WorldWideScience

Sample records for bay wetlands conservation

  1. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  2. 76 FR 22785 - Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0578-AA58 Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, United States... concerning the Natural Resources Conservation Service's (NRCS) coordination responsibilities. DATES..., Director, Ecological Sciences Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources...

  3. Applying science to conservation and restoration of the world's wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsch, W J

    2005-01-01

    The world has an estimated 7 to 9 million km2 of wetlands which can be defined through their hydrology, physiochemical environment, and biota. Many human cultures have lived in harmony with wetland environments for centuries. Many others have not, resulting in drainage or severe impact of wetlands throughout the world. Conservation of wetlands needs to be a priority for the cultural and ecological values they provide. But a more optimistic note is that large-scale restoration and re-creation of wetlands and riverine systems is beginning to happen throughout the world through ecological engineering. Examples of large-scale wetland restoration projects are presented for Delaware Bay, the Skjern River (Denmark), Florida Everglades, Louisiana Delta, the Mississippi River Basin, and the Mesopotamian Marshlands of Iraq.

  4. Bat response to carolina bays and wetland restoration in the southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Jennifer M.; Michael A. Menzel; John C. Kilgo; W. Mark Ford; ; John W. Edwards.

    2005-09-01

    Abstract: Bat activity in the southeastern United States is concentrated over riparian areas and wetland habitats. The restoration and creation of wetlands for mitigation purposes is becoming common in the Southeast. Understanding the effects of these restoration efforts on wetland flora and fauna is thus becoming increasingly important. Because bats (Order: Chiroptera) consist of many species that are of conservation concern and are commonly associated with wetland and riparian habitats in the Southeast (making them a good general indicator for the condition of wetland habitats), we monitored bat activity over restored and reference Carolina bays surrounded by pine savanna (Pinus spp.) or mixed pine-hardwood habitat types at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In order to determine how wetland restoration efforts affected the bat community, we monitored bat activity above drained Carolina bays pre- and post-restoration. Our results indicate that bat activity was greater over reference (i.e., undrained) than drained bays prior to the restorative efforts. One year following combined hydrologic and vegetation treatment, however, bat activity was generally greater over restored than reference bays. Bat activity was also greater over both reference and restored bays than in random, forested interior locations. We found significantly more bat activity after restoration than prior to restoration for all but one species in the treatment bays, suggesting that Carolina bay restoration can have almost immediate positive impacts on bat activity.

  5. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake...

  6. Litchfield Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Litchfield Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  7. 77 FR 74167 - Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation AGENCIES: Farm Service Agency, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: In accordance... associated with Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation certification requirements....

  8. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  9. Microbial diversity and carbon cycling in San Francisco Bay wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Wetland restoration efforts in San Francisco Bay aim to rebuild habitat for endangered species and provide an effective carbon storage solution, reversing land subsidence caused by a century of industrial and agricultural development. However, the benefits of carbon sequestration may be negated by increased methane production in newly constructed wetlands, making these wetlands net greenhouse gas (GHG) sources to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of wetland restoration on below-ground microbial communities responsible for GHG cycling in a suite of historic and restored wetlands in SF Bay. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with real-time GHG monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of wetland soil microbial communities. The wetland soils harbor diverse communities of bacteria and archaea whose membership varies with sampling location, proximity to plant roots and sampling depth. Our results also highlight the dramatic differences in GHG production between historic and restored wetlands and allow us to link microbial community composition and GHG cycling with key environmental variables including salinity, soil carbon and plant species.

  10. Conservation of Mexican wetlands: role of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M.H.; Ryan, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Mexico's wetlands support a tremendous biological diversity and provide significant natural resource benefits to local communities. Because they are also critical stopover and wintering grounds for much of North America's waterfowl and other migratory birds, Mexico has become an important participant in continental efforts to conserve these resources through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. Funding from the Act has supported partnerships in a number of Mexico's priority wetlands to conduct data analyses and dissemination, mapping, environmental education, wetland restoration, development of sustainable economic alternatives for local people, and reserve planning and management. These partnerships, with the close involvement of Mexico's Federal Government authority, the Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, have advanced conservation in a uniquely Mexican model that differs from that employed in the United States and Canada.

  11. The Legal Structure of Taiwan’s Wetland Conservation Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yuan Su

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In July of 2013, Taiwan passed its Wetland Conservation Act and will begin the implementation of the Act on 2 February 2015. With this Act, Taiwan has become the second Asian country to have specific legislation on wetland conservation and protection. This new law enables the society to achieve sustainable utilization on wetland ecological services. The core concepts of the Wetland Conversation Act include biological diversity conservation and wise use of wetland resources. Special political circumstances prevent Taiwan from registering its wetlands as a conservation priority under the Ramsar Convention. This new law allows the government to evaluate and assign a specific area as a “Wetland of Importance.” Under this status, any development activities within the designated area shall be prohibited unless the developer prepares a usage plan for review. The usage plan and the original usage of the natural resources within the wetland area shall also follow the “wise use” principle to protect the wetland and biological service system. However, this new law does not provide clear separation between the two different “wise use” standards. If the development is deemed necessary, new law provides compensation mitigation measures to extend the surface of the wetland and provides additional habitats for various species. Wetland conservation and management rely heavily on systematic research and fundamental data regarding Taiwan’s wetlands. Determining how to adopt these scientific methodologies and transfer them into enforceable mechanisms is a sizeable challenge for both biologists and lawyers as the Wetland Conservation Act creates many legal norms without clarifying definitions. This article will review the current wetland regulations from the legal perspective and provide suggestions for enforcement in the future.

  12. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Characterization of Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIvor, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Tidal wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida, consist of mangrove forests and salt marshes. Wetlands buffer storm surges, provide fish and wildlife habitat, and enhance water quality through the removal of water-borne nutrients and contaminants. Substantial areas of both mangroves and salt marshes have been lost to agricultural, residential, and industrial development in this urban estuary. Wetlands researchers are characterizing the biological components of tidal wetlands and examining the physical factors such as salinity, tidal flushing, and sediment deposition that control the composition of tidal wetland habitats. Wetlands restoration is a priority of resource managers in Tampa Bay. Baseline studies such as these are needed for successful restoration planning and evaluation.

  13. Demographic responses of amphibians to wetland restoration in Carolina bays on the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinkead, Karen E.

    2004-09-30

    This project studied the effects of wetland restoration on amphibian populations. These wetlands were Carolina bays located on the Savannah River Site, located near Aiken, S.C. The Savannah River Site is a National Environmental Research Park owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy. The study sites included three reference bays (functionally intact), three control bays (with active drainage ditches), six treatment bays (restored during 2001), and four bays near two of the treatment bays (in effect creating two metapopulations).

  14. Prof. Cai Shuming Receives 2005 Wetland Conservation Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Cai Shuming, an expert in wetland studies from the CAS Institute of Geodesy & Geophysics, has been honored with a Ramsar Wetland Conservation Award in 2005. The announcement was made by the Standing Committee of the Ramsar Convention on June 10 in Gland,Switzerland.

  15. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: North Dakota Wetland Management Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan CCP was written to guide management on North Dakota Wetland Management Districts for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  16. St. Croix Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on St. Croix Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  17. Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines...

  18. Windom Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Windom Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  19. Morris Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Morris Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  20. Tampa Bay coastal wetlands: nineteenth to twentieth century tidal marsh-to-mangrove conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, mangroves dominate the tidal wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida, but an examination of historic navigation charts revealed dominance of tidal marshes with a mangrove fringe in the 1870s. This study's objective was to conduct a new assessment of wetland change in Tampa Bay by digitizing nineteenth century topographic and public land surveys and comparing these to modern coastal features at four locations. We differentiate between wetland loss, wetland gain through marine transgression, and a wetland conversion from marsh to mangrove. Wetland loss was greatest at study sites to the east and north. Expansion of the intertidal zone through marine transgression, across adjacent low-lying land, was documented primarily near the mouth of the bay. Generally, the bay-wide marsh-to-mangrove ratio reversed from 86:14 to 25:75 in 125 years. Conversion of marsh to mangrove wetlands averaged 72 % at the four sites, ranging from 52 % at Old Tampa Bay to 95 % at Feather Sound. In addition to latitudinal influences, intact wetlands and areas with greater freshwater influence exhibited a lower rate of marsh-to-mangrove conversion. Two sources for nineteenth century coastal landscape were in close agreement, providing an unprecedented view of historic conditions in Tampa Bay.

  1. Wetland Habitats for Wildlife of the Chesapeake Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report reviews wildlife that use these three general wetland habitats; shallow water wetlands, forested wetlands and emergent wetlands. Wildlife discussed are...

  2. Strategy and scenario for wetland conservation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monjit Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are the most important ecosystems for the organisms in Animal Kingdom (including human beings and Plant Kingdom. There are about hundred species of flora in and around Indian Wetlands. They include Sagittaria montividensis, Cryptocoryne ciliata, Cyperus spp., Acrostichum aureum, Ipomoea aquatica, etc. They are also the habitats of several mammals like the marsh mongoose, small Indian mongoose, palm civet and the small Indian civet. Endangered species like the Indian mud turtle have also been found in the wetlands. Certain species of birds also visit the wetlands. Prominent ones are grebe, coot, darter, shag, cormorant, teals, egrets, jacanas, snipes, tern, eagle, sand piper, gulls, rails and kingfishers. The wetlands are important for production of foods and human safety. The East Kolkata wetlands with their garbage farms and fishponds have provided the city with three facilities, i.e., food, sanitation and livelihood. They also provide ecological security to the city of Kolkata. Over the past few years, wetlands have come under severe threat. With the population explosion, some of the largest fish farms have been converted from pisiculture to paddy cultivation. Industries also empty their wastewater effluent without treatment to the channels flowing eastward and these ultimately land up in the wetlands. This has caused substantial amount of deposits of metal in the canal sludge and made the wastewater incapable for the consumption by the fishes and the plants grown in the wetland. Nevertheless, due to urbanization or human interference, the wetland and its unique ecosystem biodiversity are in danger. After Ramsar Convention, 1971, different acts have been passed in India for conservation of wetlands, along with conducting general awareness program for the local people by the government, conducting different programs, management of wetlands, and research by the government, NGOs and other institutions.

  3. Leopold Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This CCP articulates the management direction for the Leopold Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. Through goals, objectives, and strategies, this CCP...

  4. CULTURAL VALUES OF WETLANDS IN BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN NEPAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirat Kamal Sampang Rai

    2006-01-01

    Nepal is rich in wetlands and its biodiversity due to diverse geography, ecology, ecosystem, and cultures. Participatory research methodology was used. More than 59 different traditional societies reside in various geographical belts with diverse and distinct language, culture, custom, religion, beliefs, social norms, knowledge and practices have significant roles in the protection and wise use of wetland biodiversity. Wetland ecology, landscape and cultural values may be accordance with the geographic and human dimension. The bio - cultural diversity supports to enhance wetlands and biodiversity richness from millennia. Traditional cultural, religious, spiritual values, customary lore, folklore, knowledge of the societies are playing important responsibility in wetland ecology, landscapes and biodiversity restoration, conservation and sustainable use, and they should be recognised, respected in National legislation.Themes of CBD, and RAMSAR should be respected and implemented to protect the cultural, religious, ritual, and customary contribution of the society.

  5. Funding and stimulation mechanisms of the wetlands` ecosystem services conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Degtyar, N.V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to study the problems of funding conservation of wetlands ecosystem services and search of organizational and economic management tools of ecosystem services, which can be implemented in Ukraine. The results of the analysis. Summary of world practice implementation of organizational and economic management tools, based on payments for wetlands ecosystem services, determine the following basic principles of their formation: 1) enter into ...

  6. Estuarine, intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types in Klag Bay, Chichagof Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six major estuarine intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types were identified within the inner basin of Klag Bay. These habitat types are mapped in Fig. 3. The...

  7. Resilience of coastal wetlands to extreme hydrologic events in Apalachicola Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahsin, Subrina; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Singh, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Extreme hydrologic events such as hurricanes and droughts continuously threaten wetlands which provide key ecosystem services in coastal areas. The recovery time for vegetation after impact from these extreme events can be highly variable depending on the hazard type and intensity. Apalachicola Bay in Florida is home to a rich variety of saltwater and freshwater wetlands and is subject to a wide range of hydrologic hazards. Using spatiotemporal changes in Landsat-based empirical vegetation indices, we investigate the impact of hurricane and drought on both freshwater and saltwater wetlands from year 2000 to 2015 in Apalachicola Bay. Our results indicate that saltwater wetlands are more resilient than freshwater wetlands and suggest that in response to hurricanes, the coastal wetlands took almost a year to recover, while recovery following a drought period was observed after only a month.

  8. Wetlands Conservation and Use. Issue Pac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview stresses the significance of wetland habitats in all 50 states. The needs of wildlife and humans are also considered in respect to…

  9. COASTAL WETLAND INSECT COMMUNITIES ALONG A TROPHIC GRADIENT IN GREEN BAY, LAKE MICHIGAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insects of Great Lakes coastal wetlands have received little attention in spite of their importance in food webs and sensitivity to anthropogenic stressors. We characterized insect communities from four coastal wetlands that spanned the length of a trophic gradient in Green Bay d...

  10. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wass, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of bromide, a conservative tracer, and rhodamine WT (RWT), a photodegrading tracer, was evaluated in three wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage. Coupled sodium bromide and RWT tracer tests were performed to establish conservative transport and reactive parameters in constructed wetlands with water losses ranging from (1) relatively impermeable (15%), (2) moderately leaky (45%), and (3) significantly leaky (76%). RWT first-order photolysis rates and sorption coefficients were determined from independent field and laboratory experiments. Individual wetland hydraulic profiles influenced the extent of transient storage interaction in stagnant water areas and consequently RWT removal. Solute mixing and transient storage interaction occurred in the impermeable wetland, resulting in 21% RWT mass loss from main channel and storage zone photolysis (10%) and sorption (11%) reactions. Advection and dispersion governed solute transport in the leaky wetland, limiting RWT photolysis removal (1.2%) and favoring main channel sorption (3.6%). The moderately leaky wetland contained islands parallel to flow, producing channel flow and minimizing RWT losses (1.6%).

