate the impact of hurricane and drought on both freshwater and saltwater wetlands from year 2000 to 2015 in Apalachicola Bay. Our results indicate that saltwater wetlands are more resilient than freshwater wetlands and suggest that in response to hurricanes, the coastal wetlands took almost a year to recover, while recovery following a drought period was observed after only a month.

  8. Wetland conservation and sustainable coastal governance in Japan and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen; Kawabe, Midori; Rewhorn, Sonja

    2011-05-01

    Coastal wetlands present particular challenges for coastal governance and for the implementation of the Ramsar Convention, not least because coastal areas are focal points of human activity and of governance ambiguity. Through the evaluation of Ramsar delivery at both national and local levels in Japan and England, the relationship between Ramsar implementation and coastal governance was examined. In England, Ramsar status is primarily treated as a nature conservation designation which limits the wider opportunities inherent in the designation. In contrast, in Japan, the Ramsar Convention is used as a policy driver at the national level and as a leverage to encourage citizen engagement, economic benefit, and wetland conservation at the local level. It was concluded that through the implementation of the Ramsar Convention in important coastal wetland areas, significant steps can be taken towards delivering integrated approaches to coastal governance.

  9. Funding and stimulation mechanisms of the wetlands` ecosystem services conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Degtyar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to study the problems of funding conservation of wetlands ecosystem services and search of organizational and economic management tools of ecosystem services, which can be implemented in Ukraine. The results of the analysis. Summary of world practice implementation of organizational and economic management tools, based on payments for wetlands ecosystem services, determine the following basic principles of their formation: 1 enter into an agreement with stakeholders payment for ecosystem services on a voluntary basis; 2 payment perform beneficiaries of ecosystem services; 3 payments are made directly to providers of ecosystem services; 4 ecosystem value should prevail over the market interests of the ecosystem services provider; 5 payment is usually carried out by a wetland ecosystem services, although, in some cases, for receiving payments may be to force a certain way of land use, etc. The author generalized and systematized modern tools that are used to manage wetlands ecosystem services. Therefore, the author proposed to allocate financial and organizational tools of ecosystem services management into separate groups. Moreover, financial instruments can be divided into public and private (or voluntary. The government funding instruments primarily include national (local target program and budget, reduced taxes, duties and tariffs, government guarantees of financial transactions of wetland ecosystem services and securitization, joint financing, credit and deposit activities on wetland ecosystem services, etc. Conclusions and directions of further researches. In Ukraine the formation of organizational and economic tools of wetlands ecosystem services managing which is based primarily on a system of payments for ecosystem services needs to take into account the following measures: conducting thorough strategic research and applied ecological, economic and other sectorial studies, conducting

  10. 50 CFR 84.21 - How do I apply for a National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Wetlands Conservation Grant? 84.21 Section 84.21 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Applying for Grants § 84.21 How do I apply for a National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant? (a) Eligible applicants should submit...

  11. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of disaster... participants must be in compliance with the highly erodible land and wetland conservation compliance...

  12. 76 FR 30186 - Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Birds and Wetlands Conservation Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Birds and Wetlands Conservation... administers grant programs associated with the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA), Public Law... partnerships to carry out wetlands conservation projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for...

  13. The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Monitoring the Delivery of Wetland Ecosystem Services across the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    CEAP-Wetlands (NRCS) and the Choptank Benchmark Watershed CEAP (ARS) have established a partnership to assess and ultimately enhance the effect of conservation practices on ecosystem services provided by wetlands in the Choptank Watershed. The provision of these wetland services (e.g., pollutant red...

  14. Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Grand Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  15. Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Back Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  17. Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  18. San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on San Pablo Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  19. 76 FR 65525 - Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland Management District; Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland Management District; Comprehensive... conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for the Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland... (district), Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake Wetland Management District are part of...

  20. Conservation of Mediterranean wetlands: interest of historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud-Bouattour, Amina; Muller, Serge D; Jamaa, Hafawa Ferchichi-Ben; Saad-Limam, Samia Ben; Rhazi, Laïla; Soulié-Märsche, Ingeborg; Rouissi, Maya; Touati, Besma; Jilani, Imtinène Ben Haj; Gammar, Amor Mokhtar; Ghrabi-Gammar, Zeineb

    2011-10-01

    The wetlands of North Africa are an endangered and invaluable ecological heritage. Some of these wetlands are now protected by various conservation statutes; which actual impact has not yet been reliably evaluated. This article aims to assess the conservation management (Nature Reserve and Ramsar site) of a protected Tunisian lake, Majen Chitane, by using palaeoecological, historical and modern data, and by comparing it with the unprotected lake Majen Choucha. While located in similar environments, these lakes are today home to very different flora. Baseline conditions reconstructed from literature indicate that both lakes were very similar until the 1950s, and comparable to the current state of Majen Choucha, housing rich oligotrophic plant communities. In the 1960s, at the time that cultivation of the adjacent peatland began, Majen Chitane underwent strong ecological changes as the initial oligotrophic plant, diatom and zooplankton communities were replaced by eutrophication-tolerant ones. Eutrophication led to the local extinction of 40-55% of the hydrophytic and temporary-pool plant species, including those characteristic of the Isoetion. Given the damages and despite the recent conservation status of the site, it's unlikely that Majen Chitane will undergo any natural regeneration. Restoring it would start with completely protecting the complex lake-peatland and re-introducing the locally extinct species from Majen Choucha. This work exemplifies the usefulness of connecting palaeoecological, historical and modern data for the conservation of Mediterranean wetlands.

  1. Monitoring the Effect of Wetland Conservation Practices in an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the substantial effect of agriculture on the extent and ability of wetlands to function, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) serves a key role in wetland conservation and restoration. The USDA has implemented several different conservation programs (e.g., the Wetland Reserve Program) wi...

  2. Status Quo, Analysis and Suggestions for Public Awareness on Wetland Conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoyun; XU Jiliang; YUAN Jun

    2011-01-01

    To understand the status of public awareness on wetland conservation in China, 1 237 people from 8 provinces or municipality were interviewed by questionnaire. After analysis of the results, 88.5% of the interviewees know the word ‘wetland'. TV and radio is the main tool for them to get information. More than two thirds of the respondents mainly learn the information on wetland conservation through TV and radio. There are still big gaps among different people in understanding wetland. Only 13.3% of the respondents give a completely right answer on question ‘ which areas are wetlands'. Most of the respondents cited lakes, marshes and rivers as wetlands, but more than half of them do not regard beaches, reservoirs, paddy fields and fish ponds as wetlands. Most of the people cited wetlands can provide such functions as water conservation, climate regulation, protecting wildlife, removing pollution, but know little about other functions such as flood control, provisioning of aquatic products, and soil retention, and much less about the cultural functions such as recreation, and inherited folk culture. Except for wastewater discharge, nearly half of the general public knows little about other threats of the wetland, while most of the people do not believe that artificial aquaculture will cause threats to the wetland areas. Public awareness on wetland conservation in China needs to be improved. Most of the respondents cited that TV, radio and internet are the most effective ways to publicize information on wetland conservation. More than two thirds of the respondents mainly learn the information on wetland conservation through TV and radio, while 38.0% of the respondents mainly through internet.Specifically, for farmers/fishermen, posters/picture albums can benefit them more than the internet; the undergraduates also expect to learn wetland mainly through posters/picture albums; while for the primary and middle school students, the school education is another

  3. China's coastal wetlands: conservation history, implementation efforts, existing issues and strategies for future improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigao; Sun, Wenguang; Tong, Chuan; Zeng, Congsheng; Yu, Xiang; Mou, Xiaojie

    2015-06-01

    China has approximately 5.80×10(6)ha coastal wetlands by 2014, accounting for 10.82% of the total area of natural wetlands. Healthy coastal wetland ecosystems play an important role in guaranteeing the territory ecological security and the sustainable development of coastal zone in China. In this paper, the natural geography and the past and present status of China's coastal wetlands were introduced and the five stages (1950s-1970s, 1980s-1991, 1992-2002, 2003-2010 and 2011-present) of China's coastal wetlands conservation from the foundation of the People's Republic in 1949 to present were distinguished and reviewed. Over the past decades, China has made great efforts in coastal wetland conservation, as signified by the implementation of coastal wetland restoration projects, the construction of coastal wetland nature reserves, the practice of routine ecological monitoring and two national wetland surveys, the promulgation of local wetland conservation statutes and specific regulations, the coordination mechanism to enhance management capacity, the wide development of coastal wetland research and public participation, and the extensive communication to strengthen international cooperation. Nonetheless, six major issues recently emerged in China's coastal wetland conservation are evidently existed, including the increasing threats of pollution and human activities, the increasing adverse effects of threaten factors on ecosystem function, the increasing threats of coastal erosion and sea-level rising, the insufficient funding for coastal wetlands conservation, the imperfect legal and management system for coastal wetlands, and the insufficient education, research and international cooperation. Although the threats and pressures on coastal wetlands conservation are still apparent, the future of China's coastal wetlands looks promising since the Chinese government understands that the sustainable development in coastal zone requires new attitudes, sound policies and

  4. Biological Diversity of Created Forested Wetlands in Comparison to Reference Forested Wetlands in the Bay Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals were surveyed at six created forested wetlands in central Maryland and at six adjacent reference forested wetlands during...

  5. The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Monitoring the Delivery of Wetland Services across the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) brings together an interdisciplinary group of experts and resources from multiple federal agencies and the University of Maryland to assess the ability of “natural,” restored, and prior-converted wetlands on cropland to im...

  6. Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge and Karner Blue Butterfly Conservation Easement: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  7. Comparison of Qinzhou bay wetland landscape information extraction by three methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chang

    2014-04-01

    and OO is 219 km2, 193.70 km2, 217.40 km2 respectively. The result indicates that SC is in the f irst place, followed by OO approach, and the third DT method when used to extract Qingzhou Bay coastal wetland.

  8. Aquatic macrophyte and macroinvertebrate diversity and conservation in wetlands of the Sinos River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, L; Rolon, A S; Stenert, C

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands are important sites for biological conservation because they support rich biodiversity and present high productivity. Species-area relationship is an important tool in conservation planning and it has been extensively used for wetland management. This study had as aims: (1) to analyse macrophyte and macroinvertebrate diversity in the fragmented wetlands of the Sinos River basin; and (2) to investigate whether wetland areas could work as a tool for selecting the important habitats for biodiversity conservation. Throughout the study, 56 species of macrophytes and 57 taxa of macroinvertebrates were identified. Macrophyte richness was related to the wetland area, but macroinvertebrate richness, however, was not related to the wetland area. The macrophyte and macroinvertebrate composition were not related to the wetland area. Species composition varied between the regions of the basin and the difference in the species composition occurred mainly by the distribution of macroinvertebrates. With regard to the biodiversity conservation of the Sinos River basin, the wetland area must not be a priority criterion for choosing the important wetlands for conservation. The environmental policies for biodiversity conservation must include management actions focused also on the protection of small wetlands. Moreover, other criteria should be analysed in further research such as habitat diversity, hydroperiod, geographic distribution and connectivity.

  9. Simulated wetland conservation-restoration effects on water quantity and quality at watershed scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xixi; Shang, Shiyou; Qu, Zhongyi; Liu, Tingxi; Melesse, Assefa M; Yang, Wanhong

    2010-07-01

    Wetlands are one of the most important watershed microtopographic features that affect hydrologic processes (e.g., routing) and the fate and transport of constituents (e.g., sediment and nutrients). Efforts to conserve existing wetlands and/or to restore lost wetlands require that watershed-level effects of wetlands on water quantity and water quality be quantified. Because monitoring approaches are usually cost or logistics prohibitive at watershed scale, distributed watershed models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), enhanced by the hydrologic equivalent wetland (HEW) concept developed by Wang [Wang, X., Yang, W., Melesse, A.M., 2008. Using hydrologic equivalent wetland concept within SWAT to estimate streamflow in watersheds with numerous wetlands. Trans. ASABE 51 (1), 55-72.], can be a best resort. However, there is a serious lack of information about simulated effects using this kind of integrated modeling approach. The objective of this study was to use the HEW concept in SWAT to assess effects of wetland restoration within the Broughton's Creek watershed located in southwestern Manitoba, and of wetland conservation within the upper portion of the Otter Tail River watershed located in northwestern Minnesota. The results indicated that the HEW concept allows the nonlinear functional relations between watershed processes and wetland characteristics (e.g., size and morphology) to be accurately represented in the models. The loss of the first 10-20% of the wetlands in the Minnesota study area would drastically increase the peak discharge and loadings of sediment, total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen (TN). On the other hand, the justifiable reductions of the peak discharge and loadings of sediment, TP, and TN in the Manitoba study area may require that 50-80% of the lost wetlands be restored. Further, the comparison between the predicted restoration and conservation effects revealed that wetland conservation seems to deserve a higher priority

  10. 7 CFR 1430.225 - Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... wetland conservation provisions. The provisions of part 12 of this title apply to this part. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions. 1430.225 Section 1430.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  11. 7 CFR 1412.68 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and wetland conservation provisions. The provisions of part 12 of this title apply to this part. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions. 1412.68 Section 1412.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  12. Environmental Valuation of Conserving the Setiu Wetland in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Suziana Binti

    Malaysia is one of the new emerging economies in Southeast Asia, but as many systems and institutions are still under development, it is comparable many other developing countries in terms of environmental, economic valuation research. Empirical evidence shows that many valuation studies conducted...... in developing countries are of poor quality and questioning the relevancy of its outcomes. In Malaysia, the Choice Experiment (CE) methods is still new in the sense that several techniques need to be improved and adapted, and many research questions remain yet to be answered. Therefore, this thesis will enrich...... the application of CE literature by applying the Stated Preference (SP) technique to the economic valuation of non-marketed environmental services from wetland conservation. This thesis consists of three empirical papers divided into two topics. The first part concerns the methodological improvement of SP survey...

  13. THE WETLAND TYPES, FUNCTIONS AND CONSERVATION IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    According to preliminary statistics, there are 9. 4 × 106ha of mire, 8.0 × 106ha of lake, 2. 1 × 106ha of salt marsh, 2. 7 × 107ha of shallow sea (0 - Sm), and 3.8 × 107ha of paddyfield, their total area amounts to 8.45 ×107ha. Wetland consists of natural wetland system and man-made wetland system. According to hydrology, landform,soil and vegetation etc., natural wetland can be divided into the following types: marine, esturine, riverine, lacustrine,palustrine subsystems. On the basis of the wetland bottom compound, waterlogged state and vegetation forms, it can be subdivided into 26 wetland classes. Man-made wetland can be subdivided into 4 wetland classes. Wetland is a unique landscape in the earth and one of the most important living environment with rich resources and many functions. At present, 262 different types of Wetland Natural Reserves have been established in China, in which 7 Wetland Nature Reserves have been listed in international important wetlands of "The Wetland Convention".

  14. Carbon Sequestration in Mediterranean Tidal Wetlands: San Francisco Bay and the Ebro River Delta (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, J.; Fennessy, S.; Ibanez, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal wetlands accumulate soil carbon at relatively rapid rates, in large part because they build soil to counteract increases in sea-level rise. Because of the rapid rates of carbon sequestration, there is growing interest in evaluating carbon dynamics in tidal wetlands around the world; however, few measurements have been completed for mediterranean-type tidal wetlands, which tend to have relatively high levels of soil salinity, likely affecting both plant productivity and decomposition rates. We measured sediment accretion and carbon sequestration rates at tidal wetlands in two mediterranean regions: the San Francisco Bay Estuary (California, USA) and the Ebro River Delta (Catalonia, Spain). Sampling sites within each region represented a range of conditions in terms of soil salinity and plant communities, and these sites serve as potential analogs for long-term carbon sequestration in restored wetlands, which could receive credits under emerging policies for carbon management. Within San Francisco Bay, we collected six sediment cores per site at four salt marshes and two brackish tidal wetlands (two transects with three stations per transect at each site) in order to identify spatial variation both within and among wetlands in the Estuary. At the Ebro Delta, individual sediment cores were collected across 14 tidal wetland sites, including salt and brackish marshes from impounded areas, river mouths, coastal lagoon, and open bay settings. Cores were collected to 50 cm, and cores were dated using 137Cs and 210Pb. Most sites within San Francisco accreted 0.3-0.5 cm/yr, with slightly higher rates of accretion at low marsh stations; accretions rates based on 137Cs were slightly higher than those based on 210Pb, likely because of the shorter time frame covered by 137Cs dating. Accretion rates from the Ebro Delta sites were similar although more variable, with rates based on 137Cs ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 cm/yr and reflecting the wide range of conditions and management

  15. Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Caleb J.; Euliss, Ned H.; Mushnet, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive modification of upland habitats surrounding wetlands to facilitate agricultural production has negatively impacted amphibian communities in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America. In attempts to mitigate ecosystem damage associated with extensive landscape alteration, vast tracks of upland croplands have been returned to perennial vegetative cover (i.e., conservation grasslands) under a variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture programs. We evaluated the influence of these conservation grasslands on amphibian occupancy of seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region. Using automated call surveys, aquatic funnel traps, and visual encounter surveys, we detected eight amphibian species using wetlands within three land-use categories (farmed, conservation grasslands, and native prairie grasslands) during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Seasonal wetlands within farmlands were used less frequently by amphibians than those within conservation and native prairie grasslands, and wetlands within conservation grasslands were used less frequently than those within native prairie grasslands by all species and life-stages we successfully modeled. Our results suggest that, while not occupied as frequently as wetlands within native prairie, wetlands within conservation grasslands provide important habitat for maintaining amphibian biodiversity in the Prairie Pothole Region

  16. Temporary wetlands: Challenges and solutions to conserving a ‘disappearing’ ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Aram J.K.; Mushet, David M.; Bell, Kathleen P.; Boix, Dani; Fitzsimons, James A.; Isselin-Nondedeu, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Frequent drying of ponded water, and support of unique, highly specialized assemblages of often rare species, characterize temporary wetlands, such as vernal pools, gilgais, and prairie potholes. As small aquatic features embedded in a terrestrial landscape, temporary wetlands enhance biodiversity and provide aesthetic, biogeochemical, and hydrologic functions. Challenges to conserving temporary wetlands include the need to: (1) integrate freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity priorities; (2) conserve entire ‘pondscapes’ defined by connections to other aquatic and terrestrial systems; (3) maintain natural heterogeneity in environmental gradients across and within wetlands, especially gradients in hydroperiod; (4) address economic impact on landowners and developers; (5) act without complete inventories of these wetlands; and (6) work within limited or non-existent regulatory protections. Because temporary wetlands function as integral landscape components, not singly as isolated entities, their cumulative loss is ecologically detrimental yet not currently part of the conservation calculus. We highlight approaches that use strategies for conserving temporary wetlands in increasingly human-dominated landscapes that integrate top-down management and bottom-up collaborative approaches. Diverse conservation activities (including education, inventory, protection, sustainable management, and restoration) that reduce landowner and manager costs while achieving desired ecological objectives will have the greatest probability of success in meeting conservation goals.

  17. Wetland ecosystem health assessment through integrating remote sensing and inventory data with an assessment model for the Hangzhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tengteng; Lin, Wenpeng; Chen, Guangsheng; Guo, Pupu; Zeng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and population growth, wetland area in China has shrunk rapidly and many wetland ecosystems have been reported to degrade during recent decades. Wetland health assessment could raise the public awareness of the wetland condition and guide policy makers to make reasonable and sustainable policies or strategies to protect and restore wetland ecosystems. This study assessed the health levels of wetland ecosystem at the Hangzhou Bay, China using the pressure-state-response (PSR) model through synthesizing remote sensing and statistical data. Ten ecological and social-economic indicators were selected to build the wetland health assessment system. Weights of these indicators and PSR model components as well as the normalized wetland health score were assigned and calculated based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. We analyzed the spatio-temporal changes in wetland ecosystem health status during the past 20years (1990-2010) from the perspectives of ecosystem pressure, state and response. The results showed that the overall wetland health score was in a fair health level, but displayed large spatial variability in 2010. The wetland health score declined from good health level to fair health level from 1990 to 2000, then restored slightly from 2000 to 2010. Overall, wetland health levels showed a decline from 1990 to 2010 for most administrative units. The temporal change patterns in wetland ecosystem health varied significantly among administrative units. Our results could help to clarify the administrative responsibilities and obligations and provide scientific guides not only for wetland protection but also for restoration and city development planning at the Hangzhou Bay area.

  18. Survival strategies of people in a Sri Lankan wetland : livelihood, health and nature conservation in Muthurajawela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogvorst, A.

    2003-01-01

    Key words: Anthropology, emic, environment, etic, gender, health, livelihoods, Muthurajawela, nature-conservation, survival strategies, Sri Lanka, wetland.The objective of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of how poor people living in a sensitive wetland ecosystem maint

  19. Bird diversity and the conservation value of a new Ramsar site: Guangdong Haifeng Wetlands, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junhua; Jiang, Zhigang; Zhang, Chunlan; Xiao, Feng; Hu, Huijian

    2011-09-01

    Wetlands are critical habitats for birds. However, wetlands are being degraded at an accelerating rate due to global human activity, and a disproportionate fraction of wetland-dependent bird species are in decline. We evaluated the conservation value of a new Ramsar site, Guangdong Haifeng Wetlands, China, for birds, by comparing bird communities (using line transect data) in 3 different districts: Gongping, Dongguan Lian'anwei and Dahu. We recorded 139 species of birds, including 26 species that are protected at a national level. Dahu had the highest species richness and diversity, whereas Dongguan Lian'anwei had the highest abundance of birds and the lowest species diversity. Finally, Gongping had both the lowest species richness and the lowest abundance. The endemism of constituent species differed among districts, and the bird communities were complementary. There were significant seasonal differences in the species richness and the number of individuals. Spring had the highest species richness and diversity. The present study identifies the high conservation value of Haifeng Wetlands for both waterbirds and terrestrial birds. Our findings suggest that conservation efforts in Haifeng Wetlands and other wetlands should focus not only on wintering migratory birds, but also on resident birds. To accomplish effective conservation, we should consider the reserve and surrounding wetlands as a whole, incorporating ecological research, education and local economic development.

  20. SLOSS or Not? Factoring Wetland Size Into Decisions for Wetland Conservation, Enhancement, Restoration, and Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitigation or replacement of several small impacted wetlands or sites with fewer large wetlands can occur deliberately through the application of functional assessment methods (e.g., Adamus 1997) or coincidentally as the result of market-based mechanisms for wetland mitigation ba...

  1. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge and Lacreek Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lacreek NWR and Lacreek Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan...

  2. Effects of conservation practices on fishes, amphibians, and reptiles within agricultural streams and wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation practices have been traditionally used to manage soil and water resources to improve agricultural production, and now include methods to reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture on streams and wetlands. These practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watershed...

  3. Fergus Falls Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Fergus Falls Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  4. Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge and Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Minnesota Valley NWR and Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan...

  5. Detroit Lakes Wetlands Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Detroit Lakes Wetlands Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines...

  6. Big Stone Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Big Stone Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  7. Abundance and Conservation of Cyperus papyrus in the Nakivubo wetland, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Nerima

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to high population growth, there is increasing pressure on wetlands to the extent that wetland natural vegetation is continuously being replaced with food crops to meet the increasing food demands. The natural vegetation of Nakivubo wetland is dominated by Cyperus papyrus. Cyperus papyrus has recently been intensively harvested, there by creating a gap between its conservation and utilization. This study was conducted to compare the abundance of papyrus in the disturbed and non disturbed sites and document the strategies used to conserve Cyperus papyrus in Nakivubo wetland. .The abundance of papyrus was assessed in 1m x 1m plots established along 2 transects in the disturbed and undisturbed parts of the wetland. The strategies used by the wetland users to conserve papyrus were determined by administering a questionnaire regarding wetland utilization to thirty respondents. The results showed that generally individuals of papyrus per hectare were higher in the undisturbed sites than disturbed sites. The non disturbed sites had more culms than the disturbed site though there were more juveniles in the disturbed site than in the non disturbed sites. All the respondents did not domesticate papyrus. Majority of the respondents did not allow the papyrus to regenerate after harvesting. They were not aware of the recommended harvesting intervals for papyrus. It is recommended that responsible authorities sensitize the public about appropriate use of the wetland and inform them about the suitable harvesting intervals for papyrus.

  8. Urban Wetlands: An Opportunity for Environmental Conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EHRENFELD David

    2009-01-01

    China's remarkable economic growth and transformation in recent years has been a model for the world,but like all other expanding economics there have been accompanying environmental problems.For more than 5,000 years,however,China has proven that it can cope with problems and remain a vibrant society.China is now turning its attention to the environment through efforts to conserve endangered species,create protected areas,use renewable energy,reforest the margins of deserts,control air pollution,rehabilitate ecosystems,develop ecological agriculture,promote ecotourism,and safeguard its supplies of fresh water.Some of these efforts have had more success than others.The restoration and protection of urban wetlands offers a unique opportunity to meet many of these environmental challenges simultaneously,including the enhancement of the awareness and appreciation of nature and natural processes among urban populations,especially children,upon whom the future of China's environmental movement depends.The United States is facing similar challenges in its urban areas,and some of its recent approaches to dealing with nature in cities may provide useful guidelines.

  9. Gap analysis and conservation network for freshwater wetlands in Central Yangtze Ecoregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowen, Li; Haijin, Zhuge; Li, Mengdi

    2013-01-01

    The Central Yangtze Ecoregion contains a large area of internationally important freshwater wetlands and supports a huge number of endangered waterbirds; however, these unique wetlands and the biodiversity they support are under the constant threats of human development pressures, and the prevailing conservation strategies generated based on the local scale cannot adequately be used as guidelines for ecoregion-based conservation initiatives for Central Yangtze at the broad scale. This paper aims at establishing and optimizing an ecological network for freshwater wetland conservation in the Central Yangtze Ecoregion based on large-scale gap analysis. A group of focal species and GIS-based extrapolation technique were employed to identify the potential habitats and conservation gaps, and the optimized conservation network was then established by combining existing protective system and identified conservation gaps. Our results show that only 23.49% of the potential habitats of the focal species have been included in the existing nature reserves in the Central Yangtze Ecoregion. To effectively conserve over 80% of the potential habitats for the focal species by optimizing the existing conservation network for the freshwater wetlands in Central Yangtze Ecoregion, it is necessary to establish new wetland nature reserves in 22 county units across Hubei, Anhui, and Jiangxi provinces.

  10. Mercury Cycling in Blacklock Wetland: A Study of a Restored Tidal Marsh in Suisun Bay, Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, W.; Stephenson, M.; Newman, A.; Siegel, S. W.; Gillenwater, D.; Coale, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Historically Suisun Bay Marsh included ~68,000 acres of tidal wetlands. From mid-1800's to early 1900's over 90% of the wetlands were reclaimed for agriculture. Today, those diked lands are predominantly managed as seasonal wetlands for waterfowl hunting. Currently, planning efforts to restore 65,000 acres of Delta and Suisun tidal habitat are in final stages of development. The 70 -acre Blacklock tidal marsh restoration site, located in northeast Suisun Marsh, was restored by the California Department of Water Resources in 2006 after having been used for livestock grazing and duck hunting activities since 1946. This study is the first effort at estimating the impact on mercury cycling of converting a diked, managed wetland with limited and seasonal water exchange to tidal marsh with unrestricted daily tidal inundations. The goals of this study were to estimate changes in total mercury and methyl mercury concentrations in fish, sediment and water within the restoration site before and after restoration. Field sampling took place January, 2005 to September, 2009. Results of two-sample t-test indicate unfiltered aqueous methylmercury concentrations post breach (0.101 to 0.768 ng L-1) were significantly lower (t(2), 8 = 6.19; p -1). Methylmercury sediment concentrations were higher and more variability between sample locations within the restoration site during year one post-breach (2.42 to 3.69 ng g-1 dry) relative to years 2 and 3 post-breach (1.48 to 1.85 ng g-1 d/w). Total mercury sediment concentrations ranged from 0.162 ± 0.013 to 0.228 ± 0.016 μg g-1 d/w. Mercury concentrations in Inland Silverside (Menidia beryllina) post-breach decreased significantly from 0.163 ± 0.039 ug g-1 w/w to 0.038 ± 0.023 ug g-1 w/w. Greater connectivity of tidal wetlands with surrounding open water areas resulted in decreased methylmercury concentrations in water, sediment, and fish. Two possible explanations may account for these results. First, wetland biogeochemistry in a

  11. Modeling of Waves, Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport for Protection of Wetlands at Braddock Bay, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    maximum wave heights near the backbay shoreline from the Jan 1971 storm for S-0, S-1, S-2, and S-3. Table 4-6 presents the calculated maxi - mum wave...decreases inside the bay. At the high water level, it appears wave overtopping pro- duces more flow in the lee of two structures, but flows are weak at...waves and currents significantly in the central backbay peninsula region preceding the wetlands. The maxi - mum wave height calculated for the Hurricane

  12. [Soil organic carbon content and its distribution pattern in Hangzhou Bay coastal wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xue-xin; Yang, Wen-ying; Wu, Ming; Jiang, Ke-yi

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution pattern in the natural intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands of Hangzhou Bay were studied, aimed to explore the effects of vegetation succession, exotic species invasion, and reclamation on the SOC in costal wetlands of the Bay. In intertidal zones, the surface SOC content ranged from 4.41 to 8.58 g x kg(-1), with an average of 6.45 g x kg(-1), and differed significantly under different vegetations, with a tendency of under Phragmites australis (8.56 +/- 0.04 g x kg(-1)) > Spartina alterniflora (7.31 +/- 0.08 g x kg(-1)) > Scirpus mariqueter (5.48 +/- 0.29 g x kg(-1)) > mudflats (4.47 +/- 0.09 g x kg(-1)); in reclaimed wetlands, the surface SOC content was 7.46 +/- 0.25 g x kg(-1) in the 1960s, 1.96 +/- 0.46 g x kg(-1) in the 1980s, and 5.12 +/- 0.16 g x kg(-1) in 2003, showing a trend of increased after an initial decrease with increasing reclamation year. The SOC in the profiles all showed a decreasing trend from the surface to the bottom. The SOC in intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil total nitrogen (TN), suggesting a large reserve of organic nitrogen in TN. The correlation between SOC and soil C/N ratio was not obvious in intertidal zones, but significantly positive in reclaimed wetlands, indicating that reclamation affected soil C/N ratio to a certain extent. This study showed that in the intertidal zones, soil carbon sequestration capacity increased gradually with plant community succession. However, the invasion of exotic species Spartina alternflora might decrease the capacity of carbon sequestration in intertidal zones. It was also found that the changes of soil moisture content, particle composition, vegetation coverage, and reclamation history were the main factors affecting the SOC distribution in reclaimed wetlands.

  13. 75 FR 73121 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... of Neskowin, Oregon. Neskowin Marsh incorporates unique freshwater wetland and bog habitats and... Fish and Wildlife Service Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos... prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz...

  14. The conservation status of Moroccan wetlands with particular reference to waterbirds and to changes since 1978

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Morgan made detailed descriptions of 24 major Moroccan wetlands visited in 1978, with a total area of 4529 ha (Morgan, N.C., 1982a. An ecological survey of standing waters in North West Africa: III. Site descriptions for Morocco. Biological Conservation, 24, 161–182.). We revisited these sites, and found that 25% of the wetland area had been destroyed by 1999. This loss was con- centrated in wetland types of low salinity ( < 5 g/l NaCl), with a 98% loss of seasonal mesohaline sites,...

  15. Projected wetland densities under climate change: Habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen; Skagen, Susan; Barsugli, Joseph J.; Rashford, Benjamin S.; Reese, Gordon C.; Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Wood, Andrew W.; Noon, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species’ vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland

  16. Projected wetland densities under climate change: habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R; Skagen, Susan K; Barsugli, Joseph J; Rashford, Benjamin S; Reese, Gordon C; Hoeting, Jennifer A; Wood, Andrew W; Noon, Barry R

    2016-09-01

    Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species' vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland

  17. Conserving Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and surrounding grasslands: evaluating effects on amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Neau, Jordan L.

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of viable and genetically diverse populations of amphibians in the Prairie Pothole Region of the United States depends on upland as well as wetland over-wintering and landscape level habitat features. Prairie pothole wetlands provide important amphibian breeding habitat while grasslands surrounding these wetlands provide foraging habitat for adults, overwintering habitat for some species, and important connectivity among breeding wetlands. Grasslands surrounding wetlands were found to be especially important for wood frogs and northern leopard frogs, while croplands dominated habitat utilized by Great Plains toads and Woodhouse’s toads. Habitat suitability mapping highlighted (1) the influence of deep-water overwintering wetlands on suitable habitat for four of five anuran species encountered; (2) the lack of overlap between areas of core habitat for both the northern leopard frog and wood frog compared to the core habitat for both toad species; and (3) the importance of conservation programs in providing grassland components of northern leopard frog and wood frog habitat. Currently, there are approximately 7.2 million acres (2.9 million hectares, ha) of habitat in the PPR identified as suitable for amphibians. WRP and CRP wetland and grassland habitats accounted for approximately 1.9 million acres (0.75 million ha) or 26 percent of this total area. Continued loss of amphibian habitat resulting from an ongoing trend of returning PPR conservation lands to crop production, will likely have significant negative effects on the region’s ability to maintain amphibian biodiversity. Conversely, increases in conservation wetlands and surrounding grasslands on the PPR landscape have great potential to positively influence the region’s amphibian populations.

  18. [Optimization of conservation network system for inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Long; Li, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Dian-Lin; Zhang, Li-Na; Zhang, Gui-Long

    2012-02-01

    By using systematic conservation planning (SCP) method, and taking catchment as planning unit, an optimization of conservation network system for the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region was conducted, with a comprehensive consideration of 3-dimensional (lateral, longitudinal and vertical) connectivity and Inter-basin Water Transfer Project and by the methods of irreplaceability analysis and gap identification. The efficacy of the optimized conservation network system was evaluated, as compared with the existing conservation network system. According to the principles of irreplaceability and connectivity, the wetland conservation gaps could be divided into two types, i.e. , be conserved in priority and in general. After the optimization, the conservation status of the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region had an overall improvement. The conserved percentage of the wetland types was from about 20% up to 46.8%, and, for each wetland type, its conserved level increased to some extent, almost above 40%. Both in the near future and in the long term, more attention should be paid to the conservation of lake wetland. In addition, the integration of ecosystem service function and biodiversity and the combination of protection with restoration would be the main task for the wetland ecosystem conservation planning in the future.

  19. San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement: Volume I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on San Diego Bay NWR (Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units) for the next 15...

  20. The Mid-Atlantic Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Monitoring Ecosystem Services Associated with Wetland Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands impart many important ecosystem services, including the maintenance of water quality, the stabilization of the climate through carbon sequestration, and enhancement of biodiversity through the provision of food and habitat. The conversion of natural or semi-natural lands to agriculture has ...

  1. Effect of conservation efforts and ecological variables on waterbird population sizes in wetlands of the Yangtze River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Qiang; Prins, Herbert H T; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Frederik

    2015-11-25

    Forage quality and availability, climatic factors, and a wetland's conservation status are expected to affect the densities of wetland birds. However, the conservation effectiveness is often poorly studied. Here, using twelve years' census data collected from 78 wetlands in the Yangtze River floodplain, we aimed to understand the effect of these variables on five Anatidae species, and evaluate the effectiveness of the conservation measures by comparing population trends of these species among wetlands that differ in conservations status. We showed that the slope angle of a wetland and the variation thereof best explain the differences in densities of four species. We also found that the population abundances of the Anatidae species generally declined in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain over time, with a steeper decline in wetlands with a lower protection status, indicating that current conservation policies might deliver benefits for wintering Anatidae species in China, as population sizes of the species were buffered to some extent against decline in numbers in wetlands with a higher level protection status. We recommend several protection measures to stop the decline of these Anatidae species in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain, which are of great importance for the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

  2. Microbial Remediation and Optimization of Oil Polluted Wetlands at Dalian Bay in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The wetland at Dalian Bay in the Northeast of China has been polluted by oil severely. The effect of various microbes and operation parameters on the bioremediation of oil-polluted wetlands at Dalian Bay was investigated and reported previously. In the study,other operation conditions related to the status of medium were investigated via statistical experimental design and analysis and a necessary information is involved to use micro-technology in the application.Methods The method used involved the direct inoculation of selected bacteria,which were capable of degrading oil. The operation conditions were further optimized and evaluated by gravimetrical assay.Results The optimal pH and temperature for the studied bacteria to degrade the existing oil pollutants were established as pH 8.0 and 27℃. The mixed of various bacteria showed better results in terms of oil degradation than any single one. Among the selected four factors,disturbance,oxidant,nutrients,and biosurfactant,the former two contributed more impacts on the oil degradation in the early stage of process,while the latter two became the limiting factors in the late stage. Three sets of optimal conditions were obtained for each individual stage,but no one was suitable for the overall process.Conclusion The study demonstrated the technical feasibility of using direct inoculation into the contaminated soil samples to remove oil pollutants. It suggested that the operation conditions should be monitored and adjusted during the different stages of bio-reactions in the process to achieve the best result of oil degradation.

  3. Hydrodynamics and Associated Sediment Transport over Coastal Wetlands in Quanzhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-jun

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes represent an important coastal wetland system.In order to understand the differences between boundary layer parameters of vegetated and unvegetated areas,as well as the mechanisms of sediment transport,several electromagnetic current meters(AEM HR,products of Alec Electronics Co.Ltd.)were deployed in coastal wetlands in Quanzhou Bay,China,to measure current velocity.During the low tide phase,the surficial sediment was collected at 10 m intervals.In situ measurements show that the current velocities on the bare flat were much higher than those in the Spartina alterniora marsh.Current velocity also varied with distance from marsh edge and plant canopy height and diameter.Around 63% of the velocity profiles in the tidal creek can be described by a logarithmic equation.Over the bare flat and Spartina alterniglora marsh,a logarithmic profile almost occurs during the flood tide phase.Sediment analysis shows that mean grain size was 6.7(D along the marsh edge,and surface sediments were transported from bare flat to marsh;the tidal creeks may change this sediment transport pattern.The hydrodynamics at early flood tide and late ebb tide phases determined the net transport direction within the study area.

  4. The Mid-Atlantic Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Ecosystem Services, Conservation Practices, and Synergistic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mid-Atlantic Region of the eastern U.S. is characterized by a diversity of coastal and freshwater wetland ecosystems that humans and other species depend upon. Ecosystem services provided by wetlands include the regulation of runoff and floodwaters, habitat for many unique organisms, pollutant r...

  5. Can rice field channels contribute to biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazilian wetlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, Leonardo; Rolon, Ana Silvia; Stenert, Cristina; Machado, Iberê Farina; Rocha, Odete

    2011-12-01

    Conservation of species in agroecosystems has attracted attention. Irrigation channels can improve habitats and offer conditions for freshwater species conservation. Two questions from biodiversity conservation point of view are: 1) Can the irrigated channels maintain a rich diversity of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians over the cultivation cycle? 2) Do richness, abundance and composition of aquatic species change over the rice cultivation cycle? For this, a set of four rice field channels was randomly selected in Southern Brazilian wetlands. In each channel, six sample collection events were carried out over the rice cultivation cycle (June 2005 to June 2006). A total of 160 taxa were identified in irrigated channels, including 59 macrophyte species, 91 taxa of macroinvertebrate and 10 amphibian species. The richness and abundance of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians did not change significantly over the rice cultivation cycle. However, the species composition of these groups in the irrigation channels varied between uncultivated and cultivated periods. Our results showed that the species diversity found in the irrigation channels, together with the permanence of water enables these man-made aquatic networks to function as important systems that can contribute to the conservation of biodiversity in regions where the wetlands were converted into rice fields. The conservation of the species in agriculture, such as rice field channels, may be an important alternative for biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazil, where more than 90% of wetland systems have already been lost and the remaining ones are still at high risk due to the expansion of rice production.

  6. Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs for the next 15 years....

  7. Tampa Bay Refuges: Egmont Key, Pinellas, and Passage Key National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Tampa Bay Refuges for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the refuges' vision and...

  8. Mapping wetlands in the Lower Mekong Basin for wetland resource and conservation management using Landsat ETM images and field survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, Charlotte; Mahaxay, Manithaphone

    2009-05-01

    The Mekong River Basin is considered to be the second most species rich river basin in the world. The 795,000 km(2) catchment encompasses several ecoregions, incorporating biodiverse and productive wetland systems. Eighty percent of the rapidly expanding population of the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), made up in part by Lao PDR, Thailand, Cambodia and Viet Nam, live in rural areas and are heavily reliant on wetland resources. As the populations of Cambodia and Lao PDR will double in the next 20 years, pressure on natural resources and particularly wetlands can only increase. For development planning, resource and conservation management to incorporate wetland issues, information on the distribution and character of Mekong wetlands is essential. The existing but outdated wetland maps were compiled from secondary landuse-landcover data, have limited coverage, poor thematic accuracy and no meta-data. Therefore the Mekong River Commission (MRC) undertook to produce new wetland coverage for the LMB. As resources, funding and regional capacity are limited, it was determined that the method applied should use existing facilities, be easily adaptable, and replicable locally. For the product to be useful it must be accepted by local governments and decision makers. The results must be of acceptable accuracy (>75%) and the methodology should be relatively understandable to non-experts. In the first stage of this exercise, field survey was conducted at five pilot sites covering a range of typical wetland habitats (MRC wetland classification) to supply data for a supervised classification of Landsat ETM images from the existing MRC archive. Images were analysed using ERDAS IMAGINE and applying Maximum Likelihood Classification. Field data were reserved to apply formal accuracy assessment to the final wetland habitat maps, with resulting accuracy ranging from 77 to 94%. The maps produced are now in use at a Provincial and National level in three countries for resource and

  9. Effect of conservation efforts and ecological variables on waterbird population sizes in wetlands of the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Qiang; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Frederik

    2015-11-01

    Forage quality and availability, climatic factors, and a wetland’s conservation status are expected to affect the densities of wetland birds. However, the conservation effectiveness is often poorly studied. Here, using twelve years’ census data collected from 78 wetlands in the Yangtze River floodplain, we aimed to understand the effect of these variables on five Anatidae species, and evaluate the effectiveness of the conservation measures by comparing population trends of these species among wetlands that differ in conservations status. We showed that the slope angle of a wetland and the variation thereof best explain the differences in densities of four species. We also found that the population abundances of the Anatidae species generally declined in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain over time, with a steeper decline in wetlands with a lower protection status, indicating that current conservation policies might deliver benefits for wintering Anatidae species in China, as population sizes of the species were buffered to some extent against decline in numbers in wetlands with a higher level protection status. We recommend several protection measures to stop the decline of these Anatidae species in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain, which are of great importance for the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

  10. Addressing Trade-offs: Experiences from Conservation and Development Initiatives in the Mkuze Wetlands, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catie Burlando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Present-day conservation policies generally include the aim to integrate biodiversity conservation and local development, and describe this as a win–win solution that can satisfy all interests. This is challenged by research claiming that many efforts fail to match practice to rhetoric. South Africa has made strong commitments to fulfill the dual goals of conservation and development, and the iSimangaliso Wetland Park is promoted as an example of this. We explore present and potential outcomes of conservation and development interventions in a community bordering the Wetland Park through the perspective of different stakeholders, with the aim of uncovering opportunities and risks. In terms of improving local livelihoods as well as involvement in conservation, the success of the studied interventions varied. Local communities may accept restrictions on resource use as a result of realistic and fairly negotiated trade-offs, but if perceived as unjust and imposed from above, then mistrust and resistance will increase. In this area, collaboration between conservation organizations and the local community had improved, but still faced problems associated with unequal power relations, unrealistic expectations, and a lack of trust, transparency, and communication. As unsustainable efforts are a waste of funds and engagement, and may even become counterproductive, policy visions need to be matched by realistic allocations of staff, time, funds, and training. At the national and international level, the true cost of conservation has to be recognized and budgeted for if efforts at integrating conservation and development are to succeed.

  11. 75 FR 68378 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... proposals for recommendation to the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is... matching funds. The Council will consider Mexican and U.S. standard grant proposals at the meeting. The... Director, Migratory Birds. BILLING CODE 4310-55-P...

  12. 78 FR 71637 - Meeting Announcement: North American Wetlands Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... proposals for recommendation to the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is... November 26, 2013. Meeting The Council will consider Mexican standard grant and U.S. standard grant... Director, Migratory Birds. BILLING CODE 4310-55-P...

  13. Dietary use and conservation concern of edible wetland plants at indo-burma hotspot: a case study from northeast India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh HB; Kanjilal PB; Kotoky R; Roshnibala S; Sundriyal M; Jain A; Sundriyal RC

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The wetlands of the North East India fall among the global hotspots of biodiversity. However, they have received very little attention with relation to their intrinsic values to human kind; therefore their conservation is hardly addressed. These wetlands are critical for the sustenance of the tribal communities. Methods Field research was conducted during 2003 to 2006 in seven major wetlands of four districts of Manipur state, Northeast India (viz. Imphal-East, Imphal-West...