  11. Funding and stimulation mechanisms of the wetlands` ecosystem services conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Degtyar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to study the problems of funding conservation of wetlands ecosystem services and search of organizational and economic management tools of ecosystem services, which can be implemented in Ukraine. The results of the analysis. Summary of world practice implementation of organizational and economic management tools, based on payments for wetlands ecosystem services, determine the following basic principles of their formation: 1 enter into an agreement with stakeholders payment for ecosystem services on a voluntary basis; 2 payment perform beneficiaries of ecosystem services; 3 payments are made directly to providers of ecosystem services; 4 ecosystem value should prevail over the market interests of the ecosystem services provider; 5 payment is usually carried out by a wetland ecosystem services, although, in some cases, for receiving payments may be to force a certain way of land use, etc. The author generalized and systematized modern tools that are used to manage wetlands ecosystem services. Therefore, the author proposed to allocate financial and organizational tools of ecosystem services management into separate groups. Moreover, financial instruments can be divided into public and private (or voluntary. The government funding instruments primarily include national (local target program and budget, reduced taxes, duties and tariffs, government guarantees of financial transactions of wetland ecosystem services and securitization, joint financing, credit and deposit activities on wetland ecosystem services, etc. Conclusions and directions of further researches. In Ukraine the formation of organizational and economic tools of wetlands ecosystem services managing which is based primarily on a system of payments for ecosystem services needs to take into account the following measures: conducting thorough strategic research and applied ecological, economic and other sectorial studies, conducting

  12. 76 FR 82075 - Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... effective July 24, 1971 (36 FR 13804), relating to notices of proposed rulemaking and public participation... 3015, subpart V, published in the Federal Register on June 24, 1983 (48 FR 29115). Executive Order... Secretary 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0560-AH97 Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of...

  13. San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on San Pablo Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  14. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Back Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  15. Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Grand Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  16. Biological Diversity of Created Forested Wetlands in Comparison to Reference Forested Wetlands in the Bay Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals were surveyed at six created forested wetlands in central Maryland and at six adjacent reference forested wetlands during...

  17. Status Quo, Analysis and Suggestions for Public Awareness on Wetland Conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoyun; XU Jiliang; YUAN Jun

    2011-01-01

    To understand the status of public awareness on wetland conservation in China, 1 237 people from 8 provinces or municipality were interviewed by questionnaire. After analysis of the results, 88.5% of the interviewees know the word ‘wetland'. TV and radio is the main tool for them to get information. More than two thirds of the respondents mainly learn the information on wetland conservation through TV and radio. There are still big gaps among different people in understanding wetland. Only 13.3% of the respondents give a completely right answer on question ‘ which areas are wetlands'. Most of the respondents cited lakes, marshes and rivers as wetlands, but more than half of them do not regard beaches, reservoirs, paddy fields and fish ponds as wetlands. Most of the people cited wetlands can provide such functions as water conservation, climate regulation, protecting wildlife, removing pollution, but know little about other functions such as flood control, provisioning of aquatic products, and soil retention, and much less about the cultural functions such as recreation, and inherited folk culture. Except for wastewater discharge, nearly half of the general public knows little about other threats of the wetland, while most of the people do not believe that artificial aquaculture will cause threats to the wetland areas. Public awareness on wetland conservation in China needs to be improved. Most of the respondents cited that TV, radio and internet are the most effective ways to publicize information on wetland conservation. More than two thirds of the respondents mainly learn the information on wetland conservation through TV and radio, while 38.0% of the respondents mainly through internet.Specifically, for farmers/fishermen, posters/picture albums can benefit them more than the internet; the undergraduates also expect to learn wetland mainly through posters/picture albums; while for the primary and middle school students, the school education is another

  18. Comparison of Qinzhou bay wetland landscape information extraction by three methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chang

    2014-04-01

    and OO is 219 km2, 193.70 km2, 217.40 km2 respectively. The result indicates that SC is in the f irst place, followed by OO approach, and the third DT method when used to extract Qingzhou Bay coastal wetland.

  19. Role of wetlands in attenuation of storm surges using coastal circulation model (ADCIRC), Chesapeake Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Mithun; Ferreira, Celso; Lawler, Seth

    2014-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia is subject to storm surge from extreme weather events nearly year-round; from tropical storms and hurricanes during the summer and fall, (e.g., hurricanes Isabel [2003] and Sandy [2012]), and from nor'easters during the winter (e.g., winter storms Nemo and Saturn [2013]). Coastal wetlands can deliver acute fortification against incoming hurricane storm surges. Coastal wetlands and vegetation shape the hydrodynamics of storm surge events by retaining water and slowing the propagation of storm surge, acting as a natural barrier to flooding. Consequently, a precise scheme to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels was also prerequisite. Two wetland sites were chosen in the Chesapeake Bay region for detailed cataloging of vegetation characteristics, including: height, stem diameter, and density. A framework was developed combining these wetlands characterizations with numerical simulations. Storms surges were calculated using Coastal circulation model (ADCIRC) coupled to a wave model (SWAN) forced by an asymmetric hurricane vortex model using an unstructured mesh (comprised of 1.8 million nodes) under a High Performance Computing environment. The Hurricane Boundary Layer (HBL) model was used to compute wind and pressure fields for historical tropical storms and for all of the synthetic storms. Wetlands were characterized in the coupled numerical models by bathymetric and frictional resistance. Multiple model simulations were performed using historical hurricane data and hypothetical storms to compare the predicted storm surge inundation resulting from various levels of wetlands expansion or reduction. The results of these simulations demonstrate the efficacy of wetlands in storm surge attenuation and also the outcome will scientifically support planning of wetlands restoration projects with multi-objective benefits for society.

  20. 50 CFR 84.21 - How do I apply for a National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, and the Virgin Islands. Louisiana is not eligible to... Wetlands Conservation Grant? 84.21 Section 84.21 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Applying for Grants § 84.21 How do I...

  1. Influence of soil physicochemical properties on hydrology and restoration response in Carolina Bay wetlands.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, C. D.; Andrews, D.M.; Kolka, R.K.

    2006-04-01

    Carolina Bays are shallow depression wetlands found in the southeast US that have been severely altered by human activity. The need to restore these complex and diverse systems is well established, but our understanding of basic wetland hydrological processes is limited, hence our ability to predict the need for and/or assess the effectiveness of bay restorations is hindered. Differing physicochemical properties of soils within bay interiors may control bay hydrology. However, previous efforts to establish relationships between soil characteristics and bay hydrology have been inconclusive and the question still remains as to why some bays are ponded throughout the year while others, within a similar landscape unit, are predominantly dry. An assessment of soil and hydrologic characteristics was initiated in restored and unrestored control bays to determine if a relationship exists. Soil morphology was described and permanent monitoring wells were installed at each site. Soil samples were collected by horizon to a depth of 2 meters at the topographic center of each site, and then analyzed. After three years, multiple regression analysis (stepwise backward and forward) was used to establish relationships between the soil physicochemical characteristics and bay hydroperiod in the undisturbed sites. Results from surface soils indicated that exchangeable acidity (EA) was the best single predictor of hydrology. The best double predictor was EA and total N and EA, total N and total C as the best triple predictor. A significant relationship (r2 = 0.96) between hydroperiod and clay content in the argillic horizon (Bt) was also observed. Subsequently, this relationship was utilized to predict hydrologic response using pre-restoration hydroperiod data. The model accurately identified sites that did not need hydrologic restoration (too wet), and effectively showed sites that responded well to restoration activities.

  2. Effect of climate fluctuations on long-term vegetation dynamics in Carolina bay wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, C.L.; De Steven, D.; Guntenspergen, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    Carolina bays and similar depression wetlands of the U.S. Southeastern Coastal Plain have hydrologic regimes that are driven primarily by rainfall. Therefore, climate fluctuations such as drought cycles have the potential to shape long-term vegetation dynamics. Models suggest two potential long-term responses to hydrologic fluctuations, either cyclic change maintaining open emergent vegetation, or directional succession toward forest vegetation. In seven Carolina bay wetlands on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, we assessed hydrologic variation and vegetation response over a 15-year period spanning two drought and reinundation cycles. Changes in pond stage (water depth) were monitored bi-weekly to monthly each year from 1989?2003. Vegetation composition was sampled in three years (1989, 1993, and 2003) and analyzed in relation to changes in hydrologic conditions. Multi-year droughts occurred prior to the 1989 and 2003 sampling years, whereas 1993 coincided with a wet period. Wetland plant species generally maintained dominance after both wet and dry conditions, but the abundances of different plant growth forms and species indicator categories shifted over the 15-year period. Decreased hydroperiods and water depths during droughts led to increased cover of grass, upland, and woody species, particularly at the shallower wetland margins. Conversely, reinundation and longer hydroperiods resulted in expansion of aquatic and emergent species and reduced the cover of flood-intolerant woody and upland species. These semi-permanent Upper Coastal Plain bays generally exhibited cyclic vegetation dynamics in response to climate fluctuation, with wet periods favoring dominance by herbaceous species. Large basin morphology and deep ponding, paired with surrounding upland forest dominated by flood-intolerant pines, were features contributing to persistence of herbaceous vegetation. Drought cycles may promote directional succession to forest in bays that are smaller

  3. Carbon Sequestration in Mediterranean Tidal Wetlands: San Francisco Bay and the Ebro River Delta (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, J.; Fennessy, S.; Ibanez, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal wetlands accumulate soil carbon at relatively rapid rates, in large part because they build soil to counteract increases in sea-level rise. Because of the rapid rates of carbon sequestration, there is growing interest in evaluating carbon dynamics in tidal wetlands around the world; however, few measurements have been completed for mediterranean-type tidal wetlands, which tend to have relatively high levels of soil salinity, likely affecting both plant productivity and decomposition rates. We measured sediment accretion and carbon sequestration rates at tidal wetlands in two mediterranean regions: the San Francisco Bay Estuary (California, USA) and the Ebro River Delta (Catalonia, Spain). Sampling sites within each region represented a range of conditions in terms of soil salinity and plant communities, and these sites serve as potential analogs for long-term carbon sequestration in restored wetlands, which could receive credits under emerging policies for carbon management. Within San Francisco Bay, we collected six sediment cores per site at four salt marshes and two brackish tidal wetlands (two transects with three stations per transect at each site) in order to identify spatial variation both within and among wetlands in the Estuary. At the Ebro Delta, individual sediment cores were collected across 14 tidal wetland sites, including salt and brackish marshes from impounded areas, river mouths, coastal lagoon, and open bay settings. Cores were collected to 50 cm, and cores were dated using 137Cs and 210Pb. Most sites within San Francisco accreted 0.3-0.5 cm/yr, with slightly higher rates of accretion at low marsh stations; accretions rates based on 137Cs were slightly higher than those based on 210Pb, likely because of the shorter time frame covered by 137Cs dating. Accretion rates from the Ebro Delta sites were similar although more variable, with rates based on 137Cs ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 cm/yr and reflecting the wide range of conditions and management

  4. THE WETLAND TYPES, FUNCTIONS AND CONSERVATION IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    According to preliminary statistics, there are 9. 4 × 106ha of mire, 8.0 × 106ha of lake, 2. 1 × 106ha of salt marsh, 2. 7 × 107ha of shallow sea (0 - Sm), and 3.8 × 107ha of paddyfield, their total area amounts to 8.45 ×107ha. Wetland consists of natural wetland system and man-made wetland system. According to hydrology, landform,soil and vegetation etc., natural wetland can be divided into the following types: marine, esturine, riverine, lacustrine,palustrine subsystems. On the basis of the wetland bottom compound, waterlogged state and vegetation forms, it can be subdivided into 26 wetland classes. Man-made wetland can be subdivided into 4 wetland classes. Wetland is a unique landscape in the earth and one of the most important living environment with rich resources and many functions. At present, 262 different types of Wetland Natural Reserves have been established in China, in which 7 Wetland Nature Reserves have been listed in international important wetlands of "The Wetland Convention".

  5. Wetland ecosystem health assessment through integrating remote sensing and inventory data with an assessment model for the Hangzhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tengteng; Lin, Wenpeng; Chen, Guangsheng; Guo, Pupu; Zeng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and population growth, wetland area in China has shrunk rapidly and many wetland ecosystems have been reported to degrade during recent decades. Wetland health assessment could raise the public awareness of the wetland condition and guide policy makers to make reasonable and sustainable policies or strategies to protect and restore wetland ecosystems. This study assessed the health levels of wetland ecosystem at the Hangzhou Bay, China using the pressure-state-response (PSR) model through synthesizing remote sensing and statistical data. Ten ecological and social-economic indicators were selected to build the wetland health assessment system. Weights of these indicators and PSR model components as well as the normalized wetland health score were assigned and calculated based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. We analyzed the spatio-temporal changes in wetland ecosystem health status during the past 20years (1990-2010) from the perspectives of ecosystem pressure, state and response. The results showed that the overall wetland health score was in a fair health level, but displayed large spatial variability in 2010. The wetland health score declined from good health level to fair health level from 1990 to 2000, then restored slightly from 2000 to 2010. Overall, wetland health levels showed a decline from 1990 to 2010 for most administrative units. The temporal change patterns in wetland ecosystem health varied significantly among administrative units. Our results could help to clarify the administrative responsibilities and obligations and provide scientific guides not only for wetland protection but also for restoration and city development planning at the Hangzhou Bay area. PMID:27236628

  6. The economic value of wetland conservation and creation: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghermandi, Andrea; van den Bergh, J. C. J. M.; Brander, L. M.; Nunes, P.A.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    The rationale for conservation and creation of wetlands stems from the recognition of both their ecological and economic values. This paper examines the welfare impacts of goods and services provided by wetlands. We collected 385 estimates of the economic value of 181 natural and man-made wetlands from 167 studies worldwide. The resulting database is less biased towards North America than previous reviews of the literature. The relative importance of characteristics of the valuation study, of...

  7. The Economic Value of Wetland Conservation and Creation: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Ghermandi; van den Bergh, J. C. J. M.; Brander, L. M.; Groot, H.L.F. de; Nunes, P.A.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    The rationale for conservation and creation of wetlands stems from the recognition of both their ecological and economic values. This paper examines the welfare impacts of goods and services provided by wetlands. We collected 385 estimates of the economic value of 181 natural and man-made wetlands from 167 studies worldwide. The resulting database is less biased towards North America than previous reviews of the literature. The relative importance of characteristics of the valuation study, of...

  8. Seasonal wetlands in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and Nicaragua: environmental characterisation and conservation state.

    OpenAIRE

    Sasa, Mahmood; Armengol Díaz, Javier; Bonilla, Fabián; Mesquita Joanes, Francesc; Piculo, Rubén; Rojo García-Morato, Carmen; Rueda, Ricardo; Monrós González, Juan S.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal wetlands in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and Nicaragua: environmental characterisation and conservation status On the Pacific coast of Nicaragua and Costa Rica, rainfall patterns and clay-rich soils allow the development of extensive wetlands. These environments constitute unique habitats for the maintenance of aquatic biodiversity and provide significant ecological services to the surrounding seasonal dry forest. Despite these benefits, wetlands have been severely reduced in the ...

  9. Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Caleb J.; Euliss, Ned H.; Mushnet, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive modification of upland habitats surrounding wetlands to facilitate agricultural production has negatively impacted amphibian communities in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America. In attempts to mitigate ecosystem damage associated with extensive landscape alteration, vast tracks of upland croplands have been returned to perennial vegetative cover (i.e., conservation grasslands) under a variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture programs. We evaluated the influence of these conservation grasslands on amphibian occupancy of seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region. Using automated call surveys, aquatic funnel traps, and visual encounter surveys, we detected eight amphibian species using wetlands within three land-use categories (farmed, conservation grasslands, and native prairie grasslands) during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Seasonal wetlands within farmlands were used less frequently by amphibians than those within conservation and native prairie grasslands, and wetlands within conservation grasslands were used less frequently than those within native prairie grasslands by all species and life-stages we successfully modeled. Our results suggest that, while not occupied as frequently as wetlands within native prairie, wetlands within conservation grasslands provide important habitat for maintaining amphibian biodiversity in the Prairie Pothole Region

  10. Survival strategies of people in a Sri Lankan wetland : livelihood, health and nature conservation in Muthurajawela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogvorst, A.

    2003-01-01

    Key words: Anthropology, emic, environment, etic, gender, health, livelihoods, Muthurajawela, nature-conservation, survival strategies, Sri Lanka, wetland.The objective of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of how poor people living in a sensitive wetland ecosystem maint

  11. 76 FR 30186 - Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Birds and Wetlands Conservation Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ..., environmental education and outreach, organizational infrastructure development, and sustainable-use studies... partnerships to carry out wetlands conservation projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for the..., and Mexico that involve long-term protection, restoration, and/ or enhancement of wetlands...

  12. Wetland macroinvertebrates of Prentiss Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan: diversity and functional group composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, R.W.; Benbow, M.E.; Hudson, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Great Lakes support many fish and waterbirds that depend directly or indirectly on coastal wetlands during some portion of their life cycle. It is known that macroinvertebrates make up an important part of wetland food webs and ecosystem function; however, our understanding of species distribution within and among wetlands has only recently received attention. We investigated the macroinvertebrates of a freshwater marsh (Prentiss Bay) in the Les Chenaux Island Area of Northern Lake Huron, Michigan. Macroinvertebrate taxa diversity and functional feeding group composition were compared between two habitats. A shallow depositional habitat with higher vegetation diversity and little wave action was compared to a deeper erosional habitat with fewer plant species and more wave action. A total of 83 taxa were collected over the summer of 1996, representing two phyla (Arthropoda and Mollusca) and five classes (Arachnida, Bivalvia, Malacostraca, Gastropoda and Insecta). A total of 79 genera were identified, with 92% being insects (39 families composed of at least 73 genera). Of the total, 42 insect genera were common to both habitats,while relatively fewer were collected exclusively from the erosional compared the depositional habitat. When habitats were pooled, predators comprised about 50% of the functional group taxa, while gathering collectors and shredders each were about 20%. Filtering collectors and scrapers each represented functional groups were lower. These data suggest that vegetation diversity, depth and wave action affect taxa composition and functional group organization of the Prentiss Bay marsh.

  13. Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment: North Dakota Wetland Management Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan CCP was written to guide management on North Dakota Wetland Management Districts for the next 15 years. This plan...

  14. Big Stone Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Big Stone Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  15. Effects of conservation practices on fishes, amphibians, and reptiles within agricultural streams and wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation practices have been traditionally used to manage soil and water resources to improve agricultural production, and now include methods to reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture on streams and wetlands. These practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watershed...

  16. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge and Lacreek Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lacreek NWR and Lacreek Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan...

  17. Detroit Lakes Wetlands Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Detroit Lakes Wetlands Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines...

  18. Fergus Falls Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Fergus Falls Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  19. Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge and Wetland Management District: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Minnesota Valley NWR and Wetland Management District for the next 15 years. This plan...

  20. Mercury Cycling in Blacklock Wetland: A Study of a Restored Tidal Marsh in Suisun Bay, Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, W.; Stephenson, M.; Newman, A.; Siegel, S. W.; Gillenwater, D.; Coale, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Historically Suisun Bay Marsh included ~68,000 acres of tidal wetlands. From mid-1800's to early 1900's over 90% of the wetlands were reclaimed for agriculture. Today, those diked lands are predominantly managed as seasonal wetlands for waterfowl hunting. Currently, planning efforts to restore 65,000 acres of Delta and Suisun tidal habitat are in final stages of development. The 70 -acre Blacklock tidal marsh restoration site, located in northeast Suisun Marsh, was restored by the California Department of Water Resources in 2006 after having been used for livestock grazing and duck hunting activities since 1946. This study is the first effort at estimating the impact on mercury cycling of converting a diked, managed wetland with limited and seasonal water exchange to tidal marsh with unrestricted daily tidal inundations. The goals of this study were to estimate changes in total mercury and methyl mercury concentrations in fish, sediment and water within the restoration site before and after restoration. Field sampling took place January, 2005 to September, 2009. Results of two-sample t-test indicate unfiltered aqueous methylmercury concentrations post breach (0.101 to 0.768 ng L-1) were significantly lower (t(2), 8 = 6.19; p -1). Methylmercury sediment concentrations were higher and more variability between sample locations within the restoration site during year one post-breach (2.42 to 3.69 ng g-1 dry) relative to years 2 and 3 post-breach (1.48 to 1.85 ng g-1 d/w). Total mercury sediment concentrations ranged from 0.162 ± 0.013 to 0.228 ± 0.016 μg g-1 d/w. Mercury concentrations in Inland Silverside (Menidia beryllina) post-breach decreased significantly from 0.163 ± 0.039 ug g-1 w/w to 0.038 ± 0.023 ug g-1 w/w. Greater connectivity of tidal wetlands with surrounding open water areas resulted in decreased methylmercury concentrations in water, sediment, and fish. Two possible explanations may account for these results. First, wetland biogeochemistry in a

  1. Gap Analysis and Conservation Network for Freshwater Wetlands in Central Yangtze Ecoregion

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xiaowen; Zhuge Haijin; Mengdi Li

    2013-01-01

    The Central Yangtze Ecoregion contains a large area of internationally important freshwater wetlands and supports a huge number of endangered waterbirds; however, these unique wetlands and the biodiversity they support are under the constant threats of human development pressures, and the prevailing conservation strategies generated based on the local scale cannot adequately be used as guidelines for ecoregion-based conservation initiatives for Central Yangtze at the broad scale. This paper a...

  2. Urban Wetlands: An Opportunity for Environmental Conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EHRENFELD David

    2009-01-01

    China's remarkable economic growth and transformation in recent years has been a model for the world,but like all other expanding economics there have been accompanying environmental problems.For more than 5,000 years,however,China has proven that it can cope with problems and remain a vibrant society.China is now turning its attention to the environment through efforts to conserve endangered species,create protected areas,use renewable energy,reforest the margins of deserts,control air pollution,rehabilitate ecosystems,develop ecological agriculture,promote ecotourism,and safeguard its supplies of fresh water.Some of these efforts have had more success than others.The restoration and protection of urban wetlands offers a unique opportunity to meet many of these environmental challenges simultaneously,including the enhancement of the awareness and appreciation of nature and natural processes among urban populations,especially children,upon whom the future of China's environmental movement depends.The United States is facing similar challenges in its urban areas,and some of its recent approaches to dealing with nature in cities may provide useful guidelines.

  3. Abundance and Conservation of Cyperus papyrus in the Nakivubo wetland, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Nerima

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to high population growth, there is increasing pressure on wetlands to the extent that wetland natural vegetation is continuously being replaced with food crops to meet the increasing food demands. The natural vegetation of Nakivubo wetland is dominated by Cyperus papyrus. Cyperus papyrus has recently been intensively harvested, there by creating a gap between its conservation and utilization. This study was conducted to compare the abundance of papyrus in the disturbed and non disturbed sites and document the strategies used to conserve Cyperus papyrus in Nakivubo wetland. .The abundance of papyrus was assessed in 1m x 1m plots established along 2 transects in the disturbed and undisturbed parts of the wetland. The strategies used by the wetland users to conserve papyrus were determined by administering a questionnaire regarding wetland utilization to thirty respondents. The results showed that generally individuals of papyrus per hectare were higher in the undisturbed sites than disturbed sites. The non disturbed sites had more culms than the disturbed site though there were more juveniles in the disturbed site than in the non disturbed sites. All the respondents did not domesticate papyrus. Majority of the respondents did not allow the papyrus to regenerate after harvesting. They were not aware of the recommended harvesting intervals for papyrus. It is recommended that responsible authorities sensitize the public about appropriate use of the wetland and inform them about the suitable harvesting intervals for papyrus.

  4. Environmental radionuclides in a coastal wetland of the Southern Laizhou Bay, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activity concentrations of radionuclides in a coastal wetland were evaluated. • Radiological hazard indexes were calculated. • The radioactivity level in the coastal wetland was in normal range. • Vertical distributions of radionuclides were investigated. - Abstract: The radioactivity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40K, and 137Cs in soil samples collected in a coastal wetland of the Southern Laizhou Bay, China were measured. Mean activity concentrations were 54.4 ± 11.7, 57.9 ± 9.7, 28.6 ± 4.3, 542 ± 21, and 10.2 ± 2.9 Bq kg−1 dry weight for 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs, respectively. Statistical analyses suggested significant correlations between clay content and 40K as well as 137Cs. The radium equivalent activity, the absorbed dose rate in the air at 1 m above the ground surface, and the external hazard index were calculated. The result showed that the radioactivity level in the wetland was in normal range. But sites along the river tended to have higher radiological hazard indexes. The vertical distributions of radionuclides in profiles illustrated some phenomena, such as vertical transport of 238U, disequilibrium between 238U and 226Ra, and change in material sources

  5. Gap Analysis and Conservation Network for Freshwater Wetlands in Central Yangtze Ecoregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaowen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Central Yangtze Ecoregion contains a large area of internationally important freshwater wetlands and supports a huge number of endangered waterbirds; however, these unique wetlands and the biodiversity they support are under the constant threats of human development pressures, and the prevailing conservation strategies generated based on the local scale cannot adequately be used as guidelines for ecoregion-based conservation initiatives for Central Yangtze at the broad scale. This paper aims at establishing and optimizing an ecological network for freshwater wetland conservation in the Central Yangtze Ecoregion based on large-scale gap analysis. A group of focal species and GIS-based extrapolation technique were employed to identify the potential habitats and conservation gaps, and the optimized conservation network was then established by combining existing protective system and identified conservation gaps. Our results show that only 23.49% of the potential habitats of the focal species have been included in the existing nature reserves in the Central Yangtze Ecoregion. To effectively conserve over 80% of the potential habitats for the focal species by optimizing the existing conservation network for the freshwater wetlands in Central Yangtze Ecoregion, it is necessary to establish new wetland nature reserves in 22 county units across Hubei, Anhui, and Jiangxi provinces.

  6. Attenuation of Storm Surge Flooding By Wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay: An Integrated Geospatial Framework Evaluating Impacts to Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Haddad, J.; Lawler, S.; Ferreira, C.

    2014-12-01

    Areas along the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries are extremely vulnerable to hurricane flooding, as evidenced by the costly effects and severe impacts of recent storms along the Virginia coast, such as Hurricane Isabel in 2003 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Coastal wetlands, in addition to their ecological importance, are expected to mitigate the impact of storm surge by acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding. Quantifying such interactions helps to provide a sound scientific basis to support planning and decision making. Using storm surge flooding from various historical hurricanes, simulated using a coupled hydrodynamic wave model (ADCIRC-SWAN), we propose an integrated framework yielding a geospatial identification of the capacity of Chesapeake Bay wetlands to protect critical infrastructure. Spatial identification of Chesapeake Bay wetlands is derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), National Land Cover Database (NLCD), and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). Inventories of population and critical infrastructure are extracted from US Census block data and FEMA's HAZUS-Multi Hazard geodatabase. Geospatial and statistical analyses are carried out to develop a relationship between wetland land cover, hurricane flooding, population and infrastructure vulnerability. These analyses result in the identification and quantification of populations and infrastructure in flooded areas that lie within a reasonable buffer surrounding the identified wetlands. Our analysis thus produces a spatial perspective on the potential for wetlands to attenuate hurricane flood impacts in critical areas. Statistical analysis will support hypothesis testing to evaluate the benefits of wetlands from a flooding and storm-surge attenuation perspective. Results from geospatial analysis are used to identify where interactions with critical infrastructure are relevant in the Chesapeake Bay.

  7. [Soil organic carbon content and its distribution pattern in Hangzhou Bay coastal wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xue-xin; Yang, Wen-ying; Wu, Ming; Jiang, Ke-yi

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution pattern in the natural intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands of Hangzhou Bay were studied, aimed to explore the effects of vegetation succession, exotic species invasion, and reclamation on the SOC in costal wetlands of the Bay. In intertidal zones, the surface SOC content ranged from 4.41 to 8.58 g x kg(-1), with an average of 6.45 g x kg(-1), and differed significantly under different vegetations, with a tendency of under Phragmites australis (8.56 +/- 0.04 g x kg(-1)) > Spartina alterniflora (7.31 +/- 0.08 g x kg(-1)) > Scirpus mariqueter (5.48 +/- 0.29 g x kg(-1)) > mudflats (4.47 +/- 0.09 g x kg(-1)); in reclaimed wetlands, the surface SOC content was 7.46 +/- 0.25 g x kg(-1) in the 1960s, 1.96 +/- 0.46 g x kg(-1) in the 1980s, and 5.12 +/- 0.16 g x kg(-1) in 2003, showing a trend of increased after an initial decrease with increasing reclamation year. The SOC in the profiles all showed a decreasing trend from the surface to the bottom. The SOC in intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil total nitrogen (TN), suggesting a large reserve of organic nitrogen in TN. The correlation between SOC and soil C/N ratio was not obvious in intertidal zones, but significantly positive in reclaimed wetlands, indicating that reclamation affected soil C/N ratio to a certain extent. This study showed that in the intertidal zones, soil carbon sequestration capacity increased gradually with plant community succession. However, the invasion of exotic species Spartina alternflora might decrease the capacity of carbon sequestration in intertidal zones. It was also found that the changes of soil moisture content, particle composition, vegetation coverage, and reclamation history were the main factors affecting the SOC distribution in reclaimed wetlands.

  8. Strategy and scenario for wetland conservation in India

    OpenAIRE

    Monjit Paul; Mukti Chanda; Supriya Sen Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Wetlands are the most important ecosystems for the organisms in Animal Kingdom (including human beings) and Plant Kingdom. There are about hundred species of flora in and around Indian Wetlands. They include Sagittaria montividensis, Cryptocoryne ciliata, Cyperus spp., Acrostichum aureum, Ipomoea aquatica, etc. They are also the habitats of several mammals like the marsh mongoose, small Indian mongoose, palm civet and the small Indian civet. Endangered species like the Indian mud turtle have ...

  9. The conservation status of Moroccan wetlands with particular reference to waterbirds and to changes since 1978

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Andy J; El Hamzaoui, Mustapha; Aziz El Agbanic, Mohammed; Franchimont, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Morgan made detailed descriptions of 24 major Moroccan wetlands visited in 1978, with a total area of 4529 ha (Morgan, N.C., 1982a. An ecological survey of standing waters in North West Africa: III. Site descriptions for Morocco. Biological Conservation, 24, 161–182.). We revisited these sites, and found that 25% of the wetland area had been destroyed by 1999. This loss was con- centrated in wetland types of low salinity ( < 5 g/l NaCl), with a 98% loss of seasonal mesohaline sites,...