  14. Freshwater Wetland Habitat Loss and Fragmentation: Implications for Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Pierre, J. P.; Labay, B. J.; Ryberg, W. A.; Hibbits, T. J.; Prestridge, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have caused widespread wetland loss and fragmentation. This trend has important implications for aquatic biota conservation, including the semi-aquatic Western Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia miaria). This species inhabits seasonally inundated, ephemeral water bodies and adjacent uplands in the southeastern U.S. However, wetland conversion to agriculture and urbanization is thought to cause the species' decline, particularly in Texas, which includes the westernmost part of its range. Because the species moves only a few kilometers between wetlands, it particularly sensitive to habitat loss and fragmentation. Thus, as part of the only state-funded species research program, this study provides the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) with scientific data to determine if the species warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We use a species distribution model to map potentially suitable habitat for most of East Texas. We evaluate landscape-scale anthropogenic activities in this region which may be contributing to the species' decline. We identify areas of urbanization, agricultural expansion, forestry, and resulting wetland loss. We find that between 2001 and 2011 approximately 80 km2 of wetlands were lost in potentially suitable habitat, including the urbanizing Houston area. We use spatial geostatistics to quantify wetland habitat fragmentation. We also introduce the Habitat Alteration Index (HAI), which calculates total landscape alteration and mean probability of occurrence to identify high-quality habitat most at risk of recent anthropogenic alteration. Population surveys by biologists are targeting these areas and future management actions may focus on mitigating anthropogenic activities there. While this study focuses on D. r. miaria, this approach can evaluate wetland habitat of other aquatic organisms.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of prairie wetland networks: power-law scaling and implications for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher K

    2010-07-01

    Although habitat networks show promise for conservation planning at regional scales, their spatiotemporal dynamics have not been well studied, especially in climate-sensitive landscapes. Here I use satellite remote sensing to compile wetland habitat networks from the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America. An ensemble of networks assembled across a hydrologic gradient from deluge to drought and a range of representative dispersal distances exhibits power-law scaling of important topological parameters. Prairie wetland networks are "meso-worlds" with mean topological distance increasing faster with network size than small-world networks, but slower than a regular lattice (or "large world"). This scaling implies rapid dispersal through wetland networks without some of the risks associated with "small worlds" (e.g., extremely rapid propagation of disease or disturbance). Retrospective analysis of wetland networks establishes a climatic envelope for landscape connectivity in the PPR, where I show that a changing climate might severely impact metapopulation viability and restrict long-distance dispersal and range shifts. More generally, this study demonstrates an efficient approach to conservation planning at a level of abstraction addressing key drivers of the global biodiversity crisis: habitat fragmentation and climatic change.

  16. San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission : Annual Report 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Congress passed, and the President signed into law, legislation establishing the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. When the purchase of property for...

  17. Using Internet search behavior to assess public awareness of protected wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Yuno; Kim, Ji Yoon; Lineman, Maurice; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Joo, Gea-Jae

    2015-02-01

    Improving public awareness of protected wetlands facilitates sustainable wetland management, which depends on public participation. One way of gauging public interest is by tracking Internet search behavior (ISB). We assessed public awareness of issues related to protected wetland areas (PWAs) in South Korea by examining the frequencies of specific queries (PWAs, Ramsar, Upo wetland, Sunchon Bay, etc.) using relative search volumes (RSVs) obtained from an Internet search engine. RSV shows how many times a search term is used relative to a second search term during a specific period. Public awareness of PWAs changed from 2007 to 2013. Initially the majority of Internet searches were related to the most well-known tidal and inland wetlands Sunchon Bay and Upo wetlands, which are the largest existing wetlands in Korea with the greatest historical exposure. Public awareness, as reflected in RSVs, of wetlands increased significantly following PWA designation for the wetlands in 2008, which followed the Ramsar 10th Conference of Contracting Parties to the Convention on Wetlands (COP10) meeting. Public interest was strongly correlated to the number of news articles in the popular media, as evidenced by the increase in Internet searches for specific wetlands and words associated with specific wetlands. Correspondingly, the number of visitors to specific wetlands increased. To increase public interest in wetlands, wetland aspects that enhance wetland conservation should be promoted by the government and enhanced via public education. Our approach can be used to gauge public awareness and participation in a wide range of conservation efforts.

  18. Magnitude and Seasonality of Wetland Methane Emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Heaps, C. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Worthy, D. E. J.; Kaplan, J. O.; Bey, I.; Drevet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May-July 2008, together with continuous 2004-2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL) and Alert (Arctic background). The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data), a peak in July-August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg/a, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000).

  19. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data, a peak in July–August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000.

  20. Tidal wetland conservation and restoration for flood mitigation in estuaries and deltas: examples and global potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Smolders, Sven; Stark, Jeroen; meire, patrick

    2014-05-01

    Low-lying and densely populated deltas and estuaries are world widely exposed to flood risks caused by storm surges. On the one hand, global change is increasing these flood risks through accelerating sea level rise and increasing storm intensity, but on the other hand, local-scale human impacts on deltas and estuaries are in many cases even more increasing the vulnerability to floods. Here we address the degradation and reclamation of tidal wetlands (i.e. salt marshes in the temperate zone and mangroves in the tropical zone) as a major source for increasing vulnerability to flooding of estuaries and deltas. Firstly, we present examples of flood mitigation by tidal wetland conservation and restoration, and secondly we explore the potentials and limitations for global application of this approach of ecosystem-based flood defense (see Temmerman et al. 2013). First, we use the Scheldt estuary (SW Netherlands and Belgium) as an example where historic wetland reclamation has importantly contributed to increasing flood risks, and where tidal marsh restoration on the previously reclaimed land is nowadays brought into large-scale practice as an essential part of the flood defense system. Based on data and hydrodynamic modelling, we show that large-scale historic marsh reclamation has largely reduced the water storage capacity of the estuary and has reduced the friction to propagating flood waves, resulting in an important landward increase of tidal and storm surge levels. Hydrodynamic model scenarios demonstrate how tidal and storm surge propagation through the estuary are affected by tidal marsh properties, including the surface area, elevation, vegetation and position of marshes along the estuary. We show that nowadays tidal wetland creation on previously reclaimed land is applied as an essential part of the flood defense system along the Scheldt estuary. Secondly, a global analysis is presented of the potential application of tidal wetlands in flood mitigation in

  1. Biodiversity inventories and conservation of the marine fishes of Bootless Bay, Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Joshua A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effective management and conservation of biodiversity is predicated on clearly defined conservation targets. Species number is frequently used as a metric for conservation prioritization and monitoring changes in ecosystem health. We conducted a series of synoptic surveys focusing on the fishes of the Bootless Bay region of Papua New Guinea to generate a checklist of fishes of the region. Bootless Bay lies directly south of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea, and experiences the highest human population density of any marine area in the country. Our checklist will set a baseline against which future environmental changes can be tracked. Results We generated a checklist of 488 fish species in 72 families found in Bootless Bay during a two-week sampling effort. Using incident-based methods of species estimation, we extrapolate there to be approximately 940 fish species in Bootless Bay, one of the lowest reported numbers in Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Our data suggest that the Bootless Bay ecosystem of Papua New Guinea, while diverse in absolute terms, has lower fish biodiversity compared to other shallow marine areas within the country. These differences in faunal diversity are most likely a combination of unequal sampling effort as well as biophysical factors within Bootless Bay compounded by historical and/or contemporary anthropogenic disturbances.

  2. The role of the Wetland Reserve Program in conservation efforts in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sammy L.; Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2006-01-01

    The Mississippi River Alluvial Valley includes the floodplain of the Mississippi River from Cairo, Illinois, USA, to the Gulf of Mexico. Originally this region supported about 10 million ha of bottomland hardwood forests, but only about 2.8 million ha remain today. Furthermore, most of the remaining bottomland forest is highly fragmented with altered hydrologic processes. During the 1990s landscape-scale conservation planning efforts were initiated for migratory birds and the threatened Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus). These plans call for large-scale reforestation and restoration efforts in the region, particularly on private lands. In 1990 the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act authorized the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP). The WRP is a voluntary program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture that provides eligible landowners with financial incentives to restore wetlands and retire marginal farmlands from agricultural production. As of 30 September 2005, over 275,700 ha have been enrolled in the program in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, with the greatest concentration in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi, USA. Hydrologic restoration is common on most sites, with open-water wetlands, such as moist-soil units and sloughs, constituting up to 30% of a given tract. Over 33,200 ha of open-water wetlands have been created, potentially providing over 115,000,000 duck-use days. Twenty-three of 87 forest-bird conservation areas have met or exceed core habitat goals for migratory songbirds and another 24 have met minimum area requirements. The WRP played an integral role in the fulfillment of these goals. Although some landscape goals have been attained, the young age of the program and forest stands, and the lack of monitoring, has limited evaluations of the program's impact on wildlife populations.

  3. Biodiversity inventory and conservation opportunity of Suwi wetlands, Muara Ancalong, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Deni; Kusneti, Monica; Suimah

    2017-02-01

    Suwi wetlands lays in location permit of palm oil plantation, which has been cleared partially, but then abandoned because is not suitable for palm oil. Considering the biological richness and the usage, the wetlands is important to be conserved, the most possible is managed as an Essential Ecosystem. The main objective of this study was to conduct an inventory of species diversity of Suwi wetlands. Habitat condition and utilization was recorded as important supporting information. The fieldworks have been done from 2013 to 2016. Camera traps and mistnetts were used and randomly done several times in a place where animal were suspected presence. Direct observations were done in the morning and afternoon especially for bird and mammal inventory while dark night observations were done for the presence of crocodile. The result of fieldworks found 12 species of mammals, 63 species of birds, 9 species of reptiles and 38 species of fish, which 30 of the total 122 species are protected, based on Indonesian law as well as international rule. Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) is an endemic and one of conservation priority species of Indonesia. Meanwhile, Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) is one of the most world's endangered crocodilians.

  4. 泉州湾河口湿地自然保护区珍稀濒危鸟类的分布特点及其保护%Distribution and Conservation of Endangered Bird in Quanzhou Bay Estuarine Wetland Natural Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈若海

    2014-01-01

    We studied the species and distribution of endangeredbird with the methods of line transects and sample points in Quanzhou Bay Estuarine Wetland Nature Reserve with 104 endangered waterfowlspecies belonging to 25 families,13 or-ders.Nineteen species belongs to II Nationally protected species, 6 species are in “China Red Data Book of Endangered Animals”, 12 species are included in“China Species Red List” and 19 species are in“Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora”.There are 49 species of endangered birds in ShishiHanjiang Village with the maximum amount among six study areas, accounting for 47.12%.There are only 37 species in Fengze Fengyu Village with theminimum amount among six study areas, accounting for 36.58%.Most of them are migrant birds, of which 57 and 13 species are winter migrant and summer migrant , respectively .Furthermore , 23 and 11 species are passing migrant and resident birds, respectively.The number of endangered birds reachesa peak in May and November.%采用路线调查和高位定点统计相结合的方法对泉州湾河口湿地自然保护区珍稀濒危鸟类的种类和分布进行了研究,共记录到104种珍稀濒危鸟类,隶属于13目25科。其中国家二级重点保护鸟类有19种,福建省重点保护鸟类有21种,列入《中国濒危动物红皮书》中的有6种,列入《中国物种红色名录》中的有12种,属于《濒危野生动植物种国际贸易公约》附录的有19种。6个调查区域中分布于石狮市蚶江镇蚶江村的珍稀濒危鸟类最多,有49种,占总数的47.12%;丰泽区城东街道凤屿村的最少,有37种,占总数的35.58%。冬候鸟57种,夏候鸟13种,旅鸟23种,留鸟11种。5月份和11月份是濒危鸟类种数出现的高峰期。结合调查结果给出了保护对策。

  5. Investigation on bioremediation of oil-polluted wetland at Liaodong Bay in northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Shuhong [Dalian Maritime Univ. (China). Coll. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Biology and Food Engineering School of Dalian (China). Inst. of Light Industry; Huang Leichang [Biology and Food Engineering School of Dalian (China). Inst. of Light Industry; Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Coll. of Environmental Science; Li Yao Olive [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry; Ding Ming [Xigang District Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Dalian (China); Hu Yingying; Ding Dewen [Dalian Maritime Univ. (China). Coll. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2006-07-15

    An investigation on the effect of various microbes on degradation was carried out as part of the study on bioremediation of oil-polluted wetland at LiaoDong Bay in northeast China. The method used involved direct inoculation of selected bacteria, which were capable of degrading oil, to the soil samples. The combination of various bacteria showed better results in terms of oil degradation than any single ones due to their synergetic effects. The operation conditions [pH 8.0, 25 C, C/N/P (40:5.6:1)] for these bacteria to degrade the oil content in the soil samples were also studied and optimized. Addition of appropriate surfactants was helpful for bacteria growth, thus favoring the oil degradation. For instance, after adding Tween 80 (300 mg/kg) for 8 days, the number of bacteria was amplified 6.22 times and the rate of oil degradation increased by 20%. Adequate amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was also beneficial for microbes to decompose oil. However, overdosage may cause the death of the bacteria. The addition of 400 mg/l H{sub 2}O{sub 2} each time was suitable. Seven thousand milligrams of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was added entirely in 11 days, and the rate of oil degradation increased significantly from 27% (without H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) up to 67%. The study clearly demonstrated that the direct soil inoculation was an effective method for environmental bioremediation. (orig.)

  6. Testing assumptions for conservation of migratory shorebirds and coastal managed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, Jaime; James Lyons,; Herring, Garth

    2015-01-01

    Managed wetlands provide critical foraging and roosting habitats for shorebirds during migration; therefore, ensuring their availability is a priority action in shorebird conservation plans. Contemporary shorebird conservation plans rely on a number of assumptions about shorebird prey resources and migratory behavior to determine stopover habitat requirements. For example, the US Shorebird Conservation Plan for the Southeast-Caribbean region assumes that average benthic invertebrate biomass in foraging habitats is 2.4 g dry mass m−2 and that the dominant prey item of shorebirds in the region is Chironomid larvae. For effective conservation and management, it is important to test working assumptions and update predictive models that are used to estimate habitat requirements. We surveyed migratory shorebirds and sampled the benthic invertebrate community in coastal managed wetlands of South Carolina. We sampled invertebrates at three points in time representing early, middle, and late stages of spring migration, and concurrently surveyed shorebird stopover populations at approximately 7-day intervals throughout migration. We used analysis of variance by ranks to test for temporal variation in invertebrate biomass and density, and we used a model based approach (linear mixed model and Monte Carlo simulation) to estimate mean biomass and density. There was little evidence of a temporal variation in biomass or density during the course of spring shorebird migration, suggesting that shorebirds did not deplete invertebrate prey resources at our site. Estimated biomass was 1.47 g dry mass m−2 (95 % credible interval 0.13–3.55), approximately 39 % lower than values used in the regional shorebird conservation plan. An additional 4728 ha (a 63 % increase) would be required if habitat objectives were derived from biomass levels observed in our study. Polychaetes, especially Laeonereis culveri(2569 individuals m−2), were the most abundant prey in foraging

  7. Mangrove and Freshwater Wetland Conservation Through Carbon Offsets: A Cost-Benefit Analysis for Establishing Environmental Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-González, César; Moreno-Casasola, Patricia; Hernández, María Elizabeth; Campos, Adolfo; Espejel, Ileana; Fermán-Almada, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    Mexico has extensive coastal wetlands (4,243,137 ha), and one of its most important sites is the Alvarado Lagoon System, located in the Papaloapan River Basin on the Gulf of Mexico. The land cover dedicated to livestock and sugarcane has increased: by 25 % in 2005 and 50 % in 2010, with a loss of wetland vegetation and the carbon that it stores. We found that the Net Present Value of mangrove carbon offsets profit is equal to 5822.71, that of broad-leaved marshes is 7958.86, cattail marshes 5250.33, and forested wetlands 8369.41 per hectare, during a 30-year-carbonoffset contract. However, the opportunity cost from conserving wetland instead of growing sugarcane is positive according to REDD+ methodology, e.g., broad-leaved marsh conservation ranged from 6.73 to 20 USD/t CO2e, that of cattail marshes from 12.20 to 32.65 USD/t CO2e, and forested wetlands from 7.15 to 20.60 USD/t CO2e, whereas the opportunity cost between conservation and livestock was negative, it means that conservation is more profitable. The cost-benefit analysis for assessing investment projects from a governmental perspective is useful to determine the viability of conserving coastal wetlands through carbon offset credits. It also shows why in some areas it is not possible to conserve ecosystems due to the opportunity cost of changing from one economic activity (livestock and sugarcane) to carbon offsets for protecting wetlands. Furthermore, it allows for a comparison of carbon markets and assessment in terms of REDD+ and its methods for determining the social cost per ton of carbon avoided.

  8. Mangrove and Freshwater Wetland Conservation Through Carbon Offsets: A Cost-Benefit Analysis for Establishing Environmental Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-González, César; Moreno-Casasola, Patricia; Hernández, María Elizabeth; Campos, Adolfo; Espejel, Ileana; Fermán-Almada, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    Mexico has extensive coastal wetlands (4,243,137 ha), and one of its most important sites is the Alvarado Lagoon System, located in the Papaloapan River Basin on the Gulf of Mexico. The land cover dedicated to livestock and sugarcane has increased: by 25 % in 2005 and 50 % in 2010, with a loss of wetland vegetation and the carbon that it stores. We found that the Net Present Value of mangrove carbon offsets profit is equal to $5822.71, that of broad-leaved marshes is $7958.86, cattail marshes $5250.33, and forested wetlands $8369.41 per hectare, during a 30-year-carbonoffset contract. However, the opportunity cost from conserving wetland instead of growing sugarcane is positive according to REDD+ methodology, e.g., broad-leaved marsh conservation ranged from $6.73 to $20 USD/t CO2e, that of cattail marshes from $12.20 to $32.65 USD/t CO2e, and forested wetlands from $7.15 to $20.60 USD/t CO2e, whereas the opportunity cost between conservation and livestock was negative, it means that conservation is more profitable. The cost-benefit analysis for assessing investment projects from a governmental perspective is useful to determine the viability of conserving coastal wetlands through carbon offset credits. It also shows why in some areas it is not possible to conserve ecosystems due to the opportunity cost of changing from one economic activity (livestock and sugarcane) to carbon offsets for protecting wetlands. Furthermore, it allows for a comparison of carbon markets and assessment in terms of REDD+ and its methods for determining the social cost per ton of carbon avoided.

  9. Assessment of the effects of farming and conservation programs on pesticide deposition in high plains wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Jason B; Hanson, Brittany Rae; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A

    2012-03-20

    We examined pesticide contamination in sediments from depressional playa wetlands embedded in the three dominant land-use types in the western High Plains and Rainwater Basin of the United States including cropland, perennial grassland enrolled in conservation programs (e.g., Conservation Reserve Program [CRP]), and native grassland or reference condition. Two hundred and sixty four playas, selected from the three land-use types, were sampled from Nebraska and Colorado in the north to Texas and New Mexico in the south. Sediments were examined for most of the commonly used agricultural pesticides. Atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and trifluralin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the northern High Plains and Rainwater Basin. Atrazine, metolachlor, trifluralin, and pendimethalin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the southern High Plains. The top 5-10% of playas contained herbicide concentrations that are high enough to pose a hazard for plants. However, insecticides and fungicides were rarely detected. Pesticide occurrence and concentrations were higher in wetlands surrounded by cropland as compared to native grassland and CRP perennial grasses. The CRP, which is the largest conservation program in the U.S., was protective and had lower pesticide concentrations compared to cropland.

  10. Wetland Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Marilyn

    1994-01-01

    Examines what wetland conservation means to different groups of Louisiana's coastal residents. Describes coastal resources, reasons for their deterioration, conservation efforts, and the impact of a public perception that conservation of wetlands is closely tied to conservation of the existing lifestyle. (LZ)

  11. Enhanced detection of wetland-stream connectivity using lidar:Implications for improved wetland conservation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of wetland–stream connectivity has been heightened due to the current dependence of wetland regulatory status on this connectivity, although the importance of wetland function to adjacent stream health has been and will continue to be substantial regardless of government policies and ...

  12. Movement patterns and the conservation of amphibians breeding in small, temporary wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C.K.; Cade, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Many amphibians breed in water but live most of their lives in terrestrial habitats. Little is known, however, about the spatial distribution of these habitats or of the distances and directions amphibians move to reach breeding sites. The amphibian community at a small, temporary pond in northcentral Florida was monitored for 5 years. Based on captures and recaptures of more than 2500 striped newts (Notophthalmus perstriatus) and 5700 eastern narrow-mouthed toads (Gastrophryne carolinensis), we tabulated the angles of orientation that these amphibians entered and exited the pond basin. Our results showed that movements of these species between the pond and terrestrial habitats were nonrandom in orientation, but that narrow corridors did not appear to be used. Differences between the species likely reflect differences in habitat preferences, whereas intraspecific differences among years and between the sexes likely reflect variation among individuals. For terrestrial buffer zones to be effective at conserving pond-breeding amphibian communities, they need both a distance and a directional component. The determination of a directional component may be obscured if studies are carried out over a short time span. Conservation efforts for wetland-breeding amphibians that concentrate solely on the wetland likely will fail without consideration of the adjacent terrestrial habitat.

  13. Diversity and distribution of aquatic insects in Southern Brazil wetlands: implications for biodiversity conservation in a Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, Leonardo; Dalzochio, Marina Schmidt; Stenert, Cristina; Rolon, Ana Silvia

    2012-03-01

    The selection of priority areas is an enormous challenge for biodiversity conservation. Some biogeographic methods have been used to identify the priority areas to conservation, and panbiogeography is one of them. This study aimed at the utilization of panbiogeographic tools, to identify the distribution patterns of aquatic insect genera, in wetland systems of an extensive area in the Neotropical region (approximately 280 000km2), and to compare the distribution of the biogeographic units identified by the aquatic insects, with the conservation units of Southern Brazil. We analyzed the distribution pattern of 82 genera distributed in four orders of aquatic insects (Diptera, Odonata, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera) in Southern Brazil wetlands. Therefore, 32 biogeographic nodes corresponded to the priority areas for conservation of the aquatic insect diversity. Among this total, 13 were located in the Atlantic Rainforest, 16 in the Pampa and three amongst both biomes. The distribution of nodes showed that only 15% of the dispersion centers of insects were inserted in conservation units. The four priority areas pointed by node cluster criterion must be considered in further inclusions of areas for biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazil wetlands, since such areas present species from different ancestral biota. The inclusion of such areas into the conservation units would be a strong way to conserve the aquatic biodiversity in this region.

  14. Spatial patterns in soil biogeochemical process rates along a Louisiana wetland salinity gradient in the Barataria Bay estuarine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B. J.; Rich, M. W.; Sullivan, H. L.; Bledsoe, R.; Dawson, M.; Donnelly, B.; Marton, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Louisiana has the highest rates of coastal wetland loss in the United States. In addition to being lost, Louisiana wetlands experience numerous other environmental stressors including changes in salinity regime (both increases from salt water intrusion and decreases from the creation of river diversions) and climate change induced changes in vegetation (e.g. the northward expansion of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) into salt marshes). In this study, we examined how these changes might influence biogeochemical process rates important in regulating carbon balance and the cycling, retention, and removal of nutrients in Louisiana wetlands. Specifically, we measured net soil greenhouse gas fluxes and collected cores for the determination of rates of greenhouse gas production, denitrification potential, nitrification potential, iron reduction, and phosphorus sorption from surface (0-5cm) and subsurface (10-15cm) depths for three plots in each of 4 sites along the salinity gradient: a freshwater marsh site, a brackish (7 ppt) marsh site, a salt marsh (17 ppt), and a Avicennia germinans stand (17 ppt; adjacent to salt marsh site) in the Barataria Bay estuarine system. Most biogeochemical processes displayed similar spatial patterns with salt marsh rates being lower than rates in freshwater and/or brackish marsh sites and not having significantly different rates than in Avicennia germinans stands. Rates in surface soils were generally higher than in subsurface soils. These patterns were generally consistent with spatial patterns in soil properties with soil water content, organic matter quantity and quality, and extractable nutrients generally being higher in freshwater and brackish marsh sites than salt marsh and Avicennia germinans sites, especially in surface soils. These spatial patterns suggest that the ability of coastal wetlands to retain and remove nutrients might change significantly in response to future climate changes in the region and that these

  15. Long-term Strategic Planning for a Resilient Metro Colombo: An Economic Case for Wetland Conservation and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, J.

    2015-12-01

    Colombo faces recurrent floods that threaten its long-term economic development. Its urban wetlands have been identified by local agencies as a critical component of its flood reduction system, but they have declined rapidly in recent years due to continuous infilling, unmanaged land development and dredging to create lakes. In collaboration with government agencies, NGOs and local universities, the World Bank has carried out a Robust Decision Making analysis to examine the value of Colombo urban wetlands, both in the short-term and long-term, and identify what are the most viable strategies available to increase the city's flood resilience in an unclear future (in terms of climate change and patterns of urban development). This has involved the use of numerous hydrological and socio-economic scenarios as well as the evaluation of some wetlands benefits, like ecosystem services, wastewater treatment, or recreational services. The analysis has determined that if all urban wetlands across the Colombo catchment were lost, in some scenarios the metropolitan area would have to cope with an annual average flood loss of approximately 1% of Colombo GDP in the near future. For long-term strategies, trade-offs between urban development, lake creation and wetland conservation were analyzed and it was concluded that an active management of urban wetlands was the lowest regret option. Finally, the analysis also revealed that in the future, with climate change and fast urban development, wetlands will not be sufficient to protect Colombo against severe floods. Pro-active urban planning and land-use management are therefore necessary, both to protect existing wetlands and to reduce future exposure. The use of many different scenarios, the consideration of several policy options, and the open participatory process ensured policy-makers' buy-in and lead to the decision to actively protect urban wetlands in Colombo.

  16. Partitioning of heavy metals in the surface sediments of Quanzhou Bay wetland and its availability to Suaeda australis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate distributions of heavy metal pollution in Quanzhou Bay wetland, the total concentration and chemical partitioning of a number of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Hg) in sediments of three sampling sites of Quanzhou Bay wetland and their availability to Suaeda australis were analyzed. The Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) values reveal that the sediments of three sampling sites may all be considered as moderately contaminated for Pb and Zn, and all sediments might be strongly contaminated with cadmium. The partitioning analyses revealed the measured heavy metals in three sites are bound to the exchangeable fraction at lower concentrations. The measured metals in a considerable amount are bound to the reducible and oxidizable fractions, and a high proportion of the measured heavy metals were distributed in the residual fraction in the sediment samples. The concentrations of Cd in each chemical phase extracted from the sediments are above natural global background levels and should be further investigated because of its toxicity. Suaeda australis has different accumulation abilities for the measured heavy metals. For the root and stem, the bioaccumulation ability assessed by bioaccumulation factor (BA F) for the measured heavy metals follows the decreasing order as: Cu>Cr> Zn>Cd, Pb, Hg. In the leaf, stronger bioaccumulation ability for Hg is exhibited. The heavy metal concentrations in Suaeda australis roots have positive correlations with their available fractions, while the exchangeable fraction of Cu and Cd might have be more important to both mature plant roots and seedling roots uptake than other fractions; as for Cr, the oxidizable fraction might make a greater contribution to the plant root uptake; as for Zn, the reducible fraction might make so contribution; and for Pb, the oxidizable fraction might make a significant contribution to the mature plant root uptake, however, the exchangeable fraction might have a significant

  17. Potential component Allee effects and their impact on wetland management in the conservation of endangered anurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A Gaston

    Full Text Available Effective management of wetland quantity and quality is crucial for effective conservation of declining amphibian populations. In particular, frogs and toads that employ aggregative breeding strategies may suffer negative population impacts in response to changes in availability of aquatic breeding habitat, including overabundance of suitable habitat, if density of conspecifics attending aggregations is positively correlated with reproductive success. Here we document such a positive relationship, potentially the first example of a component Allee effect in an anuran, in the critically endangered Houston toad (Bufo houstonensis. We assessed the relationship between mean yearly chorus size and reproductive success of males at the pond level using an information theoretic model selection approach and a two-sample t-test. The chosen model contained the single variable of mean yearly chorus size to predict probability of reproduction, as selected using the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small sample size and Akaike weight. Mean chorus sizes were significantly higher among ponds exhibiting evidence of reproduction than in those that showed no evidence of reproduction. Our results suggest that chorusing alone is a poor proxy for inference of population stability and highlight a need for reassessment of widely-used amphibian monitoring protocols. Further, amphibian conservation efforts should account for potential Allee effects in order to optimize benefits and avoid underestimating critical population thresholds, particularly in species exhibiting rapid population declines.

  18. Climate Change and Conservation Planning in California: The San Francisco Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciforte, R.; Weiss, S. B.; Schaefer, N.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change threatens California's vast and unique biodiversity. The Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals is a comprehensive regional biodiversity assessment of the 9 counties surrounding San Francisco Bay, and is designing conservation land networks that will serve to protect, manage, and restore that biodiversity. Conservation goals for vegetation, rare plants, mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates are set, and those goals are met using the optimization algorithm MARXAN. Climate change issues are being considered in the assessment and network design in several ways. The high spatial variability at mesoclimatic and topoclimatic scales in California creates high local biodiversity, and provides some degree of local resiliency to macroclimatic change. Mesoclimatic variability from 800 m scale PRISM climatic norms is used to assess "mesoclimate spaces" in distinct mountain ranges, so that high mesoclimatic variability, especially local extremes that likely support range limits of species and potential climatic refugia, can be captured in the network. Quantitative measures of network resiliency to climate change include the spatial range of key temperature and precipitation variables within planning units. Topoclimatic variability provides a finer-grained spatial patterning. Downscaling to the topoclimatic scale (10-50 m scale) includes modeling solar radiation across DEMs for predicting maximum temperature differentials, and topographic position indices for modeling minimum temperature differentials. PRISM data are also used to differentiate grasslands into distinct warm and cool types. The overall conservation strategy includes local and regional connectivity so that range shifts can be accommodated.

  19. Louisiana Coastal Wetlands Conservation Plan Boundary, Geographic NAD83, LDNR (1998) [conservation_plan_boundary_LDNR_1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset depicting the areas of coastal wetlands in the state of Louisiana. This area encloses the tidally influenced coastal region three feet or...

  20. The role of protected area wetlands in waterfowl habitat conservation: implications for protected area network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, William S.; Kesler, Dylan C.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Naylor, Luke W.; Humburg, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    The principal goal of protected area networks is biodiversity preservation, but efficacy of such networks is directly linked to animal movement within and outside area boundaries. We examined wetland selection patterns of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) during non-breeding periods from 2010 to 2012 to evaluate the utility of protected areas to migratory waterfowl in North America. We tracked 33 adult females using global positioning system (GPS) satellite transmitters and implemented a use-availability resource selection design to examine mallard use of wetlands under varying degrees of protection. Specifically, we examined effects of proximities to National Wildlife Refuges, private land, state wildlife management areas, Wetland Reserve Program easements (WRP), and waterfowl sanctuaries on mallard wetland selection. In addition, we included landscape-level variables that measured areas of sanctuary and WRP within the surrounding landscape of each used and available wetland. We developed 8 wetland selection models according to season (autumn migration, winter, spring migration), hunting season (present, absent), and time period (diurnal, nocturnal). Model averaged parameter estimates indicated wetland selection patterns varied across seasons and time periods, but ducks consistently selected wetlands with greater areas of sanctuary and WRP in the surrounding landscape. Consequently, WRP has the potential to supplement protected area networks in the midcontinent region. Additionally, seasonal variation in wetland selection patterns indicated considering the effects of habitat management and anthropogenic disturbances on migratory waterfowl during the non-breeding period is essential in designing protected area networks.

  1. Research on Hydraulic Block Scenarios in the Land Conservation Zone of the Headwaters Area of Jinshu Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the hydraulic block scenarios in the water source land conservation zone in Jinshu Bay so as to ensure the water quality in the water sources in Jinshu Bay.[Method] By dint of one dimension water amount and water quality mode in the river net in Taihu,the water flow movement characteristics and pollutants transportation rules in the water sources areas in Jinshu Bay under five kinds of hydraulic block scenarios were compared and discussed.[Result] After demolishing the tempo...

  2. Grasslands, wetlands, and agriculture: the fate of land expiring from the Conservation Reserve Program in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morefield, Philip E.; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Clark, Christopher M.; Iovanna, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is the largest agricultural land-retirement program in the United States, providing many environmental benefits, including wildlife habitat and improved air, water, and soil quality. Since 2007, however, CRP area has declined by over 25% nationally with much of this land returning to agriculture. Despite this trend, it is unclear what types of CRP land are being converted, to what crops, and where. All of these specific factors greatly affect environmental impacts. To answer these questions, we quantified shifts in expiring CRP parcels to five major crop-types (corn, soy, winter and spring wheat, and sorghum) in a 12-state, Midwestern region of the United States using a US Department of Agriculture (USDA), field-level CRP database and USDA’s Cropland Data Layer. For the years 2010 through 2013, we estimate almost 30%, or more than 530 000 ha, of expiring CRP land returned to the production of these five crops in our study area, with soy and corn accounting for the vast majority of these shifts. Grasslands were the largest type of CRP land converted (360 000 ha), followed by specifically designated wildlife habitat (76 000 ha), and wetland areas (53 000 ha). These wetland areas were not just wetlands themselves, but also a mix of land covers enhancing or protecting wetland ecosystem services (e.g., wetland buffers). Areas in the Dakotas, Nebraska, and southern Iowa were hotspots of change, with the highest areas of CRP land moving back to agriculture. By contrast, we estimate only a small amount (∼3%) of the expiring land shifted into similar, non-CRP land-retirement or easement programs. Reconciling needs for food, feed, fuel, and healthy ecosystems is an immense challenge for farmers, conservationists, and state and federal agencies. Reduced enrollment and the turnover of CRP land from conservation to agriculture raises questions about sustaining ecosystem services in this region.

  3. Illinois Natural Heritage Conservation/Education Kit IV. Special Theme: Wetland Ecology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sally F.

    This instructional guide contains 19 activities and exercises designed to help teachers familiarize their students with the wetland resources of Illinois. Each activity or exercise is ready to be copied and given to students. They include: (1) making a largemouth bass model; (2) building a wetland ecosystem; (3) investigating problems that…

  4. Integrating Federal and State data records to report progress in establishing agricultural conservation practices on Chesapeake Bay farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, W. Dean; Devereux, Olivia H.; Claggett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In response to the Executive Order for Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration (E.O. #13508, May 12, 2009), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) took on the task of acquiring and assessing agricultural conservation practice data records for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs, and transferred those datasets in aggregated format to State jurisdictional agencies for use in reporting conservation progress to the Chesapeake Bay Program Partnership (CBP Partnership). Under the guidelines and regulations that have been developed to protect and restore water-quality in the Chesapeake Bay, the six State jurisdictions that fall within the Chesapeake Bay watershed are required to report their progress in promoting agricultural conservation practices to the CBP Partnership on an annual basis. The installation and adoption of agricultural best management practices is supported by technical and financial assistance from both Federal and State conservation programs. The farm enrollment data for USDA conservation programs are confidential, but agencies can obtain access to the privacy-protected data if they are established as USDA Conservation Cooperators. The datasets can also be released to the public if they are first aggregated to protect farmer privacy. In 2012, the USGS used its Conservation Cooperator status to obtain implementation data for conservation programs sponsored by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) for farms within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Three jurisdictions (Delaware, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) used the USGS-provided aggregated dataset to report conservation progress in 2012, whereas the remaining three jurisdictions (Maryland, New York, and Virginia) used jurisdictional Conservation Cooperator Agreements to obtain privacy-protected data directly from the USDA. This report reviews the status of conservation data sharing between the USDA and the various jurisdictions, discusses the

  5. Waterbird egg mercury concentrations in response to wetland restoration in south San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Hartman, Christopher A.; Watts, Trevor C.; Barr, Jarred R.

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of 50–90 percent of 15,100 acres of former salt evaporation ponds to tidal marsh habitat in the south San Francisco Bay, California, is planned as part of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project. This large-scale habitat restoration may change the bioavailability of methylmercury. The South Bay already is known to have high methylmercury concentrations, with methylmercury concentrations in several waterbirds species more than known toxicity thresholds where avian reproduction is impaired. In this 2013 study, we continued monitoring bird egg mercury concentrations in response to the restoration of the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex to a potential tidal marsh in the future. The restoration of the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex began in autumn 2010, and the Pond A8 Notch was opened 5 feet (one of eight gates) to muted tidal action on June 1, 2011, and then closed in the winter. In autumn 2010, internal levees between Ponds A8, A7, and A5 were breached and water depths were substantially increased by flooding the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex in February 2011. In June 2012, 15 feet (three of eight gates) of the Pond A8 Notch was opened, and then closed in December 2012. In June 2013, 15 feet of the Pond A8 Notch again was opened, and the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex was a relatively deep and large pond with muted tidal action in the summer. This report synthesizes waterbird data from the 2013 breeding season, and combines it with our prior study’s data from 2010 and 2011.

  6. Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis. Volume III. Habitat Classification and Mapping and Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    itiflorum Pteridium equi hinum Melilotus spp. Rhododendron cahifornicm Phragmi tes communis Rubus spectabi his Plan tago hanceo Zeta Salix spp. Poe pratensizs...in mud and] rhuddy SiliE! bottomIs) C I ’J 0 c j d , v-( I t LI Illi I I "I fo) [ilia 1, 11 S l S ’c I , iv In I caLl fo n 0 m11ZI s ’_5 poe ( )O)OSC...California listing, State Lands Commission). Smith, Allan R., 1967. Population dynamics and ecology of the embiotocids of Humboldt Bay, California

  7. [Threats to and conservation of North African wetlands: the case of the Ramsar site of Beni-Belaid (NE Algeria)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldjedri, Mohammed; de Bélair, Gérard; Mayache, Boualem; Muller, Serge D

    2011-10-01

    Because of their biogeographical and geomorphological context, the northeastern Algeria wetlands present high species and community richness. The vegetation study of the Ramsar site of Beni-Belaid (Kabylia) showed the existence of four main communities, distributed along gradients of hydrology and disturbance. The obtained results reveal worrying threats on short term: overgrazing results in the lake invasion by the sand eroded from the coastal dune; agriculture induces illegal cutting, water pollution and excessive groundwater pumping; finally, hunting and fishing are illegally practiced into the Ramsar site. The awareness of public authorities is needed in order: (1) to completely protect the wetland with the aim of restoring a riparian forest belt; and (2) to initiate a campaign for increasing the local population awareness, and its involvement in conservation programs.

  8. Ecosystem valuation and the conservation of wild lands in vigorous economic regions: A case study in Jiuduansha Wetland, Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the loss of wild lands to satisfy traditional economic development has become a global environmental problem in recent decades, using ecosystem valuation to estimate the total economic value (TEV) of an ecosystem has become popular. The main purpose of the ecosystem valuation is to strengthen the importance of ecosystems, and bring the ecosystem services into the traditional cost-benefit analyses of land use strategy. Some studies have illustrated that in remote areas, wilderness can produce more value if it is conserved, rather than converted to traditional agricultural or industrial uses. The same situation does not seem to exist in vigorous economic regions. Thus, a case study was conducted on the Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai using three approaches: the direct market valuation, the replacement valuation and the contingent valuation. The net present TEVs of three land use scenarios over one hundred years were evaluated. The results proved that simply based on ecosystem valuation, when compared with the other two scenarios of "conservation" and "selective use", "partial conversion into terrene (dry land)" of Jiuduansha might be the optimal scenario for the well-being of the people in Shanghai. Land price was identified as the most important factor. This situation is likely due to the scarcity of land available for traditional economic development in Shanghai. Thus, we speculated that the fate of the wilderness to "be destroyed" in vigorous economic regions could not be changed simply based on ecosystem valuation. However, the variety of interest by local residents in wilderness might enhance the TEVs of scenarios such as "conservation" and "selective use", and affect the valuation results. Since some important benefits of natural ecosystems remain unknown and others are underestimated, we suggested that any land use decisions regarding the Jiuduansha Wetland should be conservative and cautious as converting wetlands into terrene is an irreversible process.

  9. Land use and conservation reserve program effects on the persistence of playa wetlands in the High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dale W; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A; Johnson, Lacrecia A; McMurry, Scott T

    2014-04-15

    Watershed cultivation and subsequent soil erosion remains the greatest threat to the service provisioning of playa wetlands in the High Plains. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) plants perennial vegetation cover on cultivated lands including playa watersheds, and therefore, the program influences sediment deposition and accumulation in playas. Our objective was to measure the effects of the CRP on sediment deposition by comparing sediment depth and present/historic size characteristics in 258 playas among three High-Plains subregions (northern, central, and southern) and the three dominant watershed types: cropland, CRP, and native grassland. Sediment depth and resultant volume loss for CRP playas were 40% and 57% lower than cropland playas, but 68% and 76% greater than playas in native grassland. Playas in CRP had remaining volumes exceeding those of cropland playas. Grassland playas had nearly three times more original playa volume and 122% greater wetland area than CRP playas. Overall, playas were larger in the south than other subregions. Sediment depth was also three times greater in the south than the north, which resulted in southern playas losing twice as much total volume as northern playas. However, the larger southern playas provide more remaining volume per playa than those in other subregions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of proper watershed management in preserving playa wetland ecosystem service provisioning in the High Plains. Furthermore, we identify regional differences in playas that may influence management decisions and provide valuable insight to conservation practitioners trying to maximize wetland services with limited resources.

  10. The role of surface and subsurface processes in keeping pace with sea level rise in intertidal wetlands of Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Bennion, Vicki; Grinham, Alistair; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in the elevation of the soil surfaces of mangroves and salt marshes are key to the maintenance of these habitats with accelerating sea level rise. Understanding the processes that give rise to increases in soil surface elevation provides science for management of landscapes for sustainable coastal wetlands. Here, we tested whether the soil surface elevation of mangroves and salt marshes in Moreton Bay is keeping up with local rates of sea level rise (2.358 mm y-1) and whether accretion on the soil surface was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise. We found variability in surface elevation gains, with sandy areas in the eastern bay having the highest surface elevation gains in both mangrove and salt marsh (5.9 and 1.9 mm y-1) whereas in the muddier western bay rates of surface elevation gain were lower (1.4 and -0.3 mm y-1 in mangrove and salt marsh, respectively). Both sides of the bay had similar rates of surface accretion (~7–9 mm y-1 in the mangrove and 1–3 mm y-1 in the salt marsh), but mangrove soils in the western bay were subsiding at a rate of approximately 8 mm y-1, possibly due to compaction of organic sediments. Over the study surface elevation increments were sensitive to position in the intertidal zone (higher when lower in the intertidal) and also to variation in mean sea level (higher at high sea level). Although surface accretion was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise in the eastern bay, subsidence largely negated gains made through surface accretion in the western bay indicating a high vulnerability to sea level rise in these forests.

  11. Securing water for wetland conservation: a comparative analysis of policy options to protect a national nature reserve in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Wu, Junjie; Wang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Ma

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluates four policy options to secure the water supply needed for wetland conservation in Qixinghe--a national wetland nature reserve in China--using four criteria: cost effectiveness, probability of success in achieving the water-saving goal, political feasibility, and farmer acceptance. This multi-criteria analysis framework reveals the ecological, economic, and socio-political trade-offs for policymakers when choosing among the four policy options. Results suggest that upgrading irrigation infrastructure in the area surrounding the wetland (Option I) is the most politically feasible option, but it is the second best option in terms of cost effectiveness. Constructing a dam to store and control floodwater (Option II) is the most reliable for achieving the water-saving goal. It is also the farmers' most favored strategy. But this option is the least cost effective and receives little support from local governments. Promoting farmers' adoption of water-saving practices (Option III) is the most cost effective, but it is less reliable for achieving the water-saving goal than Options I or II. Converting paddy crops to dry-land crops (Option IV) is politically infeasible and least reliable for achieving the water-saving goal. The overall ranking of the four options is determined using the policymakers' revealed weights on the four criteria. Option I is ranked first, followed by Options II, III, and IV.

  12. Conservation and ecofriendly utilization of wetlands associated with the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, J H Martin; Li, Ruoxi; Yuan, Xingzhong

    2013-10-01

    The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China has created a major reservoir in which the water level fluctuates annually by about 30 m, generating a drawdown zone of up to 350 km(2) in summer. Since construction of the dam, there has been scientific and public interest in how to use the drawdown zone resources in environmentally sustainable ways. To this end, and with government support, an international conference was held in Chongqing Municipality (China) in October 2011 on the subject of conservation and ecofriendly utilization of wetlands in the Three Gorges Reservoir. The conference proceedings were subsequently published in the Journal of Chongqing Normal University. The proceedings reports are reviewed here in the context of other relevant literature. The proceedings included papers on ecology, ecodesign and ecological engineering, erosion control, plant production and carbon sequestration, phytoremediation of pollution, hydrosystem management, and others. Several of the reports derive from experimental work conducted at a research field station on the Three Gorges Reservoir situated in Kaixian County, Chongqing Municipality. Plant communities in the drawdown zone are declining in diversity and evolving. Experimental plantings of flood-tolerant edible hydrophytes in a dike-pond system reveal their potential to provide economic returns for farmers, and flooding-tolerant trees, such as cypresses, also show promising results for stabilizing soils in the drawdown zone. Flood-tolerant natural plant communities vary strongly with depth and their composition provides useful indicators for revegetation strategies. In the region surrounding the reservoir, remnant natural broad-leaved evergreen forests are most effective in sequestering carbon, and within the drawdown zone, carbon is mostly stored below ground. There is strong interest in the potential of aquatic plants for removal of pollutants, notably N and P, from the reservoir water by means of floating beds

  13. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of wetland and converted wetland. 12.33 Section 12.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2)...

  14. The Beetle (Coleoptera and True bug (Heteroptera species pool of the alpine “Pian di Gembro” wetland (Villa di Tirano, Italy and its conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Montagna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he C oleoptera and Heteroptera species pool was investigated in the “Pian di Gembro” wetland (Villa di T irano, Sondrio, Italy. T he wetland consists of a bog and its surroundings, referred to as wetland components, that are both subjected to a diversified intermediate management regime (DIMR. T he application of the DIMR for plant species conservation resulted in the establishment of 11 wetland zones with a characteristic vegetation. In a three year sampling program, 997 C oleoptera and Heteroptera representing 141 species from 14 families were collected. Among these species, 64 species share both wetland components, 11 are restricted to the bog and 63 were found in the surroundings only. Among the species pool there were 23 tyrphophile taxa and only one tyrphobiont. With the exception of one zone, all zones are inhabited by zone-specific species. By taking into account both the general species pool and the pool of species of particular interest to conservationists, only one zone can be considered as redundant since it is inhabited by species that occur also in other zones. Hence, all the zones, with one exception, are effective for species pool conservation. The existing DIMR implemented for plant species conservation is also effective for conserving the species pool of C oleoptera and Heteroptera.