  10. Projected wetland densities under climate change: Habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen; Skagen, Susan; Barsugli, Joseph J.; Rashford, Benjamin S.; Reese, Gordon; Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Wood, Andrew W.; Noon, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species’ vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland

  11. San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement: Volume I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on San Diego Bay NWR (Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units) for the next 15...

  12. Conserving Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and surrounding grasslands: evaluating effects on amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Neau, Jordan L.

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of viable and genetically diverse populations of amphibians in the Prairie Pothole Region of the United States depends on upland as well as wetland over-wintering and landscape level habitat features. Prairie pothole wetlands provide important amphibian breeding habitat while grasslands surrounding these wetlands provide foraging habitat for adults, overwintering habitat for some species, and important connectivity among breeding wetlands. Grasslands surrounding wetlands were found to be especially important for wood frogs and northern leopard frogs, while croplands dominated habitat utilized by Great Plains toads and Woodhouse’s toads. Habitat suitability mapping highlighted (1) the influence of deep-water overwintering wetlands on suitable habitat for four of five anuran species encountered; (2) the lack of overlap between areas of core habitat for both the northern leopard frog and wood frog compared to the core habitat for both toad species; and (3) the importance of conservation programs in providing grassland components of northern leopard frog and wood frog habitat. Currently, there are approximately 7.2 million acres (2.9 million hectares, ha) of habitat in the PPR identified as suitable for amphibians. WRP and CRP wetland and grassland habitats accounted for approximately 1.9 million acres (0.75 million ha) or 26 percent of this total area. Continued loss of amphibian habitat resulting from an ongoing trend of returning PPR conservation lands to crop production, will likely have significant negative effects on the region’s ability to maintain amphibian biodiversity. Conversely, increases in conservation wetlands and surrounding grasslands on the PPR landscape have great potential to positively influence the region’s amphibian populations.

  13. Microbial Remediation and Optimization of Oil Polluted Wetlands at Dalian Bay in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The wetland at Dalian Bay in the Northeast of China has been polluted by oil severely. The effect of various microbes and operation parameters on the bioremediation of oil-polluted wetlands at Dalian Bay was investigated and reported previously. In the study,other operation conditions related to the status of medium were investigated via statistical experimental design and analysis and a necessary information is involved to use micro-technology in the application.Methods The method used involved the direct inoculation of selected bacteria,which were capable of degrading oil. The operation conditions were further optimized and evaluated by gravimetrical assay.Results The optimal pH and temperature for the studied bacteria to degrade the existing oil pollutants were established as pH 8.0 and 27℃. The mixed of various bacteria showed better results in terms of oil degradation than any single one. Among the selected four factors,disturbance,oxidant,nutrients,and biosurfactant,the former two contributed more impacts on the oil degradation in the early stage of process,while the latter two became the limiting factors in the late stage. Three sets of optimal conditions were obtained for each individual stage,but no one was suitable for the overall process.Conclusion The study demonstrated the technical feasibility of using direct inoculation into the contaminated soil samples to remove oil pollutants. It suggested that the operation conditions should be monitored and adjusted during the different stages of bio-reactions in the process to achieve the best result of oil degradation.

  14. Hydrodynamics and Associated Sediment Transport over Coastal Wetlands in Quanzhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-jun

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes represent an important coastal wetland system.In order to understand the differences between boundary layer parameters of vegetated and unvegetated areas,as well as the mechanisms of sediment transport,several electromagnetic current meters(AEM HR,products of Alec Electronics Co.Ltd.)were deployed in coastal wetlands in Quanzhou Bay,China,to measure current velocity.During the low tide phase,the surficial sediment was collected at 10 m intervals.In situ measurements show that the current velocities on the bare flat were much higher than those in the Spartina alterniora marsh.Current velocity also varied with distance from marsh edge and plant canopy height and diameter.Around 63% of the velocity profiles in the tidal creek can be described by a logarithmic equation.Over the bare flat and Spartina alterniglora marsh,a logarithmic profile almost occurs during the flood tide phase.Sediment analysis shows that mean grain size was 6.7(D along the marsh edge,and surface sediments were transported from bare flat to marsh;the tidal creeks may change this sediment transport pattern.The hydrodynamics at early flood tide and late ebb tide phases determined the net transport direction within the study area.

  15. Effect of conservation efforts and ecological variables on waterbird population sizes in wetlands of the Yangtze River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Qiang; Prins, Herbert H T; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Frederik

    2015-11-25

    Forage quality and availability, climatic factors, and a wetland's conservation status are expected to affect the densities of wetland birds. However, the conservation effectiveness is often poorly studied. Here, using twelve years' census data collected from 78 wetlands in the Yangtze River floodplain, we aimed to understand the effect of these variables on five Anatidae species, and evaluate the effectiveness of the conservation measures by comparing population trends of these species among wetlands that differ in conservations status. We showed that the slope angle of a wetland and the variation thereof best explain the differences in densities of four species. We also found that the population abundances of the Anatidae species generally declined in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain over time, with a steeper decline in wetlands with a lower protection status, indicating that current conservation policies might deliver benefits for wintering Anatidae species in China, as population sizes of the species were buffered to some extent against decline in numbers in wetlands with a higher level protection status. We recommend several protection measures to stop the decline of these Anatidae species in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain, which are of great importance for the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

  16. Tampa Bay Refuges: Egmont Key, Pinellas, and Passage Key National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Tampa Bay Refuges for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the refuges' vision and...

  17. Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs for the next 15 years....

  18. Can rice field channels contribute to biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazilian wetlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, Leonardo; Rolon, Ana Silvia; Stenert, Cristina; Machado, Iberê Farina; Rocha, Odete

    2011-12-01

    Conservation of species in agroecosystems has attracted attention. Irrigation channels can improve habitats and offer conditions for freshwater species conservation. Two questions from biodiversity conservation point of view are: 1) Can the irrigated channels maintain a rich diversity of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians over the cultivation cycle? 2) Do richness, abundance and composition of aquatic species change over the rice cultivation cycle? For this, a set of four rice field channels was randomly selected in Southern Brazilian wetlands. In each channel, six sample collection events were carried out over the rice cultivation cycle (June 2005 to June 2006). A total of 160 taxa were identified in irrigated channels, including 59 macrophyte species, 91 taxa of macroinvertebrate and 10 amphibian species. The richness and abundance of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians did not change significantly over the rice cultivation cycle. However, the species composition of these groups in the irrigation channels varied between uncultivated and cultivated periods. Our results showed that the species diversity found in the irrigation channels, together with the permanence of water enables these man-made aquatic networks to function as important systems that can contribute to the conservation of biodiversity in regions where the wetlands were converted into rice fields. The conservation of the species in agriculture, such as rice field channels, may be an important alternative for biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazil, where more than 90% of wetland systems have already been lost and the remaining ones are still at high risk due to the expansion of rice production.

  19. Can rice field channels contribute to biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazilian wetlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, Leonardo; Rolon, Ana Silvia; Stenert, Cristina; Machado, Iberê Farina; Rocha, Odete

    2011-12-01

    Conservation of species in agroecosystems has attracted attention. Irrigation channels can improve habitats and offer conditions for freshwater species conservation. Two questions from biodiversity conservation point of view are: 1) Can the irrigated channels maintain a rich diversity of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians over the cultivation cycle? 2) Do richness, abundance and composition of aquatic species change over the rice cultivation cycle? For this, a set of four rice field channels was randomly selected in Southern Brazilian wetlands. In each channel, six sample collection events were carried out over the rice cultivation cycle (June 2005 to June 2006). A total of 160 taxa were identified in irrigated channels, including 59 macrophyte species, 91 taxa of macroinvertebrate and 10 amphibian species. The richness and abundance of macrophytes, macroinvertebrates and amphibians did not change significantly over the rice cultivation cycle. However, the species composition of these groups in the irrigation channels varied between uncultivated and cultivated periods. Our results showed that the species diversity found in the irrigation channels, together with the permanence of water enables these man-made aquatic networks to function as important systems that can contribute to the conservation of biodiversity in regions where the wetlands were converted into rice fields. The conservation of the species in agriculture, such as rice field channels, may be an important alternative for biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazil, where more than 90% of wetland systems have already been lost and the remaining ones are still at high risk due to the expansion of rice production. PMID:22208101

  20. Effect of conservation efforts and ecological variables on waterbird population sizes in wetlands of the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Qiang; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Frederik

    2015-11-01

    Forage quality and availability, climatic factors, and a wetland’s conservation status are expected to affect the densities of wetland birds. However, the conservation effectiveness is often poorly studied. Here, using twelve years’ census data collected from 78 wetlands in the Yangtze River floodplain, we aimed to understand the effect of these variables on five Anatidae species, and evaluate the effectiveness of the conservation measures by comparing population trends of these species among wetlands that differ in conservations status. We showed that the slope angle of a wetland and the variation thereof best explain the differences in densities of four species. We also found that the population abundances of the Anatidae species generally declined in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain over time, with a steeper decline in wetlands with a lower protection status, indicating that current conservation policies might deliver benefits for wintering Anatidae species in China, as population sizes of the species were buffered to some extent against decline in numbers in wetlands with a higher level protection status. We recommend several protection measures to stop the decline of these Anatidae species in wetlands along the Yangtze River floodplain, which are of great importance for the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

  1. Addressing Trade-offs: Experiences from Conservation and Development Initiatives in the Mkuze Wetlands, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catie Burlando

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Present-day conservation policies generally include the aim to integrate biodiversity conservation and local development, and describe this as a win–win solution that can satisfy all interests. This is challenged by research claiming that many efforts fail to match practice to rhetoric. South Africa has made strong commitments to fulfill the dual goals of conservation and development, and the iSimangaliso Wetland Park is promoted as an example of this. We explore present and potential outcomes of conservation and development interventions in a community bordering the Wetland Park through the perspective of different stakeholders, with the aim of uncovering opportunities and risks. In terms of improving local livelihoods as well as involvement in conservation, the success of the studied interventions varied. Local communities may accept restrictions on resource use as a result of realistic and fairly negotiated trade-offs, but if perceived as unjust and imposed from above, then mistrust and resistance will increase. In this area, collaboration between conservation organizations and the local community had improved, but still faced problems associated with unequal power relations, unrealistic expectations, and a lack of trust, transparency, and communication. As unsustainable efforts are a waste of funds and engagement, and may even become counterproductive, policy visions need to be matched by realistic allocations of staff, time, funds, and training. At the national and international level, the true cost of conservation has to be recognized and budgeted for if efforts at integrating conservation and development are to succeed.

  2. Hydrogeochemistry and sustainability of freshwater lenses in the Samborombón Bay wetland, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol, Eleonora; García, Leandro; Borzi, Guido

    2015-07-01

    Freshwater lenses constitute one of the most vulnerable aquifer systems in the world, especially in coastal wetland areas. The objectives of this work are to determine the hydrogeochemical processes that regulate the quality of the freshwater lenses in a sector of the Samborombón Bay wetland, and to assess their sustainability as regards the development of mining activities. A hydrochemical evaluation of groundwater was undertaken on the basis of major ion, trace and environmental isotope data. The deterioration in time of the freshwater lenses in relation to mining was studied on the basis of the analysis of topographic charts, aerial photography and satellite imaging. The results obtained show that the CO2(g) that dissolves in the rainwater infiltrating and recharging the lenses is converted to HCO3-, which dissolves the carbonate facies of the sediment. The exchange of Ca2+ for Na+, the incongruent dissolution of basic plagioclase and the reprecipitation of carbonate produce a change of the Ca-HCO3 facies to Na-HCO3. In depth, the pH increases with the groundwater flow, and the volcanic glassis dissolved, releasing F-and As. Besides, the evapotranspiration processes cause the saline content to increase slightly. As the only sources of drinking water in the region are the freshwater lenses occurring in the shell ridges, mining operations have deteriorated this resource and decreased the freshwater reserves in the lenses. The study undertaken made it possible to develop some preservation, remediation and management guidelines aimed at the sustainability of the water resources in the region.

  3. Freshwater Wetland Habitat Loss and Fragmentation: Implications for Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Pierre, J. P.; Labay, B. J.; Ryberg, W. A.; Hibbits, T. J.; Prestridge, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have caused widespread wetland loss and fragmentation. This trend has important implications for aquatic biota conservation, including the semi-aquatic Western Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia miaria). This species inhabits seasonally inundated, ephemeral water bodies and adjacent uplands in the southeastern U.S. However, wetland conversion to agriculture and urbanization is thought to cause the species' decline, particularly in Texas, which includes the westernmost part of its range. Because the species moves only a few kilometers between wetlands, it particularly sensitive to habitat loss and fragmentation. Thus, as part of the only state-funded species research program, this study provides the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) with scientific data to determine if the species warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We use a species distribution model to map potentially suitable habitat for most of East Texas. We evaluate landscape-scale anthropogenic activities in this region which may be contributing to the species' decline. We identify areas of urbanization, agricultural expansion, forestry, and resulting wetland loss. We find that between 2001 and 2011 approximately 80 km2 of wetlands were lost in potentially suitable habitat, including the urbanizing Houston area. We use spatial geostatistics to quantify wetland habitat fragmentation. We also introduce the Habitat Alteration Index (HAI), which calculates total landscape alteration and mean probability of occurrence to identify high-quality habitat most at risk of recent anthropogenic alteration. Population surveys by biologists are targeting these areas and future management actions may focus on mitigating anthropogenic activities there. While this study focuses on D. r. miaria, this approach can evaluate wetland habitat of other aquatic organisms.

  4. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data, a peak in July–August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000.

  5. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in June (consistent with the aircraft data and seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover, and greatly improves the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates.

  6. BUFFER ZONE METHOD, LAND USE PLANNING AND CONSERVATION STRATEGIES ABOUT WETLANDS UNDER URBANIZATION PRESSURE IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    Ergen, Baris

    2010-01-01

    Wetlands are special areas that they offer habitat for terrestrial and water life. Wetlands are nest sides also for amphibian, for this reason wetlands offer wide range diversity for species. Wetlands are also reproduction regions for birds. Wetlands have special importance for ecosystem because they obstruct erosion. Wetlands absorb contaminants from water therefore wetlands contribute to clean water and they offer more potable water. Wetlands obstruct waterflood. In that case wetlands must ...

  7. Biodiversity inventories and conservation of the marine fishes of Bootless Bay, Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Joshua A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effective management and conservation of biodiversity is predicated on clearly defined conservation targets. Species number is frequently used as a metric for conservation prioritization and monitoring changes in ecosystem health. We conducted a series of synoptic surveys focusing on the fishes of the Bootless Bay region of Papua New Guinea to generate a checklist of fishes of the region. Bootless Bay lies directly south of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea, and experiences the highest human population density of any marine area in the country. Our checklist will set a baseline against which future environmental changes can be tracked. Results We generated a checklist of 488 fish species in 72 families found in Bootless Bay during a two-week sampling effort. Using incident-based methods of species estimation, we extrapolate there to be approximately 940 fish species in Bootless Bay, one of the lowest reported numbers in Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Our data suggest that the Bootless Bay ecosystem of Papua New Guinea, while diverse in absolute terms, has lower fish biodiversity compared to other shallow marine areas within the country. These differences in faunal diversity are most likely a combination of unequal sampling effort as well as biophysical factors within Bootless Bay compounded by historical and/or contemporary anthropogenic disturbances.

  8. Hydrogeochemistry of groundwater in coastal wetlands: implications for coastal conservation in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, R; Soulsby, C

    2001-01-29

    Groundwater in a shallow coastal aquifer in north east Scotland was monitored over the hydrological year October 1996-September 1997. Groundwater flow from inland areas sustained freshwater conditions in a dune-wetland complex of conservation importance. In particular, seasonal flooding of the coastal wetlands due to water table rise provided important roosting and breeding habitats for waterfowl. Hydrogeochemical analysis revealed that groundwater in the shallow sand aquifer was circum-neutral, and non-saline, despite being within 50 m of the sea and only 1 m above the mean high water mark. Calcium and HCO3 were the dominant cation and anion respectively, reflecting weathering processes in the aquifer. Use of the geochemical code NETPATH indicated that calcite weathering in shell fragments within the sand was the primary source of Ca and alkalinity generation. The concentrations of Na and Cl were also important, though these can be explained primarily by atmospheric inputs from precipitation. In detail, the spatial and temporal variation in groundwater chemistry was remarkably complex for what intuitively appeared a simple aquifer system. Temporal variations in groundwater chemistry mainly related to the seasonal event of groundwater recharge. Thus, the main period of rising groundwater levels resulted in a marked dilution of solutes in the aquifer, implying that water storage greatly increased in a relatively short period. A period of several weeks appeared to be required for dissolution processes to proceed to equilibrium. Spatial variation in groundwater chemistry appears to relate to the spatial distribution of geochemical processes in different hydrogeological units. Sulphate reduction, alkalinity generation and Fe precipitation appear to be locally important processes. The chemistry of groundwater maintains the wetland habitat by providing freshwater conditions that allow populations of various plant species to flourish. The potentially large recharge

  9. Tidal wetland conservation and restoration for flood mitigation in estuaries and deltas: examples and global potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Smolders, Sven; Stark, Jeroen; meire, patrick

    2014-05-01

    Low-lying and densely populated deltas and estuaries are world widely exposed to flood risks caused by storm surges. On the one hand, global change is increasing these flood risks through accelerating sea level rise and increasing storm intensity, but on the other hand, local-scale human impacts on deltas and estuaries are in many cases even more increasing the vulnerability to floods. Here we address the degradation and reclamation of tidal wetlands (i.e. salt marshes in the temperate zone and mangroves in the tropical zone) as a major source for increasing vulnerability to flooding of estuaries and deltas. Firstly, we present examples of flood mitigation by tidal wetland conservation and restoration, and secondly we explore the potentials and limitations for global application of this approach of ecosystem-based flood defense (see Temmerman et al. 2013). First, we use the Scheldt estuary (SW Netherlands and Belgium) as an example where historic wetland reclamation has importantly contributed to increasing flood risks, and where tidal marsh restoration on the previously reclaimed land is nowadays brought into large-scale practice as an essential part of the flood defense system. Based on data and hydrodynamic modelling, we show that large-scale historic marsh reclamation has largely reduced the water storage capacity of the estuary and has reduced the friction to propagating flood waves, resulting in an important landward increase of tidal and storm surge levels. Hydrodynamic model scenarios demonstrate how tidal and storm surge propagation through the estuary are affected by tidal marsh properties, including the surface area, elevation, vegetation and position of marshes along the estuary. We show that nowadays tidal wetland creation on previously reclaimed land is applied as an essential part of the flood defense system along the Scheldt estuary. Secondly, a global analysis is presented of the potential application of tidal wetlands in flood mitigation in

  10. 泉州湾河口湿地自然保护区珍稀濒危鸟类的分布特点及其保护%Distribution and Conservation of Endangered Bird in Quanzhou Bay Estuarine Wetland Natural Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈若海

    2014-01-01

    We studied the species and distribution of endangeredbird with the methods of line transects and sample points in Quanzhou Bay Estuarine Wetland Nature Reserve with 104 endangered waterfowlspecies belonging to 25 families,13 or-ders.Nineteen species belongs to II Nationally protected species, 6 species are in “China Red Data Book of Endangered Animals”, 12 species are included in“China Species Red List” and 19 species are in“Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora”.There are 49 species of endangered birds in ShishiHanjiang Village with the maximum amount among six study areas, accounting for 47.12%.There are only 37 species in Fengze Fengyu Village with theminimum amount among six study areas, accounting for 36.58%.Most of them are migrant birds, of which 57 and 13 species are winter migrant and summer migrant , respectively .Furthermore , 23 and 11 species are passing migrant and resident birds, respectively.The number of endangered birds reachesa peak in May and November.%采用路线调查和高位定点统计相结合的方法对泉州湾河口湿地自然保护区珍稀濒危鸟类的种类和分布进行了研究,共记录到104种珍稀濒危鸟类,隶属于13目25科。其中国家二级重点保护鸟类有19种,福建省重点保护鸟类有21种,列入《中国濒危动物红皮书》中的有6种,列入《中国物种红色名录》中的有12种,属于《濒危野生动植物种国际贸易公约》附录的有19种。6个调查区域中分布于石狮市蚶江镇蚶江村的珍稀濒危鸟类最多,有49种,占总数的47.12%;丰泽区城东街道凤屿村的最少,有37种,占总数的35.58%。冬候鸟57种,夏候鸟13种,旅鸟23种,留鸟11种。5月份和11月份是濒危鸟类种数出现的高峰期。结合调查结果给出了保护对策。

  11. Mapping elevations of tidal wetland restoration sites in San Francisco Bay: Comparing accuracy of aerial lidar with a singlebeam echosounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athearn, N.D.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Jaffe, B.; Hattenbach, B.J.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The southern edge of San Francisco Bay is surrounded by former salt evaporation ponds, where tidal flow has been restricted since the mid to late 1890s. These ponds are now the focus of a large wetland restoration project, and accurate measurement of current pond bathymetry and adjacent mud flats has been critical to restoration planning. Aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) has become a tool for mapping surface elevations, but its accuracy had rarely been assessed for wetland habitats. We used a singlebeam echosounder system we developed for surveying shallow wetlands to map submerged pond bathymetry in January of 2004 and compared those results with aerial lidar surveys in two ponds that were dry in May of 2004. From those data sets, we compared elevations for 5164 (Pond E9, 154 ha) and 2628 (Pond E14, 69 ha) echosounder and lidar points within a 0.375-m radius of each other (0.750-m diameter lidar spot size). We found that mean elevations of the lidar points were lower than the echosounder results by 5 ?? 0.1 cm in Pond E9 and 2 ?? 0.2 cm in Pond E14. Only a few points (5% in Pond E9, 2% in Pond E14) differed by more than 20 cm, and some of these values may be explained by residual water in the ponds during the lidar survey or elevation changes that occurred between surveys. Our results suggest that aerial lidar may be a very accurate and rapid way to assess terrain elevations for wetland restoration projects. ?? 2010 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  12. Movement patterns and the conservation of amphibians breeding in small, temporary wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C.K.; Cade, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Many amphibians breed in water but live most of their lives in terrestrial habitats. Little is known, however, about the spatial distribution of these habitats or of the distances and directions amphibians move to reach breeding sites. The amphibian community at a small, temporary pond in northcentral Florida was monitored for 5 years. Based on captures and recaptures of more than 2500 striped newts (Notophthalmus perstriatus) and 5700 eastern narrow-mouthed toads (Gastrophryne carolinensis), we tabulated the angles of orientation that these amphibians entered and exited the pond basin. Our results showed that movements of these species between the pond and terrestrial habitats were nonrandom in orientation, but that narrow corridors did not appear to be used. Differences between the species likely reflect differences in habitat preferences, whereas intraspecific differences among years and between the sexes likely reflect variation among individuals. For terrestrial buffer zones to be effective at conserving pond-breeding amphibian communities, they need both a distance and a directional component. The determination of a directional component may be obscured if studies are carried out over a short time span. Conservation efforts for wetland-breeding amphibians that concentrate solely on the wetland likely will fail without consideration of the adjacent terrestrial habitat.

  13. Long-term Strategic Planning for a Resilient Metro Colombo: An Economic Case for Wetland Conservation and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, J.

    2015-12-01

    Colombo faces recurrent floods that threaten its long-term economic development. Its urban wetlands have been identified by local agencies as a critical component of its flood reduction system, but they have declined rapidly in recent years due to continuous infilling, unmanaged land development and dredging to create lakes. In collaboration with government agencies, NGOs and local universities, the World Bank has carried out a Robust Decision Making analysis to examine the value of Colombo urban wetlands, both in the short-term and long-term, and identify what are the most viable strategies available to increase the city's flood resilience in an unclear future (in terms of climate change and patterns of urban development). This has involved the use of numerous hydrological and socio-economic scenarios as well as the evaluation of some wetlands benefits, like ecosystem services, wastewater treatment, or recreational services. The analysis has determined that if all urban wetlands across the Colombo catchment were lost, in some scenarios the metropolitan area would have to cope with an annual average flood loss of approximately 1% of Colombo GDP in the near future. For long-term strategies, trade-offs between urban development, lake creation and wetland conservation were analyzed and it was concluded that an active management of urban wetlands was the lowest regret option. Finally, the analysis also revealed that in the future, with climate change and fast urban development, wetlands will not be sufficient to protect Colombo against severe floods. Pro-active urban planning and land-use management are therefore necessary, both to protect existing wetlands and to reduce future exposure. The use of many different scenarios, the consideration of several policy options, and the open participatory process ensured policy-makers' buy-in and lead to the decision to actively protect urban wetlands in Colombo.

  14. Partitioning of heavy metals in the surface sediments of Quanzhou Bay wetland and its availability to Suaeda australis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate distributions of heavy metal pollution in Quanzhou Bay wetland, the total concentration and chemical partitioning of a number of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Hg) in sediments of three sampling sites of Quanzhou Bay wetland and their availability to Suaeda australis were analyzed. The Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) values reveal that the sediments of three sampling sites may all be considered as moderately contaminated for Pb and Zn, and all sediments might be strongly contaminated with cadmium. The partitioning analyses revealed the measured heavy metals in three sites are bound to the exchangeable fraction at lower concentrations. The measured metals in a considerable amount are bound to the reducible and oxidizable fractions, and a high proportion of the measured heavy metals were distributed in the residual fraction in the sediment samples. The concentrations of Cd in each chemical phase extracted from the sediments are above natural global background levels and should be further investigated because of its toxicity. Suaeda australis has different accumulation abilities for the measured heavy metals. For the root and stem, the bioaccumulation ability assessed by bioaccumulation factor (BA F) for the measured heavy metals follows the decreasing order as: Cu>Cr> Zn>Cd, Pb, Hg. In the leaf, stronger bioaccumulation ability for Hg is exhibited. The heavy metal concentrations in Suaeda australis roots have positive correlations with their available fractions, while the exchangeable fraction of Cu and Cd might have be more important to both mature plant roots and seedling roots uptake than other fractions; as for Cr, the oxidizable fraction might make a greater contribution to the plant root uptake; as for Zn, the reducible fraction might make so contribution; and for Pb, the oxidizable fraction might make a significant contribution to the mature plant root uptake, however, the exchangeable fraction might have a significant

  15. Geographic Information System (GIS) representation of historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC), 1979 (NODC Accession 0000605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay 1979 from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC).

  16. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterization of historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC), 1987 (NODC Accession 0000606)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Graphical representation of historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay in 1987 from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC).

  17. Securing Water for Wetland Conservation in China - An Assessment of Policy Options

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Jian; Wang Xiaoxia; Niu Kunyu; Li Shushan

    2010-01-01

    Wetlands are one of the world's most ecologically important and productive ecosystems. They face many challenges, one of the most sifnificant being the disruption of the water supplies that feed them. As the flow of water entering a wetland is diverted to other uses, the werland's ecosystme is damaged. This problem affects many wetland areas in China. This study assesses the situation in the Qixinghe Wetlands which lie in the country's Sanjiang Plain. The study hifhlights two policy options t...

  18. Potential component Allee effects and their impact on wetland management in the conservation of endangered anurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A Gaston

    Full Text Available Effective management of wetland quantity and quality is crucial for effective conservation of declining amphibian populations. In particular, frogs and toads that employ aggregative breeding strategies may suffer negative population impacts in response to changes in availability of aquatic breeding habitat, including overabundance of suitable habitat, if density of conspecifics attending aggregations is positively correlated with reproductive success. Here we document such a positive relationship, potentially the first example of a component Allee effect in an anuran, in the critically endangered Houston toad (Bufo houstonensis. We assessed the relationship between mean yearly chorus size and reproductive success of males at the pond level using an information theoretic model selection approach and a two-sample t-test. The chosen model contained the single variable of mean yearly chorus size to predict probability of reproduction, as selected using the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small sample size and Akaike weight. Mean chorus sizes were significantly higher among ponds exhibiting evidence of reproduction than in those that showed no evidence of reproduction. Our results suggest that chorusing alone is a poor proxy for inference of population stability and highlight a need for reassessment of widely-used amphibian monitoring protocols. Further, amphibian conservation efforts should account for potential Allee effects in order to optimize benefits and avoid underestimating critical population thresholds, particularly in species exhibiting rapid population declines.

  19. Interaction between continental and estuarine waters in the wetlands of the northern coastal plain of Samborombón Bay, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Inland and estuarine water flows define wetland hydrology on the Samborombón Bay. • Hydrochemistry in shell-ridges and tidal plains is due to water–rock interaction. • Mixing, evaporation and halite dissolution determine salinity in marshes. • Water flow from the shell-ridges control the overall wetland water quality. • These wetlands are complex hydrological systems with vulnerable water resources. - Abstract: On the Samborombón Bay coastline, located in the Río de la Plata estuary in Buenos Aires province (Argentina), a complex hydrological system has developed at the interface between continental and estuarine water, where significant wetlands develop. The main hydrogeological units, namely the shell ridges, the tidal plain and the marsh areas, have been identified using geomorphological criteria. Water table, hydrochemical and isotopic data have been used to determine their hydrological features, as well as those of the streams and canals. Evaporation processes, in particular, have been considered when depicting chemical and isotopic changes in surface waters in streams and marsh areas. The shell ridges represent a hydrogeological unit in which rainwater is stored, constituting a lens-shaped freshwater aquifer. In this unit, just as in the tidal plain, carbonate dissolution and ion exchange are the main processes regulating water chemistry. On the other hand, in the marsh and surface waters, processes such as mixing with estuarine water and evaporation predominate. These processes control water fluxes and the salinity of the wetland areas and, consequently, their ability to preserve the existing biodiversity. This study shows the importance of knowledge of hydrochemical processes in any proposal concerning the management and preservation of this type of wetland

  20. Research on Hydraulic Block Scenarios in the Land Conservation Zone of the Headwaters Area of Jinshu Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the hydraulic block scenarios in the water source land conservation zone in Jinshu Bay so as to ensure the water quality in the water sources in Jinshu Bay.[Method] By dint of one dimension water amount and water quality mode in the river net in Taihu,the water flow movement characteristics and pollutants transportation rules in the water sources areas in Jinshu Bay under five kinds of hydraulic block scenarios were compared and discussed.[Result] After demolishing the tempo...