  15. Biotic wetland connectivity-supporting a new approach for wetland policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amezaga, J.M.; Santamaria, L.; Green, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands are key habitats connected physically and socially with processes occurring over a much wider territory. The biotic connection through dispersal mechanisms among wetlands is of primary importance to wetland management and policies. However, traditional wetland conservation approaches are ba

  16. 75 FR 8989 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  17. 77 FR 5264 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  18. 76 FR 5820 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  19. Using chemical, microbial and fluorescence techniques to understand contaminant sources and pathways to wetlands in a conservation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhymes, J; Jones, L; Lapworth, D J; White, D; Fenner, N; McDonald, J E; Perkins, T L

    2015-04-01

    Nutrients and faecal contaminants can enter wetland systems in a number of ways, with both biological and potentially human-health implications. In this study we used a combination of inorganic chemistry, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence and Escherichia coli and total coliform (TC) count techniques to study the sources and multiple pathways of contamination affecting a designated sand dune site of international conservation importance, surrounded by agricultural land. Analysis of stream samples, groundwater and dune slack wetlands revealed multiple input pathways. These included riverbank seepage, runoff events and percolation of nutrients from adjacent pasture into the groundwater, as well as some on-site sources. The combined techniques showed that off-site nutrient inputs into the sand dune system were primarily from fertilisers, revealed by high nitrate concentrations, and relatively low tryptophan-like fulvic-like ratios<0.4Ramanunits (R.U.). The E. coli and TC counts recorded across the site confirm a relatively minor source of bacterial and nutrient inputs from on-site grazers. Attenuation of the nutrient concentrations in streams, in groundwater and in run-off inputs occurs within the site, restoring healthier groundwater nutrient concentrations showing that contaminant filtration by the sand dunes provides a valuable ecosystem service. However, previous studies show that this input of nutrients has a clear adverse ecological impact.

  20. The Ramsar Conference, Final Act of the International Conference on the Conservation of Wetlands and Waterfowl (Ramsar, Iran, 30 January to 3 February 1971).

    Science.gov (United States)

    IUCN Bulletin, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The text of the Final Act of the International Conference on the Conservation of Wetlands and Waterfowl is presented in this pamphlet. The conference was convened by the Government of Iran at Ramsar, Iran, January 30 to February 3, 1971, to promote international collaboration in this field. It was sponsored by the International Wildfowl Research…

  1. 76 FR 1190 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA; Final... National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). In this final CCP, we describe how we will manage this refuge for the next... CONTACT: Jared Brandwein, Refuge Manager, Back Bay NWR, 4005 Sandpiper Road, Virginia Beach, VA......

  2. Effects and effectiveness of USDA wetland conservation practices in the Mid-Atlantic region: A report on the conservation effects assessment project Mid-Atlantic regional wetland assessment 2008 - 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although successful wetland restoration is generally considered to provide net benefits to society, the large investment that the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has made in wetland restoration and increasing societal need for wetland ecosystem services highlights the importance of environmental...

  3. Assessing the effects of USDA conservation programs on ecosystem services provided by wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is led by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in an effort to quantify the environmental effects of conservation programs and practices on privately owned agricultural landscapes across the United States. CEAP’s approach includes application ...

  4. Movement patterns of Antillean manatees in Chetumal Bay (Mexico) and coastal Belize: A challenge for regional conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanco-Martínez, Delma Nataly; Padilla-Saldivar, J.; Hernández-Arana, Héctor Abuid; Slone, D.H.; Reid, J.P.; Morales-Vela, B.

    2013-01-01

    Information from 15 satellite-tracked Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) was analyzed in order to assess individual movements, home ranges, and high-use areas for conservation decisions. Manatees were captured in Chetumal Bay, Mexico, and tagged with Argos-monitored satellite transmitters. Location of the manatees and physical characteristics were assessed to describe habitat properties. Most manatees traveled to freshwater sources. The Maximum Area Size (MAS) for each manatee was determined using the observation-area method. Additional kernel densities of 95% home range and 50% Center of Activity (COA) were also calculated, with manatees having 1–3 COAs. Manatees exhibited two different movement patterns: remaining in Chetumal Bay, and long-distance (up to 240 km in 89 d). The residence time in Chetumal Bay was higher for females (89.6% of time) than for males (72.0%), but the daily travel rate (0.4–0.5 km/d) was similar for both sexes. Most of the COAs fell within Natural Protected Areas (NPA). However, manatees also travel for long distances into unprotected areas, where they face uncontrolled boat traffic, fishing activities, and habitat loss. Conservation of movement corridors may promote long-distance movements and facilitate genetic exchange.

  5. Tidal saltmarsh fragmentation and persistence of San Pablo Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia samuelis): Assessing benefits of wetland restoration in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, J.Y.; Sacks, B.N.; Woo, I.; Johnson, M.L.; Wylie, G.D.; ,

    2006-01-01

    The San Pablo Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia samuelis) is one of three morphologically distinct Song Sparrow subspecies in tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay estuary. These subspecies are rare, because as the human population has grown, diking and development have resulted in loss of 79% of the historic tidal marshes. Hundreds of projects have been proposed in the past decade to restore tidal marshes and benefit endemic populations. To evaluate the value of these restoration projects for Song Sparrows, we developed a population viability analysis (PVA) model to examine persistence of samuelis subspecies in relation to parcel size, connectivity, and catastrophe in San Pablo Bay. A total of 101 wetland parcels were identified from coverages of modern and historic tidal marshes. Parcels were grouped into eight fragments in the historical landscape and 10 in the present landscape. Fragments were defined as a group of parcels separated by >1 km, a distance that precluded regular interchange. Simulations indicated that the historic (circa 1850) samuelis population was three times larger than the modern population. However, only very high levels (>70% mortality) of catastrophe would threaten their persistence. Persistence of populations was sensitive to parcel size at a carrying capacity of <10 pairs, but connectivity of parcels was found to have little importance because habitats were dominated by a few large parcels. Our analysis indicates little risk of extinction of the samuelis subspecies with the current extent of tidal marshes, but the vulnerability of the small-est parcels suggests that restoration should create larger continuous tracts. Thus, PVA models may be useful tools for balancing the costs and benefits of restoring habitats for threatened tidal-marsh populations in wetland restoration planning.

  6. Constructed wetland as an ecotechnological tool for pollution treatment for conservation of Ganga river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Singh, N K; Upadhyay, A K; Dwivedi, S; Shukla, M K; Mallick, S; Singh, S N; Nautiyal, C S

    2013-11-01

    With aim to develop an efficient and ecofriendly approach for on-site treatment of sewage, a sub-surface flow constructed wetland (CW) has been developed by raising potential aquatic macrophytes; Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Colocasia esculenta, Polygonum hydropiper, Alternanthera sessilis and Pistia stratoites in gravel as medium. Sewage treatment potential of CW was evaluated by varying retention time at three different stages of plant growth and stabilization. After 6 months, monitoring of fully established CW indicated reduction of 90%, 65%, 78%, 84%, 76% and 86% of BOD, TSS, TDS, NO3-N, PO4-P and NH4-N, respectively in comparison to inlet after 36 h of retention time. Sewage treatment through CW also resulted in reduction of heavy metal contents. Thus, CW proved an effective method for treatment of wastewater and may be developed along river Ganga stretch as an alternative technology. Treated water may be drained into river to check further deterioration of Ganga water quality.

  7. Diversity and distribution of diapausing aquatic invertebrates in inland wetlands: An ecosystem conservation viewpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    processes determining the biogeography of cosmopolitan species are needed. Further knowledge of these issues should provide invaluable information allowing development of appropriate conservation management policies for inland waters across entire ecosystems, landscapes, and geographic regions....

  8. Biomonitoring of Heavy metals using the bivalve molluscs in sunderban mangrove wetland, Northeast Coast of Bay of bengal (india): possible risks to Human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Henrique; Cardoso, Ines [Departamento de Biologia Animal/Instituto de Oceanografia, Campo Grande, Lisboa (Portugal); Chatterjee, Mousumi; Kumar Bhattacharya, Asok; Aftab Alam, Mohammad [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India); Kanta Satpathy, Kamala [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Environmental and Industrial Safety Section, Safety Group, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Kumar Sarkar, Santosh

    2008-02-15

    The suitability of using four bivalve molluscs (Sanguinolaria acuminata, Anadara granosa, Meretrix meretrix, and Pelecyora trigona) in biomonitoring of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Hg) collected from intertidal regions of the Sunderban mangrove wetland, northeastern part of the Bay of Bengal, were evaluated. Both speciesdependent variability and temporal variations were pronounced. A high degree of organ specificity was evident in the bivalves where gill and mantle exhibited higher metal accumulation due to ion exchange property of the mucous layer covering these organs while shells represent very poor accumulation. Elevated values of Zn and Cu reflect high potential for biomagnification through marine food chain. Metal concentrations in different body size groups of the bivalves do not follow uniform trend. Correlation coefficient between different metal couplings as tested statistically revealed significant coupling for Pb-Zn, Pb-Cu, Zn-Cu, and Hg-Cu. Concentrations of all the metals in specific organs (visceral mass, mantle and gill) of the bivalves exceeded the safe levels according to the international standards for metals compiled by Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and would be of great risk for human consumption. It is concluded that the mussel and clam are suitable biomonitors to employ in programs designed to assess changes in metal pollution in the Sunderban mangrove wetland. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation impact plant and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 on a Chesapeake Bay wetland: review of a 28-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bert G

    2014-11-01

    An ongoing field study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on a brackish wetland on Chesapeake Bay, started in 1987, is unique as the longest continually running investigation of the effects of elevated CO2 on an ecosystem. Since the beginning of the study, atmospheric CO2 increased 18%, sea level rose 20 cm, and growing season temperature varied with approximately the same range as predicted for global warming in the 21st century. This review looks back at this study for clues about how the effects of rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation interact with high atmospheric CO2 to alter the physiology of C3 and C4 photosynthetic species, carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration, plant and ecosystem nitrogen, and distribution of plant communities in this brackish wetland. Rising sea level caused a shift to higher elevations in the Scirpus olneyi C3 populations on the wetland, displacing the Spartina patens C4 populations. Elevated CO2 stimulated carbon assimilation in the Scirpus C3 species measured by increased shoot and root density and biomass, net ecosystem production, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, and methane production. But elevated CO2 also decreased biomass of the grass, S. patens C4. The elevated CO2 treatment reduced tissue nitrogen concentration in shoots, roots, and total canopy nitrogen, which was associated with reduced ecosystem respiration. Net ecosystem production was mediated by precipitation through soil salinity: high salinity reduced the CO2 effect on net ecosystem production, which was zero in years of severe drought. The elevated CO2 stimulation of shoot density in the Scirpus C3 species was sustained throughout the 28 years of the study. Results from this study suggest that rising CO2 can add substantial amounts of carbon to ecosystems through stimulation of carbon assimilation, increased root exudates to supply nitrogen fixation, reduced dark respiration, and improved water and nitrogen use efficiency.

  10. 77 FR 63326 - Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake Wetland...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... Sand Lake Wetland Management District, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No... assessment (EA) involving Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland Management Districts (Districts). In this..., Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District final CCP'' in the subject...

  11. Pollution characteristics and ecological risk assessment of HCHs and DDTs in estuary wetland sediments from the Bohai Bay, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Tian, Shengyan; Jia, Rui; Liu, Xianbin

    2015-12-09

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) tend to persist in the environment for long periods of time. The concentration and distribution of HCHs and DDTs were investigated in surface sediments of Yongdingxinhe wetland and Binhai wetland by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). All isomers of HCHs and DDTs were detected in all of the samples. The concentrations of total HCHs (ΣHCHs) in two wetland sediments ranged from 69.81 to 379.28 ng · g (-1), with a mean value of 224.55 ng · g (-1). The concentrations of total DDTs (ΣDDTs) ranged from 98.32 to 129.10 ng · g (-1), with a mean value of 113.71 ng · g (-1). The results of an ecological risk assessment demonstrated that there was high-risk ecological effect of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) on the estuary wetlands. Lindane and technical DDTs were found to be the main sources of OCPs.

  12. The Mangroves of Kenya: general information. Compiled for Netherlands Wetlands Conservation and Training Programme, 1996.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The report contains general information on mangroves in Kenya with the following main topics: Mangrove ecology, Mangrove distribution, Mangrove vegetation, Mangrove associated flora, Mangrove fauna, Values and utilization, threats. Interactions between mangroves, seagrasses & coral reefs. Main problems related to mangrove management and Conservation. Managing mangroves to insure their survival.

  13. Development of Bird-watching Ecological Tourism in Hangzhou Bay National Wetland Park%杭州湾国家湿地公园观鸟生态旅游开发及对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈杨

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A review was presented on bird watching tourism development in China and abroad. The conditions for developing bird watching tourism and existing problems in Hangzhou Bay Wetland Park were analyzed.Suggestions were proposed to develop bird-watching ecotourism in Hangzhou bay wetland.%对观鸟旅游在国内外的发展进行概要梳理之后,分析了杭州湾湿地公园发展观鸟旅游的条件及存在问题,最后提出了杭州湾湿地公园发展观鸟生态旅游的建议与对策.

  14. Bleaching and secondary threats on the corals of Palk Bay: A survey and Proactive conservation needs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Kannapiran, E.; Manikandan, B.; ManiMurali, R.; Joseph, A.

    and altered environmental conditions warrant the proactive conservation approach guided by scientific principles. Current conservation methods in India offers physical protection to corals by entry restriction and a ban on collection of corals under wild life...

  15. CAN PALYNOLOGY CONTRIBUTE TO PLANT DIVERSITY CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES? THE WETLAND PLANTS IN SOUTHERN PO PLAIN AS A CASE STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Buldrini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of the Po Plain has long been modified by natural and human factors. The present plant landscape is almost entirely anthropogenic. Many hydro-hygrophilous species, quite common until a few decades ago, are now very rare and in danger of extinction, so conservation programmes are necessary for their protection and maintenance. It is known that the former vegetation can be reconstructed thanks to palynological data, but assessing the real presence of a given species is not always possible. This work aims to understand whether palynology can give information about the presence and identification of hydro-hygrophilous species, supporting the classical flora analyses commonly conducted on herbarium data. In some cases, these species are well characterized from a morphopalynological and phytogeographical viewpoint: the plant occurrence may be suggested even by pollen findings in surface-samples. Discovering the presence of some of these species by pollen morphotypes offers a real opportunity to gear the reintroduction/reinforcing programmes, but ecological analysis will obviously be essential to ascertain the real suitability of the chosen sites, according to the ecological requirements of the species. Our analysis refers to wetlands of the southern Po plain within the Modena Province, where detailed palynological data about present and historical local flora were available.

  16. Conservation and Ecological Restoration in Wanzuitou Wetland in the University Town of Guangzhou%广州大学城湾咀头湿地保护与生态恢复研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大达; 张静

    2016-01-01

    分析了广州大学城湾咀头湿地现状,研究了其湿地保护与生态恢复工程,旨在通过有效措施保护湿地鸟类、提升湿地生物多样性、净化区域珠江水质,形成集湿地保护、生态恢复和自然观赏于一体的广州特色湿地。%The paper presents an analysis of the status of wetland conservation and ecological restoration in Wanzuitou Wetland in the University Town of Guangzhou. Effective measures were proposed to protect wetland birds, to enhance wetland biodiversity and to purify water quality of the Pearl River, in order to develop a wetland system featured with unique Guangzhou style, integrating wetland protection, ecological restoration and natural landscapes.

  17. Concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediment cores of Sundarban mangrove wetland, northeastern part of Bay of Bengal (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binelli, Andrea [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: andrea.binelli@unimi.it; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Chatterjee, Mousumi [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Riva, Consuelo [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy); Parolini, Marco [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy); Bhattacharya, Bhaskar deb [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Bhattacharya, Asok Kumar [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Satpathy, Kamala Kanta [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Environmental and Industrial Safety Section, Safety Group, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-08-15

    The paper presents the first comprehensive survey of congener profiles (12 congeners) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in core sediment samples (<63 {mu}m) covering seven sites in Sundarban mangrove wetland (India). Gas-chromatographic analyses were carried out in GC-Ms/Ms for tri- to hepta- brominated congeners. Results pointed out a non-homogenous contamination of the wetland with {sigma}{sub 12} PBDE values ranging from 0.08 to 29.03 ng g{sup -1}, reflecting moderate to low contamination closely in conformity to other Asian aquatic environments. The general order of decreasing congener contribution to the total load was: BDE 47 > 99 > 100 > 154, similar to the distribution pattern worldwide. Although tetrabromodiphenyl ether BDE 47 was found in all samples followed by hexabromodiphenyl ether BDE-154, they were not necessarily the dominant congeners. No uniform temporal trend on PBDE levels was recorded probably due to particular hydrological characteristics of the wetland and/on non-homologous inputs from point sources (untreated municipal wastewater and local industries, electronic wastes from the dump sites, etc.) of these compounds. Because of the propensity of PBDEs to accumulate in various compartments of wildlife and human food webs, evaluation of biological tissues should be undertaken as a high priority.

  18. Conflicts between groundwater development and wetland conservation in the Spanish Mediterranean area; Conflictos entre el desarrollo de las aguas subterraneas y la conservacion de los humedales del litoral mediterraneo espanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornes, J. M.; Hera, A. de la; Ballesteros, B.; Aragon, R.

    2008-07-01

    Conflicts between groundwater use and wetland conservation are especially relevant in arid and semi-arid zones, where the areas of these natural ecosystems have decreased in the last decades. Fifty years ago, wetland losses didn't cause any conflicts because they were not valued positively. The situation has changed due to the advances in agricultural technologies, to the disappearance of marshy diseases and the development of Ecology as a science. Nowadays, there is a general awareness that wetlands must be protected. Some of the most important conflicts between groundwater development and coastal wetland conservation have taken place in Valencia (Almenara and Pego-Oliva wetlands). These two cases are analysed in this paper, together with the current situation of the Mar Menor in Murcia. (Author) 34 refs.

  19. Species composition, distribution and habitat types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the associated conservation implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorinda A Hart

    Full Text Available Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity.

  20. Species composition, distribution and habitat types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the associated conservation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lorinda A; Bowker, Meyrick B; Tarboton, Warwick; Downs, Colleen T

    2014-01-01

    Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI) value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity.

  1. Species Composition, Distribution and Habitat Types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the Associated Conservation Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lorinda A.; Bowker, Meyrick B.; Tarboton, Warwick; Downs, Colleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Maputaland–Pondoland–Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI) value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity. PMID:24662948

  2. Remote sensing techniques and geographic information systems for wetland conservation and management: monitoring scrub encroachment in Biebrza National Park

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.M.; Piórkowski, H.; Bartoszuk, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Biebrza National Park in Poland is one of the most precious wetland areas in Europe. It was established in 1993 and designated Ramsar site in 1995. Despite its protection status, the open wetland landscape is currently being threatened by the encroachment of shrubs and trees, assumed to have a n

  3. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  4. Temporal and spatial distributions of sediment mercury at salt pond wetland restoration sites, San Francisco Bay, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A.K.; Ricca, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Decommissioned agricultural salt ponds within south San Francisco Bay, California, are in the process of being converted to habitat for the benefit of wildlife as well as water management needs and recreation. Little is known of baseline levels of contaminants in these ponds, particularly mercury (Hg), which has a well established legacy in the Bay. In this study we described spatial and short-term temporal variations in sediment Hg species concentrations within and among the Alviso and Eden Landing salt ponds in the southern region of San Francisco Bay. We determined total Hg (Hgt) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the top 5 cm of sediment of most ponds in order to establish baseline conditions prior to restoration, sediment Hgt concentrations in a subset of these ponds after commencement of restoration, and variation in MeHg concentrations relative to sediment Hgt, pH, and total Fe concentrations and water depth and salinity in the subset of Alviso ponds. Inter-pond differences were greatest within the Alviso pond complex, where sediment Hgt concentrations averaged (arithmetic mean) 0.74 ??g/g pre and 1.03 ??g/g post-restoration activity compared to 0.11 ??g/g pre and post at Eden Landing ponds. Sediment Hgt levels at Alviso were fairly stable temporally and spatially, whereas MeHg levels were variable relative to restoration activities across time and space. Mean (arithmetic) sediment MeHg concentrations increased (2.58 to 3.03 ng/g) in Alviso and decreased (2.20 to 1.03 ng/g) in Eden Landing restoration ponds during the study. Differences in MeHg levels were related to water depth and pH, but these relationships were not consistent between years or among ponds and were viewed with caution. Factors affecting MeHg levels in these ponds (and in general) are highly complex and require in-depth study to understand.

  5. CASCO BAY PLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco Bay lies at the heart of Maine's most populated area. The health of its waters, wetlands, and wildlife depend in large part on the activities of the quarter-million residents who live in its watershed. Less than 30 years ago, portions of Casco Bay were off-limits to recr...

  6. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This CCP will provide the framework for making decisions on conserving natural, cultural, and recreational resources, managing visitor use, developing facilities and...

  7. [Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) executive summary was written to guide management on Don Edwards San Francisco National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15...

  8. SF Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPAs grant program to protect and restore San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund (SFBWQIF) has invested in 58 projects along with 70 partners contributing to restore wetlands, water quality, and reduce polluted runoff.,

  9. Assessing the Fauna Diversity of Marudu Bay Mangrove Forest, Sabah, Malaysia, for Future Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zakaria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove is an evergreen, salt tolerant plant community, which grows in inter-tidal coastal zones of tropical and subtropical regions of the world. They are ecologically important for many fauna species and are rich in food resources and consist of many different vegetation structures. They serve as ideal foraging and nursery grounds for a wide array of species such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fishes and aquatic invertebrates. In spite of their crucial role, around 50% of mangrove habitats have been lost and degraded in the past two decades. The fauna diversity of mangrove habitat at Marudu Bay, Sabah, East Malaysia was examined using various methods: i.e. aquatic invertebrates by swap nets, fish by angling rods and cast nets, reptiles, birds, and mammals through direct sighting. The result showed that Marudu Bay mangrove habitats harbored a diversity of fauna species including 22 aquatic invertebrate species (encompassing 11 crustacean species, six mollusk species and four worm species, 36 fish species, 74 bird species, four reptile species, and four mammal species. The wide array of fauna species could be due to the availability of complex vegetation structures, sheltered beaches and tidal mudflats, which are rich in food resources and also offer safe foraging and breeding grounds for them. These heterogeneous habitats must be protected in a sustainable way in order to ensure the continued presence of aquatic and terrestrial fauna species for future generations.

  10. SCP (systematic conservation planning) optimization for a wetland conservation network system on Sanjiang Plain, China%基于系统保护规划的三江平原湿地保护网络体系优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲艺; 李佳珊; 王继丰; 崔福星; 孙工棋; 栾晓峰; 倪红伟

    2015-01-01

    This study optimized an existing conservation network system using SCP and gap analysis while evaluating the effectiveness of the new system. The process of establishing high-value conservation networks took into account biodiversity features of different levels and dimensions in the Sanjiang Plain. The process also accounted for the irreplaceability of catchments, since these planning units fall under the framework of SCP. In the horizontal dimension, we had two conservation level objectives, one for the ecosystem level and one for the species level. Eight types of marsh wetland systems, all lake ecosystems, and high conservation value river wetland systems were selected as ecosystem level conservation surrogates. Thirteen endangered birds and four endangered mammals were selected as species level conservation surrogates. In the vertical dimension, we chose 3 effective underground water distribution areas. Ecosystem conservation targets were set based on ecological function value, rarity and threat trends. Species conservation targets were set based on level of endangerment, scope for survival, and population growth/decline trends. Protection targets were set for water resources according to their runoff modulus and recharge modulus. SCP utilizes the key concept of irreplaceability, which is a measure, varying from zero to one, indicating the importance of an area ( planning unit) for the achievement of regional conservation targets. A map of irreplaceability values is therefore a base map of conservation planning. Finally, we combined irreplaceability values with vulnerability factors ( factors threatening the ecology of the region) to design different planning options. Results were as follows:( 1 ) High conservation value areas accounted for about 16% of the whole region and were generally distributed along river and lake ecosystems. Specifically, at headwater intersections, such as the intersection of the Heilongjiang and Wusulijiang, the junction of the

  11. 7 CFR 12.30 - NRCS responsibilities regarding wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.30 NRCS responsibilities regarding wetlands. (a) Technical and... conservation provisions of this part; (4) Develop and utilize off-site and on-site wetland identification... of the area. (6) As long as the affected person is in compliance with the wetland...

  12. Incorporating future change into current conservation planning: Evaluating tidal saline wetland migration along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Osland, Michael J.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, quantified the potential for landward migration of tidal saline wetlands along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. Our analyses focused exclusively on tidal saline wetlands (that is, mangrove forests, salt marshes, and salt flats), and we combined these diverse tidal saline wetland ecosystems into a single grouping, “tidal saline wetland.” Collectively, our approach and findings can provide useful information for scientists and environmental planners working to develop future-focused adaptation strategies for conserving coastal landscapes and the ecosystem goods and services provided by tidal saline wetlands. The primary product of this work is a public dataset that identifies locations where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is expected to occur under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. In addition to identifying areas where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is possible because of the absence of barriers, these data also identify locations where landward migration of these wetlands could be prevented by barriers associated with current urbanization, future urbanization, and levees.

  13. 75 FR 17683 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... must be sent the proposal for review. By mail: Gregory K. Johnson, Director, Financial Assistance... participants to implement conservation practices and enhancements, including the development and adoption of... must provide a narrative proposal following the requirements set forth in this notice. All...

  14. 75 FR 78667 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ..., energy conservation, mitigating the effects of climate change, facilitating climate change adaptation, or... tribes, State and local units of government, producer associations, farmer cooperatives, institutions of... partner; 2. The role of NRCS; 3. The responsibilities of the partner as it relates to the monitoring...

  15. It′s like herding monkeys into a conservation enclosure: The formation and establishment of the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Saunders

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript examines a project that is representative of an emerging trend of new generation Integrated Conservation Development Projects in parts of Africa that combine socio-economic development with an emphasis on local institutional change. These ′local′ projects are interlinked with global networks of conservation interests that provide technical expertise and resourcing. In the Jozani-Chawka Bay area, project planners brokered a community governance and benefit sharing agreement that has been lauded as a watershed moment for conservation policy in Zanzibar. Key hurdles for establishing Zanzibar′s first national park, the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park, were limiting community access to customary forest resources, farmer-red colobus monkey conflict, and setting up a supportive institutional arrangement. The conflict resolution and institutional strategies adopted by the conservation planners with the aid of international funding provide insights that help explain why the project has been able to maintain a ′fragile′ localised compliance with conservation goals at the Jozani-Pete village. This has been achieved despite lingering resentment over red colobus crop damage claims, and perceptions of insignificant conservation related benefits flowing to individuals and communities. This finding raises broader concerns about whether containment strategies to ground fragile project arrangements are conducive to engendering the longer term support of local communities for new generation Integrated Conservation Development Projects.

  16. 安庆沿江湖泊湿地保护管理对策%Strategies for Conservation and Management of the Lake Wetlands along Yangtze River in Anqing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王康明

    2015-01-01

    本文介绍了安庆沿江湖泊湿地的基本情况、生态价值,在指出安庆沿江湖泊湿地保护当前面临的主要问题的基础上,提出了加强湖泊湿地保护管理的对策,旨在进一步促进沿江湖泊湿地保护管理工作。%In this paper, the basic information and ecological value of the lake wetlands along Yangtze River in Anqing City were introduced. And the main existing problems in the conservation of these wetlands along Yangtze River in Anqing were pointed out. Some strategies to strengthen the conservation and management of the lake wetlands were put forward with the aim of promoting their conservation and management.

  17. 鄱阳湖湿地现状及恢复与保育对策%Current Status of Poyang Lake Wetland and Strategies forConservation and Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹春森; 朱奇; 刘观华; 曾南京; 詹慧英

    2013-01-01

    在对鄱阳湖湿地恢复与保育现状进行分析的基础上,找出鄱阳湖湿地面临的主要威胁和鄱阳湖湿地恢复与保育中存在的主要问题,结合鄱阳湖实际情况,提出了鄱阳湖湿地恢复与保育对策。%An analysis of the current situation of Poyang Lake wetland restoration and conservation was carried out in order to find out the primary threats to and problems of Poyang Lake wetland restoration and conservation. Considering the actual situation of Poyang Lake, strategies and measures were proposed for improving conservation of the wetland.

  18. 长江中游生态区湿地保护现状及保护空缺分析%The GAP Analysis of Wetland Conservation in Central Yangtze Ecoregion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高俊琴; 郑姚闽; 张明祥; 崔国发

    2011-01-01

    Central Yangtze Ecoregion is one of the key areas which contain rich biodiversity in China.Based on the information of wetland types, wetland vegetation, waterfowl habitat and wetland existing conservation system, the reasonable layout of wetland conservation system in Central Yangtze Ecoregion was built using ArcGIS in this study.The results showed that there were 78 conservation areas including wetland reserves and parks, which have protected about 33.6% of wetland area.But, there are 3 types of wetlands and 2 types of wetland vegetations which have not been protected.The results of GAP analysis showed that there were 17 districts which need to be protected by building nature reserves or wetland parks.These proposed protected total area would be about 2 002.45 km2, integrated with existing conservation system, could protect 100% wetland types and vegetation types and 80% potential habitat in Central Yangtze Ecoregion.Thus 42.31% wetland area would be protected in Central Yangtze Ecoregion.%基于长江中游生态区湿地类型、湿地植被和鸟类生境分布情况及湿地保护体系现状,利用ArcGIS软件空间分析功能,初步构建了合理保护长江中游生态区湿地的格局.研究结果表明,目前长江中游生态区已建立了各级不同类型湿地自然保护区和湿地公园共78个,使大约33.6%的湿地面积受到了保护:但仍有3种湿地型和2种自然湿地植被没有纳入保护体系;空缺(GAP)分析表明,长江中游生态区需要建立保护区或保护小区以及湿地公园17个,面积共计2002.45km2,与现有湿地保护体系相结合,可保护100%的湿地型和湿地自然植被类型,以及80%湿地核心物种潜在生境,从而使受保护湿地面积达到42.31%.

  19. 构建基于生态文明理念的湿地保护管理制度%Institution for Wetland Conservation and Management in the Context of Ecological Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍达明

    2016-01-01

    Institutional deficiency is the direct cause for continuing depletion of area, function and biodiversity of wetlands nationwide. The development of wetland conservation and management system based on the concept of ecological civilization is critical to wetland protection under the new situation of further deepening the reform and speeding up the green development. Seven specific innovative measures were proposed to strengthen institutional arrangements for wetland management following an analysis on problems in wetland conservation and management in China. The measures include allocation of wetland property rights, classiifed wetland management and exercise of ownership, wetland ecological red line, etc. Therefore to form an institutional system that will contain wetland decrease, enhance wetland ecological functions and sustain wetland conservation and development.%全国湿地面积减少、功能下降、生物多样性衰退的趋势仍在继续,其中管理制度不健全是直接的主要原因之一。在全面深化改革、加快绿色发展的背景下,建立和健全基于生态文明理念的湿地保护管理制度,是做好新形势下湿地保护工作的关键。分析了我国湿地保护管理制度中存在的问题,提出了深化湿地管理制度的具体举措,创造性地提出了建立湿地产权确权、湿地分级管理和分级行使所有权、湿地生态红线等7项制度的具体设计,探索建立控制湿地面积减少、增强湿地生态功能、支撑湿地保护可持续发展的制度体系。

  20. The Current Status and Conservation Strategy of Wetland Resources in Mentougou District of Beijing%北京市门头沟区湿地资源现状及保护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫东; 隗有龙; 谭德远

    2012-01-01

    A survey on wetland types and areas, and animals and plants in the wetlands in Mentougou District of Beijing was carried out using 3S tcchnologies and field investigations. An assessment of wetland conservation and rational utilization was made according to the distribution of wetland resources and existing problems.%利用3S技术和实地调查的方法对北京市门头沟区境内的湿地类型、面积、动植物状况进行了调查.针对区域湿地分布现状和存在的问题,提出了湿地保护和合理利用对策.

  1. 三峡库区东溪河湿地保育区建设的生态学途径%An Ecological Way to Construct Wetland Conservation District of Dongxihe River in Three Gorges Reservoir Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐静波; 刘红; 袁兴中

    2011-01-01

    Wetland park is an important part of the wetland protection system in National level. Huanghua Island of Three Gorges reservoir was approved as national wetland park pilot by National Forestry Bureaus in 2009 and Dongxihe River is one of its three functional areas. After flooding to 173 m height in 2008, a wide area of new wetland with typical habitats and rich species emerged in waterlevel-fluctuation zone of Dongxihe River in Zhongxian County, Chongqing municipality. And waterfowl are rich in species and quantity in winter of this region which has become the concentrated area of wetland biodiversity in Three Gorges reservoir. From ecological view,the goals and functional location of wetland conservation district in Dongxihe River was discussed, and the function of this area should be based on wetland conservation, then put forward to a series of measures to littoral wetland ecosystem restoration and ecological utilization, good habitat of wetland organism construction, beautiful wetland landscape creation through the wetland habitat display sub-area which was divided into two function units named water-level-fluctuation zone succession series and wetland plants display, wetland plants seedling cultivation sub-areas, wetland buffer zone, the vegetation restoration and reconstruction project in water-level-fluctuation zone of wetland conservation district in Dongxihe River. And on this basis, wetland ecological tourism, scientific research and monitoring wetland are being developed.%湿地公园是国家湿地保护体系的重要组成部分,2009年位于三峡库区的重庆忠县皇华岛被正式批准为国家湿地公园建设试点,东溪河湿地生态保育区是其3个功能区之一.自2008年三峡水库蓄水至173 m后,已经形成消落带新生湿地;其湿地生境典型,湿地植物资源丰富,冬季水鸟种类和数量丰富,成为三峡库区湿地生物多样性的集中富集区.文章从生态学途径对东溪河湿地生态

  2. Extending REDD+ to mangroves and wetlands for small island states and a case study for the conservation of mangroves and inter-tidal mudflats in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Heng LYE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly discusses the prospects of using coastal wetlands as REDD+ projects for small island states. The paper contends that the city-state of Singapore would do well to enhance existing laws to more specifically address the challenges and threats faced in conserving mangroves and inter-tidal mudflats, and support their conservation and rehabilitation, not just to facilitate the implementation of REDD+ projects but also to meet other goals like biodiversity conservation and climate change adaptation. The proposal is to expand Sungei Buloh to encompass the mudflats at Kranji which is home to the mangrove horseshoe crab (Carcinoscrorpius rotundicauda; aligned with inter-tidal and coastal management strategies advanced under the auspices of the Ramsar Convention, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the IUCN. However, there are considerable challenges in maintaining an intact eco-system in the face of rapid development, not only in Singapore itself but also in the neighbouring state of Johor, Malaysia. The paper examines the specific legal strategies that will be required to meet the various objectives of conservation in the context of Singapore's laws and the challenges posed by the development plans of both Singapore and Malaysia.

  3. Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) as indicators of atmospherically deposited pollutants in North African wetlands of conservation importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, N. L.; Flower, R. J.; Appleby, P. G.

    Wetlands and lowland lakes in the coastal region of North Africa are being lost at an alarming rate as a result of increasing human demands for water and land. Those remaining wetlands, which have not been severely degraded, support high value ecosystems that not only contribute to regional biodiversity but also provide important resources for local human populations. However, information on the current status of these sites and the rates and directions of trends in environmental change over recent decades is generally lacking. In particular, regional data on the inputs of atmospheric pollutants to these important sites are absent. As part of the EU (INCO-MED) funded CASSARINA project, sediment cores were taken from eight coastal lakes in Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt. Chronologies for these cores were produced primarily using radionuclides and all were analysed for spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs). SCPs are produced only from high temperature fossil-fuel combustion and are thus unambiguous indicators of atmospheric deposition from industrial sources. SCP contamination trends appear to show a combination of influences from European and, more recently (post-1980), local North African sources. Contemporary data indicate contamination equivalent to that found in heavily impacted European mountain lakes or moderately impacted lowland lakes in the UK. Such levels of impact raise particular concerns over the future of Moroccan wetland lakes downwind of a recently expanded major coal-fired power station at Jorf Lasar.

  4. Archaeal rhizosphere communities differ between the native and invasive lines of the wetland plant phragmites australis (common reed) in a Chesapeake Bay subestuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phragmites australis, a common wetland plant species worldwide, is best known in North America as persistent invasive species. Only in recent decades was a native line, Phragmites australis subsp. americanus, confirmed in North American wetlands. This study investigated whether the two lines suppo...

  5. 7 CFR 12.32 - Converted wetland identification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Converted wetland identification criteria. 12.32 Section 12.32 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.32 Converted wetland identification criteria. (a) Converted...

  6. Michigan Wetlands: Yours To Protect. A Citizen's Guide to Local Involvement in Wetland Protection. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikiel, Wilfred

    This guidebook is designed to assist concerned Michigan citizens, local governments, conservation organizations, landowners, and others in their efforts to initiate wetlands protection activities. Chapter 1 focuses on wetland functions, values, losses, and the urgent need to protect wetland resources. Chapter 2 discusses wetland identification and…

  7. Interactions Between Wetlands and Tidal Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Madre, TX), (3) fjord-type (e.g., Penobscot Bay , ME), and (4) tectonically created estuaries (e.g., San Francisco Bay , CA) (Pritchard 1967). This CHETN...small marsh island in San Francisco Bay , CA. Wolaver et al. (1988) measured suspended sediment flux of 827 g/m2/year into a marsh in North Inlet, SC...permanent or ephemeral inlets. Conversely, the development or construction of wetlands within an estuary reduces bay area and the tidal prism, which will

  8. Characteristics of N2O Flux in Estuary Wetland of Jiaozhou Bay in Autumn and Winter%胶州湾河口湿地秋冬季N2O气体排放通量特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢文霞; 赵全升; 张芳; 马晓菲

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of N20 flux in Phragrmites australis wetland affected by tides and weeds wetland withoutflooding perennial in the Dagu river estuary of Jiaozhou Bay in autumn and winter were observed using a staticchamber and gas chromatograph technique from September 2009 to February 2010. N20 emission and absorptionof the two types of wetlands have a significant diurnal variation. Day maximums occurred at 12 o~lock and 21 o~lock, and the minimum value were usually at about 6 o 'clock in the morning. The maximum values inPhragrmites australis wetland and weeds wetland were 151. lμg/( m2.h), 29.3μg/( m2 ·h) and the minimumvalues were -128.91μg/( m2 ·h) and -21.5μ~( m2 ·h), respectively. N2O flux in Phragrmites australis wet-land in autumn and winter during the day time was 1.54 and 2.09 times as much as that in the night, respectively. And there were more N20 fluxes from weeds wetland in the day than during the night in autumn, just the opposite for winter. The highest monthly emissions of N2O in Phragrmites anstralis wetland and weeds wetland were 42.42 mg/m2, 6.89 mg/m2 and they were observed in November. Monthly N20 fluxes in Phragrmites australis wetland were more than weeds wetland. Seasonal N20 emissions in autumn and winter were 56.32 mg/m2and 63.38 mg/m2 in Phragrmites australis wetland, and 10.45 mg/m2 and 3.08 mg/m2 in weeds wetland, respectively. N20 flux from weeds wetland in autumn and winter was 5.39 and 20.58 times as much as that from Phragrmites australis wetland which caused by different hydrologic characteristics of wetlands and the different types of vegetation. Further analysis indicated that N2 O fluxes in weeds wetland in autumn and winter were significantly positively correlated with 5cm, 10cm ground temperature( P < 0.05 ). The relation between N2O fluxes in Phragrmites australis wetland and 5cm, 10cm ground temperature was not significantly, N2O emission and absorption in Phragrmites australis wetland was influenced largely by the

  9. Field Report: Anna Plains and Roebuck Bay Benthic Invertebrate Mapping 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Piersma, Theunis; Pearson, Grant B.; Marc S S Lavaleye; Hickey, Robert; Rogers, Danny; Holthuijsen, Sander; Estrella, Sora-Marin; de Goeij, Petra; Findlay, Naomi; Storey, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    This project has been funded by the Department of Parks and Wildlife partnership with BHP Billiton “Eighty Mile Beach and Walyarta Conservation Program”, with in-kind support from NIOZ and Wetland Research & Management This report was produced at the Broome Bird Observatory in late October 2016. Abstract 1. This is a report on repeat surveys on the state of the benthic invertebrates at two internationally important areas of intertidal mudflats in northwest Australia (Roebuck Bay and Eighty Mi...

  10. Present Management Situations of Huoqiu East-West Lake Wetland and Conservation Strategies%霍邱东西湖湿地管理现状及保护对策浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永敏

    2012-01-01

    东西湖湿地属省级自然保护区,蕴含了丰富的生物、水、土地以及生态旅游等资源,是我国淮河流域重要的生态功能区和生物多样性保护区。但由于不合理的开发利用,湿地生态功能正受到影响和威胁。本文分析了东西湖湿地的自然资源优势和保护管理中存在的问题,提出了东西湖自然保护区湿地资源的保护对策。%East-West Lake Wetland is a provincial nature reserve rich in biological, water, land and ecological tourism resources. It is an important biological function area and biodiversity reserve in the Huaihe basin in China. The biological function of the wetland is being affected and threatened due to irrational exploitation and utilization. In this paper the advantages of the wetland in natural resources and the existing problems in conservation and management were analyzed. Some coping strategies were put forward for the conservation of wetland resources in East-West Lake Wetland Nature Reserve.

  11. The Wetland Resources Status and Conservation Strategy of the Yangtze River Basin%长江流域湿地资源现状及其保护对策探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张阳武

    2015-01-01

    根据第二次全国湿地资源调查成果,分析了长江流域上游、中游和下游的湿地资源及其湿地保护现状,重点论述了长江流域内国际重要湿地和国家重要湿地的分布数量、湿地面积、保护形式等情况,同时通过对流域内423个重要湿地受威胁状况及其影响面积的调查分析,总结了长江流域湿地面临的主要威胁,探讨了长江流域湿地保护对策,旨在为长江流域湿地保护与综合治理策略研究将提供参考。%According to the field survey data of the second national wetlands inventory project,this study analyzed the wetland resources and conservation status of the Yangtze River basin,including upstream, midstream and downstream.The information of wetlands of international and national importance in this region,e.g.,number,distribution,area,forms of conservation,etc.,was introduced.Meanwhile,the major threats to the wetlands in Yangtze River basin were revealed by investigating the threatened status and im-pacted area of 423 important wetlands within the river basin.And the wetland protection countermeasures were discussed.The results will provide basic data and related information for wetland protection and com-prehensive management strategiess and tudy in the Yangtze River basin.

  12. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    FERTILE LAND:The Qixing River Wetland in Heilongjiang Province was recently named a wetland of international importance at the Sixth Asian Wetland Symposium held in Wuxi City, east China’s Jiangsu Province, on October 13

  13. 海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系构建及其在泉州湾的应用%Spatial plan zoning system for marine biodiversity conservation and a case study of the Quanzhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利; 王金坑; 蒋金龙; 傅世锋; 戴娟娟; 欧阳玉蓉

    2012-01-01

    基于海岸带综合管理的理念,通过海域生态环境敏感性评价与海域生物多样性保护重要性评价,综合利用地理相关分析法、空间叠置法等定性和定量分区相结合的方法进行海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区划界,提出了海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系,将规划区域划分为生物多样性重点保护区、生物多样性养护区和生物多样性保护重点监督区.以福建泉州湾为案例,应用海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系,得出泉州湾生物多样性保护极重要地区是泉州湾河口湿地省级自然保护区,泉州湾生物多样性保护比较重要地区是晋江河口、洛阳江河口、晋江南岸地区及清源山.泉州湾海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区方案共划定26个分区,包括生物多样性重点保护区3个,生物多样性养护区14个,生物多样性保护重点监督区9个.泉州湾的应用结果表明,本研究提出的海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系具有一定的可行性和可操作性,可为泉州湾生物多样性保护管理提供重要科学依据.%Based on the integrated coastal zone management, according to the assessment of the sensitivity of marine ecological environment and the importance of marine biodiversity conservation, the boundaries of marine biodiversity conservation zones are created by using quantitative and qualitative studies such as geographical correlation analysis and spatial overlapping. Further, a spatial plan zoning system for marine biodiversity conservation was established, which divided the planning areas into key protected areas, and proposed biodiversity conservation areas and biodiversity supervision areas. The system was then applied to Quanzhou Bay, Fujian Province. The results indicated that the key biodiversity conservation area is Quanzhou Bay Wetland Provincial Nature Reserve, the more important area for biodiversity conservation is the

  14. 北京翠湖湿地维管束植物多样性及保护对策%Diversity of Vascular Plants in Cuihu Wetland in Beijing and Its Conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳龙

    2012-01-01

    结合北京地区湿地植物相关研究和翠湖湿地维管束植物调查结果,对翠湖湿地的维管束植物进行分类、整理和分析.结果显示:翠湖湿地有维管束植物306种,隶属76科228属,占北京市维管束植物总数的17.1%.翠湖湿地分布有多种国家级和北京市级重点保护野生植物,如野大豆Glycine soja,芡实Euryale ferox、茭白 Zizania latifolia、花蔺Butomus umbellatus等.翠湖湿地还统计到外来和入侵植物共计13种,如豚草Ambrosia rtemisiifolia、凤眼莲Eichhornia crassipes等.翠湖湿地维管束植物多样性丰富,需加强植物多样性保护和管理以及科普教育.%Based on a survey of vascular plants in Cuihu Wetland and relevant studies of wetland plants in Beijing area, the vascular plants in Cuihu Wetland were classified, documented and analyzed. Results showed that there were 306 species of vascular plants in Cuihu Wetland, belonging to 76 families and 228 genera, accounting for 17.1% of the total number of vascular plants in Beijing. A variety of wild plants with national and municipal priorities for protection were found in the wetland, e.g. Glycine Soja, Euryale ferox, Zizania latifolia and Butomus umbellatus. 13 species of invasive alien plants were found in the wetland, e.g. Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Eichhomia crassipes. Growing in the wetland, there were 11 species which are the most typical wetland plants in Beijing, However, other 3 typical wetland plant species of Potamogeton pectinatus, Potamogeton panormitanus and Fimbristylis bisumbellata were not found in the wetland. The diversity of vascular plants in Cuihu Wetland is rich. Conservation and management of plant diversity and science education need to be further strengthened.