  1. Louisiana Coastal Wetlands Conservation Plan Boundary, Geographic NAD83, LDNR (1998) [conservation_plan_boundary_LDNR_1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset depicting the areas of coastal wetlands in the state of Louisiana. This area encloses the tidally influenced coastal region three feet or...

  2. Nature conservation aspects of the wetland flora in Prušnica Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Petelin, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We mapped vascular flora in the wetlands of the southern part ob Borovnica near Prušnica stream. In 6 selected wetland polygones we recorded all of the plant species and estimated their coverage. We also recorded species in broader area of reseach. In total, we recorded 134 plant species, 42 of them proved to be conservationaly important. In the studied polygones the following important wetland species were recorded: Blysmus compressus, Carex davalliana, Carex distans, Carex hostiana, Carex r...

  3. The role of protected area wetlands in waterfowl habitat conservation: implications for protected area network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, William S.; Kesler, Dylan C.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Naylor, Luke W.; Humburg, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    The principal goal of protected area networks is biodiversity preservation, but efficacy of such networks is directly linked to animal movement within and outside area boundaries. We examined wetland selection patterns of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) during non-breeding periods from 2010 to 2012 to evaluate the utility of protected areas to migratory waterfowl in North America. We tracked 33 adult females using global positioning system (GPS) satellite transmitters and implemented a use-availability resource selection design to examine mallard use of wetlands under varying degrees of protection. Specifically, we examined effects of proximities to National Wildlife Refuges, private land, state wildlife management areas, Wetland Reserve Program easements (WRP), and waterfowl sanctuaries on mallard wetland selection. In addition, we included landscape-level variables that measured areas of sanctuary and WRP within the surrounding landscape of each used and available wetland. We developed 8 wetland selection models according to season (autumn migration, winter, spring migration), hunting season (present, absent), and time period (diurnal, nocturnal). Model averaged parameter estimates indicated wetland selection patterns varied across seasons and time periods, but ducks consistently selected wetlands with greater areas of sanctuary and WRP in the surrounding landscape. Consequently, WRP has the potential to supplement protected area networks in the midcontinent region. Additionally, seasonal variation in wetland selection patterns indicated considering the effects of habitat management and anthropogenic disturbances on migratory waterfowl during the non-breeding period is essential in designing protected area networks.

  4. In situ hyperspectral data analysis for coverage estimation of submerged plant Vallisneria spiralis in Hangzhou Bay wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2010-10-01

    In Situ hyperspectral data analysis for varied coverage estimation of submerged plant is very important for the interpretation of remote sensing images. In this study, the hyperspectral reflectance of Vallisneria spiralis was measured using a Spectroradiometer with spectral range of 350-1050 nm and resolution of 3 nm in Hangzhou bay wetland and the cover of submerged plant was measured. The results showed that the reflectance rate and the "red edge peak" of the first derivation of Vallisneria spiralis spectrum rose with its increasing coverage. The relationships between the coverage of Vallisneria spiralis and the spectral reflectance, spectral indices and red edge at the wavelengths were carried out and analyzed respectively. These results showed a clear linear relationship between the coverage of Vallisneria spiralis and spectrum, and the coverage of Vallisneria spiralis could be quantitatively estimated from the reflectance measured in situ. The hyperspectral remote sensing have a ability and potential to distinguish and monitor the distribution and dynamics of submerged vegetation on a large scale.

  5. Prototype Application of NASA Missions to Identify Patterns of Wetland Vegetation Development within the South San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W.; Newcomer, M. E.; Justice, E.; Guild, L. S.; Skiles, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project is the largest tidal wetland restoration on the west coast of the United States. Monitoring vegetation development in these emergent habitats with remote sensing can provide restoration managers with an indication of ecological health and progress of development. Remotely sensed imagery was used to monitor vegetation development and to map vegetation patterns and biota changes historically, during, and after salt pond construction for ponds A19, A20, and A21. Percent vegetative cover was mapped using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from MODIS, Tasseled Cap Greenness (TCG) and NDVI from Landsat TM, and the Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) from ASTER. Field parameters included in-situ measurements and geographic locations for percent vegetative cover, and site specific species information. Field data were incorporated into GIS, and vegetation was analyzed using spatial statistics methods and a qualitative post-classification comparison technique. NDVI values obtained from the Landsat scenes indicated a net gain of 3.35 acres of vegetation cover from February 2006 (before pond breaching) to August 2009 for pond A21 and 1.33 acres and 3.14 acres for ponds A20 and A19, respectively. Increases in vegetation indicate the marsh has built up to a steady-state condition to provide appropriate habitat for endangered plant and animal species and also indicates the success of restoration practices.

  6. A field study of the effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on ecosystem processes in a Chesapeake Bay wetland. [USA - Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, B.G. (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgwater, MD (USA))

    1992-01-01

    Open top chambers are being used in a long-term project to determine the effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on ecosystem processes on a Chesapeake Bay wetland. Three communities are studied: mono-specific stands of the C3 sedge, Scirpus olneyi, and the C[sub 4] grass, Spartina patens, and a mixed community of these two species and the C[sub 4] grass, Distichlis spicata. Treatment began in the spring of 1987 and will continue through the 1994 growing season. During the first 4 years of exposure, elevated CO[sub 2] had the following effects on mono-specific stands of the C[sub 3] sedge: increased quantum yield and photosynthetic capacity, reduced dark respiration, increased numbers of shoots, roots and rhizomes, reduced nitrogen concentration of all tissues, increased nitrogen fixation and increased ecosystem carbon accumulation. In a mixed community of the sedge and C[sub 4] grass species, biomass of the C[sub 3] component increased over 100% and this was accompanied by decreased biomass in the C[sub 4] component of the community. Elevated CO[sub 2] reduced water loss, increased water potential and delayed senescence in all three species. Many factors contributed to CO[sub 2] stimulated carbon accumulation in the plant community dominated by the C[sub 3] sedge, including: sustained high photosynthetic capacity, decreased respiration, delayed senescence, and allocation of the additional carbon to roots and rhizomes. The complex interaction of these diverse responses suggests that the rising atmospheric CO[sub 2] may have a significant impact on ecosystem processes.

  7. Grasslands, wetlands, and agriculture: the fate of land expiring from the Conservation Reserve Program in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morefield, Philip E.; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Clark, Christopher M.; Iovanna, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is the largest agricultural land-retirement program in the United States, providing many environmental benefits, including wildlife habitat and improved air, water, and soil quality. Since 2007, however, CRP area has declined by over 25% nationally with much of this land returning to agriculture. Despite this trend, it is unclear what types of CRP land are being converted, to what crops, and where. All of these specific factors greatly affect environmental impacts. To answer these questions, we quantified shifts in expiring CRP parcels to five major crop-types (corn, soy, winter and spring wheat, and sorghum) in a 12-state, Midwestern region of the United States using a US Department of Agriculture (USDA), field-level CRP database and USDA’s Cropland Data Layer. For the years 2010 through 2013, we estimate almost 30%, or more than 530 000 ha, of expiring CRP land returned to the production of these five crops in our study area, with soy and corn accounting for the vast majority of these shifts. Grasslands were the largest type of CRP land converted (360 000 ha), followed by specifically designated wildlife habitat (76 000 ha), and wetland areas (53 000 ha). These wetland areas were not just wetlands themselves, but also a mix of land covers enhancing or protecting wetland ecosystem services (e.g., wetland buffers). Areas in the Dakotas, Nebraska, and southern Iowa were hotspots of change, with the highest areas of CRP land moving back to agriculture. By contrast, we estimate only a small amount (∼3%) of the expiring land shifted into similar, non-CRP land-retirement or easement programs. Reconciling needs for food, feed, fuel, and healthy ecosystems is an immense challenge for farmers, conservationists, and state and federal agencies. Reduced enrollment and the turnover of CRP land from conservation to agriculture raises questions about sustaining ecosystem services in this region.

  8. Juvenile salmonid use of freshwater emergent wetlands in the floodplain and its implications for conservation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, J.A.; Gresswell, R.E.; Fleming, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    A recent trend of enhancing freshwater emergent wetlands for waterfowl and other wildlife has raised concern about the effects of such measures on juvenile salmonids. We undertook this study to quantify the degree and extent of juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. utilization of enhanced and unenhanced emergent wetlands within the floodplain of the lower Chehalis River, Washington, and to determine the fate of the salmon using them. Enhanced emergent wetlands contained water control structures that provided an outlet for fish emigration and a longer hydroperiod for rearing than unenhanced wetlands. Age-0 and age-1 coho salmon O. kisutch were the most common salmonid at all sites, enhanced wetlands having significantly higher age-1 abundance than unenhanced wetlands that were a similar distance from the main-stem river. Yearling coho salmon benefited from rearing in two enhanced wetland habitats, where their specific growth rate and minimum estimates of survival (1.43%/d by weight and 30%; 1.37%/d and 57%) were comparable to those in other side-channel rearing studies. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased in emergent wetlands throughout the season and approached the limits lethal to juvenile salmon by May or June each year. Emigration patterns suggested that age-0 and age-1 coho salmon emigrated as habitat conditions declined. This observation was further supported by the results of an experimental release of coho salmon. Survival of fish utilizing emergent wetlands was dependent on movement to the river before water quality decreased or stranding occurred from wetland desiccation. Thus, our results suggest that enhancing freshwater wetlands via water control structures can benefit juvenile salmonids, at least in the short term, by providing conditions for greater growth, survival, and emigration. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  9. Wetland InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  10. The role of surface and subsurface processes in keeping pace with sea level rise in intertidal wetlands of Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Bennion, Vicki; Grinham, Alistair; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in the elevation of the soil surfaces of mangroves and salt marshes are key to the maintenance of these habitats with accelerating sea level rise. Understanding the processes that give rise to increases in soil surface elevation provides science for management of landscapes for sustainable coastal wetlands. Here, we tested whether the soil surface elevation of mangroves and salt marshes in Moreton Bay is keeping up with local rates of sea level rise (2.358 mm y-1) and whether accretion on the soil surface was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise. We found variability in surface elevation gains, with sandy areas in the eastern bay having the highest surface elevation gains in both mangrove and salt marsh (5.9 and 1.9 mm y-1) whereas in the muddier western bay rates of surface elevation gain were lower (1.4 and -0.3 mm y-1 in mangrove and salt marsh, respectively). Both sides of the bay had similar rates of surface accretion (~7–9 mm y-1 in the mangrove and 1–3 mm y-1 in the salt marsh), but mangrove soils in the western bay were subsiding at a rate of approximately 8 mm y-1, possibly due to compaction of organic sediments. Over the study surface elevation increments were sensitive to position in the intertidal zone (higher when lower in the intertidal) and also to variation in mean sea level (higher at high sea level). Although surface accretion was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise in the eastern bay, subsidence largely negated gains made through surface accretion in the western bay indicating a high vulnerability to sea level rise in these forests.

  11. [Threats to and conservation of North African wetlands: the case of the Ramsar site of Beni-Belaid (NE Algeria)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldjedri, Mohammed; de Bélair, Gérard; Mayache, Boualem; Muller, Serge D

    2011-10-01

    Because of their biogeographical and geomorphological context, the northeastern Algeria wetlands present high species and community richness. The vegetation study of the Ramsar site of Beni-Belaid (Kabylia) showed the existence of four main communities, distributed along gradients of hydrology and disturbance. The obtained results reveal worrying threats on short term: overgrazing results in the lake invasion by the sand eroded from the coastal dune; agriculture induces illegal cutting, water pollution and excessive groundwater pumping; finally, hunting and fishing are illegally practiced into the Ramsar site. The awareness of public authorities is needed in order: (1) to completely protect the wetland with the aim of restoring a riparian forest belt; and (2) to initiate a campaign for increasing the local population awareness, and its involvement in conservation programs.

  12. Ecosystem valuation and the conservation of wild lands in vigorous economic regions: A case study in Jiuduansha Wetland, Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the loss of wild lands to satisfy traditional economic development has become a global environmental problem in recent decades, using ecosystem valuation to estimate the total economic value (TEV) of an ecosystem has become popular. The main purpose of the ecosystem valuation is to strengthen the importance of ecosystems, and bring the ecosystem services into the traditional cost-benefit analyses of land use strategy. Some studies have illustrated that in remote areas, wilderness can produce more value if it is conserved, rather than converted to traditional agricultural or industrial uses. The same situation does not seem to exist in vigorous economic regions. Thus, a case study was conducted on the Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai using three approaches: the direct market valuation, the replacement valuation and the contingent valuation. The net present TEVs of three land use scenarios over one hundred years were evaluated. The results proved that simply based on ecosystem valuation, when compared with the other two scenarios of "conservation" and "selective use", "partial conversion into terrene (dry land)" of Jiuduansha might be the optimal scenario for the well-being of the people in Shanghai. Land price was identified as the most important factor. This situation is likely due to the scarcity of land available for traditional economic development in Shanghai. Thus, we speculated that the fate of the wilderness to "be destroyed" in vigorous economic regions could not be changed simply based on ecosystem valuation. However, the variety of interest by local residents in wilderness might enhance the TEVs of scenarios such as "conservation" and "selective use", and affect the valuation results. Since some important benefits of natural ecosystems remain unknown and others are underestimated, we suggested that any land use decisions regarding the Jiuduansha Wetland should be conservative and cautious as converting wetlands into terrene is an irreversible process.

  13. 77 FR 23745 - Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Bay Checkerspot Butterfly and Serpentine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Butterfly and Serpentine Grasslands, City of San Jose, Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., the Santa Clara Valley dudleya; and one nonlisted plant, the most beautiful jewelflower. The applicant... Conservation Plan for Bay checkerspot butterfly and serpentine grasslands, Santa Clara County California:...