  15. STUDY ON WETLAND LOSS AND ITS REASONS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems with many functions. But the general public and government lack a comprehensive understanding of the importance of wetland benefits, thus making blindly exploitation, wetland resources decreasing and losing biodiversity. So wetlands in China, as in most countries, have suffered heavily from the pressure of development and have confronted with the threats of loss. The paper takes Sanjiang Plain marshes, lakes in the middle reaches of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River, coastal wetlands and mangroves as cases to study wetland loss in China, and puts forward main existing reasons of wetland loss, such as blindly reclamation and exploitation of wetland resources,over-exploitation of bio-resources in wetland, etc. More recently, there has been a growing recognition of the benefits of wetlands and a wide range of legal and regulatory initiatives have been undertaken which are designed to improve wetland management and conservation. On the basis of the above analysis, the paper brings forward some suggestions on wetland conservation.

  16. National Wetlands Inventory - Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate...

  17. Biodiversity Conservation and Ecological Restoration in Guangdong Kongjiang Wetland%广东孔江湿地生物多样性保护与生态恢复工程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵顺; 何明华; 彭文鹰

    2016-01-01

    Considering the problems of pollution by production and domestic consumption, agricultural non-point pollution and simple vegetation community in Guangdong Kongjiang national wetland park, wetland biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration were discussed, in order to provide scientiifc basis for construction planning of the wetland park.%针对广东孔江国家湿地公园出现的库周村民生产生活污染、农业面源污染、植被群落单一等问题,开展湿地生物多样性保护与生态恢复工程,为湿地公园后期建设规划提供依据。

  18. Factors affecting coastal wetland loss and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, D.R.; Phillips, S.W.

    2007-01-01

    Opening paragraph: Tidal and nontidal wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay watershed provide vital hydrologic, water-quality, and ecological functions. Situated at the interface of land and water, these valuable habitats are vulnerable to alteration and loss by human activities including direct conversion to non-wetland habitat by dredge-and-fill activities from land development, and to the effects of excessive nutrients, altered hydrology and runoff, contaminants, prescribed fire management, and invasive species. Processes such as sea-level rise and climate change also impact wetlands. Although local, State, and Federal regulations provide for protection of wetland resources, the conversion and loss of wetland habitats continue in the Bay watershed. Given the critical values of wetlands, the Chesapeake 2000 Agreement has a goal to achieve a net gain in wetlands by restoring 25,000 acres of tidal and nontidal wetlands by 2010. The USGS has synthesized findings on three topics: (1) sea-level rise and wetland loss, (2) wetland restoration, and (3) factors affecting wetland diversity.

  19. Persistence of legacy soil P and elevated background water P concentrations in Water Conservation Area 2A, a northern Everglades wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juston, John M.; Kadlec, Robert H.; DeBusk, William F.; Jerauld, Mike J.; DeBusk, Thomas A.

    2015-12-01

    Upstream source control and Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have reduced phosphorus (P) loads to Water Conservation Area 2A (WCA-2A), a northern Everglades wetland, by three quarters since year 2000. Nevertheless, large storages of P remain in enriched peat soils and it is unclear how legacy stores will impact spatial and temporal scales of recovery. We remeasured soil P enrichment along a well-studied eutrophication gradient in WCA-2A and applied a profile modeling approach with uncertainty analysis to assess changes in longitudinal soil P gradients 13 years after load reductions. We then analyzed existing internal water P data, using a novel data screening approach, for evidence of lowest possible water P concentrations independent from inflows. We interpret such water P limits as evidence of the strength of internal loading at a location. Results indicate that soil P enrichment persists in the ˜7.5 km long "impacted" zone, with no significant evidence of net advancement or recession, while a large pool of labile P in the flocculent layer consolidated and diminished. There is indeed evidence, both spatial and temporal, that this extensive zone of enriched soil P continues to elevate lowest achievable water P concentrations. The corresponding gradient of elevated water P limits is both receding and diminishing since load reductions, thus providing further evidence toward recovery. However, results also suggest that these "transitory P limits" due to internal loading are likely to persist for decades above water quality targets. These results advance our understanding of recovery in impacted wetlands and are relevant to Everglades restoration.

  20. Current Status, Conservation and Restoration of Karst Wetland Resources in Huixian of Guilin%桂林会仙喀斯特湿地资源现状与保护恢复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴协保

    2014-01-01

    Current status of karst wetland resources in Huixian of Guiling was reviewed, and problems existing in conservation and restoration of the wetland was analyzed. Technical approaches, objectives, program activities and critical technical measures of wetland conservation and restoration were proposed, so as to provide guidance and help for the development of the National Karst Wetland Park in Huixian of Guilin.%摸清了会仙喀斯特湿地资源现状,分析了会仙喀斯特湿地保护与恢复存在的问题,提出了湿地保护恢复的主要技术思路、目标以及湿地保护恢复工程的主要内容与关键技术措施,以期为会仙喀斯特国家湿地公园的建设提供指导与帮助。

  1. 黄淮海地区跨流域湿地生态系统保护网络体系优化%Optimization of conservation network system for inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓龙; 李晓文; 张明祥; 杨殿林; 张黎娜; 张贵龙

    2012-01-01

    By using systematic conservation planning ( SCP) method, and taking catchment as planning unit, an optimization of conservation network system for the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region was conducted, with a comprehensive consideration of 3-dimensional (lateral, longitudinal and vertical) connectivity and Inter-basin Water Transfer Project and by the methods of irreplaceability analysis and gap identification. The efficacy of the optimized conservation network system was evaluated, as compared with the existing conservation network system. According to the principles of irreplaceability and connectivity, the wetland conservation gaps could be divided into two types, i. e. , be conserved in priority and in general. After the optimization, the conservation status of the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region had an overall improvement. The conserved percentage of the wetland types was from about 20% up to 46. 8% , and, for each wetland type, its conserved level increased to some extent, almost above 40% . Both in the near future and in the long term, more attention should be paid to the conservation of lake wetland. In addition, the integration of ecosystem service function and biodiversity and the combination of protection with restoration would be the main task for the wetland ecosystem conservation planning in the future.%运用系统保护规划方法,以集水区为保护规划单元,综合考虑三维(3D)连接性(横向、纵向、垂向)和跨流域调水工程,通过不可替代性分析和保护空缺识别,对黄淮海地区跨流域湿地生态系统保护网络体系优化进行研究,并通过与已有保护体系对比,评估了优化体系的效用.结果表明:依据不可替代性大小和连接性原则,湿地保护空缺可分为优先保护空缺和一般保护空缺;黄淮海地区湿地生态系统保护体系经过优化后,湿地保护状况整体上有较大改观,其中所有湿地类

  2. 安徽湿地保护管理现状与发展对策%Current Status and Development Strategies of Wetland Conservation and Management in Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢琳琳; 顾长明

    2012-01-01

    安徽湿地资源具有面积大、类型多、分布不均、水系发达、水质差别大和生物物种丰富等特点。安徽湿地保护面临着人口增长和经济快速发展的双重压力,湖泊围垦、泥沙淤积、环境污染、过度渔猎、江湖隔绝、生物入侵、基建和城市化对湿地保护构成严重威胁。本文在详细分析安徽湿地资源保护管理现状和存在问题的基础上,提出了实施湿地恢复与重建工程、完善法规、加强科研宣教、健全组织机构、建立湿地监测网络、增加资金投入等一系列全面推进安徽湿地保护管理工作的措施。%The wetland resources of Anhui Province have characteristics including large surface area,multiple wetland types, uneven distribution,well - developed water systems,varied water quality,and abundant wildlife.Wetland protection in Anhui Province faces pressure from human population growth and rapid economic development.There are many serious threats to wetland protection including lake reclamation,sediment deposition,environment pollution,overfishing,isolation of river and lake,biological invasions,infrastructure construction,and urbanization.Based on the current status and existing problems of the wetland resources conservation and management in Anhui provinces we offer recommendations to guide future policy formulation and implementation of wetland conservation and management.These include implementation of programs on wetland restoration and reconstruction,improving and perfecting laws and regulations,strengthening scientific research and public education, reinforcement of management organizations,construction of wetland monitoring system,and increasing financial support.

  3. 75 FR 33822 - Los Esteros Critical Energy Facility Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Bay Checkerspot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... the Bay Checkerspot Butterfly and Serpentine Endemic Plant Species, Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY... maintenance of the Los Esteros Critical Energy Facility (LECEF) located in Santa Clara County, California. The... (Streptanthus albidus albidus), Santa Clara Valley dudleya (Dudleya setchellii), and Tiburon...

  4. Neotropical coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropical region, which includes the tropical Americas, is one of the world's eight biogeographic zones. It contains some of the most diverse and unique wetlands in the world, some of which are still relatively undisturbed by humans. This chapter focuses on the northern segment of the Neotropics (south Florida, the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America), an area that spans a latitudinal gradient from about 7 N to 29 N and 60 W to 112 W. Examples of coastal wetlands in this realm include the Everglades (Florida, USA), Ten Thousand Islands (Florida, USA), Laguna de Terminos (Mexico), Twin Cays (Belize), and Zapata Swamp (Cuba). Coastal wetlands are dominated by mangroves, which will be emphasized here, but also include freshwater swamps and marshes, saline marshes, and seagrass beds. The aim of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of Neotropical coastal wetlands of the North American continent, with an emphasis on mangroves, since this is the dominant vegetation type and because in-depth coverage of all wetland types is impossible here. Instead, the goal is to describe the environmental settings, plant and animal communities, key ecological controls, and some conservation concerns, with specific examples. Because this book deals with wetlands of North America, this chapter excludes coastal wetlands of South America. However, much of the information is applicable to mangrove, marsh, and seagrass communities of other tropicaI regions.

  5. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour.

  6. Wetland Reclamation and Habitat Damage Assessment in Jiaozhou Bay%基于生境等价分析法的胶州湾湿地围垦生态损害评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京梅; 王晓玲

    2013-01-01

    Assessing habitat damage resulting from wetland reclamation is important for developing marine ecological damage compensation policy. The process of reclamation in Jiaozhou Bay has become increasingly serious in recent decades, and has affected the ecological environment and wetland habitats. Here, we summarize relevant research in this field and introduce habitat equivalency analysis (HEA) to the Chinese research community. The two main indicators in this assessment are biological diversity and the ability of water quality clarification. Using HEA we found that the area of wetland reclamation in Jiaozhou Bay is 2264 hm2 and the level of habitat damage is approximately 54.5%. By planting salt marshes as a form of restoration and where the service level is equivalent to that of the damaged area, the scale of the restoration project should be 358 hm2 to achieve initial habitat service levels of filled wetlands. With reference to the average public value of different ocean ecosystem services, the habitat service damage is worth 42.64 million CNY per year. Whether the services provided by the restoration project match losses caused by reclamation requires further study. Sensitivity analysis on the discount rate and the time required to reach base service levels should now be examined.%评估湿地围垦的生态损害,对目前迫切需要制定的海洋生态损害补偿政策以及生态修复计划具有重要的现实意义.本文针对黄海胶州湾湿地围垦,运用生境等价分析法,完成了围垦湿地的生境受损量、补偿量及补偿面积的评估.结果显示:1988年-1997年期间,胶州湾湿地围垦面积约为2264hm2,生境损害程度为54.5%.假设通过人工种植沼泽植被来修复受损湿地生境,且修复生境所提供的服务等于受损区域的生境服务,则修复工程的规模为358hm2,才能达到补偿受损湿地生境服务水平的目标.进一步参照不同类型海洋生态系统的平均公益价值标准,该

  7. 77 FR 27210 - Publication of the Final National Wetland Plant List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Conservation Service (NRCS), is announcing the availability of the final 2012 National Wetland Plant List (NWPL... wetland determinations under the Clean Water Act and the Wetland Conservation Provisions of the Food... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Publication of the Final National Wetland Plant List AGENCY:...

  8. Mapping Flood Reduction Benefits of Potential Wetlands Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public officials and environmental managers face difficult decisions when allocating funds to prioritize the most beneficial wetlands conservation or restoration projects, and often face difficulty even characterizing benefits. One benefit of natural and constructed wetlands is t...

  9. Biotic wetland connectivity—supporting a new approach for wetland policy

    OpenAIRE

    Amezaga, J.M.; Santamaría, Luis; Green, Andy J.

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands are key habitats connected physically and socially with processes occurring over a much wider territory. The biotic connection through dispersal mechanisms among wetlands is of primary importance to wetland management and policies. However, traditional wetland conservation approaches are based on the preservation of isolated sites considered to be of special importance (typically owing to their importance for concentrations of migratory waterbirds). Research linking local species ric...

  10. Use of Land Use Land Cover Change Mapping Products in Aiding Coastal Habitat Conservation and Restoration Efforts of the Mobile Bay NEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Swann, Roberta; Smooth, James

    2010-01-01

    The Mobile Bay region has undergone significant land use land cover change (LULC) over the last 35 years, much of which is associated with urbanization. These changes have impacted the region s water quality and wildlife habitat availability. In addition, much of the region is low-lying and close to the Gulf, which makes the region vulnerable to hurricanes, climate change (e.g., sea level rise), and sometimes man-made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Land use land cover change information is needed to help coastal zone managers and planners to understand and mitigate the impacts of environmental change on the region. This presentation discusses selective results of a current NASA-funded project in which Landsat data over a 34-year period (1974-2008) is used to produce, validate, refine, and apply land use land cover change products to aid coastal habitat conservation and restoration needs of the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (MB NEP). The project employed a user defined classification scheme to compute LULC change mapping products for the entire region, which includes the majority of Mobile and Baldwin counties. Additional LULC change products have been computed for select coastal HUC-12 sub-watersheds adjacent to either Mobile Bay or the Gulf of Mexico, as part of the MB NEP watershed profile assessments. This presentation will include results of additional analyses of LULC change for sub-watersheds that are currently high priority areas, as defined by MB NEP. Such priority sub-watersheds include those that are vulnerable to impacts from the DWH oil spill, as well as sub-watersheds undergoing urbanization. Results demonstrating the nature and permanence of LULC change trends for these higher priority sub-watersheds and results characterizing change for the entire 34-year period and at approximate 10-year intervals across this period will also be presented. Future work will include development of value-added coastal habitat quality

  11. Bird Diversity and Conservation Strategy in the Reclaimed Hexi Wetland of Poyang Lake%鄱阳湖荷溪退田还湖湿地区域鸟类多样性及其保护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬皆

    2011-01-01

    调查了鄱阳湖荷溪区域湿地鸟类资源,并对164种鸟类的种类组成、区系特点、珍稀濒危性、鸟类季节性、生态分布进行了分析,针对湿地鸟类保护中存在的问题,提出了保护对策.%Wetland bird resources and their diversity in the reclaimed Hexiwetland of Poyang Lake were studied by investigating the species composition,the avifauna characteristics, the status of rare and endangered species, theseasonal changes, and ecological distribution of the 164 bird species. Existingproblems in wetland bird protection were identified and a conservation strategywas proposed.

  12. Variation in tidal wetland plant diversity and composition within and among coastal estuaries: assessing the relative importance of environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Question: Does wetland plant composition vary more by estuarine type (differentiated by the degree of riverine versus oceanic influence) or habitat type within estuaries (defined by US National Wetlands Inventory [NWI] marsh classes)? Location: Oregon estuaries: Netarts Bay, ...

  13. Management of wetlands for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Gray,; Heath M. Hagy,; J. Andrew Nyman,; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires an understanding of basic ecosystem processes, animal and plant life history strategies, and principles of wildlife management. Management techniques that are used differ depending on target species, coastal versus interior wetlands, and available infrastructure, resources, and management objectives. Ideally, wetlands are managed as a complex, with many successional stages and hydroperiods represented in close proximity. Managing wetland wildlife typically involves manipulating water levels and vegetation in the wetland, and providing an upland buffer. Commonly, levees and water control structures are used to manipulate wetland hydrology in combination with other management techniques (e.g., disking, burning, herbicide application) to create desired plant and wildlife responses. In the United States, several conservation programs are available to assist landowners in developing wetland management infrastructure on their property. Managing wetlands to increase habitat quality for wildlife is critical, considering this ecosystem is one of the most imperiled in the world.

  14. 高强度人类活动对泉州湾滨海湿地环境的影响及其对策%Effects of high-intensity human activities on the environment variations of coastal wetland in the Quanzhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶翔; 王爱军; 马牧; 方建勇

    2016-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are rich in natural resources and represent a favorable environment. They have thus been developed and utilized throughout human history, and this has caused the loss and degradation of these areas. Coastal wetlands are located at the interactions among land, sea, and atmosphere, thereby providing an important ecological niche. Based on a summary of hydrodynamic, geomorphology, ecological, and environmental quality data of the coastal wetland in the Quanzhou Bay, the effects of reclamation, cultivation, pollutant discharge, and artificial ecological engineering on coastal wetlands were discussed. Results indicate that the area of coastal wet-lands has decreased with an increase in socioeconomic development and human activity, and that the tidal water and sediment transport paths and patterns are changing. Furthermore, the environmental quality of the coastal wetlands is declining, and biodiversity and biomass are decreasing. In order to achieve the sustainable development of coastal wetlands inthe Quanzhou Bay, the following strategies are proposed: (1) to strengthen the scientific management of reclamation and recommend new reclamation methods; (2) to perform coastal wetland realignment and ecosystem restoration and construct a coastal wetland park to provide local advantages; (3) to excavate local marine culture and develop ecotourism. The effects of heavily intensive human activities on coastal wetlands are revealed in this study, and as such, this provides a scientific basis for the research and realignment of coastal wetlands and pol-icy-making basis in relation to the development and protection of coastal wetlands in the Quanzhou Bay.%由于滨海湿地丰富的资源和优越的环境,人们对其进行了大规模的开发利用,导致了滨海湿地的丧失与生态退化。滨海湿地位于陆地-海洋-大气相互作用最活跃的地带,具有非常重要的生态意义。总结泉州湾滨海湿地水动力、地貌、生态

  15. Galveston Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The Galveston Bay estuary is located on the upper Texas Gulf coast (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). It is composed of four major sub-bays—Galveston, Trinity, East, and West Bays. It is Texas’ largest estuary on the Gulf Coast with a total area of 155,399 hectares (384,000 acres) and 1,885 km (1,171 miles) of shoreline (Burgan and Engle, 2006). The volume of the bay has increased over the past 50 years due to subsidence, dredging, and sea level rise. Outside of ship channels, the maximum depth is only 3.7 m (12 ft), with the average depth ranging from 1.2 m (4 ft) to 2.4 m (8 ft)— even shallower in areas with widespread oyster reefs (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). The tidal range is less than 0.9 m (3 ft), but water levels and circulation are highly influenced by wind. The estuary was formed in a drowned river delta, and its bayous were once channels of the Brazos and Trinity Rivers. Today, the watersheds surrounding the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers, along with many other smaller bayous, feed into the bay. The entire Galveston Bay watershed is 85,470 km2 (33,000 miles2 ) large (Figure 1). Galveston Island, a 5,000 year old sand bar that lies at the western edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf of Mexico, impedes the freshwater flow of the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers into the Gulf, the majority of which comes from the Trinity. The Bolivar Peninsula lies at the eastern edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf. Water flows into the Gulf at Bolivar Roads, 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 Galveston Pass, between Galveston Island and Bolivar Peninsula, and at San Luis Pass, between the western side of Galveston Island and Follets Island.

  16. 北京城市湿地现状及保护对策%Current Status and Conservation Strategy of Urban Wetland in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志明; 高士武; 王小文; 王昌海

    2013-01-01

    Urban wetlands are playing an important role in environmental protection and socio-economic development in cities. In this paper, the history and Current Status of Beijing urban wetland area were analyzed based on the latest statistical data. The causes for the decreases of Beijing urban wetlands were identified, and suggestions were made for the protection of urban wetlands.%  城市湿地对环境保护和社会经济发展具有重要意义。利用最新的统计数据,分析了北京城市湿地面积的历史变迁及现状,并提出了相应的保护对策。

  17. 平坝县湿地现状与保护对策%Current Situation and Conservation Countermeasures of Pingba County Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖正武; 廖婧琳

    2013-01-01

    Using the second wetland survey data of Pingba County,this paper analyzed the situation of Pingba wet-land,and put forward some countermeasures for protecting the wetland.%  运用平坝县第二次湿地调查资料,对平坝县的湿地现状进行了分析,并针对性地提出了一些保护对策。

  18. 基于生态学研究制定湿地保护策略:以台湾七股湿地为例%Ecological Study Helps with Wetland Conservation Policy Making:A Case from Chiku, Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林幸助; 盛强

    2014-01-01

    To formulaterational and effective wetland conservation and management policy,the relationships among biodiversity, ecological function and ecosystem services need to be well-understood. And then,the influences by anthropogenic activities and climate impact on coastal wetlands and the vulnerability should beenaccurately assessed. There is no enough data on the economic evaluation of coastal wetlands. Furthermore, not many progress/actions were observed in legal/law system for the conservation of coastal wetlands. If applied ecological studies are to have a greater impact on informing environmental policy or conserve coastal wetlands, much greater attention needs to be given to the scale of the research efforts, as well as to the interaction with scientists of other fields and local people to carry out interdisciplinary analyses. The case study in the Chiku coastal area in Taiwan will be used as an example for demonstration.%制定合理有效的滨海湿地保护法律制度和管理策略,需要我们理解生物多样性、生态功能和生态系统服务之间的相互关系,并正确地评估滨海湿地的脆弱性以及人类活动和环境变化对湿地的影响。然而,当前滨海湿地保护政策制定过程中有关生态及经济评估数据尚显不足。在此,本文以台湾七股滨海区域作为案例,展示了滨海湿地环境保护政策制定过程生态学研究发挥的影响力,并体现出对其他领域和当地居民相互协作的力量整合,最终实现湿地保护的策略。

  19. Island characteristics within wetlands influence waterbird nest success and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Ackerman, Josh; Herzog, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coastal waterbird populations are threatened by habitat loss and degradation from urban and agricultural development and forecasted sea level rise associated with climate change. Remaining wetlands often must be managed to ensure that waterbird habitat needs, and other ecosystem functions, are met. For many waterbirds, the availability of island nesting habitat is important for conserving breeding populations. We used linear mixed models to investigate the influence of pond and island landscape characteristics on nest abundance and nest success of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA, based on a 9-year dataset that included >9,000 nests. Nest abundance and nest success were greatest within ponds and on individual islands located either 4 km from San Francisco Bay. Further, nest abundance was greater within ponds with relatively few islands, and on linear-shaped, highly elongated islands compared to more rounded islands. Nest success was greater on islands located away from the nearest surrounding pond levee. Compared to more rounded islands, linear islands contained more near-water habitat preferred by many nesting waterbirds. Islands located away from pond levees may provide greater protection from terrestrial egg and chick predators. Our results indicate that creating and maintaining a few, relatively small, highly elongated and narrow islands away from mainland levees, in as many wetland ponds as possible would be effective at providing waterbirds with preferred nesting habitat.

  20. 7 CFR 12.23 - Conservation plans and conservation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation plans and conservation systems. 12.23 Section 12.23 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.23 Conservation plans and conservation systems. (a) Use...

  1. Estuarine ecology : A report on Santa Clara County Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report on the Santa Clara County wetlands was written just prior to the establishment of the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The report summarizes...

  2. 陕西黄河湿地省级自然保护区生态系统保育及恢复存在的问题及对策%Problems and Countermeasures of Ecosystem Conservation and Restoration of Shaanxi Provincial Yellow River Wetland Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保星; 王宝琴; 关燕雯

    2014-01-01

    According to current situation of the Yellow River wetland in Shaanxi Province,the significance of study on ecosystem conservation and restoration was discussed,foreign wetland research dynamic and wetland research progress in our country were analyzed,problems and countermeasures of ecosystem conservation and restoration of Shaanxi Provincial Yellow River wetland nature reserve were pointed out,so as to provide important reference for the future study on wetland ecosystem conservation and restoration of Shaanxi Provincial Yellow River wetland nature reserve.%针对陕西黄河湿地现状,论述了开展湿地生态系统保育恢复研究的重要意义,分析了国外湿地研究动态和我国湿地研究的进展,指出了在陕西黄河湿地自然保护区开展保育与恢复存在的问题和具体对策,以期为今后陕西黄河湿地自然保护区进行湿地生态系统保育及恢复研究提供重要参考。

  3. Salt Ponds, South San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    higher resolution 1000 pixel-wide image The red and green colors of the salt ponds in South San Francisco Bay are brilliant visual markers for astronauts. The STS-111 crew photographed the bay south of the San Mateo bridge in June, 2002. This photograph is timely because a large number of the salt ponds (more than 16,500 acres) that are owned by Cargill, Inc. will be sold in September for wetlands restoration-a restoration project second in size only to the Florida Everglades project. Rough boundaries of the areas to be restored are outlined on the image. Over the past century, more than 80% of San Francisco Bay's wetlands have been filled and developed or diked off for salt mining. San Francisco Bay has supported salt mining since 1854. Cargill has operated most of the bay's commercial salt ponds since 1978, and had already sold thousands of acres to the State of California and the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge. This new transaction will increase San Francisco Bay's existing tidal wetlands by 50%. The new wetlands, to be managed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will join the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge, and provide valuable habitat for birds, fish and other wildlife. The wetlands will contribute to better water quality and flood control in the bay, and open up more coastline for public enjoyment. Additional information: Cargill Salt Ponds (PDF) Turning Salt Into Environmental Gold Salt Ponds on Way to Becoming Wetlands Historic Agreement Reached to Purchase San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds Astronaut photograph STS111-376-3 was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth

  4. Species Diversity and Its Conservation in the OverseasChinese Town (OCT) Wetland in Shenzhen%深圳华侨城湿地物种多样性及其保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    昝启杰; 许会敏; 谭凤仪; 廖文波; 樊蓓莉

    2013-01-01

    The wetland of Overseas Chinese Town (OCT) is located in the Pearl River estuary, Shenzhen. Its total area is about 690,000 m2, including 500,000 m2 of water areas. It is an important component of the wetland ecosystem in Shenzhen Bay. In this paper, we study and analyze biodiversity of OCT wetland of the native plants, alien plants and vegetation types, birds, benthic, plankton, etc. The results showed as following:The total number of plant species is 162 belonging to 60 families, including 7 species of true mangrove belonging to 6 genera and 5 families, and 5 species of semi-mangrove belonging to 4 genera and 3 families; The number of bird species is 101 belonging to 36 families, accounting for 50% of the total number of birds in Shenzhen Bay, including 6 wild animal species of Class II priority for protection;A Total of 14 algae was identified, belonging to 11 genera; 5 species of zooplankton were identified. The results indicated that the wetland is facing a serious ecological crisis, including the large area spread of invasive plants, simplification of species composition. The biodiversity of both birds and benthic organisms was lower than that of Futian Mangrove Nature Reserve and Feng Tong estuary Wetland. It needs to take certain protective measures to strengthen the integrated management.%深圳华侨城湿地位于珠江口深圳湾北岸,通过箱涵与深圳湾海水相通,总面积69万m2,水域面积约50万m2,是深圳湾湿地生态系统的重要组成部分。对华侨城湿地植被、鸟类、底栖生物、浮游生物的多样性进行了调查,结果表明:华侨城湿地共有植物60科162种,其中真红树植物5科6属7种,半红树植物3科4属5种,外来入侵植物27种;鸟类共有12目36科101种,约占深圳湾鸟类总种数的50%,其中国家Ⅱ级重点保护野生鸟类6种;共鉴定出藻类5门11属14种;浮游动物25种。华侨城湿地面临严重的生态危机,主要包括入侵植物大

  5. Direction and magnitude of change in soil use for a wetland area in Chile: Puren marshes, a priority site for biodiversity conservation (stage 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Varas, Alejandra

    2014-05-01

    Land managers and policymakers need information about soil change caused by anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors to predict the effects of management on soil function, compare alternatives, and make decisions. This is particularly relevant in highly fragile ecosystems such as wetlands or humid systems. The wetlands require the presence of three key components: hydric soils, hydrophytic vegetation and wetland hydrology. Therefore, the presence of hydric soils in humid systems is essential for the existence of a wetland. In Chile, one of the geographic zones with the greatest diversity of humid systems is the coast of the Araucanía Region, which contains one of the largest and most threatened humid systems of the region, Puren Marshes, whose soils are only generically described as alluvial terraces and miscellaneous swamp. In this area, studies have reported a high intensity of anthropogenic activity, generating soil erosion, loss of wetland coverage and landscape alteration. For this first stage of a main investigation about the vulnerability of hydric soils to changes in patterns of soil use, the objective was to characterize the variables of soil use in the Puren Marshes and determinate the direction and magnitude of change in soil use in the study area for the period between 1994 and 2007 (the official reports indicate that until 1994, the total area of Puren Marshes was 1147 ha). For the analyses, were used official reports of soil use, the coverages were obtained from the project map databases "Catastro y Evaluación de los Recursos Vegetacionales Nativos de Chile" 1993 and its update for La Araucanía, Regional Government of La Araucanía 2011, DMF CONAF 2010 and IGM 2007. The map information was processed in ARCGIS 9.3.1 software under UTM coordinates, datum WGS 84 and 18 South Time extended. Was developed a multitemporal analysis by construction of transition matrix and confusion matrix. The results obtained show that for the period analysed, the

  6. Freshwater Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  7. A New Species of the Bay Goby Genus Eucyclogobius, Endemic to Southern California: Evolution, Conservation, and Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Camm C.; Spies, Brenton; Ellingson, Ryan A.; Jacobs, David K.

    2016-01-01

    A geographically isolated set of southern localities of the formerly monotypic goby genus Eucyclogobius is known to be reciprocally monophyletic and substantially divergent in mitochondrial sequence and nuclear microsatellite-based phylogenies relative to populations to the north along the California coast. To clarify taxonomic and conservation status, we conducted a suite of analyses on a comprehensive set of morphological counts and measures from across the range of Eucyclogobius and describe the southern populations as a new species, the Southern Tidewater Goby, Eucyclogobius kristinae, now separate from the Northern Tidewater Goby Eucyclogobius newberryi (Girard 1856). In addition to molecular distinction, adults of E. kristinae are diagnosed by: 1) loss of the anterior supratemporal lateral-line canals resulting in higher neuromast counts, 2) lower pectoral and branched caudal ray counts, and 3) sets of measurements identified via discriminant analysis. These differences suggest ecological distinction of the two species. Previous studies estimated lineage separation at 2–4 million years ago, and mitochondrial sequence divergence exceeds that of other recognized fish species. Fish from Santa Monica Artesian Springs (Los Angeles County) northward belong to E. newberryi; those from Aliso Creek (Orange County) southward constitute E. kristinae. The lagoonal habitat of Eucyclogobius has been diminished or degraded, leading to special conservation status at state and federal levels beginning in 1980. Habitat of the newly described species has been impacted by a range of anthropogenic activities, including the conversion of closing lagoons to open tidal systems in the name of restoration. In the last 30 years, E. kristinae has only been observed in nine intermittently occupied lagoonal systems in northern San Diego County; it currently persists in only three sites. Thus, the new species is in imminent danger of extinction and will require ongoing active management

  8. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  9. 7 CFR 1410.11 - Farmable Wetlands Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farmable Wetlands Program. 1410.11 Section 1410.11... Wetlands Program. (a) In addition to other allowable enrollments, land may be enrolled in this program through the Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP) within the overall Conservation Reserve Program provided...

  10. Mercury distribution and speciation in the sediments of mangrove wetland in Quanzhou Bay%泉州湾红树林湿地沉积物中汞分布及形态特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于瑞莲; 胡恭任; 刘越; 杨翼

    2011-01-01

    采集了泉州湾红树林湿地表层沉积物样品,测定了沉积物中不同形态汞的含量,研究了汞的分布特征、赋存形态及其生物有效性.泉州湾红树林湿地表层沉积物中总汞含量范围0.03~0.22 mg·kg-1,除14#采样点外,其余各采样点均符合海洋沉积物质量(GB 18668-2002) Ⅰ类标准;沉积物中不同形态汞占总汞的比例为可氧化态(84.0%)>残渣态(14.0%)>可还原态(1.8%)>弱酸溶态(0.2%);沉积物中汞的生物有效性较高,对红树林生态系统存在一定的潜在危害.%Surface sediments were sampled from the mangrove wetland in Quanzhou Bay to study the distribution, speciation, and bio-availability of mercury in the sediments. The total mercury content in the sediments ranged in 0. 03-0. 22 mg · kg-1, which met the first class standard of Marine Sediment Quality ( GB 18668-2002) , with the exception of that at site 14. The average proportion of different speciation mercury to total mercury in the sediments presented a sequence of oxidizable ( 84. 0% ) > residual ( 14. 0% ) > reducible ( 1. 8% ) > weak acid soluble ( 0. 2% ) . The relatively high bio-availability of mercury in the sediments indicated certain potential hazard to the mangrove ecosystem.

  11. Impact Analysis of Coastal Engineering Projects on Mangrove Wetland Area Change with Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, two large scale coastal engineering projects have been carried out in the Deep Bay surrounded by Shenzhen City and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. One project is Shenzhen River channel regulation and the other is the sea reclamation along the seashore on the Shenzhen side. The two projects are very close to the two national nature reserves, specifically Futian in Shenzhen and Mai Po in Hong Kong, which are important wetland ecosystems worldwide. This paper aims to identify and monitor the mangrove wetland changes with time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper images pre and post to the two engineering projects being launched. Coupled analysis of the image interpretation results and tidal data acquired at the same time in the context of the two works reveals that the mangrove wetland area has increased from year 1989 to 1994, and has changed little from year 1994 to 2002. Binary coding is applied to reveal the distribution image of mangrove at each phase, and the coding image shows that the construction of the two coastal engineering projects has caused frequent changes in mangrove spatial distribution. The study also shows that the change is not significant regarding to the precision of the method and the natural evolution of mangrove wetland, and the projects do not cause apparently influences upon the two national mangrove conservation zones at least for the research time period.

  12. Management Plan Montezuma Wetlands Complex 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Montezuma Wetlands Complex Project (MWC) is a land conservation and management project jointly sponsored by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New York State...

  13. Defining Hydrophytes for Wetland Identification and Delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Engineers); Norman Melvin and Michelle Schuman (U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service); Mary Butterwick and Bill...Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual (Environmental Laboratory 1987) “Large plants (macrophytes), such as aquatic mosses , liverworts

  14. Environmental Assessment: Impoundment Rehabilitation on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to rehabilitate the wetland impoundments of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The environmental assessment describes the...

  15. Study of Panjin Wetlands Along Bohai Coast (Ⅱ): Ecological Water Requirement of Shuangtaizi Estuarine Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tieliang; ZHOU Linfei; ZHAO Be; YANG Peiqi

    2009-01-01

    Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland along the Bohai Sea coast, the biggest bulrush wetland in the world, has been listed in The Record of Important International Wetland Conservation District'. Taking the year of 2 000 as an example, the minimum, the most suitable and the maximum ecological water requirement of Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland are calculated in this paper based on both ecological theory and Geological Information System technology. In addition, the remote sensing technique is adopted in the data acquisition process. Moreover, the total water requirement and the unit area water requirement for different wetland types are obtained. The result is very important for water resources planning, ecological conservation and regional agriculture structure ad-justment in Shuangtaizi. Meanwhile, this study can serve as a useful example for calculating the ecological water requirement in other similar estuarine wetlands.

  16. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    Watching flocks of waterfowl taking off and landing in the large expanse of wetland near his home is a favorite pastime of Li Qiwen a middle-aged primary school teacher in Weichang Township,Luobei County in Heilongjiang Province.The wetland is home to hundreds of species of birds,including rare white storks and red-crowned cranes,as well as more common geese and ducks.

  17. The Willapa Bay Oyster Reserves in Washington State: Fishery collapse, creating a sustainable replacement, and the potential for habitat conservation and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oysters have been an important resource in Washington state since the mid 1800’s and are intimately associated with recent history of the Willapa Bay estuary just as they have defined social culture around much larger US east coast systems. The Willapa Bay oyster reserves were set aside to preserve...

  18. Dynamic Change and Conservation Strategy of Wetlands in Huanghua%黄骅湿地的动态变化及保护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玲; 张义文; 焦明; 徐艳菲; 申海鹏

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the dynamic change and the changing cause of wetland in Huanghua from 2001 to 2009, the Landsat satellite images of 2001, 2005 and 2009 was interpreted and processed by ERDAS and ENVI; and relative data was obtained by the method of Change Detection to observe the dynamic change and transforming situation. The results showed that the area of wetland was reducing seriously, and some was converted to artificial wetland. Based on the phenomenon, some protective measures were proposed.%为了研究黄骅湿地2001-2009年的变化情况及变化原因,运用ERDAS和ENVI对2001、2005、2009年美国Landsat卫星影像进行影像判读和数据处理,利用Change Detection方法得到相关数据,探讨其动态变化状况及转化情况.结果表明,黄骅湿地不断减少,其中自然湿地面积大量减少,并部分转为人工湿地.依据这一现象提出了一些保护措施.

  19. What Makes a Wetland a Wetland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of and activities about various kinds of wetlands. Contains seven learning activities ranging from creating wetland scenes with picture cutouts to actually exploring a wetland. Includes reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  20. Virginia ESI: Wetlands (Wetland Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the coastal wetlands for Virginia, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  1. Community strategy for mangrove forest conservation: Conquista Campesina Conservation Easement

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The drafting of a community plan for mangrove forest conservation in the communal land of Conquista Campesina (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico) is part of a more ambitious project aimed at establishing a protected wetlands corridor in the coastal region of the state of Chiapas. The purpose is to guarantee the conservation, protection and restoration of priority wetlands, placing special emphasis on vulnerable ecosystems. With the technical support of Pronatura Sur A. C. and after signing a conserv...

  2. Examining water quality effects of riparian wetland loss and restoration scenarios in a southern ontario watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanhong; Liu, Yongbo; Ou, Chunping; Gabor, Shane

    2016-06-01

    Wetland conservation has two important tasks: The first is to halt wetland loss and the second is to conduct wetland restoration. In order to facilitate these tasks, it is important to understand the environmental degradation from wetland loss and the environmental benefits from wetland restoration. The purpose of the study is to develop SWAT based wetland modelling to examine water quality effects of riparian wetland loss and restoration scenarios in the 323-km(2) Black River watershed in southern Ontario, Canada. The SWAT based wetland modelling was set up, calibrated and validated to fit into watershed conditions. The modelling was then applied to evaluate various scenarios of wetland loss from existing 7590 ha of riparian wetlands (baseline scenario) to 100% loss, and wetland restoration up to the year 1800 condition with 11,237 ha of riparian wetlands (100% restoration). The modelling was further applied to examine 100% riparian wetland loss and restoration in three subareas of the watershed to understand spatial pattern of water quality effects. Modelling results show that in comparing to baseline condition, the sediment, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) loadings increase by 251.0%, 260.5%, and 890.9% respectively for 100% riparian wetland loss, and decrease by 34.5%, 28.3%, and 37.0% respectively for 100% riparian wetland restoration. Modelling results also show that as riparian wetland loss increases, the corresponding environmental degradation worsens at accelerated rates. In contrast, as riparian wetland restoration increases, the environmental benefits improve but at decelerated rates. Particularly, the water quality effects of riparian wetland loss or restoration show considerable spatial variations. The watershed wetland modelling contributes to inform decisions on riparian wetland conservation or restoration at different rates. The results further demonstrate the importance of targeting priority areas for stopping riparian wetland loss

  3. 中国红树林湿地资源及其保护%The mangrove wetland resources and their conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乔民; 隋淑珍

    2001-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands are evergreen tree and shrub communities mainly consisting of mangrove plants, usually growing on the upper part of tidal flat of tropical and subtropical coasts, and periodically inundated by tidal water. Mangroves are naturally distributed in Hainan, Guangxi, Guangdong, Taiwan and Fujian provinces, with an area of about 15,000 ha.There are 26 exclusive mangrove species and 11 semi-exclusive mangrove species in China. The mangrove wetland in China has low direct economic values, but plays an important role in protecting coastline, keeping coastal biodiversity and fishery resources, clarifying sea water, beautifying environment, and so on. It is a coastal ecologically critical area that is specially easy to be undervalued.The mangrove areas have been sharply reduced because of human s unreasonable exploiting activities,such as des-troying mangroves for agricultural and salt fields, for aquaculture ponds and for urban construction, and the mangrove wetland resources are in danger and need urgent efficient management and protection. Eighteen mangrove natural reserves have been established. It is essential to attract scientists to take an active part in scientific researches on mangrove wetlands, to spread the knowledge about mangrove environmental functions, to reverse its decline trend and to achieve the ecological restoration and sustainable deve-lopment of mangrove wetland ecosystem.%红树林是我国海岸湿地类型之一,自然分布于海南、广西、广东、福建、台湾等省区。现有面积约 1.5万 hm2,包括 26种真红树 ,11种半红树。中国红树林湿地直接经济价值不高,而防浪护岸、维持海岸生物多样性和渔业资源、净化水质、美化环境等生态环境功能显著,属于特别容易被价值低估的海岸生态关键区。 1960年代以来的毁林围海造田或造盐田,毁林围塘养殖,毁林围海搞城市建设等人类不合理开发活动,使红树林面积剧减

  4. Integrating field sampling, spatial statistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.J.; Jong, S.M. de; Addink, E.A.; Couto, E.G.; Nunes Da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J.

    2011-01-01

    Development of efficient methodologies for mapping wetland vegetation is of key importance to wetland conservation. Here we propose the integration of a number of statistical techniques, in particular cluster analysis, universal kriging and error propagation modelling, to integrate observations from

  5. Using remote sensing to research Beijing wetlands dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Wenji; GONG; Zhaoning; GONG; Huili; LI; Xiaojuan; ZHANG; Songmei; LI; Jing

    2006-01-01

    In Beijing, where wetlands are important to municipal freshwater conservation and biodiversity retention, three different types of wetlands were identified: riverside wetlands, wetlands surrounding lakes and reservoirs, and wetlands in municipal parks.Remote sensing technology was applied in combination with field investigations to monitor and analyze the changes in these wetlands, and a combination of fusion technologies,Landsat TM/ETM+ and IKONOS imaging, was used to investigate and map them. This study indicates that not only have wetland areas been reduced by half, but also their ecological environments have been degraded because of rapid economic development and population increase. Suggestions based on this research are made to reconstruct the ecological environment of the wetlands and return them to their previous state.

  6. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  7. Coastal Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the materials. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The unit materials emphasize the structure,…

  8. Strength in Numbers: Describing the Flooded Area of Isolated Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie M.; Haag, Kim H.

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of isolated, freshwater wetlands are scattered across the karst1 landscape of central Florida. Most are small (less than 15 acres), shallow, marsh and cypress wetlands that flood and dry seasonally. Wetland health is threatened when wetland flooding patterns are altered either by human activities, such as land-use change and ground-water pumping, or by changes in climate. Yet the small sizes and vast numbers of isolated wetlands in Florida challenge our efforts to characterize them collectively as a statewide water resource. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida alone, water levels are measured monthly in more than 400 wetlands by the Southwest Florida Water Management Distirct (SWFWMD). Many wetlands have over a decade of measurements. The usefulness of long-term monitoring of wetland water levels would greatly increase if it described not just the depth of water at a point in the wetland, but also the amount of the total wetland area that was flooded. Water levels can be used to estimate the flooded area of a wetland if the elevation contours of the wetland bottom are determined by bathymetric mapping. Despite the recognized importance of the flooded area to wetland vegetation, bathymetric maps are not available to describe the flooded areas of even a representative number of Florida's isolated wetlands. Information on the bathymetry of isolated wetlands is rare because it is labor intensive to collect the land-surface elevation data needed to create the maps. Five marshes and five cypress wetlands were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000 to 2004 as part of a large interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida. The wetlands are located either in municipal well fields or on publicly owned lands (fig. 1). The 10 wetlands share similar geology and climate, but differ in their ground-water settings. All have historical water-level data and multiple vegetation surveys. A comprehensive report by Haag and

  9. Does prescribed fire benefit wetland vegetation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, C.; Bounds, D.L.; Ruby, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fire on wetland vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States are poorly known, despite the historical use of fire by federal, state, and private landowners in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Prescribed fire is widely used by land managers to promote vegetation that is beneficial to migratory waterfowl, muskrats, and other native wildlife and to reduce competition from less desirable plant species. We compared vegetative response to two fire rotations, annual burns and 3-year burns, and two control sites, Control 1 and Control 2. We tested the effects of fire within six tidal marsh wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay Wildlife Management Area in Maryland. We examined changes in total live biomass (all species), total stem density, litter, and changes in live biomass and stem density of four dominant wetland plant species (11 variables). Our results suggest that annual prescribed fires will decrease the accumulation of litter, increase the biomass and stem densities of some wetland plants generally considered less desirable for wildlife, and have little or no effect on other wetland plants previously thought to benefit from fire. ?? 2011 US Government.