  14. 浅议城市湿地公园的保护与开发——以乌海龙游湾湿地公园为例%On the protection and development of urban wetland park --The Wuhai longyou Bay Wetland Park, for example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟学群

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the National Department of housing construction issued "Urban Wetland Park Planning and Design C-uidelines "proposed" com prehensive protection, ecological priority, rational use, sustainable development "approach to guide the country's wetland conservation and develop ment work. After much build a wetland park. However, the success stories of Wetland Throughout the country, do not. The reason, we found that the majority of parks in protecting the good, but the development has not done well, usually just give a simple science, education and other functions. So caused to the park's operations depends mainly on financial allocation, the majority of park stretched in terms of capital, and ultimately affect the overall protection of wetlands. It can be said that we are not done quite enough in the "fair use". To the Wuhai longyou Bay Wetland Park design process, for example, stated that the Wetland Park should be designed to adhere to the principle of combining urban wetland conservation and rational development and utilization should be fully protected on the basis of reasonable use should protect and develop simultaneously to boost development in order to protect, to develop to promote the protection, by means of market operations, in order to truly sustainable development, sustainable use.%2005年,国家住建部颁布了《城市湿地公园规划设计导则》,提出"全面保护、生态优先、合理利用、持续发展"的方针,指导全国的湿地保护开发工作。之后多地建立起了湿地公园。但是,纵观全国的湿地公园,做的成功的案例并不多。究其原因,我们发现,多数公园在保护方面做的不错,但是在开发方面却做得不好,一般只是赋予简单的科普、教育等功能。这样造成公园的运营主要靠财政拨款,多数公园在资金方面捉襟见肘,最终也影响到湿地的整体保护。可以说,目前我们就是在"合理利用"方面做得相当不够。本文以

  15. Recommendations for the conservation and management of humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis in the Algoa Bay region, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Karczmarski

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis inhabiting the Algoa Bay region. Eastern Cape, South Africa, was investigated by means of land- and sea-based surveys undertaken between May 1991 and May 1994. This article reviews the findings which are relevant to the conservation of humpback dolphins and provides recommendations for both the conservation and management of this species in Eastern Cape waters. In general, humpback dolphins appear to be typical coastal dolphins which occur in small numbers, have low population growth and depend on restricted inshore resources. Establishment of protected areas where human impact could be limited or controlled seems to be the most effective conservation/management approach. Habitats critical for humpback dolphins in Eastern Cape waters (inshore rocky reefs and the dolphin's core areas in the Algoa Bay region have been identified. It is recommended that a conservation and management zone (marine sanctuary in the Algoa Bay region be established and a suitable site for it is identified. Given adequate legislation and proper management, this area could be used for the development of ecotourism, including dolphin-watch operations, which would further stimulate interest in coastal conservation.

  16. The preservation of wetland ecological goods and services: an evaluation of land conservation techniques for the Lac La Biche watershed, Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmel, Eric Ian

    2007-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems situated in the Lac La Biche, Alberta watershed provide environmental goods and services whose values are not incorporated in land use decision-making. Ignoring the economic value associated with wetland conservation underestimates the true cost of land development, and may lead to land-uses that do not maximize benefits to society. I conduct an economic valuation, stakeholder consultation, legal analysis and explore the relationship between land uses and the Lac La Biche a...

  17. Conservation and ecofriendly utilization of wetlands associated with the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, J H Martin; Li, Ruoxi; Yuan, Xingzhong

    2013-10-01

    The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China has created a major reservoir in which the water level fluctuates annually by about 30 m, generating a drawdown zone of up to 350 km(2) in summer. Since construction of the dam, there has been scientific and public interest in how to use the drawdown zone resources in environmentally sustainable ways. To this end, and with government support, an international conference was held in Chongqing Municipality (China) in October 2011 on the subject of conservation and ecofriendly utilization of wetlands in the Three Gorges Reservoir. The conference proceedings were subsequently published in the Journal of Chongqing Normal University. The proceedings reports are reviewed here in the context of other relevant literature. The proceedings included papers on ecology, ecodesign and ecological engineering, erosion control, plant production and carbon sequestration, phytoremediation of pollution, hydrosystem management, and others. Several of the reports derive from experimental work conducted at a research field station on the Three Gorges Reservoir situated in Kaixian County, Chongqing Municipality. Plant communities in the drawdown zone are declining in diversity and evolving. Experimental plantings of flood-tolerant edible hydrophytes in a dike-pond system reveal their potential to provide economic returns for farmers, and flooding-tolerant trees, such as cypresses, also show promising results for stabilizing soils in the drawdown zone. Flood-tolerant natural plant communities vary strongly with depth and their composition provides useful indicators for revegetation strategies. In the region surrounding the reservoir, remnant natural broad-leaved evergreen forests are most effective in sequestering carbon, and within the drawdown zone, carbon is mostly stored below ground. There is strong interest in the potential of aquatic plants for removal of pollutants, notably N and P, from the reservoir water by means of floating beds

  18. Using water destined for irrigation to conserve wetland ecosystems: A basis for assessing feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammonds, M. J.; Vietz, G. J.; Costelloe, J. F.

    2013-08-01

    Regulated rivers often have associated wetlands with declining ecological health due to reduced inundation frequency. One innovative option to improve the ecological condition of such wetlands is to use them as temporary off-river water storages, where the water used to inundate them is subsequently allocated to consumptive use. The hydrologic feasibility of this option has yet to be demonstrated. We investigated three physical aspects of a floodplain wetlands system that must be considered, relative to irrigation demand, to determine feasibility: (a) historical inundation frequencies and the effect of regulation and climate change, (b) natural storage volumes and enhanced volumes using retaining walls, and (c) estimated loss rates. We found that inundation frequencies are reduced under regulation and that this reduction is even greater for projected climate change scenarios. Natural volumes were found to be 5% of annual irrigation demand, increasing to 20% with retaining walls; a small proportion at the system scale but significant at farm scale, especially with opportunities for multiple fillings per season. Losses are estimated at 36%-63% of the initial volume, depending on timing of wetland inundation and drawdown. Careful consideration must be applied to issues of frequency and timing of inundation, drawdown rates, and connectivity when considering the ecological benefits of using wetlands as storages. Environmental benefits will be a trade-off with capital, operational, and maintenance costs and water pricing.

  19. The Beetle (Coleoptera and True bug (Heteroptera species pool of the alpine “Pian di Gembro” wetland (Villa di Tirano, Italy and its conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Montagna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he C oleoptera and Heteroptera species pool was investigated in the “Pian di Gembro” wetland (Villa di T irano, Sondrio, Italy. T he wetland consists of a bog and its surroundings, referred to as wetland components, that are both subjected to a diversified intermediate management regime (DIMR. T he application of the DIMR for plant species conservation resulted in the establishment of 11 wetland zones with a characteristic vegetation. In a three year sampling program, 997 C oleoptera and Heteroptera representing 141 species from 14 families were collected. Among these species, 64 species share both wetland components, 11 are restricted to the bog and 63 were found in the surroundings only. Among the species pool there were 23 tyrphophile taxa and only one tyrphobiont. With the exception of one zone, all zones are inhabited by zone-specific species. By taking into account both the general species pool and the pool of species of particular interest to conservationists, only one zone can be considered as redundant since it is inhabited by species that occur also in other zones. Hence, all the zones, with one exception, are effective for species pool conservation. The existing DIMR implemented for plant species conservation is also effective for conserving the species pool of C oleoptera and Heteroptera.

  20. The utility of state parks as a conservation tool for isolated and ephemeral wetlands: A case study from the southern Blue Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. H.; Baldwin, R.; Pitt, A. L.; Baldwin, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    Biodiversity management has been historically confined to parks and protected areas and these types of formally-protected areas may help to mitigate the effects of climate change and habitat loss by preventing further fragmentation, degradation and the spread of invasive species. Much research has demonstrated the importance of parks and other such protected areas for their ecological, conservational, and socio-cultural benefits. Protected areas constitute ~ 12% of the earth's land surface and are described as an essential core unit for for in situ conservation. State parks provide a type of a priori conservation, allowing areas which are identified as ecologically important within state park boundaries to be more rapidly prioritized for conservation and management. The development of South Carolina's state parks strongly contributed to cultural, social and ecological improvement across the state and we demonstrate that this network of protected areas can also help scientists to better locate, study and conserve cryptic or unprotected habitats. Our goals for this study were to use the SC state park system to 1) examine the structural and functional differences between wetlands located inside versus outside the state park system, and 2) suggest a conservation framework for small wetlands incorporating both state parks and adjacent areas with variable ownership status. At each wetland, we variables at the within-pond and local (5 m buffer around pool) scales. We visited each study wetland (N = 41, park pool = 19, non-park pools = 22) 5 times during both 2010 and 2011; collected water quality data and recorded the presence and activity of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, phytoplankton and benthic algae. We hypothesized that wetlands within state parks would have better water quality and higher species richness compared to non-park wetlands. Our case study revealed that wetlands outside of state parks exhibited less variable depths and

  1. 75 FR 73027 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section... Program (EQIP), Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), and Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP... conservation outcomes and achieve resource conservation objectives. The functions of CCPI can best be...

  2. 78 FR 33857 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  3. 76 FR 5820 - Meeting Announcements: North American Wetlands Conservation Council; Neotropical Migratory Bird...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...; Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Advisory Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission). This meeting is open to the public. The Advisory Group for the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) grants program (Advisory Group) will...

  4. 76 FR 1190 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA; Final... National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). In this final CCP, we describe how we will manage this refuge for the next... CONTACT: Jared Brandwein, Refuge Manager, Back Bay NWR, 4005 Sandpiper Road, Virginia Beach, VA......

  5. Movement patterns of Antillean manatees in Chetumal Bay (Mexico) and coastal Belize: A challenge for regional conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanco-Martínez, Delma Nataly; Padilla-Saldivar, J.; Hernández-Arana, Héctor Abuid; Slone, D.H.; Reid, J.P.; Morales-Vela, B.

    2013-01-01

    Information from 15 satellite-tracked Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) was analyzed in order to assess individual movements, home ranges, and high-use areas for conservation decisions. Manatees were captured in Chetumal Bay, Mexico, and tagged with Argos-monitored satellite transmitters. Location of the manatees and physical characteristics were assessed to describe habitat properties. Most manatees traveled to freshwater sources. The Maximum Area Size (MAS) for each manatee was determined using the observation-area method. Additional kernel densities of 95% home range and 50% Center of Activity (COA) were also calculated, with manatees having 1–3 COAs. Manatees exhibited two different movement patterns: remaining in Chetumal Bay, and long-distance (up to 240 km in 89 d). The residence time in Chetumal Bay was higher for females (89.6% of time) than for males (72.0%), but the daily travel rate (0.4–0.5 km/d) was similar for both sexes. Most of the COAs fell within Natural Protected Areas (NPA). However, manatees also travel for long distances into unprotected areas, where they face uncontrolled boat traffic, fishing activities, and habitat loss. Conservation of movement corridors may promote long-distance movements and facilitate genetic exchange.

  6. Tidal saltmarsh fragmentation and persistence of San Pablo Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia samuelis): Assessing benefits of wetland restoration in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, J.Y.; Sacks, B.N.; Woo, I.; Johnson, M.L.; Wylie, G.D.; ,

    2006-01-01

    The San Pablo Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia samuelis) is one of three morphologically distinct Song Sparrow subspecies in tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay estuary. These subspecies are rare, because as the human population has grown, diking and development have resulted in loss of 79% of the historic tidal marshes. Hundreds of projects have been proposed in the past decade to restore tidal marshes and benefit endemic populations. To evaluate the value of these restoration projects for Song Sparrows, we developed a population viability analysis (PVA) model to examine persistence of samuelis subspecies in relation to parcel size, connectivity, and catastrophe in San Pablo Bay. A total of 101 wetland parcels were identified from coverages of modern and historic tidal marshes. Parcels were grouped into eight fragments in the historical landscape and 10 in the present landscape. Fragments were defined as a group of parcels separated by >1 km, a distance that precluded regular interchange. Simulations indicated that the historic (circa 1850) samuelis population was three times larger than the modern population. However, only very high levels (>70% mortality) of catastrophe would threaten their persistence. Persistence of populations was sensitive to parcel size at a carrying capacity of <10 pairs, but connectivity of parcels was found to have little importance because habitats were dominated by a few large parcels. Our analysis indicates little risk of extinction of the samuelis subspecies with the current extent of tidal marshes, but the vulnerability of the small-est parcels suggests that restoration should create larger continuous tracts. Thus, PVA models may be useful tools for balancing the costs and benefits of restoring habitats for threatened tidal-marsh populations in wetland restoration planning.

  7. Assessing the effects of USDA conservation programs on ecosystem services provided by wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is led by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in an effort to quantify the environmental effects of conservation programs and practices on privately owned agricultural landscapes across the United States. CEAP’s approach includes application ...

  8. Rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation impact plant and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 on a Chesapeake Bay wetland: review of a 28-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bert G

    2014-11-01

    An ongoing field study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on a brackish wetland on Chesapeake Bay, started in 1987, is unique as the longest continually running investigation of the effects of elevated CO2 on an ecosystem. Since the beginning of the study, atmospheric CO2 increased 18%, sea level rose 20 cm, and growing season temperature varied with approximately the same range as predicted for global warming in the 21st century. This review looks back at this study for clues about how the effects of rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation interact with high atmospheric CO2 to alter the physiology of C3 and C4 photosynthetic species, carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration, plant and ecosystem nitrogen, and distribution of plant communities in this brackish wetland. Rising sea level caused a shift to higher elevations in the Scirpus olneyi C3 populations on the wetland, displacing the Spartina patens C4 populations. Elevated CO2 stimulated carbon assimilation in the Scirpus C3 species measured by increased shoot and root density and biomass, net ecosystem production, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, and methane production. But elevated CO2 also decreased biomass of the grass, S. patens C4. The elevated CO2 treatment reduced tissue nitrogen concentration in shoots, roots, and total canopy nitrogen, which was associated with reduced ecosystem respiration. Net ecosystem production was mediated by precipitation through soil salinity: high salinity reduced the CO2 effect on net ecosystem production, which was zero in years of severe drought. The elevated CO2 stimulation of shoot density in the Scirpus C3 species was sustained throughout the 28 years of the study. Results from this study suggest that rising CO2 can add substantial amounts of carbon to ecosystems through stimulation of carbon assimilation, increased root exudates to supply nitrogen fixation, reduced dark respiration, and improved water and nitrogen use efficiency.

  9. Constructed wetland as an ecotechnological tool for pollution treatment for conservation of Ganga river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Singh, N K; Upadhyay, A K; Dwivedi, S; Shukla, M K; Mallick, S; Singh, S N; Nautiyal, C S

    2013-11-01

    With aim to develop an efficient and ecofriendly approach for on-site treatment of sewage, a sub-surface flow constructed wetland (CW) has been developed by raising potential aquatic macrophytes; Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Colocasia esculenta, Polygonum hydropiper, Alternanthera sessilis and Pistia stratoites in gravel as medium. Sewage treatment potential of CW was evaluated by varying retention time at three different stages of plant growth and stabilization. After 6 months, monitoring of fully established CW indicated reduction of 90%, 65%, 78%, 84%, 76% and 86% of BOD, TSS, TDS, NO3-N, PO4-P and NH4-N, respectively in comparison to inlet after 36 h of retention time. Sewage treatment through CW also resulted in reduction of heavy metal contents. Thus, CW proved an effective method for treatment of wastewater and may be developed along river Ganga stretch as an alternative technology. Treated water may be drained into river to check further deterioration of Ganga water quality.