  10. W. R. Grace: Plant Uses Six Sigma Methodology and Traditional Heat Balance Analysis to Identify Energy Conservation Opportunities at Curtis Bay Works (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-12-01

    The plant-wide energy assessment at W. R. Grace's Curtis Bay Works helped identify four projects with combined potential savings of $840,000 per year. A separate, unique project that would partner W. R. Grace with the City of Baltimore to recover and use landfill gas (methane) to cogenerate steam and electricity was also identified during the assessment. If implemented, the project would recover gas from the landfill to replace 40% of the electricity and 65% of the fuel currently required to produce steam at Curtis Bay Works. Annual savings are estimated at $900,000 to $1.2 million.

  11. W.R. Grace: Plant Uses Six Sigma Methodology and Traditional Heat Balance Analysis to Identify Energy Conservation Opportunities at Curtis Bay Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-01

    The plant-wide energy assessment at W. R. Grace's Curtis Bay Works helped identify four projects with combined potential savings of $840,000 per year. A separate, unique project that would partner W. R. Grace with the City of Baltimore to recover and use landfill gas (methane) to cogenerate steam and electricity was also identified during the assessment. If implemented, the project would recover gas from the landfill to replace 40% of the electricity and 65% of the fuel currently required to produce steam at Curtis Bay Works. Annual savings are estimated at $900,000 to $1.2 million.

  12. Effects of a cattail wetland on water quality of Irondequoit Creek near Rochester, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.; Bernard, John M.; Seischab, Franz K.

    2000-01-01

    A 6-year (1990-96) study of the Ellison Park wetland, a 423-acre, predominantly cattail (Typha glauca) marsh in Monroe County, N.Y., was conducted to document the effect that this wetland has on the water quality of Irondequoit Creek, which flows through it. Irondequoit Creek drains 151 square miles of mostly urban and suburban land and is the main tributary to Irondequoit Bay on Lake Ontario. The wetland was a sink for total phosphorus and total suspended solids (28 and 47 percent removal efficiencies, respectively, over the 6-year study period). Sedimentation and vegetative filtration appear to be the primary mechanisms for the decrease in loads of these constituents. Total nitrogen loads were decreased slightly by the wetland; removal efficiencies for ammonia-plusorganic nitrogen and nitrate-plus-nitrite were 6 and 3 percent, respectively. The proportions of total phosphorus and total nitrogen constituents were altered by the wetland. Orthophosphate and ammonia nitrogen were generated within the wetland and represented 12 percent of the total phosphorus output load and 1.8 percent of total nitrogen output load, respectively. Conservative chemicals, such as chloride and sulfate, were littleaffected by the wetland. Concentrations of zinc, lead, and cadmium showed statistically significant decreases, which are attributed to sedimentation and filtration of sediment and organic matter to which these elements adsorb. Sediment samples from open-water depositional areas in the wetland contained high concentrations of (1) trace metals, including barium, manganese, strontium, zinc (each of which exceeded 200 parts per million), as well as chromium, copper, lead, and vanadium, and (2) some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Persistent organochlorine pesticides, such as chlordane, dieldrin, DDT and its degradation products (DDD and DDE), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s), also were detected, but concentrations of these compounds were within the ranges often found in

  13. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  14. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  15. A regional classification of the effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrogen transport to surface waters in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.; LaMotte, Andrew E.; Sekellick, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen from nonpoint sources contributes to eutrophication, hypoxia, and related ecological degradation in Atlantic Coastal Plain streams and adjacent coastal estuaries such as Chesapeake Bay and Pamlico Sound. Although denitrification in depressional (non-riparian) wetlands common to the Coastal Plain can be a significant landscape sink for nitrogen, the effectiveness of individual wetlands at removing nitrogen varies substantially due to varying hydrogeologic, geochemical, and other landscape conditions, which are often poorly or inconsistently mapped over large areas. A geographic model describing the spatial variability in the likely effectiveness of depressional wetlands in watershed uplands at mitigating nitrogen transport from nonpoint sources to surface waters was constructed for the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (NACP), from North Carolina through New Jersey. Geographic and statistical techniques were used to develop the model. Available medium-resolution (1:100,000-scale) stream hydrography was used to define 33,799 individual watershed catchments in the study area. Sixteen landscape metrics relevant to the occurrence of depressional wetlands and their effectiveness as nitrogen sinks were defined for each catchment, based primarily on available topographic and soils data. Cluster analysis was used to aggregate the 33,799 catchments into eight wetland landscape regions (WLRs) based on the value of three principal components computed for the 16 original landscape metrics. Significant differences in topography, soil, and land cover among the eight WLRs demonstrate the effectiveness of the clustering technique. Results were used to interpret the relative likelihood of depressional wetlands in each WLR and their likely effectiveness at mitigating nitrogen transport from upland source areas to surface waters. The potential effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrogen transport varies substantially over different parts of the NACP

  16. The birds of Bristol Bay: A challenge to American ornithologist

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the challenges of conserving the habitat and resources of Bristol Bay for generations to come. The ecosystems in Bristol Bay are described, as...

  17. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  18. Analysis of conservative tracer measurement results using the Frechet distribution at planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel and showing the effect of clogging processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical process, developed in Maple environment, has been successful in decreasing the error of measurement results and in the precise calculation of the moments of corrected tracer functions. It was proved that with this process, the measured tracer results of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C) can be fitted more accurately than with the conventionally used distribution functions (Gaussian, Lognormal, Fick (Inverse Gaussian) and Gamma). This statement is true only for the planted HSFCW-Cs. The analysis of unplanted HSFCW-Cs needs more research. The result of the analysis shows that the conventional solutions (completely stirred series tank reactor (CSTR) model and convection-dispersion transport (CDT) model) cannot describe these types of transport processes with sufficient accuracy. These outcomes can help in developing better process descriptions of very difficult transport processes in HSFCW-Cs. Furthermore, a new mathematical process can be developed for the calculation of real hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dispersion coefficient values. The presented method can be generalized to other kinds of hydraulic environments.

  19. The Strategies of Wetland Resources Investigation and Conservation Management in Lijiang City of Yunnan Province%云南省丽江市湿地资源现状与保护管理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠兴; 胡宗华

    2015-01-01

    利用3S技术与实地调查相结合的方法,查清云南省丽江市的湿地资源现状。该市湿地资源丰富,共有4个湿地类,10个湿地型,湿地总面积36211.62 hm2;湿地植物共有120科800多种,有7个植被类型,68个群系;共有鸟类66种、鱼类25种、两栖类6种、爬行类3种、兽类14种。针对湿地资源特点与湿地保护管理存在的问题,提出了完善管理机构、加大执法力度等管理对策。%Used the method of combining 3S technology and fieldwork,found out the status of wetland resources in Lijiang city of Yunnan province.It is rich wetland resource for total 4 wetlands class,10 wetlands type.Wetland area is 36211.62 hm2 .The wetland pants are 120 family and over 800 species,7 vegetation types,68 formations.66 species of wetland birds,3 species of fish,6 species of wetland amphibians,3 species of wetland reptiles,3 species of wetland mammals were found in wetland plant.It is condition for the characteristics of wetland resource and the threatened wetland resource,to improve countermeasures,as the management mechanism and strengthen water pollution control.

  20. Heron conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushlan, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Herons are large, popular and, in many cases, spectacular birds found in wetlands world-wide, both tropical and temperate, natural and man-made. Some populations are very small and localized, some have decreased, some have expanded their ranges, and a few are pests of human activities. In the fifteen years since the publication of the latest monographic treatment of the family, The Herons Handbook, there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of heron status and conservation requirements, set against a backdrop of increasing concern about the future of the world?s wetland habitats. This book provides a comprehensive update following two distinct threads. The status and conservation needs of herons are first presented on a regional basis, in a series of chapters set at a continental or subcontinental scale. Over 200 biologists and heron conservationists have contributed to the data summarized here, and the very latest census and survey results provide the most up-to-date and detailed picture of heron populations currently available. Chapters discussing several critical issues in heron conservation follow, tending to focus on the international nature of the problems.

  1. Consolidated checklist of birds in the Pallikaranai Wetlands, Chennai, India

    OpenAIRE

    P.P.N. Raj; J. Ranjini; R. Dhanya; J. Subramanian; Azeez, P. A; S. Bhupathy

    2010-01-01

    We documented the avifauna of Pallikaranai marshes located near the Chennai metropolis in southern India. In total, 110 species of migratory and resident birds including those listed in the Red Data Book were recorded. Presently the wetland is facing severe threats from various anthropogenic pressures caused due to unplanned waste disposal and land conversion. The high population of migratory as well as wetland birds in this area emphasizes the urgent need of conservation of this urban wetland.

  2. Consolidated checklist of birds in the Pallikaranai Wetlands, Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.N. Raj

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We documented the avifauna of Pallikaranai marshes located near the Chennai metropolis in southern India. In total, 110 species of migratory and resident birds including those listed in the Red Data Book were recorded. Presently the wetland is facing severe threats from various anthropogenic pressures caused due to unplanned waste disposal and land conversion. The high population of migratory as well as wetland birds in this area emphasizes the urgent need of conservation of this urban wetland.

  3. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  4. 滨海湿地鸟类的动物生态与保护生物学研究%Research of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology About Coast Wetland Birds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小麟

    2011-01-01

    The research areas of animal ecology and conservation biology group in recent 10 years focus on the relationship between animal biodiversity and its environments, ecology and key impact factors af animal reproduction, contamination transfer and enrichment processes along the food chain of waterbirds, molecular techniques for identification of bird species or sex, population genetic diversity and its impact factors, endangered mechanism of rare and threaten animals, conservation of animal diversity and its habitats. The methods used in our studies are ecological or molecular and the animals focused are the vertebrates, especially ardeids and other waterbirds in coast wetlands.%采用生态学研究方法和分子生物学技术.以滨海湿地鸟类等脊椎动物为研究对象,尤其以鹭科鸟类为主,研究动物多样性与环境的相互关系,分析鸟类繁殖生态及其关键环境影响因素,探讨滨海湿地鸟类食物链的污染物转移与富集规律,建立鸟类物种及性别的分子生物学鉴定技术,分析鹭科鸟类种群遗传多样性及其影响因素,探讨濒危物种的致危机制,以期促进生物多样性及其栖息地的保护.

  5. Wetland features and landscape context predict the risk of wetland habitat loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Kevin J; Flather, Curtis H

    2011-04-01

    Wetlands generally provide significant ecosystem services and function as important harbors of biodiversity. To ensure that these habitats are conserved, an efficient means of identifying wetlands at risk of conversion is needed, especially in the southern United States where the rate of wetland loss has been highest in recent decades. We used multivariate adaptive regression splines to develop a model to predict the risk of wetland habitat loss as a function of wetland features and landscape context. Fates of wetland habitats from 1992 to 1997 were obtained from the National Resources Inventory for the U.S. Forest Service's Southern Region, and land-cover data were obtained from the National Land Cover Data. We randomly selected 70% of our 40 617 observations to build the model (n = 28 432), and randomly divided the remaining 30% of the data into five Test data sets (n = 2437 each). The wetland and landscape variables that were important in the model, and their relative contributions to the model's predictive ability (100 = largest, 0 = smallest), were land-cover/ land-use of the surrounding landscape (100.0), size and proximity of development patches within 570 m (39.5), land ownership (39.1), road density within 570 m (37.5), percent woody and herbaceous wetland cover within 570 m (27.8), size and proximity of development patches within 5130 m (25.7), percent grasslands/herbaceous plants and pasture/hay cover within 5130 m (21.7), wetland type (21.2), and percent woody and herbaceous wetland cover within 1710 m (16.6). For the five Test data sets, Kappa statistics (0.40, 0.50, 0.52, 0.55, 0.56; P < 0.0001), area-under-the-receiver-operating-curve (AUC) statistics (0.78, 0.82, 0.83, 0.83, 0.84; P < 0.0001), and percent correct prediction of wetland habitat loss (69.1, 80.4, 81.7, 82.3, 83.1) indicated the model generally had substantial predictive ability across the South. Policy analysts and land-use planners can use the model and associated maps to prioritize

  6. Using the ecosystem services concept to analyse stakeholder involvement in wetland management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Shacham, E.; Dayan, T.; Groot, de R.S.; Beltrame, C.; Guillet, F.; Feitelson, E.

    2015-01-01

    Wetland management usually involves multiple stakeholders. This paper describes how the use of the ecosystem services (ES) concept can help to identify the main stakeholders associated with wetland conservation, using the Hula Wetland in the Sea of Galilee’s watershed as a case study. We conducted a

  7. A Review of the Recent Scientific Literature on Irrigation Induced and Enhanced Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    heavily affected; for example, the California and Nevada wetlands in North America , the Macquarie Marshes in Australia, and the Aral Sea in central...more documentation exists concerning the importance of irrigated wetlands as habitat. About 72% of all reptiles , 77% of all amphibian species, 80...North America , South America , and Europe. Aquatic ecosystems, avian ecology, conservation, management, waterbirds, shorebirds, wetlands Erwin, R. M

  8. Effects of flow modification on a cattail wetland at the mouth of Irondequoit Creek near Rochester, New York: Water levels, wetland biota, sediment, and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.

    2004-01-01

    An 11-year (1990-2001) study of the Ellison Park wetland, a 423-acre, predominantly cattail (Typha glauca) wetland at the mouth of Irondequoit Creek, was conducted to document the effects that flow modifications, including installation of a flow-control structure (FCS) in 1997 and increased diversion of stormflows to the backwater areas of the wetland, would have on the wetland's ability to decrease chemical loads transported by Irondequoit Creek into Irondequoit Bay on Lake Ontario. The FCS was designed to raise the water-surface elevation and thereby increase the dispersal and detention of stormflows in the upstream half of the wetland; this was expected to promote sedimentation and microbial utilization of nutrients, and thereby decrease the loads of certain constituents, primarily phosphorus, that would otherwise be carried into Irondequoit Bay. An ecological monitoring program was established to document changes in the wetland's water levels, biota, sedimentation rates, and chemical quality of water and sediment that might be attributable to the flow modifications.Water-level increases during storms were mostly confined to the wetland area, within about 5,000 ft upstream from the FCS. Backwater at a point of local concern, about 13,000 ft upstream, was due to local debris jams or constriction of flow by bridges and was not attributable to the FCS.Plant surveys documented species richness, concentrations of nutrients and metals in cattail tissues, and cattail productivity. Results indicated that observed differences among survey periods and between the areas upstream and downstream from the FCS were due to seasonal changes in water levels—either during the current year or at the end of the previous year's growing season—that reflected the water-surface elevation of Lake Ontario, rather than water-level control by the FCS. Results showed no adverse effects from the naturally high water levels that prevail annually during the spring and summer in the wetland

  9. The Wetland Resources Investigation and Conservation Management Strategies in Yulong County of Yunnan Province%云南省玉龙县湿地资源调查与保护管理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠兴

    2014-01-01

    利用3S技术与实地调查相结合的方法,查清云南省玉龙县的湿地资源现状。该县共有河流湿地、湖泊湿地、沼泽湿地、人工湿地4个湿地类,10个湿地型,湿地总面积10488.71 hm2;湿地植物110科700多种,有6个植被类型,30个群系;湿地鸟类10目14科66种,两栖类记录有2目5科6种,爬行类记录有1目2科3种,兽类4目6科14种。针对湿地资源特点、湿地资源受威胁的状况,提出完善管理机构、加强水污染控制等对策。%This paper used the method of combining 3S technology and fieldwork and found out the status of wetland resources in Yu-long County of Yunnan Province.There were river wetlands,lakes wetlands,marsh wetlands and artificial wetlands in the county.It had total 4 wetlands class ,10 wetlands types ,the wetland area was 10488.71 hm2.The wetland pants were 110 families and over 700 species,6 vegetation types ,30 formations;there were 66 species of wetland birds in 14 families and 10 orders,6 species of wetland amphibians in 5 families and 2 orders,3 species of wetland reptiles in 2 families and 1 order,14 species of wetland mammals in 6 families and 4 orders.It raised the characteristics and the threatened conditions of wetland resource wetland resource ,it raised coun-termeasures of the management mechanism perfect and strengthening water pollution control .

  10. Wetland assessment, monitoring and management in India using geospatial techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, J K

    2015-01-15

    Satellite remote sensing and GIS have emerged as the most powerful tools for inventorying, monitoring and management of natural resources and environment. In the special context of wetland ecosystems, remotely sensed data from orbital platforms have been extensively used in India for the inventory, monitoring and preparation of action plans for conservation and management. First scientific inventory of wetlands in India was carried out in 1998 by Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad using indigenous IRS (Indian Remote Sensing Satellite) data of 1992-93 timeframe, which stimulated extensive use of geospatial techniques for wetland conservation and management. Subsequently, with advances in GIS, studies were carried out for development of Wetland Information System for a state (West Bengal) and for Loktak lake wetland (a Ramsar site) as a prelude to National Wetland Information System. Research has also been carried out for preparation of action plans especially for Ramsar sites in the country. In a novel research, use of the geospatial technology has also been demonstrated for biodiversity conservation using landscape ecological metrics. A country-wide estimate of emission of methane, a Green House Gas, from wetlands has also been made using MODIS data. Present article critically reviews the work carried out in India for wetland conservation and management using geospatial techniques.

  11. Development of a "Hydrologic Equivalent Wetland" Concept for Modeling Cumulative Effects of Wetlands on Watershed Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Li, R.; Yang, X.; Duan, L.; Luo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are one of the most important watershed microtopographic features that affect, in combination rather than individually, hydrologic processes (e.g., routing) and the fate and transport of constituents (e.g., sediment and nutrients). Efforts to conserve existing wetlands and/or to restore lost wetlands require that watershed-level effects of wetlands on water quantity and water quality be quantified. Because monitoring approaches are usually cost or logistics prohibitive at watershed scale, distributed watershed models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), can be a best resort if wetlands can be appropriately represented in the models. However, the exact method that should be used to incorporate wetlands into hydrologic models is the subject of much disagreement in the literature. In addition, there is a serious lack of information about how to model wetland conservation-restoration effects using such kind of integrated modeling approach. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a "hydrologic equivalent wetland" (HEW) concept; and 2) demonstrate how to use the HEW concept in SWAT to assess effects of wetland restoration within the Broughton's Creek watershed located in southwestern Manitoba of Canada, and of wetland conservation within the upper portion of the Otter Tail River watershed located in northwestern Minnesota of the United States. The HEWs were defined in terms of six calibrated parameters: the fraction of the subbasin area that drains into wetlands (WET_FR), the volume of water stored in the wetlands when filled to their normal water level (WET_NVOL), the volume of water stored in the wetlands when filled to their maximum water level (WET_MXVOL), the longest tributary channel length in the subbasin (CH_L1), Manning's n value for the tributary channels (CH_N1), and Manning's n value for the main channel (CH_N2). The results indicated that the HEW concept allows the nonlinear functional relations between watershed processes

  12. Detection and characterizacion of Colombian wetlands using Alos Palsar and MODIS imagery

    OpenAIRE

    L.M. Estupinan-Suarez; Florez-Ayala, C.; M.J. Quinones; Pacheco, A.M.; Santos, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands regulate the flow of water and play a key role in risk management of extreme flooding and drought. In Colombia, wetland conservation has been a priority for the government. However, there is an information gap neither an inventory nor a national baseline map exists. In this paper, we present a method that combines a wetlands thematic map with remote sensing derived data, and hydrometeorological stations data in order to characterize the Colombian wetlands. Following the adop...

  13. Forecasting climate change impacts on the distribution of wetland habitat in the Midwestern United states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garris, Heath W; Mitchell, Randall J; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Barrett, Linda R

    2015-02-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns brought on by climate change threaten to alter the future distribution of wetlands. We developed a set of models to understand the role climate plays in determining wetland formation on a landscape scale and to forecast changes in wetland distribution for the Midwestern United States. These models combined 35 climate variables with 21 geographic and anthropogenic factors thought to encapsulate other major drivers of wetland distribution for the Midwest. All models successfully recreated a majority of the variation in current wetland area within the Midwest, and showed that wetland area was significantly associated with climate, even when controlling for landscape context. Inferential (linear) models identified a consistent negative association between wetland area and isothermality. This is likely the result of regular inundation in areas where precipitation accumulates as snow, then melts faster than drainage capacity. Moisture index seasonality was identified as a key factor distinguishing between emergent and forested wetland types, where forested wetland area at the landscape scale is associated with a greater seasonal variation in water table depth. Forecasting models (neural networks) predicted an increase in potential wetland area in the coming century, with areas conducive to forested wetland formation expanding more rapidly than areas conducive to emergent wetlands. Local cluster analyses identified Iowa and Northeastern Missouri as areas of anticipated wetland expansion, indicating both a risk to crop production within the Midwest Corn Belt and an opportunity for wetland conservation, while Northern Minnesota and Michigan are potentially at risk of wetland losses under a future climate.

  14. 胶州湾湿地海域水体和表层沉积物环境质量评价%Environmental aualitv assessment of water body and surface sediment in the sea area of Jiaozhou Bay wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洪瑞; 陈聚法; 崔毅; 赵俊; 杨风

    2011-01-01

    Based on the investigation data from 48 sampling stations in the sea area of Jiaozhou Bay wetland in 2009, and by using Nemerow index, eutrophication index ( El) , and Hakanson potential ecological risk index, an assessment was conducted on the environmental quality of water body and surface sediment in the sea area. According to the assessment on the 16 indicators including pH, dissolved oxygen ( DO) , dissolved inorganic nitrogen ( DIN) , dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIP) , chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) , petroleum hydrocarbons, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg, As, hexachlorocyolohexane (HCH) , dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) , conform, and faecal coli-form, the water quality was at moderate and serious pollution level in the tidal reach of Dagu River, at slight and moderate pollution level in the intertidal zone, and at slight pollution level in the shallow sea. The eutrophication level differed markedly with the regions, being very serious in the tidal reach of Dagu River (El value 58. 13-327. 89), serious in the intertidal zone (El value 1. 34-19. 96) , and slight in the shallow sea (El value 0. 65-2. 10). The surface sediments in the sea area were basically at slight pollution level. The sediment quality was at slight pollution level in the tidal reach of Dagu River, at slight and moderate pollution level in the intertidal zone, and at cleaner and slight pollution level in the shallow sea. The pollution parameter ( C/ ) and contamination index (Cd) of the heavy metals in the surface sediments were low, suggesting that the pollution de-gree was at a lower level. The Cu and Zn were the primary pollution factors in the sediments. The potential ecological risk parameter (£,') and risk index (RI) of the heavy metals in the surface sediments were lower, indicating a slight ecological risk of heavy metals pollution.%基于2009年对胶州湾湿地48个站点的调查数据,采用内梅罗(Nemerow)指数、富营养指数(EI)和Hakanson潜在生态危害指数法对

  15. Wonderful Wetlands: An Environmental Education Curriculum Guide for Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King County Parks Div., Redmond, WA.

    This curriculum guide was designed to give teachers, students, and society a better understanding of wetlands in the hope that they learn why wetlands should be valued and preserved. It explores what is meant by wetlands, functions and values of wetlands, wetland activities, and wetland offerings which benefit animal and plant life, recreation,…

  16. The biogeography of Mid-Atlantic CEAP wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods: The national U.S.D.A. Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practices. The goal of CEAP is to determine the effectiveness of wetland conservation practices and programs, including im...

  17. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher D.; DeSteven, Diane; Kilgo, John C.

    2004-12-31

    Barton, Christopher, D., Diane DeSteven and John C. Kilgo. 2004. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina). Ecol. Rest. 22(4):291-292. Abstract: Carolina bays and smaller depression wetlands support diverse plant communities and provide critical habitat for semi-aquatic fauna throughout the Coastal Plain region of the southeastern United States. Historically, many depression wetlands were altered or destroyed by surface ditching, drainage, and agricultural or silviculture uses. These important habitats are now at further risk of alteration and loss following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2001 restricting federal regulation of isolated wetlands. Thus, there is increased attention towards protecting intact sites and developing methods to restore others. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 312-mi2 (800-km2) Savannah River Site (SRS) in west-central South Carolina includes about 350 Carolina bays and bay-like wetland depressions, of which about two-thirds were degraded or destroyed prior to federal acquisition of the land. Although some of the altered wetlands have recovered naturally, others still have active active drainage ditches and contain successional forests typical of drained sites. In 1997, DOE established a wetland mitigation bank to compensate for unavoidable wetland impacts on the SRS. This effort provided an opportunity fir a systematic research program to investigate wetland restoration techniques and ecological responses. Consequently, research and management staffs from the USDA Forest Service, Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation, the Savannah River Technology Center, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) and several universities developed a collaborative project to restore degraded depression wetlands on the SRS. The mitigation project seeks cost-effective methods to restore the hydrology and vegetation typical of natural depression wetlands, and so enhance habitats for

  18. Characterizing wetland change at landscape scale in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Sheng, Sheng; Zhou, Wen; Cui, Lijuan; Liu, Maosong

    2011-08-01

    Human activities produced great impacts on wetlands worldwide. Taking Jiangsu Province, China, as a representative wetland region subject to extensive human activities, the aim of this study is to understand the conversion trajectory and spatial differentiation in wetland change from a multi-scale perspective. Based on multi-temporal Landsat images, it was found that the natural wetlands decreased by 11.2% from 1990 to 2006 in Jiangsu Province. Transition matrices showed that the conversion of natural wetlands to human-made wetlands (mostly aquaculture ponds) was the major form of natural wetland reduction, accounting for over 60% of the reduction. Percentage reduction and area reduc tion of natural wetlands were respectively quantified within different wetland cover zones using a moving window analysis. Average percentage reduction showed a decreasing tendency with increasing wetland cover. The high-cover and mid-cover zone presented the largest area reduction at the scales of 1-2 km and 4-8 km, respectively. Local hotspots of natural wetland reduction were mapped using the equal-interval and quantile classification schemes. The hotspots were mostly concentrated in the Lixiahe marshes and the coastal wetland areas. For the area reduction hotspots, the quantile classification presented larger area and more patches than the equal-interval classification; while an opposite result was shown for the percentage reduction hotspots. With respect to the discontinuous distribution of the natural wetlands, area reduction could be more appropriate to represent reduction hotspots than percentage reduction in the study area. These findings could have useful implications to wetland conservation.

  19. 保护优先与综合管理的创新实践%An Innovative Practice of Prioritization of Conservation and Integrated Management——Comments on "Sichuan Provincial Regulation of Wetland Protection"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高正

    2011-01-01

    Wetland is not only an important habitat for the survival and development of biological resources, but also of significant implications for the sustainable development of social and economic development in Sichuan province. Destruction of wetland would cause severe social damages, and wetland should be protected by law. Currently there is no national law specific for wetland protection, in order to strengthen wetland protection Sichuan Province has enacted a provincial regulation of wetland protection through repeated legislative investigations and learning experiences from other provinces. The wetland protection in Sichuan Province has now been put on a track with formal legality.%湿地是生物资源生存和发展的重要栖息地之一,对四川省社会经济可持续发展具有重要意义.破坏湿地会产生严重的社会危害性,湿地应受法律的保护.为切实加强湿地保护,在国家尚无湿地保护单行法律法规的情况下,四川省经过反复立法调研,并借鉴其他省份的经验,出台了这一地方性法规,将该省湿地保护管理正式纳入法制化轨道.

  20. 加强大庆湿地保护工作促进大庆生态环境健康发展%Strengthen the Daqing Wetland Conservation to Promote the Healthy Development of the Ecological Environment of Daqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程淑波

    2014-01-01

    大庆湿地具有重要的价值,是大庆生态安全体系的重要组成部分,也是经济社会可持续发展的重要基础。为了大力开展大庆湿地保护工作,应在新城区的核心区域建设湿地公园,做好湿地科研和保护、规划、编制工作,开展湿地资源调查、评价和监测工作,加强对大庆湿地保护管理和湿地保护工作的宣传、教育。%Daqing wetland has an important value, is an important part of daqing ecological security system, also is the important foundation of sustainable economic and social development. In order to vigorously promote the daqing wetland protection work, should be the core of the new area construction of wetland park, wetland research and protection, planning, preparation work, wetland resources survey, evaluation and monitoring work, enhancing the management daqing wetland protection and wetland protection work of propaganda and education.

  1. Status of Biodiversity at Wetland Ecosystem of Mohangonj Upazila in Netrakona District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zahangeer Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Species in wetlands provide ecosystem services, and protect the sustainable environment for human beings. The wetland biodiversity has been impacted at Mohangonj in Bangladesh due to the development of major environmental threats. The present research is undertaken to report the species status, wetland properties, and major environmental pressures in each wetland ecosystem. Among the recorded species, the total percentage of visible, threatened, endangered, and extinct species was 69.23, 18.62, 10, and 1.92% in these wetland ecosystems, respectively. The highest number of threatened species was found in the wetland of Aizda (29%; the lowest was in Khalaura (8%. The maximum number of endangered species was noted in the wetland of Sonarthal (16%, and the minimum was in Chadra (4% wetland. Four percent species were in the extinct category at some of the wetland ecosystems. Wetland biodiversity protects wetland ecosystem services and the sustainable environment for species conservation. Continuous monitoring of wetland biodiversity might be helpful for the conservation of species in the wetland ecosystem.

  2. Exploring Policy Options to Stop the Loss of Wetlands on Prairie Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serran, J.; Creed, I. F.

    2013-12-01

    nutrients once in the wetland. Finally, the function indicators are aggregated to provide an overall function score for each wetland. This overall value estimates a wetland's potential to provide ecosystem services compared to other wetlands on the landscape. The function indicators in combination with 'scarcity' as indicated by the historical wetland loss rates allows policy makers to adjust thresholds between wetland function scores and policy and management objectives. The wetland function assessment system offers a scientific foundation upon which wetland policy can be built. To exemplify its policy potential, we conduct quantitative ';future' scenarios to determine priority wetlands for protection under different development scenarios - this scenario analysis reveals the necessity of making tradeoffs among wetland functions, as wetlands with high ecological function may not be the same wetlands with high hydrological function. The project's resulting wetland function assessment system will improve conservation and restoration/remediation efforts by identifying high functioning wetlands, by revealing the necessity of tradeoffs, and by directing conservation towards preserving wetlands that provide important ecosystem services while allowing other wetlands to be developed.

  3. The significant surface-water connectivity of "geographically isolated wetlands"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Mushet, David M.; Alexander, Laurie C.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Richter, Stephen; Walls, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the current literature, coupled with our collective research expertise, on surface-water connectivity of wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” (sensu Tiner Wetlands 23:494–516, 2003a) to critically assess the scientific foundation of grouping wetlands based on the singular condition of being surrounded by uplands. The most recent research on wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” shows the difficulties in grouping an ecological resource that does not reliably indicate lack of surface water connectivity in order to meet legal, regulatory, or scientific needs. Additionally, the practice of identifying “geographically isolated wetlands” based on distance from a stream can result in gross overestimates of the number of wetlands lacking ecologically important surface-water connections. Our findings do not support use of the overly simplistic label of “geographically isolated wetlands”. Wetlands surrounded by uplands vary in function and surface-water connections based on wetland landscape setting, context, climate, and geographic region and should be evaluated as such. We found that the “geographically isolated” grouping does not reflect our understanding of the hydrologic variability of these wetlands and hence does not benefit conservation of the Nation’s diverse wetland resources. Therefore, we strongly discourage use of categorizations that provide overly simplistic views of surface-water connectivity of wetlands fully embedded in upland landscapes.

  4. Ecological classification of wetland plant associations in the Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In response to concerns regarding the conservation and management of wetland biodiversity within the Lahontan Valley, The Nature Conservancy, in cooperation with the...

  5. 2010 bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Corte Madera Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Spragens, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution bathymetric survey of Corte Madera Bay, California, was collected in early 2010 in support of a collaborative research project initiated by the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The primary objective of the Innovative Wetland Adaptation in the Lower Corte Madera Creek Watershed Project is to develop shoreline adaptation strategies to future sea-level rise based upon sound science. Fundamental to this research was the development of an of an up-to-date, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) extending from the subtidal environment through the surrounding intertidal marsh. We provide bathymetric data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and have merged the bathymetry with a 1-m resolution aerial lidar data set that was collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during the same time period to create a seamless, high-resolution DEM of Corte Madera Bay and the surrounding topography. The bathymetric and DEM surfaces are provided at both 1 m and 10 m resolutions formatted as both X, Y, Z text files and ESRI Arc ASCII files, which are accompanied by Federal Geographic Data Committee compliant metadata.

  6. Percent Wetland Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  7. Wetland Program Pilot Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Wetland Grant Database (WGD) houses grant data for Wetland Program Development Grants (created by EPA in 1990 under the Clean Water Act Section 104(b)(3)...

  8. Percent Wetland Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  9. Artesian Wetlands Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Artesian Wetlands Survey includes data on the wetlands in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. Data recorded includes location, area of influence, area inundated,...

  10. Improving wetland mapping techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mapping wetland extent, structure and invasives using radar imagery. Acquiring optical, thermal, LIDAR, and RADAR images and analysis for improved wetland mapping,...

  11. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  12. Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Smith, Kevin G.; Lund, Søren

    2013-01-01

    The Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit is a toolkit of research methods and better management practices used in HighARCS (Highland Aquatic Resources Conservation and Sustainable Development), an EU-funded project with field experiences in China, Vietnam and India. It aims...

  13. Redeeming the Weeping Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Renowned as the"Kidneys of the Earth,"wetlands are one of the three major ecosystems of the planet,along with forests and seas.With 10 percent of the world’s wetlands,China ranks number one in terms of the area of wetlands in Asia,and fourth in the world.China’s wetlands are abundant in type(containing all-natural and man-made types listed in the Convention

  14. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Zimmerman

    2001-01-01

    There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health intera...

  15. Study on biodiversity and conservation strategies in national wetland park of Yingzhou West Lake%颍州西湖国家湿地公园生物多样性及保护对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘生杰; 隋娟娟; 李永民; 聂超

    2012-01-01

    Yingzhou West Lake,a national wetland park,provides good habitats for various species for their survival and reproduction,so that resources of animal and plant are rich in the wetland park.But wetland area gradually dwindling,environmental pollution,unreasonable utilization of biological resources,short of money and feeble scientific research on wetland are faced in wetland protection in Yingzhou West Lake.The development of urbanization,tourism also have a negative impact on ecological environment of the wetland park.So advices such as restoring vegetation,returning farmlands to lake,pollution control,perfecting laws,increasing investment,strengthening scientific research and publicity on the wetland,promoting community economy are given to protect the wetland park.%颍州西湖国家湿地公园的良好生境为多种生物提供了生存和繁衍条件,动植物资源丰富。西湖湿地保护面临面积不断减少、环境污染、生物资源利用不合理、经费不足、科研薄弱及城镇化、旅游开发对生境影响等问题。提出恢复植被、退田还湖、防治污染、完善法规、增加投入、加强科研与宣传、促进社区经济发展等湿地保护建议。

  16. Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Smith, Kevin G.; Lund, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    The Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit is a toolkit of research methods and better management practices used in HighARCS (Highland Aquatic Resources Conservation and Sustainable Development), an EU-funded project with field experiences in China, Vietnam and India. It aims...... to communicate best practices in conserving biodiversity and sustaining ecosystem services to potential users and to promote the wise-use of aquatic resources, improve livelihoods and enhance policy information....

  17. Wetlands in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Wetlands are shallow marine waters and wet areas in cluding rivers, lakes and marshes. According to scientists, even reservoirs and paddy fields fall into the category. Wetlands are classified into over 40 types but accounts for only 6% of the earth's total land area. Human beings inhabit by water and grass because wetlands provide us with water and wet soil.

  18. Presettlement Vegetation and Natural Fire Regimes of the Grand Bay/Banks Lake Natural Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project was to develop maps of the original vegetation and original fireregimes of the Grand Bay-Old Field Bay-Banks Lake wetland complex to provide...

  19. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Matthew J; Creed, Irena F; Alexander, Laurie; Basu, Nandita B; Calhoun, Aram J K; Craft, Christopher; D'Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E; Jawitz, James W; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L Katherine; Lane, Charles R; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L; Mushet, David M; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C

    2016-02-23

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

  20. Status, trends, and changes in freshwater inflows to bay systems in the Corpus Christi Bay National Estuary Program study area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, W.H.; Mosier, J. G.; Bush, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to quantify current (1983–93) mean freshwater inflows to the six bay systems (open water and wetlands) in the Corpus Christi Bay National Estuary Program study area, to test for historical temporal trends in inflows, and to quantify historical and projected changes in inflows. The report also addresses the adequacy of existing data to estimate freshwater inflows.

  1. Developing a spatially-explicit climate adaptation framework for estuarine ecosystems of the San Francisco Bay: climate adaptation for decision support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides recommended resource allocations for conserving four subregions of SanFrancisco (SF) Bay, including North Bay, Suisun, Central Bay and South...

  2. SWS European Chapter Meeting on wetland restoration-Challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Brix, Hans; Kronvang, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction Wetland loss and degradation in Europe have been extreme andare still ongoing. By way of example, at least two-thirds of all shal-low lakes, bogs and wet meadows have been lost in Denmark since1784. The challenge for wetland scientists in Europe is to reversethe loss of wetlands...... and promote the protection of existing wet-lands and work for restoration of degraded wetlands.The EU Habitats Directive (HD) and the EU Water FrameworkDirective (WFD) are important policy instruments in wetland con-servation. Thus, restoration of wetlands and constructed wetlandshave become increasingly...... popular as mitigation options in RiverBasin Management Plans under the WFD to reduce nitrogen andphosphorus losses from fields to catchments.An important task for wetland scientists is to enhance our basicand applied understanding of the interlinked hydrological, bio-geochemical and ecological processes...

  3. Land use in Korean tidal wetlands: impacts and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  4. Land Use in Korean Tidal Wetlands: Impacts and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R.; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  5. Wetland Management - A Success Story In Transition - Restoration of Bhoj Wetland, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgal, M. K.; Tech, B. M.; Miwwa

    Wetlands are beautiful, biologically diverse, hydrologically disperse and ecological vibrant landscape world wide, embracing soils, water, plants, animals and human be- ing. The population growth in the catchment of wetlands led to multifarious human interventions for deriving maximum benefit from the wetlands and their catchments neglecting and disrespecting the principles of sustainability. This act of destruction has been pronounced in developing countries which are under the grip of poverty, illiteracy and lack of environmental education. SBhoj WetlandS is a Lake situated ´ in Central India, Earthen Dam across the river KOLANS in 1061 AD by then ruler king BHOJ. Till 1950 this Wetland was served as a principal source of water supply, even not requiring filtration. As the city grew and the wetland started getting encir- cled by habitation and urban development, the anthropogenic pressures on the lake increased, thus accelerating the process of eutrophication, making the water unfit for human consumption without due treatment due to deterioration of quality of water. For the conservation and management of Bhoj Wetland (Lake Bhopal) a project is under- taken in the financial assistance from Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC, Japan). The project envisages tackle various issues of conservation and management ofn the wetlands under a multi prongs strategies and manner. Although these issues are deeply interrelated and interlinked but for operational and management ease, these issues have been divided into various sub projects which are being tackled indepen- dently, albeit with undercurrent knowledge and understanding of the related issues and interconnectivity with each other. The Project itself is an apt example of the spectrum of varied problems and issues that come to light when attempts are made for sustain- able conservation and management of a wetland. The Project as envisaged intends to conserve and manage through 14 sub projects as under:- Sub

  6. Vegetation establishment success in restored carolina bay depressions on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina - phase one.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharitz, Rebecca, A.; Mulhouse, John, M.

    2004-05-01

    Successful wetlands restoration must re-establish or enhance three parameters: wetland hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 2000). On the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, restoration of small Carolina bay depression-wetlands was initiated in FY 2001 to provide wetland acreage for mitigation banking (US DOE 1997). Sixteen small depressions that had historically been drained for agricultural purposes were selected for restoration, and an additional four were initially chosen to serve as non-restored controls. Restoration treatments included plugging the existing ditches to increase water volume retention and wetland hydroperiod and clear-cutting removal of woody vegetation in the interiors. Planned endpoints of the restoration were herbaceous meadow and forested savanna bay interiors, and pine savanna and pine/hardwood forested bay margins (Barton and Singer 2001). To promote forested savanna interiors, saplings of bald cypress and swamp tupelo were planted following removal of the woody species.

  7. Soil Physical Characteristics and Water Conservation Function for Four Main Wetland Types in Gahai of Gannan%甘南尕海不同湿地类型土壤物理特性及其水源涵养功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马维伟; 王辉; 王修华; 王元峰; 赵赫然

    2012-01-01

    The soil physical properties and water conservation function of 4 types of wetland were studied in Gahai, Gannan. Results indicate that there are great differences in soil particle composition, soil bulk density and soil porosity for the different wetland types, and they are fluctuating changes with the increase in soil depth~ the average level of thick sand of soil for herbaceous peats, permanent marsh wetlands and mountain wetlands is 63.00~, 46.47% and 37.60~ respectively; fine sand for mountain wetlands, permanent marsh and herbaceous peats is 62.40~, 53.53~ and 33.63~; the average soil bulk density of permanent marsh wetlands(0.49 g/cm~), mountain wetlands(0.90 g/cma) and subalpine meadows(1.29 g/cm3) is about 2, 4, 6 times that of herbaceous peats(0.22 g/em3) ; the total soil porosity is shown as: Herbaceous peats 〉per- manent marsh wetlands 〉mountain wetlands 〉subalpine meadows~ the non-capillary porosity is shown as: Herbaceous peats 〉subalpine meadows 〉mountain wetlands 〉permanent marsh wetlands~ the average level of maximum water holding quantity of soil for herbaceous peats, permanent marsh wetlands, mountain wet- lands and subalpine meadows is 13 143.94 t/hm2 , 11 640.19 t/hm2 , 9 060.79 t/hm2 and 7 391.80 t/hm2 re- spectively; non-capillary water holding quantity of soil for herbaceous peats, subalpine meadows, mountain wetlands and permanent marsh wetlands is 937.67 t/hm2, 598.50 t/hm2, 594.67 t/hm2 and 325.13 t/hm2 respectively the average water draught capacity of soil for subalpine meadows, permanent marsh wetlands, mountain wetlands and herbaceous peats is 51.49 mm, 49.66 mm, 43.42 mm and 22.45 mm respectively. The function of water conservation for herbaceous peats is the best and the function of water draught for subalpine meadows is the best in Gahai of Gannan.%通过对甘南尕海4种湿地类型的土壤物理性状和水源涵养功能的研究,结果表明:不同类型湿地的土壤颗粒组成、土壤

  8. Case Studies on Coastal Wetlands and Water Resources in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O Nwankwoala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands play a very important role in the sustenance of both the surface andgroundwater resources of the country. It is sad to observe that the country is fast losingher wetlands, as the rich wetlands are being seriously threatened by a number ofanthropogenic and biophysical factors. Some of the notable human actions includepopulation pressure, rapid urbanization, mining, oil and industrial waste pollution,overgrazing, logging, dam construction, transportation routes and other physicalinfrastructure. Others factors are uncontrolled tilling for crop production andunprecedented/unregulated land reclamation. Subsidence, saltwater intrusion, sandstorm, desertification and droughts, invasion by alien floral and faunal species as well asmarine and coastal erosion are natural threats to wetlands in Nigeria. Wetlandsdestruction affects negatively water supply and water resources management. This studyexamines in great detail the fate of wetlands in the face of climate change andrecommends that efforts should be made to accurately document the country’s wetland.The paper therefore suggested sustainable options for wetlands and water resourcesmanagement in Nigeria. This, the paper opined, can be done through the strengtheningof wetlands preservation and conservation regulation, mitigating the effects of climatechange as well as the development of deliberate restoration programmes and policiesaimed at sustaining degraded wetlands in Nigeria.

  9. ESTIMATION OF ECOLOGICAL SERVICE VALUES OF WETLANDS IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bin; LI Bo; ZHONG Yang; NAKAGOSHI Nobukazu; CHEN Jia-kuan

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai is a coastal metropolitan city with various types of natural wetlands, which account for 23.5% of its total area. According to the definition of wetland in Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, the wetlands of Shanghai were classified into 4 types: coastal, riverine, lacustrine, and reservoir and pond wetlands. In order to examine the roles of wetlands in the life-support system of Shanghai, we calculated the area of each type of the wetlands using GIS technique, and then measured the ecological service values of different ecosystems in Shanghai based on the classification of ecosystem services proposed by COSTANZA et al. (1997). The estimated annual value of ecosystem services in the study area was 7.3×109US$/a for the total area of 1 356 700ha, among which about 97% was provided by the wetlands. Effective conservation and management of wetlands are therefore crucial to Shanghai's sustainable development. The limitations of the evaluation method for ecosystem service value were also discussed in the present paper.

  10. Freshwater Wetlands: A Citizen's Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc., Hobart, NY.

    The purpose of this "primer" for the general public is to describe the general characteristics of wetlands and how wetland alteration adversely affects the well-being of humans. Particular emphasis is placed on wetlands in New York State and the northeast. Topics discussed include wetland values, destruction of wetlands, the costs of wetland…

  11. Freshwater Wetlands: A Citizen's Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc., Hobart, NY.

    The purpose of this "primer" for the general public is to describe the general characteristics of wetlands and how wetland alteration adversely affects the well-being of humans. Particular emphasis is placed on wetlands in New York State and the northeast. Topics discussed include wetland values, destruction of wetlands, the costs of…

  12. Mangrove ecosystem of India: Conservation and management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Murthy, P.S.; Komarpant, D.S.

    groups of islands in the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea respectively. Coastal wetlands area of about 63,600 sq km in the country hardly includes about 5% of mangrove cover. Due to unawareness regarding the importance and lack of management in the past...

  13. Accumulation/dispersion of heavy metals in the saline soil of the Jianzhou Bay northeastern coastal wetland%胶州湾滨海湿地盐渍土壤中重金属的聚集与分散特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学刚; 袁华茂; 许思思; 段丽琴; 李宁; 张默; 宋金明

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinization is a worldwide resource and ecological problem, and systemic study on saline soil is the foundation for its bioremediation. The accumulation/dispersion of heavy metals in the saline soils was discussed based on the research on the saline soils in the northeastern coastal wetland of Jiaozhou Bay. The variations of Cu and Zn concentrations in saline soils of the Jiaozhou Bay northeastern coast were great and their concentrations were higher than the soil background values; the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr had little difference between sample stations but were higher than the background values; the variations of As and Mo concentration were not prominence and their concentrations were lower than the background values; the distribution was similar to V ,Co and Ni, the concentrations of which in the northern part were somewhat higher than the soil background values whereas in the southern part were slight lower than the soil background values. Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Ni were "elements accumulated by saline soil" and As, Co, V, Mo "elements dispersed by saline soil". As, Co, Ni, V, Mo, Cu, Zn and Pb of saline soils in the northeastern coast of the Jiaozhou Bay mainly came from soil parent materials and were not influenced by anthropogenic activities, whereas Cr and Cd mainly originated from industrial and agricultural inputs by Qingdao besides the parent materials. Pb and Zn in most of the saline soil were not polluted, but light polluted in some areas of the northeast coastal in the Jiaozhou Bay. Half of the studied stations had no pollution of Cu and Cr, but the other half stations were polluted slightly by Cu and Zn. However, there was mild to moderate pollution for Cd. The pollution severity of the heavy metals in the region followed the order of Cd〉〉Cu〉Cr〉〉Zn〉 Pb〉〉Ni〉V 〉Co〉As〉Mo. Beside the effect of material source, the concentrations of heavy metals in saline soils of the northeastern coast of the Jiaozhou Bay

  14. Colorado wetlands initiative : 1997-2000 : Protecting Colorado's wetlands resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Colorado Wetlands Initiative is an endeavor to protect wetlands and wetland-dependent wildlife through the use of voluntary, incentive-based mechanisms. It is a...

  15. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  16. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-07-14

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376,970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50,519.13 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  17. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-Xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50519.1 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  18. Importance of Carolina Bays to the Avifauna of Pinelands in the Southeastern United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapka, Stephen, J.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2011-07-01

    Abstract - Past anthropogenic activity has led to the destruction or alteration of Carolina bay wetlands throughout the southeastern United States. Presently, urban development, combined with a 2001 ruling by the US Supreme Court relaxing protection of isolated wetlands, poses an increasing threat to these and other isolated wetland systems; however, little information exists on the importance of these wetland systems to birds. We compared breeding and wintering bird communities of upland pine (Pinus spp.) forests with and without Carolina bays. Estimated species richness was greater in pine forests with Carolina bays than without during the winter (31.7 ± 1.3 [mean ± SE] vs. 26.9 ± 1.2; P = 0.027), but not in the breeding season (27.9 ± 2.2 vs. 26.3 ± 2.2; P = 0.644). Total relative abundance did not differ between pine forests with Carolina bays and those without in either the breeding (148.0 ± 16.0 vs. 129.4 ± 10.4 birds/40 ha; P = 0.675) or winter (253.0 ± 36.4 vs. 148.8 ± 15.1 birds/40 ha; P = 0.100) seasons. However, 23 species, 43% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in pine forests with bays during the breeding season, and 20 species, 30% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in such sites during winter. In contrast, only 6 and 1 species were observed only in pine forests without bays during the breeding and winter seasons, respectively, indicating that few species were negatively affected by the presence of bays. Thus, Carolina bays appear to enrich the avifauna of pine forests in the southeastern United States.

  19. The potential of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Olley, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Moreton Bay, in South East Queensland, Australia, is a Ramsar wetland of international significance. A decline of the bay's ecosystem health has been primarily attributed to sediments and nutrients from catchment sources. Sediment budgets for three catchments indicated gully erosion dominates the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas erosion from cultivated soils is the primary sediment source in Blackfellow Creek. Sediment tracing with fallout-radionuclides confirmed subsoil erosion processes dominate the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas in Blackfellow Creek cultivated and subsoil sources contribute >90% of sediments. Other sediment properties are required to determine the relative sediment contributions of channel bank, gully and cultivated sources in these catchments. The potential of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources is presented. The conservativeness of these sediment properties was examined through evaluating particle size variations in depth core soil samples and investigating whether they remain constant in source soils over two sampling occasions. Varying conservative behavior and source discrimination was observed. TN in the

  20. Mid-Atlantic CEAP wetland restoration – lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable effort to protect and restore wetlands throughout the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation pr...

  1. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - Montana Wetland and Riparian Framework - Map Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Montana Wetland and Riparian Framework represents the extent, type, and approximate location of wetlands, riparian areas, and deepwater habitats in Montana....

  2. Mud On the Move: Measuring Suspended Sediment Concentrations within Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, J.; Ferner, M.; Lacy, J. R.; Schile, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Supply of suspended sediment is critical for the development and sustainability of tidal wetlands. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is also a key parameter used in calibrating wetland accretion models, which aid in understanding restoration dynamics and projecting resilience to sea-level rise. Despite the importance of suspended sediment, few field studies have directly measured SSC within tidal wetlands, relying instead on measurements in adjacent waters or focusing on long-term rates of sediment accretion. We refined and tested a simple method for collecting SSC samples within wetlands on an incoming high tide, using siphon collectors. Bottles were positioned during low tide at set locations along transects extending away from either channels or the lower boundary of the vegetated wetland. This sampling protocol was developed collaboratively, with substantial input from local wetland managers and other stakeholders within the San Francisco Bay area and beyond. Simultaneously, we measured time series of SSC, water level, and tidal currents in the subtidal shallows, on the intertidal mudflats, and in two channels within the wetland. We observed significant sediment export during king tides in the wetland channels. Cumulative suspended sediment flux (SSF) over four days during the January 2014 king tides was approximately 10 tons/m of channel width, towards the bay. During neap tides SSF in the channels was directed landward but was lower in magnitude. Elevated velocities in the channels during ebb king tides suggest that resuspension within the channels, rather than erosion of the wetland, accounts for much of the bayward SSF. Within the wetland, SSC from the siphon samplers was highest at the bayward end of the cross-shore transects, indicating landward sediment flux. Taken together with long term accretion data which indicates sediment accumulation within the wetland, our results suggest that sediment is primarily supplied across the wetland-Bay interface

  3. Scoping Agriculture, Wetland Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is identified as the main cause of wetland degradation and loss. Using a drivers, pressures, state changes, impacts and responses (DPSIR) framework to analyze 90 cases drawn from all parts of the world and all wetland types, this report assesses the character of agriculture - wetlands interactions (AWIs) and their impacts in socio-economic and ecosystem services terms. The report is a technical framework that is used to scope out the relevance and nature of AWIs, identify response...

  4. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher

    2007-12-15

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ≈ 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

  5. Evaluation of a market in wetland credits: entrepreneurial wetland banking in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Morgan; Hayden, Nicholas

    2008-06-01

    With the rise of market-led approaches to environmental policy, compensation for permitted discharge of dredge or fill material into wetlands under Section 404 of the U.S. Clean Water Act has been purchased increasingly from entrepreneurial third-party providers. The growth of this practice (i.e., entrepreneurial wetland banking) has resolved many challenges associated with wetland compensation. But it has also produced (1) quantifiable temporal loss of wetland ecological functions, (2) spatial redistribution of wetland area, and (3) a degree of regulatory instability that may pose a threat to entrepreneurial compensation as a sustainable component of wetland-compensation policy. We used achieved compensation ratios, lapse between bank credit sale and the attainment of performance standards, distance between impact and bank site, and changes in bank market area to examine these 3 factors. We analyzed data from a census of all such transactions in the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled from site visits, Corps databases, and contacts with consultants and Section 404 permittees. Entrepreneurial banking provided compensation at a lower overall ratio than nonbank forms of compensation. Approximately 60% of bank credits were sold after site-protection standards were met but before ecological performance standards were met at the bank site. The average distance between bank and impact site was approximately 26 km. The area of markets within which established banks can sell wetland credits has fluctuated considerably over the study period. Comparing these data with similar data for other compensation mechanisms will assist in evaluating banking as an element of conservation policy. Data characterizing the performance of entrepreneurial wetland banks in actual regulatory environments are scarce, even though it is the most established of similar markets that have become instrumental to federal policy in administering several major environmental

  6. Reconstruction of Anacostia wetlands: success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, R.S.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    . Revegetation, which is a product of direct plantings (16 species comprised of 350,000 plants) and by establishment of volunteer plants, must be considered successful. Remarkably, full vegetation cover was achieved by the end of the first year (1993). Species diversity is high with 100-130 wetland species occupying portions of the wetland. Good species differentiation (incipient plant communities) can be noted at areas of sediment elevation differences. There is a good range of predominant species (five to eight) with rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides) initially being dominant but in later years becoming codominant. Even the native wild rice (Zizania aquatica) is making a substantive comeback. Invasive plants such as purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and phragmites (Phragmites australis) are being watched and dealt with as appropriate. There has been important habitat creation, and a resulting increase in fauna can be expected, particularly as the acreage reconstructed at Kenilworth has more than doubled with similarly reconstructed wetlands at Kingman Lake (42 acres), which were completed during the summer of 2000, just a quarter of a mile down river. One of the challenges with the Kingman marsh reconstruction has been protecting against the grazing pressure of native Canada geese (Branm canadensis). In the long run, these revived Anacostia wetlands are bound to improve local conditions and will contribute to a rejuvenated Chesapeake Bay system.

  7. Matéria orgânica e textura do solo em veredas conservadas e antropizadas no bioma Cerrado Organic matter and texture of the soil in conserved and altered wetlands in the Cerrado biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo F. de Sousa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As veredas são ecossistemas úmidos, geralmente associados a solos hidromórficos e ao afloramento do lençol freático, ocorrendo com frequência nas proximidades das nascentes e cursos d'água da região do Cerrado. Este trabalho objetivou estudar os solos de veredas situadas no bioma Cerrado, em ambientes conservados e antropizados (em áreas agrícolas e de pecuária, por meio da determinação da textura e da matéria orgânica do solo. Três veredas foram selecionadas para amostragem de solo, sendo: uma conservada, circundada por vegetação natural; uma área antropizada, com pastagem em seu entorno e uma outra, também antropizada, com culturas anuais (agricultura em seu entorno. As amostras de solo foram coletadas em diferentes profundidades, ao longo de linhas de referência dispostas segundo sua posição no relevo, nos terços superior, médio e inferior de uma das vertentes, acompanhando de modo aproximado o sentido da linha de drenagem da vereda. Verificou-se que os teores de argila na região inferior do relevo são maiores em ambientes antropizados e os teores de silte são maiores na vereda adjacente à área agrícola. No terço inferior das vertentes os teores de matéria orgânica são menores em veredas adjacentes às áreas com pastagens e agricultura.Veredas (a type of wetland are humid ecosystems, generally associated to hydromorphic soils and shallow water table, which occur frequently in the neighborhood of the springs and watercourses in the Cerrado region. The objective of this work was to study wetland soils located in undisturbed (native forest and disturbed (agriculture and pasture environments by means of determination of the soil texture and organic matter contents. Three wetlands were selected for this study: undisturbed wetland, surrounded by natural vegetation; disturbed wetland, surrounded by pasture areas; and disturbed wetland, surrounded by cultivated areas. Soil samples were collected at three different

  8. Characterising and modelling groundwater discharge in anagricultural wetland on the French Atlantic coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. Weng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between a wetland and its surrounding aquifer was studied in the Rochefort agricultural marsh (150 km2. Groundwater discharge in the marsh was measured with a network of nested piezometers. Hydrological modelling of the wetland showed that a water volume of 770,000 m3 yr–1 is discharging into the marsh, but that this water flux essentially takes place along the lateral borders of the wetland. However, this natural discharge volume represents only 20% of the artificial freshwater injected each year into the wetland to maintain the water level close to the soil surface. Understanding and quantifying the groundwater component in wetland hydrology is crucial for wetland management and conservation. Keywords: wetland, hydrology, groundwater, modelling, marsh

  9. 78 FR 50441 - Iowa Wetland Management District, 35 Counties in North-Central and Northwest Iowa; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Iowa Wetland Management District (district, WMD) for public review... sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and Service policies. In... Fish and Wildlife Service Iowa Wetland Management District, 35 Counties in North-Central and...

  10. Golf courses and wetland fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colding, Johan; Lundberg, Jakob; Lundberg, Stefan; Andersson, Erik

    2009-09-01

    Golf courses are often considered to be chemical-intensive ecosystems with negative impacts on fauna. Here we provide evidence that golf courses can contribute to the support and conservation of wetland fauna, i.e., amphibians and macroinvertebrates. Comparisons of amphibian occurrence, diversity of macroinvetebrates, and occurrence of species of conservation concern were made between permanent freshwater ponds surveyed on golf courses around Sweden's capital city, Stockholm, and off-course ponds in nature-protected areas and residential parklands. A total of 71 macroinvertebrate species were recorded in the field study, with no significant difference between golf course ponds and off-course ponds at the species, genus, or family levels. A within-group similarities test showed that golf course ponds have a more homogenous species composition than ponds in nature-protected areas and ponds in residential parkland. Within the macroinvertebrate group, a total of 11 species of odonates were identified, with no difference detected between the categories of ponds, nor any spatial autocorrelation. Significant differences were found between pond categories in the occurrence of five species of amphibians, although anuran occurrence did not differ between ponds. The great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) was significantly associated with golf course ponds, but the smooth newt (Triturus vulgaris) was not. We found no evidence of any correlation between pond size and occurrence of amphibians. Among the taxa of conservation concern included in the sample, all amphibians are nationally protected in Sweden, with the internationally threatened T. cristatus more frequently found in golf course ponds. Among macroinveterbrates of conservation status, the large white-faced darter dragonfly (Leucorrhinia pectoralis) was only detected in golf course ponds, and Tricholeiochiton fagesi (Trichoptera) was only found in one off-course pond. GIS results revealed that golf courses provide over

  11. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Habitat Loss in the Mobile, Galveston, and Tampa Bay Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Morgan; Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico has experienced dramatic wetland habitat area losses over the last two centuries. These losses not only damage species diversity, but contribute to water quality, flood control, and aspects of the Gulf coast economy. Overall wetland losses since the 1950s were examined using land cover/land use (LCLU) change analysis in three Gulf coast watershed regions: Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay, and Tampa Bay. Two primary causes of this loss, LCLU change and climate change, were then assessed using LCLU maps, U.S. census population data, and available current and historical climate data from NOAA. Sea level rise, precipitation, and temperature effects were addressed, with emphasis on analysis of the effects of sea level rise on salt marsh degradation. Ecological impacts of wetland loss, including fishery depletion, eutrophication, and hypoxia were addressed using existing literature and data available from NOAA. These ecological consequences in turn have had an affect on the Gulf coast economy, which was analyzed using fishery data and addressing public health impacts of changes in the environment caused by wetland habitat loss. While recent federal and state efforts to reduce wetland habitat loss have been relatively successful, this study implies a need for more aggressive action in the Gulf coast area, as the effects of wetland loss reach far beyond individual wetland systems themselves to the Gulf of Mexico as a whole.

  12. Carbon stocks and soil sequestration rates of riverine mangroves and freshwater wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation and degradation of wetlands are important causes of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Accurate measurements of carbon (C) stocks and sequestration rates are needed for incorporating wetlands into conservation and restoration programs with the aim for preventing carbon emissions. Here, we assessed whole ecosystem C stocks (trees, soil and downed wood) and soil N stocks of riverine wetlands (mangroves, marshes and peat swamps) within L...

  13. Wetlands: Earth's Kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands are unique, diverse, and productive habitats that emerge at the fringe of aquatic and upland land systems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wetlands as "areas that are regularly inundated by surface water or groundwater and characterized by a preva...

  14. Microbiology of wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Dedysh, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands are ecologically as well as economically important systems due to their high productivity, their nutrient (re)cycling capacities, and their prominent contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions. Being on the transition between terrestrial and—aquatic ecosystems, wetlands are buffers for

  15. Addressing the Multiple Drivers of Wetland Ecosystems Degradation in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, J.; Ndimele, P. E.; Odunuga, S.; Akanni, A.; Kosemani, B.; Ahove, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several body of knowledge have noted the importance of wetland ecosystems in climate moderation, resource supply and flood risk reduction amongst others. Relevant as it may, rapidly increasing population and uncontrolled urban development poses a challenge in some regions and require understanding of the ecosystem components and drivers of change over a long period of time. Thus, the main thrust of this paper is to analyse multiple drivers of wetland ecosystems degradation in the last 30 years in the Lagos megacity using field study, desktop review, satellite data and laboratory analysis. Key drivers identified includes: conversion of wetlands to settlements and waste sink, land use planning that neglects wetland conservation and restoration, ineffective legal status for wetlands, over exploitation leading to degradation and fragmentation of wetland ecosystems governance. In stemming further loss of this vital ecosystem, this study adopted and proposed respectively, the Drivers, Pressure, State, Impact and Response (DPSIR) and Integrated Planning Approach (IPA) frameworks in analysing policy and governance issues in wetland development. These analyses figured out amongst others, strict conservation and sustainable use of wetland resources, habitat restoration, climate adaptation measures, legal protection and wetland management institution as major responses to current multiple pressures facing wetland ecosystems in Lagos. For these frameworks to be made meaningful, weak coordination among government agencies and institutional capacity in implementation and law enforcement, unsustainable resource extraction by private/business organization and issues on alternative sources of income on the part of the local communities amongst others needs to be addressed.

  16. 条斑紫菜对胶州湾湿地浅海富营养化状况生物修复效果%Study on bioremediation effects of Porphyra yezoensis on eutrophic condition in the seawaters of Jiaozhou Bay wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈聚法; 赵俊; 过锋; 张艳; 夏斌

    2012-01-01

    The quality of seawater in Porphyra yezoensis culturing area in the Jiaozhou Bay wetland was surveyed and studied. Experimental study on the uptake effectiveness of nutritional elements such as nitrogen and phosphorous by P. Yezoensis was carried out. According to the surveyed and experimental results, the bioremediation effects of P. Yezoensis on eutrophic seawater was analyzed comprehensively. The results showed that there was an obvious reducing effect on the residual nutriments in seawater of the Jiaozhou Bay wetland by cultivating P. Yezoensis. The contents of nitrogen, phosphorous and organic carbon as well as eutrophicationindex(EI) in culturing area were all lower than those in the control area. Under experimental conditions, P. Yezoensis showed significant effectiveness on the uptake of nitrogen and phosphorous as well as reduction of eutrophication level. The decrease of content of dissolved inorganic nitrogen(DIN) was 17. 15%~21. 26% at the various experimental cycles and that of dissolved inorganic phosphorous(DIP) was 55. 73% ~ 61. 12% , indicating that the uptake amount of DIP by P. Yezoensis leafy thalli growth was obviously higher than that of DIN. In addition, the eutrophication level of water decreased from medium eutrophic with El of 2. 211 ~ 2. 592 to oligotrophic with El of 0. 749 ~ 0. 873 and the decrease rate of El was 63. 32% ~ 69. 39%. According to the natural environmental conditions of Jiaozhou Bay wetland,by cultivating seaweeds on a large-scale , the nutritional elements such as nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon can be removed in quantity and meanwhile the eutrophication level of seawater can be reduced efficiently.%对胶州湾湿地海域条斑紫菜Porphyra yezoensis Ueda养殖区水环境进行了现场调查和研究,对紫菜生长吸收N、P营养盐的效果进行了实验研究,在此基础上综合分析了紫菜对富营养化海水的生物修复效果.研究结果表明,条斑紫菜养殖对胶州湾湿地海水中

  17. Estado del conocimiento de humedales del norte patagónico (Argentina: aspectos relevantes e importancia para la conservación de la biodiversidad regional State of the knowledge of north Patagonian wetlands (Argentina: major aspects and importance for regional biodiversity conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA G PEROTTI

    2005-12-01

    wetland is due to land use, species introduction, and the interaction of these disturbances with climate change. In this paper we summarize geographic, geomorphological and climatic information of several wetlands located in North Patagonia (Argentina. Besides, we present information on aquatic vegetation, fish and amphibian fauna distributions and endemisms with the aim of emphasizing the importance of wetlands to sustain regional biodiversity. Finally, we highlight the processes impacting wetlands at present time and point out the importance of obtaining basic information for management and conservation strategies

  18. Establishing baseline conditions to inform adaptive management of South San Francisco Bay salt ponds: A comparison of waterbird abundance from the 1980s to the 2000s

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 30,000 acres of wetlands within the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) provide critical habitat for over one million waterbirds...

  19. Counteracting wetland overgrowth increases breeding and staging bird abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehikoinen, Petteri; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Mikkola-Roos, Markku; Jaatinen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Human actions have led to loss and degradation of wetlands, impairing their suitability as habitat especially for waterbirds. Such negative effects may be mitigated through habitat management. To date scientific evidence regarding the impacts of these actions remains scarce. We studied guild specific abundances of breeding and staging birds in response to habitat management on 15 Finnish wetlands. In this study management actions comprised several means of vegetation removal to thwart overgrowth. Management cost efficiency was assessed by examining the association between site-specific costs and bird abundances. Several bird guilds exhibited positive connections with both habitat management as well as with invested funds. Most importantly, however, red-listed species and species with special conservation concern as outlined by the EU showed positive correlations with management actions, underlining the conservation value of wetland management. The results suggest that grazing was especially efficient in restoring overgrown wetlands. As a whole this study makes it clear that wetland habitat management constitutes a feasible conservation tool. The marked association between invested funds and bird abundance may prove to be a valuable tool for decision makers when balancing costs and impact of conservation measures against one another.

  20. Counteracting wetland overgrowth increases breeding and staging bird abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehikoinen, Petteri; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Mikkola-Roos, Markku; Jaatinen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Human actions have led to loss and degradation of wetlands, impairing their suitability as habitat especially for waterbirds. Such negative effects may be mitigated through habitat management. To date scientific evidence regarding the impacts of these actions remains scarce. We studied guild specific abundances of breeding and staging birds in response to habitat management on 15 Finnish wetlands. In this study management actions comprised several means of vegetation removal to thwart overgrowth. Management cost efficiency was assessed by examining the association between site-specific costs and bird abundances. Several bird guilds exhibited positive connections with both habitat management as well as with invested funds. Most importantly, however, red-listed species and species with special conservation concern as outlined by the EU showed positive correlations with management actions, underlining the conservation value of wetland management. The results suggest that grazing was especially efficient in restoring overgrown wetlands. As a whole this study makes it clear that wetland habitat management constitutes a feasible conservation tool. The marked association between invested funds and bird abundance may prove to be a valuable tool for decision makers when balancing costs and impact of conservation measures against one another. PMID:28128327

  1. New Jersey (USA) wetlands past, present and future: using sediment archives to inform and guide wetland protection, restoration and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nicole; Clear, Jennifer; Horton, Benjamin; Nikitina, Daria; Enache, Mihaela; Potapova, Marina; Frizzera, Dorina; Procopio, Nicholas; Vane, Christopher; Shaw, Timothy; Walker, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Due to the rapid and pervasive loss of coastal wetland ecosystems and the enumerable services they provide, recent attention has been given to their protection and restoration. Knowledge gaps exist, however, that limit the efficacy of restoration efforts, particularly regarding response times of wetland ecosystems to natural (storms and sea-level rise) and anthropogenic impacts and the appropriate indices or metrics of ecosystem health to be incorporated in management practices to achieve restoration goals. Here we present results from monitoring studies and stratigraphic investigations from marshes across the New Jersey, USA shoreline from Delaware Bay to Raritan Bay (~210 km of coastline that vary in degree of urbanization and anthropogenic disturbances) that address these limitations. In Delaware Bay, we identify a series of abrupt contacts (mud-peat couplets) from a sequence spanning the past two thousand years that we infer result from erosive storm events. By dating the base of these contacts and the return to high salt marsh peat, we are able to estimate the recovery time of marshes under varying rates of sea-level rise. In marshes from Great Sound to Raritan Bay, we use microfossils (e.g., foraminifera, diatoms) as indices of ecosystem health. We monitor the response of microfossils to natural (e.g., changes in salinity or inundation frequency from sea-level rise) and anthropogenic (e.g., nutrient loading) influences and apply quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstruction techniques to sediment archives to understand the relative influence of these factors on New Jersey wetlands over the past two thousand years. These results can be used to inform future coastal wetland restoration targets and as a model to develop site-specific goals in other regions.

  2. Transportation impacts to wildlife on state route 37 in northern San Pablo Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Bryan R.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2002-01-01

    State Route 37 bisects conservation lands managed by San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) and Napa-Sonoma Marshes Wildlife Area (California Department of Fish and Game) in Solano and Sonoma Counties. The 2-lane highway connects Interstates 101 and 80 in northern San Francisco Bay and experiences ~26,000 vehicles per day. Road-killed wildlife between Napa River and Tolay Creek bridges (14.7 km) were counted in 2000 to ascertain species composition, relative abundance, and relative occurence (animal fatality interval). The primary objectives of the study were to determine if endangered salt marsh harvest mice (Reithrodontomys raviventris), California clapper rails (Rallus longirostris), or other species of concern were represented, and to collect baseline data on transportation impacts to wildlife in the area. During 51 surveys, 291 dead birds (54.6%) and mammals (45.4%) were observed. Endangered species were not positively identified dead on the highway. In total, 28 bird, 10 mammal and 1 reptile species were positively identified along this section of highway that traverses tidal marsh and diked baylands (i.e., salt ponds, seasonal wetlands, and oat-hay agriculture fields). The mean animal fatality interval for both lanes was one road-kill every 2.1km (2.1 km SD).

  3. Fish utilisation of wetland nurseries with complex hydrological connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ben; Johnston, Ross; Baker, Ronald; Sheaves, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The physical and faunal characteristics of coastal wetlands are driven by dynamics of hydrological connectivity to adjacent habitats. Wetlands on estuary floodplains are particularly dynamic, driven by a complex interplay of tidal marine connections and seasonal freshwater flooding, often with unknown consequences for fish using these habitats. To understand the patterns and subsequent processes driving fish assemblage structure in such wetlands, we examined the nature and diversity of temporal utilisation patterns at a species or genus level over three annual cycles in a tropical Australian estuarine wetland system. Four general patterns of utilisation were apparent based on CPUE and size-structure dynamics: (i) classic nursery utlisation (use by recently settled recruits for their first year) (ii) interrupted peristence (iii) delayed recruitment (iv) facultative wetland residence. Despite the small self-recruiting 'facultative wetland resident' group, wetland occupancy seems largely driven by connectivity to the subtidal estuary channel. Variable connection regimes (i.e. frequency and timing of connections) within and between different wetland units (e.g. individual pools, lagoons, swamps) will therefore interact with the diversity of species recruitment schedules to generate variable wetland assemblages in time and space. In addition, the assemblage structure is heavily modified by freshwater flow, through simultaneously curtailing persistence of the 'interrupted persistence' group, establishing connectivity for freshwater spawned members of both the 'facultative wetland resident' and 'delayed recruitment group', and apparently mediating use of intermediate nursery habitats for marine-spawned members of the 'delayed recruitment' group. The diversity of utilisation pattern and the complexity of associated drivers means assemblage compositions, and therefore ecosystem functioning, is likely to vary among years depending on variations in hydrological connectivity

  4. A survey of the wetlands and floodplains of the borrow area and wetland/shorebird complex for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.; Yin, S.; Hlohowskyj, I.

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting cleanup operations at the Weldon Spring site, St. Charles, Missouri, that will include development of a 77-ha (191-acre) soil borrow area. Eight wetlands, including riverine and palustrine emergent wetland types and totaling 0.9 ha (2.2 acres), will be eliminated during excavation of the borrow area. A 23-ha (57-acre) wetland/shorebird complex will be created at the Busch Conservation Area. The complex will include 2 ha (5 acres) of palustrine emergent wetland as mitigation for wetland losses in the borrow area.

  5. Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledvina, Joseph A.

    2008-05-01

    Research on the effects of wetland restoration on reptiles and amphibians is becoming more common, but almost all of these studies have observed the colonization of recently disturbed habitats that were completely dry at the time of restoration. In a similar manner, investigations herpetofaunal responses to forest management have focused on clearcuts, and less intensive stand manipulations are not as well studied. To evaluate community and population responses of reptiles and amphibians to hydrology restoration and canopy removal in the interior of previously degraded Carolina bays, I monitored herpetofauna in the uplands adjacent to six historically degraded Carolina bays at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for four years after restoration. To evaluate the effects of forest thinning on upland herpetofauna, forests were thinned in the margins of three of these bays. I used repeated measures ANOVA to compare species richness and diversity and the abundance of selected species and guilds between these bays and with those at three reference bays that were not historically drained and three control bays that remained degraded. I also used Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) to look for community-level patterns based treatments.

  6. 湿地生物地球化学过程研究进展%Advance in Study on the Biogeochemical Process in Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白军红; 邓伟; 朱颜明

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands are special ecosystems with distinctive biogeochemical circulation.Wetland soil locates where biogeochemical conversions take place,and its Eh value strongly influences the biogeochemical conversion procedure of elements. This paper analyzed the biogeochemical conversion procedure of essential elements such as C,N,P and S,the main environmental factors influencing the biogeochemical circulation in wetlands,and summarized important characters of the biogeochemical circulation in wetlands.It is concluded that controlling pollution and reinforcing conservation and management of wetlands will keep positive biogeochemical circulation in wetlands.

  7. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Bird

    Full Text Available Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m; although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%, relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%. The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  8. Surficial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in different estuary wetlands in the Pearl river, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Honggang; Cui, Baoshan [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Kejiang [Xinjiang Research Center of Water and Wastewater Treatment, Xinjiang Deland Co., LTD., Urumqi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A total of 87 soil profiles sampled from five types of wetlands in the Pearl River estuary were analyzed to investigate the surficial and vertical distributions of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn). The results show that wetlands directly connected with rivers (e.g., riparian wetlands, estuarine wetlands, and mangrove wetlands) has much higher metal concentrations than those indirectly connected with rivers (e.g., pond wetlands and reclaimed wetlands). The river water is the major pollution source for all investigated heavy metals. The vertical distribution of heavy metals can be classified into three patterns: (i) linear distribution pattern. The concentration of heavy metals gradually decreases with an increase in soil depth (for riparian and estuarine wetlands); (ii) irregular and stable pattern (for pond and reclaimed wetlands); and (iii) middle enrichment pattern (for mangrove wetlands). In addition to river-borne inputs, a variety of vegetation composition, hydraulic conditions, and human activities also contribute to the variation in distribution of heavy metals in different wetlands. Soil properties (e.g., particle size, pH, salinity, and SOM) also affect the distribution of trace metals in each soil layer. The major pollution source of heavy metals is industrial wastewater. Other sources include agriculture and domestic premises, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides a sound basis for the risk assessment of heavy metals in the studied wetlands and for wetland conservation in general. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. 7 CFR 766.110 - Conservation Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Conservation Contract by the Conservation Contract review team: (1) Wetlands or highly erodible lands; and (2..., or wildlife habitat of local, State, tribal, or national importance; (ii) Land in 100-year..., regional, State, or tribal importance; (vi) Buffer areas necessary for the adequate protection of...

  10. Total economic value of wetlands products and services in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuru, Willy; Turyahabwe, Nelson; Mugisha, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands provide food and non-food products that contribute to income and food security in Uganda. This study determined the economic value of wetland resources and their contribution to food security in the three agroecological zones of Uganda. The values of wetland resources were estimated using primary and secondary data. Market price, Productivity, and Contingent valuation methods were used to estimate the value of wetland resources. The per capita value of fish was approximately US$ 0.49 person⁻¹. Fish spawning was valued at approximately US$ 363,815 year⁻¹, livestock pastures at US$ 4.24 million, domestic water use at US$ 34 million year⁻¹, and the gross annual value added by wetlands to milk production at US$ 1.22 million. Flood control was valued at approximately US$ 1,702,934,880 hectare⁻¹ year⁻¹ and water regulation and recharge at US$ 7,056,360 hectare⁻¹ year⁻¹. Through provision of grass for mulching, wetlands were estimated to contribute to US$ 8.65 million annually. The annual contribution of non-use values was estimated in the range of US$ 7.1 million for water recharge and regulation and to US$ 1.7 billion for flood control. Thus, resource investment for wetlands conservation is economically justified to create incentives for continued benefits.

  11. Total Economic Value of Wetlands Products and Services in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Kakuru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide food and non-food products that contribute to income and food security in Uganda. This study determined the economic value of wetland resources and their contribution to food security in the three agroecological zones of Uganda. The values of wetland resources were estimated using primary and secondary data. Market price, Productivity, and Contingent valuation methods were used to estimate the value of wetland resources. The per capita value of fish was approximately US$ 0.49 person−1. Fish spawning was valued at approximately US$ 363,815 year−1, livestock pastures at US$ 4.24 million, domestic water use at US$ 34 million year−1, and the gross annual value added by wetlands to milk production at US$ 1.22 million. Flood control was valued at approximately US$ 1,702,934,880 hectare−1 year−1 and water regulation and recharge at US$ 7,056,360 hectare−1 year−1. Through provision of grass for mulching, wetlands were estimated to contribute to US$ 8.65 million annually. The annual contribution of non-use values was estimated in the range of US$ 7.1 million for water recharge and regulation and to US$ 1.7 billion for flood control. Thus, resource investment for wetlands conservation is economically justified to create incentives for continued benefits.

  12. A conceptual approach to evaluating grassland restoration potential on Huron Wetland Management District, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To assist with the Comprehensive Conservation Plan process, Huron Wetland Management District (WMD) requested that information be synthesized on ecological...

  13. Futures Analysis of Urban Land Use and Wetland Change in Saskatoon, Canada: An Application in Strategic Environmental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sizo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a scenario-based approach to strategic environmental assessment (SEA for wetland trend analysis and land use and land cover (LUC modeling in an urban environment. The application is focused on the Saskatoon urban environment, a rapidly growing urban municipality in Canada’s prairie pothole region. Alternative future LUC was simulated using remote sensing data and city spatial planning documentation using a Markov Chain technique. Two alternatives were developed and compared for LUC change and threats to urban wetland sustainability: a zero alternative that simulated trends in urban development and wetland conservation under a business as usual scenario, in the absence of prescribed planning and zoning actions; and an alternative focused on implementation of current urban development plans, which simulated future LUC to account for prescribed wetland conservation strategies. Results show no improvement in future wetland conditions under the city’s planned growth and wetland conservation scenario versus the business as usual scenario. Results also indicate that a blanket wetland conservation strategy for the city may not be sufficient to overcome the historic trend of urban wetland loss; and that spatially distributed conservation rates, based on individual wetland water catchment LUC peculiarities, may be more effective in terms of wetland conservation. The paper also demonstrates the challenges to applied SEA in a rapidly changing urban planning context, where data are often sparse and inconsistent across the urban region, and provides potential solutions through LUC classification and prediction tools to help overcome data limitations to support land use planning decisions for wetland conservation.

  14. Wetlands Inventory Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Nevada wetlands inventory is a unit of a nationwide survey undertaken by the Fish and Wildlife Service to locate and tabulate by habitat types the important...

  15. WaterWetlands_NWI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — VCGI downloaded NWI quads from the US FWS web site and reprojected to VCS NAD83. NWI digital data files are records of wetlands location and classification as...

  16. Classics of Artifical Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    By the construcfion of frraced fields over the past cenfuries,the Hani people created wetland in the ailao Mountains,an area where there originally was no such land ,which greatly improved the local ecosystem.

  17. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  18. Mapping wetland functions using Earth observation data and multi-criteria analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinel, Sébastien; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Clément, Bernard; Maltby, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Wetland functional assessment is commonly conducted based on field observations, and thus, is generally limited to small areas. However, there is often a need for wetland managers to obtain information on wetland functional performance over larger areas. For this purpose, we are proposing a new field-based functional assessment procedure in which wetland functions are evaluated and classified into hydrogeomorphic units according to a multi-criteria analysis approach. Wetland-related geographic information system layers derived from Earth observation data (LiDAR, multispectral and radar data) are used in this study for a large-scale functional evaluation. These include maps of a hydrogeomorphic units, ditches, vegetation, annual flood duration, biomass, meadows management, and wetland boundaries. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a 132 km(2) international long-term ecological research site located in the west of France was assessed. Four wetland functions were evaluated: flood peak attenuation, low water attenuation, denitrification, and habitat. A spatial distribution map of the individual wetland functions was generated, and the intensity levels of the functions were highlighted. Antagonisms between functions within individual hydrogeomorphic units were also identified. Mapping of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological wetland functions over large areas can provide an efficient tool for policy makers and other stakeholders including water authorities, nature conservation agencies, and farmers. Specifically, this tool has the potential to provide a mapping of ecosystem services, conservation management priorities, and possible improvements in water resources management.

  19. [Research progress on wetland ecotourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Long; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Wetland is rich in biodiversity and cultural diversity, possessing higher tourism value and environmental education and community participation functions. Wetland ecotourism reflects the sustainable development of tourism economy and wetland protection, having received great concern from governments and scholars at home and abroad. This paper summarized the related theories and practices, discussed the research advances in wetland ecotourism from the aspects of significance, progress, contents, methods and results, and pointed out the important research fields in the future, aimed to accelerate the development of wetland ecotourism research and to provide reference about the resources exploitation, environment protection, and scientific administration of wetland and related scenic areas.

  20. The influence of coastal wetlands on hurricane surge in Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C.; Irish, J. L.; Olivera, F.

    2010-12-01

    The State of Texas has historically faced hurricane-related damage episodes, with Ike being the most recent example. It is expected that, in the future, hurricanes will intensify due to climate change causing greater surges, while the attenuating effect of wetlands on storm surges will also be modified due to sea level rise changes in wetland vegetation type and spatial location. Numerical analysis of storm surges is an important instrument to predict and simulate flooding extent and magnitude in coastal areas. Most operational surge models account for the influence of wetlands and other vegetation by momentum loss due to friction at the bottom and by reduction of imposed wind stress. A coupled hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) and wave model (SWAN) was employed, and wetlands were characterized using Manning’s n, surface canopy, and surface roughness. The wetlands parameters were developed from: 1) the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) 1992 and 2001; 2) the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) 2001. The calibrated coupled model for two historical hurricanes, Bret and Beulah, was used to simulate the storm surge for each scenario. Preliminary results for the sensitivity analyses, for hurricane Bret, comparing the scenarios with parameters developed from NLCD and NWI datasets with four hypothetical scenarios considering very high and low Manning’s n and wind stress (surface canopy) values showed that, for areas inside Nueces Bay, the storm surge high could vary up to four times depending on the parameter selection, for areas inside Corpus Christi Bay, the storm surge high varied around three times and behind the barrier island the storm surge high variation was less than three times. This study is a first step for an evaluation of the impact that sea level rise, climate changed wetlands, wetlands restoration, land use change, and wetlands degradation have on hurricane related surge elevation and extent in the city of Corpus Christi.

  1. Drainage investment and wetland loss: an analysis of the national resources inventory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Soil Conservation Service (SCS) conducts a survey for the purpose of establishing an agricultural land use database. This survey is called the National Resources Inventory (NRI) database. The complex NRI land classification system, in conjunction with the quantitative information gathered by the survey, has numerous applications. The current paper uses the wetland area data gathered by the NRI in 1982 and 1987 to examine empirically the factors that generate wetland loss in the United States. The cross-section regression models listed here use the quantity of wetlands, the stock of drainage capital, the realty value of farmland and drainage costs to explain most of the cross-state variation in wetland loss rates. Wetlands preservation efforts by federal agencies assume that pecuniary economic factors play a decisive role in wetland drainage. The empirical models tested in the present paper validate this assumption.

  2. The Research of Ecology-Oriented Reasonable Deployment of Water Resources at Shuangtaizi Estuary Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaofeng; WANG Tieliang; SU Fangli; ZHOU Linfei; LI Bo

    2011-01-01

    Shuangtaizi estuary wetland, the largest natural conservation district in China, and one of the best preserved, largest ecological lands with the most complete vegetation types in the world, is located in Panjin city, Liaoning Province. In rccent years,the degradation of Shuangtaizi estuary wetland is very serious. In order to rescue lives in the wetland and protect valuable natural resources, the information system of Shuangtaizi estuary wetland was built with ‘3S' technology, and the minimum, optimum, and maximum eco-environmental water requirements were calculated respectively. Furthermore, for restoring the ecological functions of wetland and preventing wetland degradation, the balance between supply and demand of water resource was analyzed, and an optimal allocation scheme of water resources was proposed based on three kinds of equilibrium.

  3. The current status, threats and protection way of Sanjiang Plain wetland, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUZhi-qiang; LIUTong

    2005-01-01

    The Sanjiang Plain is a vast area of alluvial floodplains and low hills in northeast Heilongjiang Province. It is the largest tract of wetlands in China and East Asia outside of Siberia. 28 wetland nature reserves exist on the Sanjiang Plain, and three of them have been listed as wetlands of international importance to water bird conservation by the Ramsar Convention Bureau. The wetlands of Sanjiang Plain are noteworthy for its rich biodiversity, but they continue to decline in area and deteriorate in quality currently. The main threats or constrains, immediate cause, root cause and required response are analyzed in this paper, and the four aspects opinion such as improvement of watershed management, enhancement of protection and restoration of habitats and biodiversity, alternative livelihoods of rural residents living in and near natural wetland reserve, and reinforcement of capacity building of natural reserves are brought forward as the effective measures for the Sanjiang Plain wetland protection.

  4. Wetland suitability and connectivity for trans-Saharan migratory waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merken, Ronny; Deboelpaep, Evelien; Teunen, Joachim; Saura, Santiago; Koedam, Nico

    2015-01-01

    To complete their life cycle waterbirds rely on patchily distributed and often ephemeral wetlands along their migration route in a vast unsuitable matrix. However, further loss and degradation of remaining wetland habitats might lead to a configuration and size of stopovers that is no longer sufficient to ensure long-term survival of waterbird populations. By identifying optimal conservation targets to maintain overall habitat availability en route, we can accommodate an as yet absent functional connectivity component in larger management frameworks for migratory waterbirds, such as the Ramsar Convention and the EU Natura 2000 Network. Using a graph-based habitat availability metric (Equivalent Connected Area) we determine the functional connectivity of wetland networks for seven migratory waterbirds with divergent habitat requirements. Analyses are performed at two spatial extents both spanning the Mediterranean Sea and centered around Greece (Balkan-Cyrenaica and Greece-Cyrenaica). We create species-specific suitable habitat maps and account for human disturbance by species-specific disturbance buffers, based on expert estimates of Flight Initiation Distances. At both spatial extents we quantitatively determine the habitat networks' overall functional connectivity and identify wetland sites that are crucial for maintaining a well-connected network. We show that the wetland networks for both spatial extents are relatively well connected and identify several wetland sites in Greece and Libya as important for maintaining connectivity. The application of disturbance buffers results in wetland site-specific reduction of suitable habitat area (0.90-7.36%) and an overall decrease of the network's connectivity (0.65-6.82%). In addition, we show that the habitat networks of a limited set of species can be combined into a single network which accounts for their autoecological requirements. We conclude that targeted management in few but specific wetland complexes could

  5. Metro Multnomah Wetlands - Multnomah Channel Wetland Restoration Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Multnomah Channel Wetland Restoration Monitoring Project characterizes wetlands use by juvenile salmonids and other fishes in the Multnomah Channel Marsh Natural...

  6. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - MO 2012 East West Gateway Wetlands (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Cowardin’s Classification of Wetlands and Deep Water Habitats of the United States (http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/wetlands/classwet/index.htm), together with...

  7. Detecting Emergence, Growth, and Senescence of Wetland Vegetation with Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa L. Gallant

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide ecosystem goods and services vitally important to humans. Land managers and policymakers working to conserve wetlands require regularly updated information on the statuses of wetlands across the landscape. However, wetlands are challenging to map remotely with high accuracy and consistency. We investigated the use of multitemporal polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR data acquired with Canada’s Radarsat-2 system to track within-season changes in wetland vegetation and surface water. We speculated, a priori, how temporal and morphological traits of different types of wetland vegetation should respond over a growing season with respect to four energy-scattering mechanisms. We used ground-based monitoring data and other ancillary information to assess the limits and consistency of the SAR data for tracking seasonal changes in wetlands. We found the traits of different types of vertical emergent wetland vegetation were detected well with the SAR data and corresponded with our anticipated backscatter responses. We also found using data from Landsat’s optical/infrared sensors in conjunction with SAR data helped remove confusion of wetland features with upland grasslands. These results suggest SAR data can provide useful monitoring information on the statuses of wetlands over time.

  8. Restored agricultural wetlands in Central Iowa: habitat quality and amphibian response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Clay; Rebecca A. Reeves,; Smalling, Kelly; Klaver, Robert W.; Vandever, Mark; Battaglin, William A.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are declining throughout the United States and worldwide due, partly, to habitat loss. Conservation practices on the landscape restore wetlands to denitrify tile drainage effluent and restore ecosystem services. Understanding how water quality, hydroperiod, predation, and disease affect amphibians in restored wetlands is central to maintaining healthy amphibian populations in the region. We examined the quality of amphibian habitat in restored wetlands relative to reference wetlands by comparing species richness, developmental stress, and adult leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) survival probabilities to a suite of environmental metrics. Although measured habitat variables differed between restored and reference wetlands, differences appeared to have sub-lethal rather than lethal effects on resident amphibian populations. There were few differences in amphibian species richness and no difference in estimated survival probabilities between wetland types. Restored wetlands had more nitrate and alkaline pH, longer hydroperiods, and were deeper, whereas reference wetlands had more amphibian chytrid fungus zoospores in water samples and resident amphibians exhibited increased developmental stress. Restored and reference wetlands are both important components of the landscape in central Iowa and maintaining a complex of fish-free wetlands with a variety of hydroperiods will likely contribute to the persistence of amphibians in this landscape.

  9. Select state inland wetland protection laws. A review of the state laws and their natural resource data requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Although many states afford some measure of protection for wetland areas through flood-plain regulations or through programs for coastal areas, shorelands, scenic and wild rivers or pollution control, few states have programs that adequately deal with conservation of wetlands. Only 16 states have legislation specifically regulating development or use of wetlands. Most of the wetland acts apply only to coastal wetlands, several to inland wetlands and three acts apply to both. Many other states are still regulating wetland use through the dredge and fill and/or critical area program. Several offer tax incentives to property owners to encourage protection of wetlands or broader open spaces. Many states have acquired wetlands for park and wildlife purposes and a large measure of wetland protection is achieved by the very restrictive controls applied to floodways areas. Direct floodplain or floodway regulations or state standards for local regulations were adopted in 24 states but protection of ecological values of wetlands is rarely an explicit objective of these programs. Scenic and wild river programs adopted in one half of the states provide some protection for wetland areas.

  10. Prerequisites for understanding climate-change impacts on northern prairie wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Post van der Burg, Max; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) contains ecosystems that are typified by an extensive matrix of grasslands and depressional wetlands, which provide numerous ecosystem services. Over the past 150 years the PPR has experienced numerous landscape modifications resulting in agricultural conversion of 75–99 % of native prairie uplands and drainage of 50–90 % of wetlands. There is concern over how and where conservation dollars should be spent within the PPR to protect and restore wetland basins to support waterbird populations that will be robust to a changing climate. However, while hydrological impacts of landscape modifications appear substantial, they are still poorly understood. Previous modeling efforts addressing impacts of climate change on PPR wetlands have yet to fully incorporate interacting or potentially overshadowing impacts of landscape modification. We outlined several information needs for building more informative models to predict climate change effects on PPR wetlands. We reviewed how landscape modification influences wetland hydrology and present a conceptual model to describe how modified wetlands might respond to climate variability. We note that current climate projections do not incorporate cyclical variability in climate between wet and dry periods even though such dynamics have shaped the hydrology and ecology of PPR wetlands. We conclude that there are at least three prerequisite steps to making meaningful predictions about effects of climate change on PPR wetlands. Those evident to us are: 1) an understanding of how physical and watershed characteristics of wetland basins of similar hydroperiods vary across temperature and moisture gradients; 2) a mechanistic understanding of how wetlands respond to climate across a gradient of anthropogenic modifications; and 3) improved climate projections for the PPR that can meaningfully represent potential changes in climate variability including intensity and duration of wet and dry periods. Once

  11. Managing the wetlands. People and rivers: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, P

    1993-01-01

    At the current population growth rate in Africa, the population will reach 1 billion by 2010. Water is needed to sustain these people, yet rainfall in Africa is erratic. Africans are already confronting a shortage of freshwater. Agriculture supports 66% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa. Sound agricultural development is needed to curb rural-urban migration, but a constant supply of freshwater is essential. Major rivers (the Limpopo in southern Africa and the Save/Sabi in Zimbabwe and Mozambique) now flow only seasonally. The flows of the Chari-Logona, the Nile, and the Zambezi are falling. Continual mismanagement of Africa's river basins coupled with current projections of global climate change will expand desiccation. All but the White Nile and the Zaire rivers flood seasonally every year, thereby expanding Africa's wetlands. Wetlands have been targeted for development projects (e.g., hydroelectric projects and large dams), largely to meet urban-industrial demands. Development planners tend to ignore the economic value of the wetlands. For example, the Niger Inland Delta sustains 550,000 people, 1 million cattle, and 1 million sheep. Wetlands replenish ground water and serve as natural irrigation. River basin planning often results in environmentally disastrous schemes which do not understand local management practices. Hydrologists, engineers, geologists, and economics design these schemes, but sociologists, anthropologists, and development experts should be included. The unfinished Jonglei Canal in southern Sudan would have adversely affected 400,000 pastoralists. The Volta River Authority's Akosombo Dam displaced 84,000 people and flooded the most productive agricultural land in Ghana. A sustainable future in Africa depends on understanding the interactions of human uses and the ways in which they relate to the natural variations in river flow. The IUCN Wetlands Programme, based on the principles of the World Conservation Strategy, is working with

  12. 1986 Wetland Plant List Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wetland Plant List represents the combined efforts of many biologistsworking over the last 10 years to define the wetland flora of the UnitedStates.

  13. Wetland Restoration and Sediment Removal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2008, Minnesota’s Private Lands Program and Wetland Management Districts began to compare different methods of restoring prairie pothole wetlands to see if there...

  14. Spatial Planning of a climate adaptation zone for wetland ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.C.; Hoek, van der D.C.J.; Vonk, M.

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a spatial planning approach for the implementation of adaptation measures to climate change in conservation planning for ecological networks. We analyse the wetland ecosystems of the Dutch National Ecological Network for locations where the effectiveness of the network might be weake

  15. Bayes and empirical Bayes: do they merge?

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Sonia; Scricciolo, Catia

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian inference is attractive for its coherence and good frequentist properties. However, it is a common experience that eliciting a honest prior may be difficult and, in practice, people often take an {\\em empirical Bayes} approach, plugging empirical estimates of the prior hyperparameters into the posterior distribution. Even if not rigorously justified, the underlying idea is that, when the sample size is large, empirical Bayes leads to "similar" inferential answers. Yet, precise mathematical results seem to be missing. In this work, we give a more rigorous justification in terms of merging of Bayes and empirical Bayes posterior distributions. We consider two notions of merging: Bayesian weak merging and frequentist merging in total variation. Since weak merging is related to consistency, we provide sufficient conditions for consistency of empirical Bayes posteriors. Also, we show that, under regularity conditions, the empirical Bayes procedure asymptotically selects the value of the hyperparameter for ...

  16. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen B; Manker, Craig R; Pigati, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-24

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated (14)C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  17. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen; Manker, Craig; Pigati, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  18. Effect of wetland management: are lentic wetlands refuges of plant-species diversity in the Andean-Orinoco Piedmont of Colombia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Pacheco, Johanna I; Rös, Matthias; Escobar, Federico; Castro-Lima, Francisco; Verdú, José R; López-Iborra, Germán M

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated degradation of the wetlands and fragmentation of surrounding vegetation in the Andean-Orinoco Piedmont are the main threats to diversity and ecological integrity of these ecosystems; however, information on this topic is of limited availability. In this region, we evaluated the value of 37 lentic wetlands as reservoirs of woody and aquatic plants and analyzed diversity and changes in species composition within and among groups defined according to management given by: (1) type (swamps, heronries, rice fields, semi-natural lakes, constructed lakes and fish farms) and (2) origins (natural, mixed and artificial). A total of 506 plant species were recorded: 80% woody and 20% aquatic. Of these, 411 species (81%) were considered species typical of the area (Meta Piedmont distribution). Diversity patterns seem to be driven by high landscape heterogeneity and wetland management. The fish farms presented the highest diversity of woody plants, while swamps ranked highest for aquatic plant diversity. Regarding wetland origin, the artificial systems were the most diverse, but natural wetlands presented the highest diversity of typical species and can therefore be considered representative ecosystems at the regional scale. Our results suggest that lentic wetlands act as refuges for native vegetation of Meta Piedmont forest, hosting 55% of the woody of Piedmont species and 29% of the aquatic species of Orinoco basin. The wetlands showed a high species turnover and the results indicated that small wetlands (mean ± SD: size = 11 ± 18.7 ha), with a small area of surrounding forest (10 ± 8.6 ha) supported high local and regional plant diversity. To ensure long-term conservation of lentic wetlands, it is necessary to develop management and conservation strategies that take both natural and created wetlands into account.

  19. Effect of wetland management: are lentic wetlands refuges of plant-species diversity in the Andean–Orinoco Piedmont of Colombia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna I. Murillo-Pacheco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated degradation of the wetlands and fragmentation of surrounding vegetation in the Andean–Orinoco Piedmont are the main threats to diversity and ecological integrity of these ecosystems; however, information on this topic is of limited availability. In this region, we evaluated the value of 37 lentic wetlands as reservoirs of woody and aquatic plants and analyzed diversity and changes in species composition within and among groups defined according to management given by: (1 type (swamps, heronries, rice fields, semi-natural lakes, constructed lakes and fish farms and (2 origins (natural, mixed and artificial. A total of 506 plant species were recorded: 80% woody and 20% aquatic. Of these, 411 species (81% were considered species typical of the area (Meta Piedmont distribution. Diversity patterns seem to be driven by high landscape heterogeneity and wetland management. The fish farms presented the highest diversity of woody plants, while swamps ranked highest for aquatic plant diversity. Regarding wetland origin, the artificial systems were the most diverse, but natural wetlands presented the highest diversity of typical species and can therefore be considered representative ecosystems at the regional scale. Our results suggest that lentic wetlands act as refuges for native vegetation of Meta Piedmont forest, hosting 55% of the woody of Piedmont species and 29% of the aquatic species of Orinoco basin. The wetlands showed a high species turnover and the results indicated that small wetlands (mean ± SD: size = 11 ± 18.7 ha, with a small area of surrounding forest (10 ± 8.6 ha supported high local and regional plant diversity. To ensure long-term conservation of lentic wetlands, it is necessary to develop management and conservation strategies that take both natural and created wetlands into account.

  20. Ecosystem Services Valuation of Lakeside Wetland Park beside Chaohu Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wetland ecosystems are one of the three great ecosystems on Earth. With a deepening of research on wetland ecosystems, researchers have paid more and more attention to wetland ecosystem services such as flood mitigation, climate control, pollution prevention, soil-erosion prevention, biodiversity maintenance, and bio-productivity protection. This study focuses on a lakeside wetland ecosystem in Hefei, a city in central China, and estimates the value of ecosystem services such as material production, air purification, water conservation, biodiversity, recreation, species conservation, education and scientific research. We adopted the market value method, carbon tax method, afforestation cost method, shadow engineering method and contingent value method (CVM using questionnaire survey data during the study period. The results show that the total value of the ecosystem services of Lakeside Wetland Park was 144 million CNY in 2015. Among these services, the value of society service is the maximum at 91.73 million CNY, followed by ecological service and material production service (42.23 million CNY and 10.43 billion CNY in 2015 respectively. When considering wetland ecosystems for economic development, other services must be considered in addition to material production to obtain a longer-term economic value. This research reveals that there is scope for more comprehensive and integrated model development, including multiple wetland ecosystem services and appropriate handling of wetland ecosystem management impacts.

  1. 湿地文化旅游开发研究——以齐齐哈尔扎龙湿地为例%Development of Wetland Cultural Tourism——A Case Study of Zhalong Wetland in Tsitsihar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈睿曦; 徐淑梅

    2013-01-01

    湿地是文化诞生的摇篮,是最有力的生产者.多样的文化是湿地可持续发展的重要推动力,旅游作为湿地合理开发利用的方式,将湿地文化作为湿地开发规划的核心,体现了湿地厚重的积淀、独特的魅力.阐述了湿地文化旅游相关概念、开发意义等,并以扎龙湿地为例提出湿地文化旅游开发建议,为湿地资源开发与保护提供新的思路.%Wetland acts as an incubator for culture, it is one of the best productive ecosystems in the world. A wide variety of culture is an important driving force for sustainable wetland development. Tourism is an appropriate way of wetland development and utilization, and wetland culture is the core of wetland development plan, reflecting the accumulation of cultural value and unique attraction of the wetland. This study illustrates the concept of wetland cultural tourism and the significance of wetland development. Taking Zhalong Wetland as an example, suggestions were made for the development of wetland cultural tourism, providing a new approach to conservation and development of wetland resources.

  2. FGD liner experiments with wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsch, W.J.; Ahn, C.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment often requires impermeable liners not only to protect groundwater resources but also to ensure that there is adequate water in the wetland to support appropriate aquatic life, particularly wetland vegetation. Liners or relatively impervious site soils are very important to the success of constructed treatment wetlands in areas where ground water levels are typically close to the ground surface. This study, carried out at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, investigated the use of FGD material from sulfur scrubbers as a possible liner material for constructed wetlands. While several studies have investigated the use of FGD material to line ponds, no studies have investigated the use of this material as a liner for constructed wetlands. They used experimental mesocosms to see the effect of FGD liner materials in constructed wetlands on water quality and on wetland plant growth. This paper presents the results of nutrient analyses and physicochemical investigation of leachate and surface outflow water samples collected from the mesocosms. Plant growth and biomass of wetland vegetation are also included in this paper. First two year results are reported by Ahn et al. (1998, 1999). The overall goal of this study is the identification of advantages and disadvantages of using FGD by-product as an artificial liner in constructed wetlands.

  3. An introduction to the San Francisco Estuary tidal wetlands restoration series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of tidal wetlands may provide an important tool for improving ecological health and water management for beneficial uses of the San Francisco Estuary (hereafter “Estuary”. Given the large losses of tidal wetlands from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in the last 150 years, it seems logical to assume that restoring tidal wetlands will have benefits for a variety of aquatic and terrestrial native species that have declined during the same time period. However, many other changes have also occurred in the Estuary concurrent with the declines of native species. Other factors that might be important in species declines include the effects of construction of upstream dams, large and small water diversions within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, agricultural pesticides, trace elements from industrial and agricultural activities, and invasions of alien species. Discussions among researchers, managers, and stakeholders have identified a number of uncertainties regarding the potential benefits of tidal wetland restoration. The articles of the Tidal Wetlands Restoration Series address four major issues of concern. Stated as questions, these are: 1. Will tidal wetland restoration enhance populations of native fishes? 2. Will wetland restoration increase rates of methylation of mercury? 3. Will primary production and other ecological processes in restored tidal wetlands result in net export of organic carbon to adjacent habitats, resulting in enhancement of the food web? Will the carbon produced contribute to the formation of disinfection byproducts when disinfected for use as drinking water? 4. Will restored tidal wetlands provide long-term ecosystem benefits that can be sustained in response to ongoing physical processes, including sedimentation and hydrodynamics? Reducing the uncertainty surrounding these issues is of critical importance because tidal wetland restoration is assumed to be a critical tool for enhancement

  4. Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Tanja Maria; Lentini, Pia Eloise; Lumsden, Linda Faye; Wintle, Brendan Anthony; van der Ree, Rodney

    2016-07-01

    Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands

  5. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites--indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  6. Independent External Peer Review Report of the Dredged Material Management Plan for Green Bay, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    Ill. Illinois Natural Areas Inventory, Statewide Illinois. Wildflowers Conservation Development, McHenry County, Ill. Atkinson Road Wetland...062-041983, 1984) Licensed Professional Engineering, State of California (#35743, 1983) Licensed Professional Engineering, State of Georgia

  7. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manasa, M.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    and Meade 1983). The delta is about 360 km wide, along the Bay of Bengal (Islam and Gnauck 2008). The fluvial input is the major source of nutrients to the Bay of Bengal. The annual supply of nutrients by Ganga and Brahmaputra rivers to the Bay of Bengal.... Geochem. 27 195–212. Islam S N and Gnauck A 2008 Mangrove wetland ecosys- tems in Ganges–Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh; Front. Earth Sci. China 2 439–448, doi: 10.1007/s11707-008- 0049-2. Jannink N T, Zachariasse W J and Van der Zwaan G J 1998 Living...

  8. Wetland biogeochemistry and ecological risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Huang, Laibin; Gao, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangliang

    2017-02-01

    Wetlands are an important ecotone between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and can provide great ecological service functions. Soils/sediments are one of the important components of wetland ecosystems, which support wetland plants and microorganisms and influence wetland productivity. Moreover, wetland soils/sediments serve as sources, sinks and transfers of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chemical contaminants such as heavy metals. In natural wetland ecosystems, wetland soils/sediments play a great role in improving water quality as these chemical elements can be retained in wetland soils/sediments for a long time. Moreover, the biogeochemical processes of the abovementioned elements in wetland soils/sediments can drive wetland evolution and development, and their changes will considerably affect wetland ecosystem health. Therefore, a better understanding of wetland soil biogeochemistry will contribute to improving wetland ecological service functions.

  9. Mercury bioaccumulation in estuarine wetland fishes: evaluating habitats and risk to coastal wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are globally important areas for methylmercury bioaccumulation because of high methylmercury production rates and use by fish and wildlife. We measured total mercury (THg) concentrations in ten fish species from 32 wetland and open bay sites in San Francisco Bay Estuary (2005–2008). Fish THg concentrations (μg/g dry weight ± standard error) differed by up to 7.4× among estuary habitats. Concentrations were lowest in open bay (0.17 ± 0.02) and tidal wetlands (0.42 ± 0.02), and highest in managed seasonal saline wetlands (1.27 ± 0.05) and decommissioned high salinity salt ponds (1.14 ± 0.07). Mercury also differed among fishes, with Mississippi silversides (0.87 ± 0.03) having the highest and longjaw mudsuckers (0.37 ± 0.01) the lowest concentrations. Overall, 26% and 12% of fish exceeded toxicity benchmarks for fish (0.20 μg/g wet weight) and piscivorous bird (0.30 μg/g wet weight) health, respectively. Our results suggest that despite managed wetlands' limited abundance within estuaries, they may be disproportionately important habitats of Hg risk to coastal wildlife.

  10. ZEBRA MUSSEL COLONIZATION OF RUSTY CRAYFISH IN GREEN BAY, LAKE MICHIGAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August, 1995 six rusty crayfish colonized with zebra mussels were captured in small-meshed fyke-nets sets set apart as of a fish sampling effort at Peter's Marsh and Long-Tail Point Wetland in lower Green Bay. Mussels colonized virtually all areas of the crayfish bodies, but ...

  11. Studies on breeding shorebirds at Medusa Bay, Taimyr, in Summer 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulp, I.; Schekkerman, H.; Klaassen, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the Summer of 2000 a combined Dutch-Russian expedition took place to the Willem Barentz field station at Medusa Bay near Dikson in north-western Taimyr. The expedition was organized by Alterra, the Working Group for International Waterbird and Wetland Research (WIWO) and the Dutch Agricultural De

  12. Studies on breeding shorebirds at Medusa Bay, Taimyr, in summer 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulp, I.; Schekkerman, H.

    2001-01-01

    In the Summer of 2001 a combined Dutch-Russian expedition took place to the Willem Barentz field station at Medusa Bay near Dikson in north-western Taimyr. The expedition was organized by Alterra, the Working Group for International Waterbird and Wetland Research (WIWO) and the Agricultural Departme

  13. Electricity from wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetser, Koen; Dieleman, Kim; Buisman, Cees; Strik, David

    2017-01-01

    Application of the plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) in wetlands should be invisible without excavation of the soil. The preferred design is a tubular design with the anode directly between the plant roots and an oxygen reducing biocathode inside the tube. Oxygen should be passively supplied to the c

  14. Microbiology of wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Dedysh, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Watersaturated soil and sediment ecosystems (i.e. wetlands) are ecologically as well as economically important systems due to their high productivity, their nutrient (re)cycling capacities and their prominent contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions. Being on the transition between terrestria

  15. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  16. 78 FR 27989 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ..., consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, our policies... refuge lands south of Millport Slough and east of Highway 101. A small gravel parking lot and kiosk would... development of access trail and gravel parking lot.'' Siletz Bay NWR The waterfowl hunting area acreage...

  17. Research Advances on Marine Ecological Effect and Repairing Techniques of Coastal Mangrove Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na; LI; Pimao; CHEN; Peipei; QIAO; Chuanxin; QIN

    2014-01-01

    Coastal mangrove wetland is one of the areas whose global ecological environmental conditions have severely changed. Its ecosystem is vulnerable to damaged. The international community has paid attention to conservation and wisely use of mangrove wetland. This paper describes five parts of coastal mangrove wetland at home and abroad,including seawater’s purification effect of nitrogen and phosphorus,seawater’s adsorption of heavy metals,the functions of carbon sequestration and climate regulation,implant restoration techniques and the status of protection and management. And research trends of coastal mangrove wetland were proposed,in order to provide reference for the restoration and protection of China’s coastal mangrove wetland.

  18. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Status Report II 2000-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher

    2006-07-13

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ≈ 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report. Post restoration monitoring will continue through 2005. A final report to the Mitigation Bank Review Team will be submitted in mid-2006.

  19. Natural wetland emissions of methylated trace elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, B.; Lenz, M.; Charlet, L.; Berg, M.; Winkel, L.H.E.

    2014-01-01

    Natural wetlands are well known for their significant methane emissions. However, trace element emissions via biomethylation and subsequent volatilization from pristine wetlands are virtually unstudied, even though wetlands constitute large reservoirs for trace elements. Here we show that the averag

  20. 76 FR 52635 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... conservation practice standards used to carry out HEL and wetland provisions of the law. DATES: Effective Date... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  1. 76 FR 1595 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... revisions to conservation practice standards used to carry out HEL and wetland provisions of the law. DATES... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  2. 75 FR 33761 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... revisions to conservation practice standards used to carry out HEL and wetland provisions of the law. DATES... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  3. 75 FR 4525 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... conservation systems that treat highly erodible land (HEL) or on land determined to be a wetland. Section 343... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  4. 75 FR 46903 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... conservation systems that treat highly erodible land (HEL) or on land determined to be a wetland. Section 343... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  5. 77 FR 74456 - Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... revisions to conservation practice standards used to carry out HEL and wetland provisions of the law. DATES... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Changes to the National Handbook of Conservation Practices for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation...

  6. Restoration of Bhoj Wetlands At Bhopal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S. S.; Kulshrestha, M.; Wetland Project, Bhoj

    Bhoj Wetlands comprise the two lakes at Bhopal, India. These wetlands are listed amongst the 21 lakes recognized by Ministry of Environment and Forest, India and are under consideration for Ramsar lake status. The twin lakes have a total water- spread area of 32.29 sq. kms and catchment area of 370.6 sq. kms and both lakes support a rich and diverse range of flora and fauna. Currently with the help of 7055-m Yen soft loan from Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), a comprehen- sive project called the Bhoj Wetland Project has been launched for Eco-conservation management of twin lakes and this is one of the most reputed projects of its kind being undertaken in India. This paper presents details of the various works being undertaken for restoration of these wetlands at Bhopal. The Bhoj Wetlands are located at Bhopal, a city founded in 11th century AD by King Bhoj and which became known for the worst industrial Gas tragedy in 1984 when thousands lost their lives. The city is still recovering and the Bhoj Wetland Project is playing a very crucial role in improving the overall environmental status of the City. These wetlands are at present facing acute en- vironmental degradation due to pollution from a number of sources such as inflow of untreated sewage and solid waste, silt erosion and inflow from catchment, commercial activities like washing of clothes and cleaning of vehicles etc., inflow of agricultural residues and pesticides, and encroachment by builders all of which are fast eroding the rich eco-culture, flora fauna in and around the wetlands. The Bhoj Wetland Project is being implemented since the year 1995 and is scheduled to end in March 2002. The project works are being undertaken under the overall aegis of Ministry of Housing Environment, Govt. of Madhya Pradesh (M.P.) State, India. All the detailed project reports (DPRs) and preliminary ground work was undertaken by the in-house staff of Bhoj Wetland project, resulting in huge amounts of

  7. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava M Tabak

    Full Text Available Sea Level Rise (SLR caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  8. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Nava M; Laba, Magdeline; Spector, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  9. Evaluation of Surface Hydrological Connectivity Between a Forested Coastal Wetland and Regulated Waters of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D. D.; Wilcox, B. P.; Jacob, J. S.; Sipocz, A.; Munster, C.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid urbanization, industry, and agriculture have put enormous developmental pressure on coastal forested wetlands along the Texas coast. At least 97,000 acres of freshwater forested wetlands on the Texas coast have been lost since 1955, amid much larger losses of other coastal wetland types (TPWD-Texas Wetlands Conservation Plan, 1996). Some coastal wetlands are protected by federal regulations under the Clean Water Act in an effort to maintain wetland hydrological and ecological services, such as water quality improvement and flood control. However, federal protection of many important coastal wetlands is dependent upon documented proof of a hydrologic connection to federally protected Waters of the United States and reasonable influence on the quality of those waters. This study focuses on a 13 acre catchment of coastal flatwoods wetland with an ambiguous legal status because of a possible , but undocumented, hydrologic connection to regulated Waters of the United States. Documentation of the hydrologic connectivity of this type of wetland is critical because of the geographic extent of similar wetlands and their contributions to water quality. The objective of the study was to determine if a hydrologic connection exists, and if so, to quantify the strength of the connection. A surface connection was established based on runoff and rainfall data collected since April of 2005, with the wetland discharging surface water directly into an adjacent protected wetland. The connection was weak during dry years, but in years with average rainfall, surface runoff accounted for a much more significant portion of the water budget. These results suggest that runoff water from similar wetlands contributes directly to protected wetland waters, and may influence water quality downstream.

  10. Identifying Areas of Potential Wetland Hydrology in Irrigated Croplands Using Aerial Image Interpretation and Analysis of Rainfall Normality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    interpretation represents a valuable resource utilized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetland Inventory Mapping program (USFWS 2014), USACE, U...S. Department of Agriculture - Natural Resource Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS), and other federal and state agencies. The USDA-NRCS (1997... Conservation Act Using Aerial Imagery to Assess Wetland Hydrology. BWSR Technical Guidance. Strange, E. M., K. D. Faush, and A. P. Covich. 1999. Sustaining

  11. The contribution of reserves and anthropogenic habitat for functional connectivity and resilience of ephemeral wetland networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. R.; Uden, D.; Angeler, D.; Hellman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Functional connectivity of reserves and other suitable habitat patches is crucial for persistence of spatially structured populations, and therefore for resilience. To maintain or increase connectivity at spatial scales larger than individual patches, conservation actions may focus on creating and maintaining reserves or influencing management actions taken on non-reserves. We assess functional connectivity of isolated wetlands within an intensively managed agricultural matrix. Using a graph-theoretic approach, we assessed the functional connectivity and spatial distribution of wetlands in the Rainwater Basins, Nebraska, U.S.A. at four assumed anuran dispersal distances. We compare the contemporary wetlands landscape to the historical landscape and putative future landscapes and evaluate the importance of individual and aggregated reserve and non-reserve wetlands for maintaining connectivity. Connectivity was greatest in the historical landscape, where wetlands were also the most densely distributed. The construction of irrigation reuse pits for water storage has substantially increased connectivity in the current landscape, but because their distribution is more uniform than historical wetlands, larger and longer-dispersing species may be favored over smaller, shorter-dispersing species. Because of their relatively low number, wetland reserves did not affect connectivity as greatly as non-reserve wetlands or irrigation reuse pits; however, they provide the highest-quality anuran habitat. Future levels of connectivity in the region will be directly impacted by the planned removal of irrigation reuse pits, and on non-reserve wetlands. Multi-scale spatial and temporal assessments of the effects of landuse change and conservation actions on landscape connectivity may be used to direct and prioritize conservation actions, and should also be useful for reserve network and landscape resilience assessments.

  12. Connecting carbon and nitrogen storage in rural wetland soil to groundwater abstraction for urban water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David Bruce; Feit, Sharon J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether groundwater abstraction for urban water supply diminishes the storage of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and organic matter in the soil of rural wetlands. Wetland soil organic matter (SOM) benefits air and water quality by sequestering large masses of C and N. Yet, the accumulation of wetland SOM depends on soil inundation, so we hypothesized that groundwater abstraction would diminish stocks of SOM, C, and N in wetland soils. Predictions of this hypothesis were tested in two types of subtropical, depressional-basin wetland: forested swamps and herbaceous-vegetation marshes. In west-central Florida, >650 ML groundwater day(-1) are abstracted for use primarily in the Tampa Bay metropolis. At higher abstraction volumes, water tables were lower and wetlands had shorter hydroperiods (less time inundated). In turn, wetlands with shorter hydroperiods had 50-60% less SOM, C, and N per kg soil. In swamps, SOM loss caused soil bulk density to double, so areal soil C and N storage per m(2) through 30.5 cm depth was diminished by 25-30% in short-hydroperiod swamps. In herbaceous-vegetation marshes, short hydroperiods caused a sharper decline in N than in C. Soil organic matter, C, and N pools were not correlated with soil texture or with wetland draining-reflooding frequency. Many years of shortened hydroperiod were probably required to diminish soil organic matter, C, and N pools by the magnitudes we observed. This diminution might have occurred decades ago, but could be maintained contemporarily by the failure each year of chronically drained soils to retain new organic matter inputs. In sum, our study attributes the contraction of hydroperiod and loss of soil organic matter, C, and N from rural wetlands to groundwater abstraction performed largely for urban water supply, revealing teleconnections between rural ecosystem change and urban resource demand.

  13. Diversity and abundance of amphibian species in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeje Kassie Teme; Mengistu Wale Mollaleign; Asersie MekonnenAregie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the population status, abundance and diversity of amphibians found in Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Methods: The present study dealed with amphibian diversity at Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland during the period of August 2015 to September 2015. Transect line and visual encounter survey methods were used in careful visual estimation and amphibians were recorded in all possible habitats of the study area. Results: The total of 251 individuals of amphibians within 12 species grouped into 5 families were recorded in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Chefa wetland had the highest species abundance as well as richness with a total of 231 individuals falling in 11 species. Conclusions: This study reveals that the Chefa wetland is rich in amphibian diversity and supports many more species. Further studies are needed on molecular basis, population structure, habitat use by amphibians for better understanding and also imposing several conservation strategies in Chefa wetland.

  14. Macroclimatic change expected to transform coastal wetland ecosystems this century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Christopher A.; Osland, Michael J.; Grace, James B.; Stagg, Camille L.; Day, Richard H.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; From, Andrew; McCoy, Meagan L.; McLeod, Jennie L.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal wetlands, existing at the interface between land and sea, are highly vulnerable to climate change. Macroclimate (for example, temperature and precipitation regimes) greatly influences coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. However, research on climate change impacts in coastal wetlands has concentrated primarily on sea-level rise and largely ignored macroclimatic drivers, despite their power to transform plant community structure and modify ecosystem goods and services. Here, we model wetland plant community structure based on macroclimate using field data collected across broad temperature and precipitation gradients along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Our analyses quantify strongly nonlinear temperature thresholds regulating the potential for marsh-to-mangrove conversion. We also identify precipitation thresholds for dominance by various functional groups, including succulent plants and unvegetated mudflats. Macroclimate-driven shifts in foundation plant species abundance will have large effects on certain ecosystem goods and services. Based on current and projected climatic conditions, we project that transformative ecological changes are probable throughout the region this century, even under conservative climate scenarios. Coastal wetland ecosystems are functionally similar worldwide, so changes in this region are indicative of potential future changes in climatically similar regions globally.

  15. Tropical wetlands and REDD+: Three unique scientific challenges for policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Friess

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The carbon sequestration and storage value of terrestrial habitats is now increasingly appreciated, and is the basis for Payment for Ecosystem Service (PES policies such as REDD+. Tropical wetlands may be suitable for inclusion in such schemes because of the disproportionately large volume of carbon they are able to store. However, tropical wetlands offer a number of unique challenges for carbon management and policy compared to terrestrial forest systems: 1 Tropical wetlands are dynamic and subject to a wide range of physical and ecological processes that affect their long-term carbon storage potential – thus, such systems can quickly become a carbon source instead of a sink; 2 Carbon dynamics in tropical wetlands often operate over longer time-scales than are currently covered by REDD+ payments; and 3 Much of the carbon in a tropical wetland is stored in the soil, so monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV needs to adequately encapsulate the entire ecosystem and not just the vegetative component. This paper discusses these physical and biological concepts, and highlights key legal, management and policy questions that must be considered when constructing a policy framework to conserve these crucial ecosystems.

  16. Assessing Nebraska playa wetland inundation status during 1985-2015 using Landsat data and Google Earth Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghong; Li, Yao; Gu, Yue; Jiang, Weiguo; Xue, Yuan; Hu, Qiao; LaGrange, Ted; Bishop, Andy; Drahota, Jeff; Li, Ruopu

    2016-12-01

    Playa wetlands in Nebraska provide globally important habitats for migratory waterfowl. Inundation condition is an important indicator of playa wetland functionality. However, there is a lack of long-term continuous monitoring records for playa wetlands. The objective of this study was to determine a suitable index for Landsat images to map the playa inundation status in March and April during 1985-2015. Four types of spectral indices-negative normalized vegetation index, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), modified NDWI, and Tasseled Cap Wetness-Greenness Difference (TCWGD)-were evaluated to detect playa inundation conditions from Landsat images. The results indicate that the TCWGD is the most suitable index for distinguishing playa inundation status. By using Landsat images and Google Earth Engine, we mapped the spring inundation condition of Nebraska playas during 1985-2015. The results show that the total inundated areas were 176.79 km(2) in spring migratory season, representing 18.92% of the total area of playa wetlands. There were 9898 wetlands inundated at least once in either March or April during the past 30 years, representing 29.41% of a total of 33,659 historical wetlands. After comparing the historical hydric soil footprints and the inundated areas, the results indicate that the hydrological conditions of the majority of playas in Nebraska have changed. The inundated wetlands are candidates for protection and/or partial restoration, and the un-inundated wetlands need more attention for wetland restoration. Wetlands in areas enrolled in conservation easements had a significantly high level of playa inundation status than non-conserved wetlands during spring migratory seasons in the past decades.These conservation easements only count for 4.29% of the total footprint areas, but they have contributed 20.82% of the inundation areas in Nebraska during the past 30 years.

  17. Processes contributing to resilience of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify processes that contribute to resilience of coastal wetlands subject to rising sea levels and to determine whether the relative contribution of these processes varies across different wetland community types. We assessed the resilience of wetlands to sea-level rise along a transitional gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW) to marsh by measuring processes controlling wetland elevation. We found that, over 5 years of measurement, TFFWs were resilient, although some marginally, and oligohaline marshes exhibited robust resilience to sea-level rise. We identified fundamental differences in how resilience is maintained across wetland community types, which have important implications for management activities that aim to restore or conserve resilient systems. We showed that the relative importance of surface and subsurface processes in controlling wetland surface elevation change differed between TFFWs and oligohaline marshes. The marshes had significantly higher rates of surface accretion than the TFFWs, and in the marshes, surface accretion was the primary contributor to elevation change. In contrast, elevation change in TFFWs was more heavily influenced by subsurface processes, such as root zone expansion or compaction, which played an important role in determining resilience of TFFWs to rising sea level. When root zone contributions were removed statistically from comparisons between relative sea-level rise and surface elevation change, sites that previously had elevation rate deficits showed a surplus. Therefore, assessments of wetland resilience that do not include subsurface processes will likely misjudge vulnerability to sea-level rise.

  18. APPLICATION OF ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS TO ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL VULNERABILITY OF WETLANDS IN THE JIANGHAN PLAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-lei; NING Long-mei; HU Wang-bin

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands in the Jianghan Plain are important components of wetland types in lake area in the middle and lower reaches the Changjiang (Yangtze) River and they fulfill many uses and functions related to hydrology,waste assimilation, ecosystem productivity and biodiversity. Owing to natural factors and human activities, especially excessive reclamation from lakes, the shrinking process of the lakes has been accelerated. Wetland ecosystem has shown the characteristics of vulnerability. According to the analysis of wetland ecological function in the Jianghan Plain, this paper presented an index system related to productivity, stability and environmental capacity. By using the method of Analytic Hierarchy Process, we computed the values of the relative weights of the indexes, and evaluated the vulnerability level of the wetland ecosystem by the method of multi-indexes. The case study showed that the fragile extent of wetland ecosystem in the Jianghan Plain is 5.6. This means that the wetland ecosystem in the Jiang-han Plain is laid to the state of middle vulnerability. Therefore, the wetland conservation and eco-rehabilitation in the Jianghan Plain should be paid attention to.

  19. Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation using wetland plants: An ecosustainable approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, P.K. [Mizoram Central University, Tanhril (India). School for Earth Science & Natural Resource Management

    2008-07-01

    This review addresses the global problem of heavy metal pollution originating from increased industrialization and urbanization and its amelioration by using wetland plants both in a microcosm as well as natural/field condition. This review mentions salient features of wetland ecosystems, their vegetation component, and the pros and cons involved in heavy metal removal. Wetland plants are preferred over other bio-agents due to their low cost, frequent abundance in aquatic ecosystems, and easy handling. Constructed wetlands proved to be effective for the abatement of heavy metal pollution from acid mine drainage; landfill leachate; thermal power; and municipal, agricultural, refinery, and chlor-alkali effluent. the physicochemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating heavy metals. Typha, Phragmites, Eichhornia, Azolla, Lemna, and other aquatic macrophytes are some of the potent wetland plants for heavy metal removal. Biomass disposal problem and seasonal growth of aquatic macrophytes are some limitations in the transfer of phytoremediation technology from the laboratory to the field. However, the disposed biomass of macrophytes may be used for various fruitful applications. An ecosustainable model has been developed through the author's various works, which may ameliorate some of the limitations. The creation of more areas for phytoremediation may also aid in wetlands conservation. Genetic engineering and biodiversity prospecting of endangered wetland plants are important future prospects in this regard.

  20. Snohomish Estuary Wetlands Study. Volume IV. Delineation of Wetland Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    River FIG. 4 -G. 5 CARNATION [] Scale in Miles 0 5 1 FALL CITY SNOHOMISH ESTUARY WETLANDS STUDY 8AOUAH FIG. 6-/ 44 Isan A EVRT 12 1 land NO4Carnation on the Snoqualmie River (Tolt River confluence). I B. OBJECTIVES 8. The objectives of the overall Snohomish Estuary Wetlands

  1. Indicators of hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological integrity for estimating potential loss of ecosystem services from wetlands on domesticated landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Aldred, D.; Spargo, A.; Bayley, S.

    2012-12-01

    these indicators over the past years. For a time series of wetlands loss we derive these indicators of functions and benefits to estimate changes in the provision of specific aquatic ecosystem services on the landscape. Last, we develop formulae for integrating these indicators to determine whether a specific wetland or wetland complex should be prioritized for conservation, exemplifying potential trade-offs among ecosystem services in setting conservation targets on this wetland dominated landscapes. The proposed theoretical framework evolved from close collaboration between scientists and resource managers, and will inform those engaged in developing wetland policies for a broad range of jurisdictions.

  2. Status of Bay of Bengal: An Ecological Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai IK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The marine resources are a major source of food, a reservoir of minerals, major suppliers of oxygen, regulator of climate. It is also an ultimate dumping ground for the mounting burden of human waste material. Due to unchecked anthropogenic activity in recent years, the physico-chemical and biological status of the marine environments have changed significantly. This has resulted in the changing environmental scenario of the world. The Bay of Bengal, is one of the largest Bay in the world known to receive large flow of sediments from several rivers and other water bodies from India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Indonesia etc., Many of these rivers bring along with them, a large quantity of effluents from cities / towns located on either side of these rivers, thus making the Bay nutrient rich. This Bay also plays a major role in determining the climatic conditions of India and other South East Asian countries. Thus its ecology is of paramount interest. Further, the Bay is also known for its oligotrophic nature as well low productivity, thus resulting in high diversity of flora and fauna. The ecological status of the Bay has a direct bearing on the lifescape of the Bay, and therefore, a study was undertaken to understand abiotic and biotic factors with special reference to zooplankton. Based on the observations, the study recommends certain appropriate measures to be taken to conserve the ecology of one of the largest Bay in the world.

  3. The Blackwater NWR inundation model. Rising sea level on a low-lying coast: land use planning for wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curt; Clark, Inga; Guntenspergen, Glenn; Cahoon, Don; Caruso, Vincent; Hupp, Cliff; Yanosky, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (BNWR), on the Eastern Shore of Chesapeake Bay (figure 1), occupies an area less than 1 meter above sea level. The Refuge has been featured prominently in studies of the impact of sea level rise on coastal wetlands. Most notably, the refuge has been sited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as a key example of 'wetland loss' attributable to rising sea level due to global temperature increase. Comparative studies of aerial photos taken since 1938 show an expanding area of open water in the central area of the refuge. The expanding area of open water can be shown to parallel the record of sea level rise over the past 60 years. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) manages the refuge to support migratory waterfowl and to preserve endangered upland species. High marsh vegetation is critical to FWS waterfowl management strategies. A broad area once occupied by high marsh has decreased with rising sea level. The FWS needs a planning tool to help predict current and future areas of high marsh available for waterfowl. 'Wetland loss' is a relative term. It is dependant on the boundaries chosen for measurement. Wetland vegetation, zoned by elevation and salinity (figure 3), respond to rising sea level. Wetlands migrate inland and upslope and may vary in areas depending on the adjacent land slopes. Refuge managers need a geospatial tool that allows them to predict future areas that will be converted to high and intertidal marsh. Shifts in location and area of coverage must be anticipated. Viability of a current marsh area is also important. When will sea level rise make short-term management strategies to maintain an area impractical? The USGS has developed an inundation model for the BNWR centered on the refuge and surrounding areas. Such models are simple in concept, but they require a detailed topographic map upon which to superimpose future sea level positions. The new system of LIDAR mapping of land and

  4. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M. Ross

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change.

  5. Pesticide concentrations in frog tissue and wetland habitats in a landscape dominated by agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L; Reeves, Rebecca; Muths, Erin; Vandever, Mark; Battaglin, William A; Hladik, Michelle L; Pierce, Clay L

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and exposure to pesticides are likely primary factors contributing to amphibian decline in agricultural landscapes. Conservation efforts have attempted to restore wetlands lost through landscape modifications to reduce contaminant loads in surface waters and providing quality habitat to wildlife. The benefits of this increased wetland area, perhaps especially for amphibians, may be negated if habitat quality is insufficient to support persistent populations. We examined the presence of pesticides and nutrients in water and sediment as indicators of habitat quality and assessed the bioaccumulation of pesticides in the tissue of two native amphibian species Pseudacris maculata (chorus frogs) and Lithobates pipiens (leopard frogs) at six wetlands (3 restored and 3 reference) in Iowa, USA. Restored wetlands are positioned on the landscape to receive subsurface tile drainage water while reference wetlands receive water from overland run-off and shallow groundwater sources. Concentrations of the pesticides frequently detected in water and sediment samples were not different between wetland types. The median concentration of atrazine in surface water was 0.2 μg/L. Reproductive abnormalities in leopard frogs have been observed in other studies at these concentrations. Nutrient concentrations were higher in the restored wetlands but lower than concentrations thought lethal to frogs. Complex mixtures of pesticides including up to 8 fungicides, some previously unreported in tissue, were detected with concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 1,500 μg/kg wet weight. No significant differences in pesticide concentrations were observed between species, although concentrations tended to be higher in leopard frogs compared to chorus frogs, possibly because of differences in life histories. Our results provide information on habitat quality in restored wetlands that will assist state and federal agencies, landowners, and resource managers in identifying and implementing

  6. Pesticide concentrations in frog tissue and wetland habitats in alandscape dominated by agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Reeves, Rebecca; Muths, Erin L.; Vandever, Mark W.; Battaglin, William A.; Hladik, Michelle; Pierce, Clay L.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and exposure to pesticides are likely primary factors contributing to amphibian decline in agricultural landscapes. Conservation efforts have attempted to restore wetlands lost through landscape modifications to reduce contaminant loads in surface waters and providing quality habitat to wildlife. The benefits of this increased wetland area, perhaps especially for amphibians, may be negated if habitat quality is insufficient to support persistent populations. We examined the presence of pesticides and nutrients in water and sediment as indicators of habitat quality and assessed the bioaccumulation of pesticides in the tissue of two native amphibian species Pseudacris maculata (chorus frogs) and Lithobates pipiens (leopard frogs) at six wetlands (3 restored and 3 reference) in Iowa, USA. Restored wetlands are positioned on the landscape to receive subsurface tile drainage water while reference wetlands receive water from overland run-off and shallow groundwater sources. Concentrations of the pesticides frequently detected in water and sediment samples were not different between wetland types. The median concentration of atrazine in surface water was 0.2 μg/L. Reproductive abnormalities in leopard frogs have been observed in other studies at these concentrations. Nutrient concentrations were higher in the restored wetlands but lower than concentrations thought lethal to frogs. Complex mixtures of pesticides including up to 8 fungicides, some previously unreported in tissue, were detected with concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 1500 μg/kg wet weight. No significant differences in pesticide concentrations were observed between species, although concentrations tended to be higher in leopard frogs compared to chorus frogs, possibly because of differences in life histories. Our results provide information on habitat quality in restored wetlands that will assist state and federal agencies, landowners, and resource managers in identifying and

  7. Tidal wetlands of the Yaquina and Alsea River estuaries, Oregon: Geographic Information Systems layer development and recommendations for National Wetlands Inventory revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Laura S.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Janousek, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    -scale wetland restoration and conservation action planning. Several new prioritization sites (not included in the 1999 prioritization) were identified in each estuary, consisting of NWI polygons formerly classified as nontidal wetland or upland. The GIS products of this project improve the accuracy and utility of the NWI data, and provide useful tools for estuarine resource management.

  8. Robust Modeling of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes from Coastal Wetland Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, O. I.; Ishtiaq, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many critical wetland biogeochemical processes are still largely unknown or poorly understood at best. Yet, available models for predicting wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O) are generally mechanistic in nature. This knowledge gap leads to inappropriate process descriptions or over-parameterizations in existing mechanistic models, which often fail to provide accurate and robust predictions across time and space. We developed a systematic data-analytics and informatics method to identify the dominant controls and quantify the relative linkages of wetland GHG fluxes in relation to various hydro-climatic, sea level, biogeochemical and ecological drivers. The method was applied to data collected from 2012-14 through an extensive field campaign from different blue carbon sites of Waquoit Bay, MA. Multivariate pattern recognition techniques of principal component and factor analyses were employed to identify the dominant controls of wetland GHG fluxes; classifying and grouping process variables based on their similarity and interrelation patterns. Power-law based partial least squares regression models were developed to quantify the relative linkages of major GHGs with different process drivers and stressors, as well as to achieve site-specific predictions of GHG fluxes. Wetland biogeochemical similitude and scaling laws were also investigated to unravel emergent patterns and organizing principles of wetland GHG fluxes. The research findings will guide the development of parsimonious empirical to appropriate mechanistic models for spatio-temporally robust predictions of GHGs fluxes and carbon sequestration from coastal wetland ecosystems. The research is part of two current projects funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation; focusing on wetland data collections, knowledge formation, formulation of robust GHGs prediction models, and development of ecological engineering tools.

  9. Discharge between San Antonio Bay and Aransas Bay, southern Gulf Coast, Texas, May-September 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Jeffery W.

    2001-01-01

    Along the Gulf Coast of Texas, many estuaries and bays are important habitat and nurseries for aquatic life. San Antonio Bay and Aransas Bay, located about 50 and 30 miles northeast, respectively, of Corpus Christi, are two important estuarine nurseries on the southern Gulf Coast of Texas (fig. 1). According to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, “Almost 80 percent of the seagrasses [along the Texas Gulf Coast] are located in the Laguna Madre, an estuary that begins just south of Corpus Christi Bay and runs southward 140 miles to South Padre Island. Most of the remaining seagrasses, about 45,000 acres, are located in the heavily traveled San Antonio, Aransas and Corpus Christi Bay areas” (Shook, 2000).Population growth has led to greater demands on water supplies in Texas. The Texas Water Development Board, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission have the cooperative task of determining inflows required to maintain the ecological health of the State’s streams, rivers, bays, and estuaries. To determine these inflow requirements, the three agencies collect data and conduct studies on the need for instream flows and freshwater/ saline water inflows to Texas estuaries.To assist in the determination of freshwater inflow requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, conducted a hydrographic survey of discharge (flow) between San Antonio Bay and Aransas Bay during the period May–September 1999. Automated instrumentation and acoustic technology were used to maximize the amount and quality of data that were collected, while minimizing personnel requirements. This report documents the discharge measured at two sites between the bays during May–September 1999 and describes the influences of meteorologic (wind and tidal) and hydrologic (freshwater inflow) conditions on discharge between the two bays. The movement of water between the bays is

  10. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully

  11. Ecosystem services: developing sustainable management paradigms based on wetland functions and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.; Smith, Loren M.; Conner, William H.; Burkett, Virginia R.; Wilcox, Douglas A.; Hester, Mark W.; Zheng, Haochi

    2013-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century and twentieth century, there was considerable interest and activity to develop the United States for agricultural, mining, and many other purposes to improve the quality of human life standards and prosperity. Most of the work to support this development was focused along disciplinary lines with little attention focused on ecosystem service trade-offs or synergisms, especially those that transcended boundaries of scientific disciplines and specific interest groups. Concurrently, human population size has increased substantially and its use of ecosystem services has increased more than five-fold over just the past century. Consequently, the contemporary landscape has been highly modified for human use, leaving behind a fragmented landscape where basic ecosystem functions and processes have been broadly altered. Over this period, climate change also interacted with other anthropogenic effects, resulting in modern environmental problems having a complexity that is without historical precedent. The challenge before the scientific community is to develop new science paradigms that integrate relevant scientific disciplines to properly frame and evaluate modern environmental problems in a systems-type approach to better inform the decision-making process. Wetland science is a relatively new discipline that grew out of the conservation movement of the early twentieth century. In the United States, most of the conservation attention in the earlier days was on wildlife, but a growing human awareness of the importance of the environment led to the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1969. Concurrently, there was a broadening interest in conservation science, and the scientific study of wetlands gradually gained acceptance as a scientific discipline. Pioneering wetland scientists became formally organized when they formed The Society of Wetland Scientists in 1980 and established a publication outlet to share wetland research

  12. Role of Wetland Ecosystems In Hydrobioecological Dynamics In Indian Punjab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ladhar, Satnam

    parts of Punjab and important parts of Rajasthan. Over the time water storage capacity of this wetland has reduced to 14740 acre-feet. Ropar Wetland located upstream of Harike Wetland provides drink- ing and irrigation water supplies to most parts of Punjab. Once made for this sole pur- pose, the Wetlands have helped enormous build up of biological resources and their conservation including some rare species. Because of unique wildlife values, Harike Wetland was notified as Wildlife Sanctuary in 1981 and as Ramsar site in 1990. Ropar and another important wetland Kanjli have been designated as national wetlands by 1 the Ministry of Environment &Forests, Govt. of India. All these three wetlands are, however, suffering from encroachments, siltation, weed growth, pollution, and up- stream diversion, which are changing the local hydrological regime. Details shall be discussed. 2

  13. 杭州湾4种植物盐胁迫下种子萌发能力与分布的关系%Correlation of seed germination capacities under salt stress with four plant species distribution in the Hangzhou Bay Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶小齐; 吴明; 王琦; 蒋科毅; 邵学新

    2012-01-01

    In the Hangzhou Bay Wetlands, plant species occupy different habitats. It is not clear whether the distribution pattern of plant species was related to their ability to germinate under salt stress conditions. Soils from the habitats of four populations of Suaeda glauca, Suaeda australis , Phragmites australis , and Artemisia lavandulifolia were sampled respectively and soil salt content, pH, and water content were analyzed and compared. The percent germination of their seeds when exposed to 0-50 g · L-1 NaCl solution was measured by germinating 30 seeds in three Petri dishes respectively in an illumination incubator at 28 ℃. Finally, correlation between germination percent of seeds for the four species exposed to a 20 g · L-1 NaCl solution versus soil salt content, pH, and water content was analyzed. Results for the four species showed that the soil salt content of the growth habitats was S. glauca > S. australis > P. australis > A. lavandulifolia; soil pH was P. australis > A. lavandulifolia > S. glauca and S. australis; and soil water content was S. glauca > P. australis > 5. australis > A. lavandulifolia. With the NaCl solution (0-50 g·L-1), the percent germination decreased signifi-cantly (P S. australis > P. australis > A. lavandulifolia. After replacement of NaCl solution (0-50 g·L-1) with distilled water, the seed germination percent remarkably increased (P < 0.01). But the final germination capacity was in the same order as before the replacement. In addition, only the soil salt content was strongly related to percent germination of the four seed-types exposed to 20 g · L-1 NaCl solution (P < 0.05). These results indicated that soil salt content was an important limiting factor for seed germination, and the distribution pattern of the four plant species was generally related to their habitat's soil salt content and the ability of the seeds to germinate at high NaCl concentrations.%为了探明杭州湾湿地植物碱蓬Suaedae glauca

  14. Reef Fish Surveys for Fagatele Bay, American Samoa, 2007 (NODC Accession 0068717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish surveys were conducted in November 2007 using visual census techniques at Fagatele Bay under the guidance of Dr. Alison Green, the Nature Conservancy. This...

  15. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  16. Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands ESI: WETLANDS (Wetland Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the coastal wetland habitats for Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands classified according to the Environmental...

  17. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - MO 2015 Meramec Wetland Complex (GDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MoRAP produced and integrated data to map and rank wetlands for the Meramec River bottomland in Missouri. LiDAR elevation and vegetation height information and air...

  18. Impacts of Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activities on the Ecological Restoration of Wetlands in the Arid Regions of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of the global ecosystem, wetlands and their dynamics greatly influence regional eco-environment systems. To understand the distributions, change processes and temporal-spatial characteristics of the wetlands of the inland river basin in an arid region (Heihe River Basin, HRB, this paper employed multi-source remote sensing data to facilitate multi-temporal monitoring of the HRB wetland using a wetland information extraction method. First, we performed monitoring of these wetlands for the years 2000, 2007, 2011 and 2014; then, we analyzed the variation characteristics of the spatial-temporal dynamics of the wetlands in the HRB over the last 15 years via the landscape dynamic change model and the transformation matrix. In addition, we studied the possible driving mechanisms of these changes. The research results showed that the total area of the HRB wetlands had decreased by 2959.13 hectares in the last 15 years (Since 2000, and the annual average loss was −1.09%. The dynamics characterizing the HRB wetlands generally presented a trend of slow increase after an initial decrease, which can be classified into three stages. From 2000 to 2007, the total wetland area rapidly decreased; from 2007 to 2011, the area slowly decreased; and from 2011 to 2014, the area gradually increased. The dynamic changing processes characterizing the wetland resources were ascribed to a combination of natural processes and human activities. The main driving mechanisms of wetland dynamic changes include climatic conditions, upper reach water inflows, population, water resources, cultivated area, and policy. The findings of this study can served as reference and support for the conservation and management of wetland resources in the HRB.

  19. Emerging dragonfly diversity at small Rhode Island (U.S.A.) wetlands along an urbanization gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti Lubertazzi, Maria A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Natal habitat use by dragonflies was assessed on an urban to rural land-use gradient at a set of 21 wetlands, during two emergence seasons (2004, 2005). The wetlands were characterized for urbanization level by using the first factor from a principal components analysis combining chloride concentration in the wetland and percent forest in the surrounding buffer zone. Measurements of species diversity and its components (species richness and evenness) were analyzed and compared along the urbanization gradient, as were distributions of individual species. Dragonfly diversity, species richness, and evenness did not change along the urbanization gradient, so urban wetlands served as natal habitat for numerous dragonfly species. However, several individual species displayed strong relationships to the degree of urbanization, and most were more commonly found at urban sites and at sites with fish. In contrast, relatively rare species were generally found at the rural end of the gradient. These results suggest that urban wetlands can play important roles as dragonfly habitat and in dragonfly conservation efforts, but that conservation of rural wetlands is also important for some dragonfly species.

  20. The evaluation of the value of soil erosion prevention on wetlands in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Wenji; Liu, Hao

    2011-02-01

    Wetland is an important part of the ecological system. It has an important role in soil erosion prevention. Without the protection of wetland, soil erosion will cause two aspects physical loss, including 1) the waste land caused by soil degradation and desertification; 2) nutrient contents loss. This paper takes all wetland in Beijing as object. This research includes investigation and research on indexes of soil erosion prevention in Beijing wetland ecological system. Two aspects of reduction soil waste and prevent soil fertility are studied. Potential and actual soil erosion are calculated using GIS and universal soil erosion equation based on collected data, with the difference of the two amounts is the soil conservation quantify, which will be converted to economic value. Research results show the economic value of Beijing wetland in the soil erosion prevention is 4,962.56 million Yuan. The river and swamp have the highest value; meanwhile, the rural wetland's value of soil erosion resistance is more than in the urban area. Wetland has the extremely vital significance to keep a good ecological environment in Beijing.

  1. Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation using wetland plants: an ecosustainable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar

    2008-01-01

    This review addresses the global problem of heavymetal pollution originating from increased industrialization and urbanization and its amelioration by using wetland plants both in a microcosm as well as natural/field condition. Heavymetal contamination in aquatic ecosystems due to discharge of industrial effluents may pose a serious threat to human health. Alkaline precipitation, ion exchange columns, electrochemical removal, filtration, and membrane technologies are the currently available technologies for heavy metal removal. These conventional technologies are not economical and may produce adverse impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Phytoremediation of metals is a cost-effective "green" technology based on the use of specially selected metal-accumulating plants to remove toxic metals from soils and water. Wetland plants are important tools for heavy metal removal. The Ramsar convention, one of the earlier modern global conservation treaties, was adopted at Ramsar, Iran, in 1971 and became effective in 1975. This convention emphasized the wise use of wetlands and their resources. This review mentions salient features of wetland ecosystems, their vegetation component, and the pros and cons involved in heavy metal removal. Wetland plants are preferred over other bio-agents due to their low cost, frequent abundance in aquatic ecosystems, and easy handling. The extensive rhizosphere of wetland plants provides an enriched culture zone for the microbes involved in degradation. The wetland sediment zone provides reducing conditions that are conducive to the metal removal pathway. Constructed wetlands proved to be effective for the abatement of heavymetal pollution from acid mine drainage; landfill leachate; thermal power; and municipal, agricultural, refinery, and chlor-alkali effluent. the physicochemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating heavy metals. Typha, Phragmites, Eichhornia, Azolla, Lemna, and other aquatic macrophytes are some

  2. Habitat utilization by wetland birds of Munderikadavu, a proposed bird sanctuary in northern Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roshnath

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Munderikadavu is rich in avifaunal diversity. A total of 82 species of birds from 36 families belonging to 13 orders were recorded in the wetland including wetland dependant species. Lowland vegetation had the highest species richness (46 species followed by upland (41 species, aerial (38 species, emergent vegetation (22 species and paddy fields (21 species.  Open water had the lowest species richness. Upland vegetation had the highest species diversity (H′-3.19 followed by aerial (H′-2.52.  There was more species overlap between emergent and low land vegetations (Cm-0.7.  The threats in Munderikadavu wetland were dumping of waste and conversion of cultivation land into shrimp farming area. Thus land use changes need to be regulated in order to conserve the wetland and bird community.  

  3. Are all intertidal wetlands naturally created equal? Bottlenecks, thresholds and knowledge gaps to mangrove and saltmarsh ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Horstman, Erik M.; Balke, Thorsten; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Galli, Demis; Webb, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands such as saltmarshes and mangroves provide numerous important ecological functions, though they are in rapid and global decline. To better conserve and restore these wetland ecosystems, we need an understanding of the fundamental natural bottlenecks and thresholds to their establishment and long-term ecological maintenance. Despite inhabiting similar intertidal positions, the biological traits of these systems differ markedly in structure, phenology, life history, phylogeny and dispersal, suggesting large differences in biophysical interactions. By providing the first systematic comparison between saltmarshes and mangroves, we unravel how the interplay between species-specific life-history traits, biophysical interactions and biogeomorphological feedback processes determine where, when and what wetland can establish, the thresholds to long-term ecosystem stability, and constraints to genetic connectivity between intertidal wetland populations at the landscape level. To understand these process interactions, research into the constraints to wetland development, and biological adaptations to overcome these critical bottlenecks and thresholds requires a truly interdisciplinary approach.

  4. Effects of Pipeline Construction on Wetland Ecosystems: Russia-China Oil Pipeline Project (Mohe-Daqing Section)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaofei Yu; Guoping Wang; Yuanchun Zou; Qiang Wang; Hongmei Zhao; Xianguo Lu (Key Lab of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Inst. of Geography and Agroecology, Changchun (China)), e-mail: wangguoping@neigae.ac.cn

    2010-07-15

    Although the multiple roles of wetland ecosystems and their value to humanity have been increasingly understood and documented in recent years, the efforts to conserve and restore wetlands are not in harmony with the press for high speed of economy growth. The degradation of wetlands is proceeding, especially in China. Russia- China Oil Pipe-line Project (Mohe-Daqing Section) has already begun in May 2009, and is ongoing. The pipeline runs through four riverine wetlands and two marshlands of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China. Although the project has vital significance of mitigating the energy crisis as well as guaranteeing the energy security of China, it will bring a series of ecological and environmental problems, especially for wetland ecosystems

  5. Radioiodine concentrated in a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Zhang, Saijin; Roberts, Kimberly A; Schwehr, Kathy; Xu, Chen; Creeley, Danielle; Ho, Yi-Fang; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Yeager, Chris M; Santschi, Peter H

    2014-05-01

    Most subsurface environmental radioactivity contamination is expected to eventually resurface in riparian zones, or wetlands. There are a number of extremely sharp biogeochemical interfaces in wetlands that could alter radionuclide speciation and promote accumulation. The objective of this study was to determine if a wetland concentrated (129)I emanating from a former waste disposal basin located on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA. Additionally, studies were conducted to evaluate the role of sediment organic matter in immobilizing the radioiodine. Groundwater samples were collected along a 0.7-km transect away from the seepage basin and in the downstream wetlands. The samples were analyzed for (129)I speciation (iodide (I(-)), iodate (IO3(-)), and organo-I). Groundwater (129)I concentrations in many locations in the wetlands (as high as 59.9 Bq L(-1)(129)I) were greatly elevated with respect to the source term (5.9 Bq L(-1)(129)I). (129)I concentration profiles in sediment cores were closely correlated to organic matter concentrations (r(2) = 0.992; n = 5). While the sediment organic matter promoted the uptake of (129)I to the wetland sediment, it also promoted the formation of a soluble organic fraction: 74% of the wetland groundwater (129)I could pass through a 1 kDa (wetlands may be highly effective at immobilizing aqueous (129)I, they may also promote the formation of a low-molecular-weight organic species that does not partition to sediments. This study provides a rare example of radioactivity concentrations increasing rather than decreasing as it migrates from a point source and brings into question assumptions in risk models regarding continuous dilution of released contaminants.

  6. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  7. Bathymetry in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4x4 meter resolution bathymetric surface for Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The depth values are in meters referenced to the...

  8. Biscayne Bay Alongshore Epifauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field studies to characterize the alongshore epifauna (shrimp, crabs, echinoderms, and small fishes) along the western shore of southern Biscayne Bay were started in...

  9. Humboldt Bay Orthoimages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-meter pixel resolution, four band orthoimages covering the Humboldt Bay area. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  10. Vocal patterns of adult females and juveniles Caiman yacare (Crocodilia: Alligatoridae) in Brazilian Pantanal wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuro, Fernando L; Iack-Ximenes, Gilson E; Wogel, Henrique; Bilate, Marcos

    2013-09-01

    The Paraguayan caiman (Caiman yacare) is the main Caimaninae species occurring in the Brazilian Pantanal Wetland. Despite the relative availability of works focused on biology and conservation of the Paraguayan caiman, almost nothing is known about its vocal structure and behavior. We recorded aggressive calls of adult caiman females guarding nests and, afterwards, the distress calls of the new born juvenile caimans in seasonally flooded areas of the Nhecolândia (Southern Pantanal). The results of both observations and sonographic analyses diverged from studies with other crocodilian species. Aggressive vocalization of adult females of the Paraguayan caiman was longer and more complex than the same vocalization of larger Alligatoridae species. Vocalizations of the young caimans presented interspecific differences with other crocodilian offsprings. Moreover, we found statistically significant intraspecific variation in the distress call structure among different pods, even separated by few kilometers. Differences in distress call structure were tested by Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA). We obtained the squared Mahalanobis distances between the acoustic multivariate spaces of each pod provided by the CDA and compared with the geographic distance between the bays of origin of each pod through Mantel Test. The geographic distance by itself did not explain the differences found in the structure of the vocalization of young caimans from different pods. The adult females of Paraguayan caiman positively responded to playbacks of calls from juvenile caimans from pods of other regions, as well as to rough imitations of distress call. Since the adult caimans showed protective responses to quite heterogeneous vocalizations of distress by juveniles, we hypothesized that the variation in the distress call pattern may be associated to a low specificity in sound recognition by adult caimans.

  11. Modelling Holocene carbon accumulation and methane emissions of boreal wetlands – an Earth system model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Schuldt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the Last Glacial Maximum, boreal wetlands have accumulated substantial amounts of peat, estimated at 180–621 Pg of carbon. Wetlands have significantly affected the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition in the past and will play a significant role in future changes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. In order to investigate those changes with an Earth system model, biogeochemical processes in boreal wetlands need to be accounted for. Thus, a model of peat accumulation and decay was developed and included in the land surface model JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM. Here we present the evaluation of model results from 6000 yr BP to the pre-industrial period. Over this period of time, 240 Pg of peat carbon accumulated in the model in the areas north of 40° N. Simulated peat accumulation rates agree well with those reported for boreal wetlands. The model simulates CH4 emissions of 49.3 Tg CH4 yr−1 for 6000 yr BP and 51.5 Tg CH4 yr−1 for pre-industrial times. This is within the range of estimates in the literature, which range from 32 to 112 Tg CH4 yr−1 for boreal wetlands. The modelled methane emission for the West Siberian Lowlands and Hudson Bay Lowlands agree well with observations. The rising trend of methane emissions over the last 6000 yr is in agreement with measurements of Antarctic and Greenland ice cores.

  12. Exposure and Figure Out of Climate Induced Alterations in the Wetlands of Banglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiquee, S. A.; Rahman, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Unique geographic location and geo-morphological conditions of Bangladesh have made the wetlands of this country one of the most vulnerable to climate change. Wetland plays a crucial role in maintaining the ecological balance of ecosystems and cultural figures and which occupy around 50% of the area. Drought, excessive temperature, mountain snowfields and glaciers melting, riverbank erosion, salinity intrusion, flashflood, storm surges, higher water temperatures, precipitation anomalies, coastal cyclones, seasonal anomalies and extremes are main threats to the wetland ecosystem. Enhanced UV-B radiation and increased summer precipitation will significantly increase dissolved organic carbon concentrations altering major biogeochemical cycles and also will result into the expansion of range for many invasive aquatic weeds. Generally, rising temperature will lower water quality through a fall in oxygen concentrations, release of phosphorus from sediments, increased thermal stability, and altered mixing patterns. As a result biodiversity is getting degraded, many species of flora and fauna are getting threatened, and wetland-based ecosystem is getting degenerated. At the same time, the living conditions of local people are deteriorating as livelihoods, socioeconomic institutions, and extensive cultural values as well. For conserving and managing wetlands technology, legislation, educational knowledge, action plan strategy and restoration practices are required. In order to address the human needs in the changing climate community-based adaptation approaches and wetland restoration, practices had been taken in almost every type of wetlands in Bangladesh. Therefore, Bangladesh now needs a comprehensive strategy and integrated system combining political, economic, social, technological approaches and institutional supports to address sustainable wetland restoration, conservation and the newly added crisis, climate change.

  13. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company......’s purpose: selling millions of goods, some of which are ‘designer’ items and some of which are considered design icons....

  14. Application of Participatory Development Theory in Wetland Ecotourism Initiatives——A Case Study of Baiyangdian in Anxin of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; SONG Jin-Ping; ZHANG Ning

    2008-01-01

    As one of the few ecological wetlands in North China,Baiyangdian bears multiple important ecological functions, including ①adjusting the ecological balance of North China; ②safeguarding the downstream areas, especially Tianjin City, the Beijing - Shanghai Railway and Huabei Oil Field; ③serving as the reservoir for the North - to - South Water Diversion Project and the emergent use of water for Beijing; ④conserving biodiversity. Wetland ecotourism is a scientific and wise use pattern for wetland resources, through which, a source of financing is provided for wetland conservation, economic alternatives are generated for local people to reduce overexploitatian on wetland resources and the public awareness of environmental protection is enhanced. Since wetland ecotourism can benefit the co - existence between human and nature and promote social equity between people, it enjoys broad promise for popularization and implementation. The proactive cooperation and sound interaction between main stakeholders, and the wide participation of the community residents, will guarantee the sustainable development of wetland ecotourism. Based on the analysis of current status of participation and interactive relationships of the main stakeholders in Baiyangdian tourism, this article made an attempt to apply the theory of participatory development to the ecotourism initiatives of Baiyangdian wetland, discussed and brought forward the countermeasures to improve community participation in wetland ecotourism under the guidance of this theory.

  15. U. S. groups fight James Bay II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    This article reviews the opposition program to the James Bay II hydroelectric project. The environmental costs of the first phase of James Bay, the La Grande project, have been huge, resulting in massive alterations of the environment and causing widespread mercury poisoning of fish, loss of wetlands and disruption of caribou calving grounds. Start-up of the Great Whale project is imminent, and will result in the flooding of ca 5,000 square kilometers of wilderness. The environmental costs of phases 2 and 3 will be even larger than for the first phase, with potential for significant disruption of fresh-water input into James and Hudson Bays. Drastic changes in the volume and salinity of the water will jeopardize the life patterns of many migratory birds, polar bears, beluga wales, seals and other wildlife. These, along with other social costs, are prohibitive for the Cree. The Cree have been actively opposing the project in the United States, and a groundswell of American opposition has been building. The Cree have been successful in persuading Bangor, Maine, to cancel a proposed contract with Hydro Quebec, on economic grounds. Opposition is building in Burlington, Vermont, to a contract with Hydro Quebec for the planned purchase of 15 MW of power from Hydro Quebec. Secret contracts between Hydro Quebec and thirteen multinational aluminum corporations, to supply power at below cost, have been publicized. The signing of an energy contract between New York and Quebec has been delayed for one year due to the inability of Hydro Quebec to make progress on the project in the face of opposition at home.

  16. User-Friendly Predictive Modeling of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes and Carbon Storage in Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2015-12-01

    We developed user-friendly empirical models to predict instantaneous fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from coastal wetlands based on a small set of dominant hydro-climatic and environmental drivers (e.g., photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature, water depth, and soil salinity). The dominant predictor variables were systematically identified by applying a robust data-analytics framework on a wide range of possible environmental variables driving wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The method comprised of a multi-layered data-analytics framework, including Pearson correlation analysis, explanatory principal component and factor analyses, and partial least squares regression modeling. The identified dominant predictors were finally utilized to develop power-law based non-linear regression models to predict CO2 and CH4 fluxes under different climatic, land use (nitrogen gradient), tidal hydrology and salinity conditions. Four different tidal wetlands of Waquoit Bay, MA were considered as the case study sites to identify the dominant drivers and evaluate model performance. The study sites were dominated by native Spartina Alterniflora and characterized by frequent flooding and high saline conditions. The model estimated the potential net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) both in gC/m2 and metric tonC/hectare by up-scaling the instantaneous predicted fluxes to the growing season and accounting for the lateral C flux exchanges between the wetlands and estuary. The entire model was presented in a single Excel spreadsheet as a user-friendly ecological engineering tool. The model can aid the development of appropriate GHG offset protocols for setting monitoring plans for tidal wetland restoration and maintenance projects. The model can also be used to estimate wetland GHG fluxes and potential carbon storage under various IPCC climate change and sea level rise scenarios; facilitating an appropriate management of carbon stocks in tidal wetlands and their incorporation into a

  17. 北京野鸭湖国家湿地公园湿地恢复与建设实践%Wetland Restoration and Development Practices in Yeya Lake National Wetland Park, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白华

    2013-01-01

    通过野鸭湖湿地公园湿地恢复与建设实践,总结了野鸭湖湿地公园在湿地保护与开发建设方面的经验,尤其在建设湿地园林绿化景观、科学配置湿地植物、恢复湿地生态系统等方面提出了建议。同时,分析了野鸭湖湿地的资源优势与不足,提出了湿地保护的重要意义。%Practices of wetland restoration and development activities in Yeya Lake Wetland Park was reviewed to summarize experiences in conservation and development of Yeya Lake Wetland Park. Suggestions were proposed for building a wetland landscape of gardening and afforestation, appropriate deployment of wetland plants, and restoration of wetland ecosystem. Meanwhile, advantages and disadvantages of resources of Yeya Lake were identified, giving high importance to wetland conservation.

  18. Mapping wetland loss and restoration potential in Flanders (Belgium: an ecosystem service perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Decleer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the case of Flanders (northern part of Belgium we present an integrated approach to calculate accurate losses of wetlands, potentials for restoration, and their ecosystem services supplies and illustrate how these insights can be used to evaluate and support policy making. Flanders lost about 75% of its wetland habitats in the past 50-60 years, with currently only 68,000 ha remaining, often in a more or less degraded state. For five different wetland categories (excluding open waters we calculated that restoration of lost wetland is still possible for an additional total area of about 147,000 ha, assuming that, with time and appropriate measures and techniques, the necessary biophysical and ecological conditions can more or less be restored or created. Wetland restoration opportunities were mapped according to an open and forested landscape scenario. Despite the fact that for 49,000 ha wetland restoration is justifiable by the actual presence of an appropriate spatial planning and/or protection status, the official Flemish nature policy only foresees 7,400 to 10,600 ha of additional wetland (open waters excluded by 2050. The benefits of a more ambitious wetland restoration action program are underpinned by an explorative and quantified analysis of ecosystem service supply for each of the two scenarios, showing that the strongly increased supply of several important regulating and cultural ecosystem services might outweigh the decrease of food production, especially if extensive farming on temporary wet soils remains possible. Finally, we discuss the challenges of wetland restoration policies for biodiversity conservation and climate change.

  19. A study of waterbirds wintering in Mission Bay combining field methods and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Lesley Mika

    Mission Bay (San Diego, California) is located along the Pacific Flyway and is an important habitat for waterbirds in the winter. Little has been documented about this habitat and this project aims to create a baseline to establish an understanding of how waterbirds use Mission Bay, as well as comparing current bird species presence to presence in the past. Mission Bay was divided into grid areas and each was surveyed twice daily at high and low tides. Waterbird activity included foraging, non-foraging, and flying was recorded during each survey over a two-year period from mid-October through January in 2013--2015. Data extracted from this dataset were combined with wetland area, natural area and historic wetland area and was analyzed to understand relationships of independent variables by bird group using a Zero-Inflated Negative Binomial regression model and by waterbird biodiversity using an Ordinary Least Squares regression model. In addition, waterbird habitat was documented across natural and man-made areas. More waterbird species were sighted during contemporary surveys in comparison to historic data from the 1950's and 1970's with similar biodiversity estimates determined for San Diego Bay. Results indicated that geographical area and the presence of wetland habitat significantly affected the biodiversity of waterbirds using Mission Bay in the winter with the highest biodiversity occurring in the largest wetland area in the Kendall-Frost Mission Bay Marsh Preserve. The combination of high biodiversity occurring in the largest wetland area with restricted access to the marsh suggests that human disturbance reduces species richness in this area, confirming the impact of disturbance on sensitive waterbird species cited in other research. Most bird groups favored north Mission Bay with the exception of herons and gulls that preferred southern areas of the bay, likely due to opportunistic interaction with humans, as gulls demonstrated a negative association to

  20. COMPARISON OF HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN SURFACE SEDIMENT OF TANJUNG PIAI WETLAND WITH OTHER SITES RECEIVING ANTHROPOGENIC INPUTS ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Tanjung Piai wetland has now been proclaimed to be a wetland of international importance since 2003. Therefore, its heavy metal pollution status should be known and recorded. In this study, sediments in Tanjung Piai wetland were collected in 2002 and 2005 and were analysed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. For comparison purpose, sediments were also collected for metal analysis from a known polluted site at Kg. Pasir Puteh, four jetties and a river. A comparison with the polluted sediment collected from Kg. Pasir Puteh and the established Sediment Quality Criteria showed that Tanjung Piai was not polluted with Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. These background concentrations or baseline data of heavy metals in the sediment is important for future reference. Therefore, Tanjung Piai wetland is a suitable site for sanctuary and wetland conservation and it should be conserved for its pristine conditions in order to support its high biodiversity.

  1. Module bay with directed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  2. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  3. The use of remote sensing to quantify wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range, Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teferi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services such as storing and regulating water flows and water quality, providing unique habitats to flora and fauna, and regulating micro-climatic conditions. Conversion of wetlands for agricultural use is a widespread practice in Ethiopia, particularly in the southwestern part where wetlands cover large areas. Although there are many studies on land cover and land use changes in this region, comprehensive studies on wetlands are still missing. Hence, extent and rate of wetland loss at regional scales is unknown. The objective of this paper is to quantify wetland dynamics and estimate wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range (area covering 17 443 km2 in the Upper Blue Nile basin, a key headwater region of the river Nile. Therefore, satellite remote sensing imagery of the period 1986–2005 were considered. To create images of surface reflectance that are radiometrically consistent, a combination of cross-calibration and atmospheric correction (Vogelman-DOS3 methods was used. A hybrid supervised/unsupervised classification approach was used to classify the images. Overall accuracies of 94.1% and 93.5% and Kappa Coefficients of 0.908 and 0.913 for the 1986 and 2005 imageries, respectively were obtained. The results showed that 607 km2 of seasonal wetland with low moisture and 22.4 km2 of open water are lost in the study area during the period 1986 to 2005. The current situation in the wetlands of Choke Mountain is characterized by further degradation which calls for wetland conservation and rehabilitation efforts through incorporating wetlands into watershed management plans.

  4. The use of remote sensing to quantify wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range, Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teferi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services such as storing and regulating water flows and water quality, providing unique habitats to flora and fauna, and regulating micro-climatic conditions. Conversion of wetlands for agricultural use is a widespread practice in Ethiopia, particularly in the southwestern part where wetlands cover large areas. Although there are many studies on land cover and land use changes in this region, comprehensive studies on wetlands are still missing. Hence, extent and rate of wetland loss at regional scale is unknown. The objective of this paper is to quantify wetland dynamics and estimate wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range (area covering 17 443 km2 in the Upper Blue Nile basin, a key headwater region of the river Nile. Therefore, satellite remote sensing images of the period 1986–2005 were considered. To create images of surface reflectance that are radiometrically consistent, a combination of cross-calibration and atmospheric correction (Vogelman-DOS3 methods was used. A hybrid supervised/unsupervised classification approach was used to classify the images. Overall accuracies of 94.1% and 93.5% and Kappa Coefficients of 0.908 and 0.913 for the 1986 and 2005 imageries, respectively were obtained. The results showed that 607 km2 of seasonal wetland with low moisture and 22.4 km2 of open water are lost in the study area during the period 1986 to 2005. The current situation in the wetlands of Choke Mountain is characterized by further degradation which calls for wetland conservation and rehabilitation efforts through incorporating wetlands into watershed management plans.

  5. Conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  6. Wetland Assessment Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (uav) Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M. A.; Greenfield, R.; Tesfamichael, S.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry is a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of wetlands. Accurate planning derived from this technological advancement allows for more effective management and conservation of wetland areas. This paper presents results of a study that aimed at investigating the use of UAV photogrammetry as a tool to enhance the assessment of wetland ecosystems. The UAV images were collected during a single flight within 2½ hours over a 100 ha area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. An AKS Y-6 MKII multi-rotor UAV and a digital camera on a motion compensated gimbal mount were utilised for the survey. Twenty ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a Trimble GPS to achieve geometrical precision and georeferencing accuracy. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) computer vision techniques were used to derive ultra-high resolution point clouds, orthophotos and 3D models from the multi-view photos. The geometric accuracy of the data based on the 20 GCP's were 0.018 m for the overall, 0.0025 m for the vertical root mean squared error (RMSE) and an over all root mean square reprojection error of 0.18 pixel. The UAV products were then edited and subsequently analysed, interpreted and key attributes extracted using a selection of tools/ software applications to enhance the wetland assessment. The results exceeded our expectations and provided a valuable and accurate enhancement to the wetland delineation, classification and health assessment which even with detailed field studies would have been difficult to achieve.

  7. WETLAND ASSESSMENT USING UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Boon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV photogrammetry is a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of wetlands. Accurate planning derived from this technological advancement allows for more effective management and conservation of wetland areas. This paper presents results of a study that aimed at investigating the use of UAV photogrammetry as a tool to enhance the assessment of wetland ecosystems. The UAV images were collected during a single flight within 2½ hours over a 100 ha area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. An AKS Y-6 MKII multi-rotor UAV and a digital camera on a motion compensated gimbal mount were utilised for the survey. Twenty ground control points (GCPs were surveyed using a Trimble GPS to achieve geometrical precision and georeferencing accuracy. Structure-from-Motion (SfM computer vision techniques were used to derive ultra-high resolution point clouds, orthophotos and 3D models from the multi-view photos. The geometric accuracy of the data based on the 20 GCP’s were 0.018 m for the overall, 0.0025 m for the vertical root mean squared error (RMSE and an over all root mean square reprojection error of 0.18 pixel. The UAV products were then edited and subsequently analysed, interpreted and key attributes extracted using a selection of tools/ software applications to enhance the wetland assessment. The results exceeded our expectations and provided a valuable and accurate enhancement to the wetland delineation, classification and health assessment which even with detailed field studies would have been difficult to achieve.

  8. Aquatic macrophyte diversity of the Pantanal wetland and upper basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VJ. Pott

    Full Text Available This is a short review of the state of the art concerning diversity of aquatic macrophytes and the main aquatic vegetation types in the Brazilian Pantanal wetland and upper watershed. There are ca. 280 species of aquatic macrophytes on the Pantanal floodplain, with scarce endemism. On the upper watershed, Cerrado wetlands (veredas and limestone springs have a distinct flora from the Pantanal, with twice the species richness. As a representative case of aquatic habitats influenced by river flood, some primary data are presented for the Pantanal Matogrossense National Park and associated Acurizal Preserve, analysing the floristic similarity among aquatic vegetation types. We comment on problems of conservation and observe that Panicum elephantipes Nees is one of the few natives to compete with the invasive Urochloa arrecta (Hack. ex T. Durand & Schinz Morrone & Zuloaga.

  9. Aquatic macrophyte diversity of the Pantanal wetland and upper basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, V J; Pott, A; Lima, L C P; Moreira, S N; Oliveira, A K M

    2011-04-01

    This is a short review of the state of the art concerning diversity of aquatic macrophytes and the main aquatic vegetation types in the Brazilian Pantanal wetland and upper watershed. There are ca. 280 species of aquatic macrophytes on the Pantanal floodplain, with scarce endemism. On the upper watershed, Cerrado wetlands (veredas) and limestone springs have a distinct flora from the Pantanal, with twice the species richness. As a representative case of aquatic habitats influenced by river flood, some primary data are presented for the Pantanal Matogrossense National Park and associated Acurizal Preserve, analysing the floristic similarity among aquatic vegetation types. We comment on problems of conservation and observe that Panicum elephantipes Nees is one of the few natives to compete with the invasive Urochloa arrecta (Hack. ex T. Durand & Schinz) Morrone & Zuloaga.

  10. Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs) Case Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Wetland Grant Database (WGD) houses grant data for Wetland Program Development Grants (created by EPA in 1990 under the Clean Water Act Section 104(b)(3)...

  11. Designated Wetlands and Setback Distances in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This GIS layer depicts wetlands designated for protection in the state of Iowa. Designated wetland is defined in Iowa Code subsection 459.102(21) as follows: 21....

  12. Measuring the Condition of Saline Wetlands Threatened by Agricultural Intensification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The saline wetlands,or "saladas",of Monegros Desert,NE Spain,contain biodiversity that depends on the establishment of a prognostic monitoring system that can warn of approaching irreversible damage.In the context of a lack of existing biodiversity inventories for the saladas,we determined their state of conservation and vulnerability using seven physical indicators:escarpment continuity,cropping,stone dumping,size,water occurrence,distance to roads,and proximity to irrigated areas.These features were combined into three meaningful indexes,i.e.,conservation,current vulnerability,and future vulnerability,thus creating an assessment of the preservation or degradation of saladas in the context of encroaching agricultural irrigation projects.The proposed indexes produced consistent results and showed that a great number of the Monegros wetlands were threatened,regardless of their size or frequency of water occurrence.Only 20% of the saladas studied were classified as being in a good or very good conservation,whereas 50% were in bad or very bad shape.A high current vulnerability was found for 60% of the saiadas.For saladas located in land to be irrigated,we predicted that 73% would have a high or very high future vulnerability.Currently,58% of the saladas were in bad or very bad condition and fully 65% of the saladas,variable in size,presented a bad or very bad prognosis.Our approach provides a monitoring strategy for the conservation of saline wetlands threatened by agricultural intensification,especially irrigation.

  13. Corpus Christi, Nueces, and Aransas Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay and Nueces Bay comprise the middle estuarine portion of Texas’ Coastal Bend region (Figure 1; Burgan and Engle, 2006). Aransas Bay is part of the upper estuarine portion of the region. These bays make up part of the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, one of the many estuarine areas in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program (Holt, 1998). The Coastal Bend region is sub-humid and sub-tropical. Summers are long, hot, and humid, and winters are short and mild. The landscape around the estuaries is dominated by row crops, pastures, and brushy rangeland (Handley and others, 2007). The Nueces River, along with other smaller rivers and creeks, provides freshwater inflow—along with essential nutrients and sediment— into Nueces Bay, which feeds into Corpus Christi Bay (Holt, 1998). Freshwater inflow into the Aransas Bay comes from Mission River, Aransas River, and Copano Creek. The region is relatively dry otherwise and prone to droughts. Corpus Christi receives an average of 76.2 cm (30 in) of rain annually; evaporation usually exceeds 177.8 cm (70 in) (Holt, 1998; Handley and others, 2007). The San Antonio-Nueces Coastal Basin drains into Aransas Bay. The Nueces River basin covers 43,253 km2 (16,700 miles2 ), from northwest of San Antonio, flowing southeast to where it drains into Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays (Holt, 1998). The Nueces-Rio Grande basin covers approximately 18,648 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 km2 (7,200 miles2 ) and flows partially into Corpus Christi Bay (as well as the upper Laguna Madre). The inflow from Nueces River has declined by approximately 20 percent over the past several decades, partly due to construction of lakes and reservoirs, particularly Lake Corpus Christi

  14. Conservation program and practice effects on ecosystem services in the mid atlantic region of the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Mid-Atlantic Regional (MIAR) Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP-Wetland) study area covers approximately ~58,000 km2 in the eastern United States, including areas of within five states (North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and New...

  15. A Mechanistically Informed User-Friendly Model to Predict Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes and Carbon Storage from Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, O. I.; Ishtiaq, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a user-friendly modeling tool on MS Excel to predict the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and estimate potential carbon sequestration from the coastal wetlands. The dominant controls of wetland GHG fluxes and their relative mechanistic linkages with various hydro-climatic, sea level, biogeochemical and ecological drivers were first determined by employing a systematic data-analytics method, including Pearson correlation matrix, principal component and factor analyses, and exploratory partial least squares regressions. The mechanistic knowledge and understanding was then utilized to develop parsimonious non-linear (power-law) models to predict wetland carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes based on a sub-set of climatic, hydrologic and environmental drivers such as the photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature, water depth, and soil salinity. The models were tested with field data for multiple sites and seasons (2012-13) collected from the Waquoit Bay, MA. The model estimated the annual wetland carbon storage by up-scaling the instantaneous predicted fluxes to an extended growing season (e.g., May-October) and by accounting for the net annual lateral carbon fluxes between the wetlands and estuary. The Excel Spreadsheet model is a simple ecological engineering tool for coastal carbon management and their incorporation into a potential carbon market under a changing climate, sea level and environment. Specifically, the model can help to determine appropriate GHG offset protocols and monitoring plans for projects that focus on tidal wetland restoration and maintenance.

  16. Salinity Tolerance of the Hygrophilous Plant Species in the Wetlands of the South of the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco GOMEZ MERCADO

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate (or to study or to gain information about with the salinity tolerance of the hygrophilous plantspecies recorded along the River Guadiamar (SW of the Iberian Peninsula and in four sublittoral wetlands of the bay of Almería (SEof the Iberian Peninsula. The first of these wetlands is an Atlantic-type open wetland. The other four wetlands in Almería are closedlagoon-like wetlands. The data of each species are given and grouped in categories defined by tolerance range. The results obtained forthe species found in the two sites are then compared. The salinity conditions of the soils of these two types of wetlands are also comparedto discover any possible cause for differentiation. Finally, the different units of measurement of salinity available and some conversionmodels for them will be discussed. As a result of the present data and analysis, the study proposes a model to estimate total dissolved saltsfrom electrical conductivity.

  17. Teacher Valuation and Use of Posters to Promote Sustainability of Wetlands in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndaruga, Ayub Macharia

    2009-01-01

    Posters have a long history of use as tools to promote awareness on diverse issues including environmental conservation. A study was done using 39 primary school teachers in Kenya to explore their valuation and use of a wetlands poster during their teaching at school and within the community. The teachers were sampled using a non-purposive,…

  18. Spatial and temporal variations' of characidae habitat, case study in Abras de Mantequilla wetland, Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Mieles, M.G.; Corzo, G.; Irvine, K.; Mynett, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    A central component of predictive ecology in wetlands is the analysis of species distribution as a function of their biotic and abiotic environment. This analysis is normally used by decision-makers in biodiversity conservation, species monitoring and environmental planning, among others. Habitat su

  19. Tlokoeng Valley Community's Conceptions of Wetlands: Prospects for More Sustainable Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokuku, Tšepo; Taylor, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This article explores prospects for community-based water resources management in Tlokoeng Valley, in the northern district of Lesotho. A qualitative survey was conducted to establish the pre-knowledge of the valley community. This provided a basis for a community education programme on wetlands conservation. Fifteen focus group interviews (FGIs)…

  20. 关于湿地公园湿地保护建设的思考--以湖南新邵筱溪国家湿地公园为例%Consideration on wetland protection and construction of wetland park---The example of Xiaoxi National Wetland Park in Xinshao County of Hunan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周根苗

    2016-01-01

    以湖南新邵筱溪国家湿地公园为例,在简述其基本情况、湿地保护工程建设的基础上,从加大宣传力度,提高公众对湿地保护重要性的认识;加大湿地公园湿地保护资金投入;加快建立湿地保护生态补偿机制;完善相关湿地保护法律法规;建立健全科技支撑体系,加大创新力度等五个方面提出了湿地公园湿地保护建设的建议。%Taking Xiaoxi National Wetland Park in Xinshao County of Hunan Province as an example,and the basic sit﹣uation and construction of wetland protection of it were measured. The reference for the construction of wetland park wet﹣land protection suggestions are pointed out in five aspects as following:intensify propaganda,raise public awareness of the importance of wetland protection and wetland park wetland protection funds,accelerate wetland conservation ecological compensation mechanism,perfecting the related wetland protection laws and regulations,establish and improve the sup﹣port system of science and technology,and increase the intensity of innovation.