  10. Constructed wetland as an ecotechnological tool for pollution treatment for conservation of Ganga river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Singh, N K; Upadhyay, A K; Dwivedi, S; Shukla, M K; Mallick, S; Singh, S N; Nautiyal, C S

    2013-11-01

    With aim to develop an efficient and ecofriendly approach for on-site treatment of sewage, a sub-surface flow constructed wetland (CW) has been developed by raising potential aquatic macrophytes; Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Colocasia esculenta, Polygonum hydropiper, Alternanthera sessilis and Pistia stratoites in gravel as medium. Sewage treatment potential of CW was evaluated by varying retention time at three different stages of plant growth and stabilization. After 6 months, monitoring of fully established CW indicated reduction of 90%, 65%, 78%, 84%, 76% and 86% of BOD, TSS, TDS, NO3-N, PO4-P and NH4-N, respectively in comparison to inlet after 36 h of retention time. Sewage treatment through CW also resulted in reduction of heavy metal contents. Thus, CW proved an effective method for treatment of wastewater and may be developed along river Ganga stretch as an alternative technology. Treated water may be drained into river to check further deterioration of Ganga water quality. PMID:24080292

  11. Diversity and distribution of diapausing aquatic invertebrates in inland wetlands: An ecosystem conservation viewpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    processes determining the biogeography of cosmopolitan species are needed. Further knowledge of these issues should provide invaluable information allowing development of appropriate conservation management policies for inland waters across entire ecosystems, landscapes, and geographic regions....

  12. Development of Bird-watching Ecological Tourism in Hangzhou Bay National Wetland Park%杭州湾国家湿地公园观鸟生态旅游开发及对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈杨

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A review was presented on bird watching tourism development in China and abroad. The conditions for developing bird watching tourism and existing problems in Hangzhou Bay Wetland Park were analyzed.Suggestions were proposed to develop bird-watching ecotourism in Hangzhou bay wetland.%对观鸟旅游在国内外的发展进行概要梳理之后,分析了杭州湾湿地公园发展观鸟旅游的条件及存在问题,最后提出了杭州湾湿地公园发展观鸟生态旅游的建议与对策.

  13. The Mangroves of Kenya: general information. Compiled for Netherlands Wetlands Conservation and Training Programme, 1996.

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Els

    1996-01-01

    The report contains general information on mangroves in Kenya with the following main topics: Mangrove ecology, Mangrove distribution, Mangrove vegetation, Mangrove associated flora, Mangrove fauna, Values and utilization, threats. Interactions between mangroves, seagrasses & coral reefs. Main problems related to mangrove management and Conservation. Managing mangroves to insure their survival.

  14. Concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediment cores of Sundarban mangrove wetland, northeastern part of Bay of Bengal (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binelli, Andrea [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: andrea.binelli@unimi.it; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Chatterjee, Mousumi [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Riva, Consuelo [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy); Parolini, Marco [Department of Biology, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy); Bhattacharya, Bhaskar deb [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Bhattacharya, Asok Kumar [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700 019 (India); Satpathy, Kamala Kanta [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Environmental and Industrial Safety Section, Safety Group, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-08-15

    The paper presents the first comprehensive survey of congener profiles (12 congeners) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in core sediment samples (<63 {mu}m) covering seven sites in Sundarban mangrove wetland (India). Gas-chromatographic analyses were carried out in GC-Ms/Ms for tri- to hepta- brominated congeners. Results pointed out a non-homogenous contamination of the wetland with {sigma}{sub 12} PBDE values ranging from 0.08 to 29.03 ng g{sup -1}, reflecting moderate to low contamination closely in conformity to other Asian aquatic environments. The general order of decreasing congener contribution to the total load was: BDE 47 > 99 > 100 > 154, similar to the distribution pattern worldwide. Although tetrabromodiphenyl ether BDE 47 was found in all samples followed by hexabromodiphenyl ether BDE-154, they were not necessarily the dominant congeners. No uniform temporal trend on PBDE levels was recorded probably due to particular hydrological characteristics of the wetland and/on non-homologous inputs from point sources (untreated municipal wastewater and local industries, electronic wastes from the dump sites, etc.) of these compounds. Because of the propensity of PBDEs to accumulate in various compartments of wildlife and human food webs, evaluation of biological tissues should be undertaken as a high priority.

  15. Conflicts between groundwater development and wetland conservation in the Spanish Mediterranean area; Conflictos entre el desarrollo de las aguas subterraneas y la conservacion de los humedales del litoral mediterraneo espanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornes, J. M.; Hera, A. de la; Ballesteros, B.; Aragon, R.

    2008-07-01

    Conflicts between groundwater use and wetland conservation are especially relevant in arid and semi-arid zones, where the areas of these natural ecosystems have decreased in the last decades. Fifty years ago, wetland losses didn't cause any conflicts because they were not valued positively. The situation has changed due to the advances in agricultural technologies, to the disappearance of marshy diseases and the development of Ecology as a science. Nowadays, there is a general awareness that wetlands must be protected. Some of the most important conflicts between groundwater development and coastal wetland conservation have taken place in Valencia (Almenara and Pego-Oliva wetlands). These two cases are analysed in this paper, together with the current situation of the Mar Menor in Murcia. (Author) 34 refs.

  16. Species composition, distribution and habitat types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the associated conservation implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorinda A Hart

    Full Text Available Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity.

  17. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexin Shao

    Full Text Available Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC. The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1 and DOC (306 mg kg-1, while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1, and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1. Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1, and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1 and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1; however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1, β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1, and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1. Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  18. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands. PMID:26560310

  19. Ecology and conservation of large coastal sharks from Anegada Bay, Buenos Aires province, Argentina.

    OpenAIRE

    Lucifora, L.O.

    2003-01-01

    Reproduction, age, growth, feeding habits and population dynamics of four large temperate sharks (sand tiger shark Carcharias taurus, school shark Galeorhinus galeus, copper shark Carcharhinus brachyurus, and broadnose sevengill shark Notorynchus cepedianus) were studied in Anegada Bay (between 39°50' and 40°40'S), Argentina. Data were gathered from 1089 individuals examined during a three-year study period. Age and growth were studied through examination of vertebral centra only in the first...

  20. Remote sensing techniques and geographic information systems for wetland conservation and management: monitoring scrub encroachment in Biebrza National Park

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.M.; Piórkowski, H.; Bartoszuk, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Biebrza National Park in Poland is one of the most precious wetland areas in Europe. It was established in 1993 and designated Ramsar site in 1995. Despite its protection status, the open wetland landscape is currently being threatened by the encroachment of shrubs and trees, assumed to have a n

  1. Temporal and spatial distributions of sediment mercury at salt pond wetland restoration sites, San Francisco Bay, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A.K.; Ricca, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Decommissioned agricultural salt ponds within south San Francisco Bay, California, are in the process of being converted to habitat for the benefit of wildlife as well as water management needs and recreation. Little is known of baseline levels of contaminants in these ponds, particularly mercury (Hg), which has a well established legacy in the Bay. In this study we described spatial and short-term temporal variations in sediment Hg species concentrations within and among the Alviso and Eden Landing salt ponds in the southern region of San Francisco Bay. We determined total Hg (Hgt) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the top 5 cm of sediment of most ponds in order to establish baseline conditions prior to restoration, sediment Hgt concentrations in a subset of these ponds after commencement of restoration, and variation in MeHg concentrations relative to sediment Hgt, pH, and total Fe concentrations and water depth and salinity in the subset of Alviso ponds. Inter-pond differences were greatest within the Alviso pond complex, where sediment Hgt concentrations averaged (arithmetic mean) 0.74 ??g/g pre and 1.03 ??g/g post-restoration activity compared to 0.11 ??g/g pre and post at Eden Landing ponds. Sediment Hgt levels at Alviso were fairly stable temporally and spatially, whereas MeHg levels were variable relative to restoration activities across time and space. Mean (arithmetic) sediment MeHg concentrations increased (2.58 to 3.03 ng/g) in Alviso and decreased (2.20 to 1.03 ng/g) in Eden Landing restoration ponds during the study. Differences in MeHg levels were related to water depth and pH, but these relationships were not consistent between years or among ponds and were viewed with caution. Factors affecting MeHg levels in these ponds (and in general) are highly complex and require in-depth study to understand.

  2. It′s like herding monkeys into a conservation enclosure: The formation and establishment of the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Saunders

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript examines a project that is representative of an emerging trend of new generation Integrated Conservation Development Projects in parts of Africa that combine socio-economic development with an emphasis on local institutional change. These ′local′ projects are interlinked with global networks of conservation interests that provide technical expertise and resourcing. In the Jozani-Chawka Bay area, project planners brokered a community governance and benefit sharing agreement tha...

  3. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This CCP will provide the framework for making decisions on conserving natural, cultural, and recreational resources, managing visitor use, developing facilities...

  4. [Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) executive summary was written to guide management on Don Edwards San Francisco National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15...

  5. Assessing vulnerable and expanding vegetation stands and species in the San Francisco Bay Area for conservation management under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morueta-Holme, N.; Heller, N. E.; McLaughlin, B.; Weiss, S. B.; Ackerly, D.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of suitable climatic areas for species and vegetation types is expected to shift due to ongoing climate change. While the pace at which current distributions will shift is hard to quantify, predictions of where climatically suitable areas will be in the future can allow us to map 1) areas currently occupied by a species or vegetation type unlikely to persist through the end of this century (vulnerable stands), 2) areas likely to do better in the future and serve as nuclei for population expansion (expanding stands), and 3) areas likely to act as climate refugia (persisting stands). We quantified the vulnerability of 27 individual plant species and 27 vegetation types in the San Francisco Bay Area as well as the conservation importance, vulnerability, and resilience of selected management sites for climate change resilient conservation. To this end, we developed California-wide models of species and vegetation distributions using climate data from the 2014 California Basin Characterization Model at a 270 m resolution, projected to 18 different end-of century climate change scenarios. Combining these distribution models with high resolution maps of current vegetation, we were able to map projected vulnerable, expanding, and persisting stands within the Bay Area. We show that vegetation and species are expected to shift considerably within the study region over the next decades; although we also identify refugia potentially able to offset some of the negative impacts of climate change. We discuss the implications for managers that wish to incorporate climate change in conservation decisions, in particular related to choosing species for restoration, identifying areas to collect seeds for restoration, and preparing for expected major vegetation changes. Our evaluation of individual management sites highlights the need for stronger coordination of efforts across sites to prioritize monitoring and protection of species whose ranges are contracting

  6. Assessing the Fauna Diversity of Marudu Bay Mangrove Forest, Sabah, Malaysia, for Future Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zakaria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove is an evergreen, salt tolerant plant community, which grows in inter-tidal coastal zones of tropical and subtropical regions of the world. They are ecologically important for many fauna species and are rich in food resources and consist of many different vegetation structures. They serve as ideal foraging and nursery grounds for a wide array of species such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fishes and aquatic invertebrates. In spite of their crucial role, around 50% of mangrove habitats have been lost and degraded in the past two decades. The fauna diversity of mangrove habitat at Marudu Bay, Sabah, East Malaysia was examined using various methods: i.e. aquatic invertebrates by swap nets, fish by angling rods and cast nets, reptiles, birds, and mammals through direct sighting. The result showed that Marudu Bay mangrove habitats harbored a diversity of fauna species including 22 aquatic invertebrate species (encompassing 11 crustacean species, six mollusk species and four worm species, 36 fish species, 74 bird species, four reptile species, and four mammal species. The wide array of fauna species could be due to the availability of complex vegetation structures, sheltered beaches and tidal mudflats, which are rich in food resources and also offer safe foraging and breeding grounds for them. These heterogeneous habitats must be protected in a sustainable way in order to ensure the continued presence of aquatic and terrestrial fauna species for future generations.

  7. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2) are... of food, forage, or fiber and as long as such actions do not alter the hydrology of nearby...

  8. SCP (systematic conservation planning) optimization for a wetland conservation network system on Sanjiang Plain, China%基于系统保护规划的三江平原湿地保护网络体系优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲艺; 李佳珊; 王继丰; 崔福星; 孙工棋; 栾晓峰; 倪红伟

    2015-01-01

    This study optimized an existing conservation network system using SCP and gap analysis while evaluating the effectiveness of the new system. The process of establishing high-value conservation networks took into account biodiversity features of different levels and dimensions in the Sanjiang Plain. The process also accounted for the irreplaceability of catchments, since these planning units fall under the framework of SCP. In the horizontal dimension, we had two conservation level objectives, one for the ecosystem level and one for the species level. Eight types of marsh wetland systems, all lake ecosystems, and high conservation value river wetland systems were selected as ecosystem level conservation surrogates. Thirteen endangered birds and four endangered mammals were selected as species level conservation surrogates. In the vertical dimension, we chose 3 effective underground water distribution areas. Ecosystem conservation targets were set based on ecological function value, rarity and threat trends. Species conservation targets were set based on level of endangerment, scope for survival, and population growth/decline trends. Protection targets were set for water resources according to their runoff modulus and recharge modulus. SCP utilizes the key concept of irreplaceability, which is a measure, varying from zero to one, indicating the importance of an area ( planning unit) for the achievement of regional conservation targets. A map of irreplaceability values is therefore a base map of conservation planning. Finally, we combined irreplaceability values with vulnerability factors ( factors threatening the ecology of the region) to design different planning options. Results were as follows:( 1 ) High conservation value areas accounted for about 16% of the whole region and were generally distributed along river and lake ecosystems. Specifically, at headwater intersections, such as the intersection of the Heilongjiang and Wusulijiang, the junction of the

  9. 基于系统保护规划的三江平原湿地保护网络体系优化%SCP (systematic conservation planning) optimization for a wetland conservation network system on Sanjiang Plain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲艺; 李佳珊; 王继丰; 崔福星; 孙工棋; 栾晓峰; 倪红伟

    2015-01-01

    This study optimized an existing conservation network system using SCP and gap analysis while evaluating the effectiveness of the new system. The process of establishing high-value conservation networks took into account biodiversity features of different levels and dimensions in the Sanjiang Plain. The process also accounted for the irreplaceability of catchments, since these planning units fall under the framework of SCP. In the horizontal dimension, we had two conservation level objectives, one for the ecosystem level and one for the species level. Eight types of marsh wetland systems, all lake ecosystems, and high conservation value river wetland systems were selected as ecosystem level conservation surrogates. Thirteen endangered birds and four endangered mammals were selected as species level conservation surrogates. In the vertical dimension, we chose 3 effective underground water distribution areas. Ecosystem conservation targets were set based on ecological function value, rarity and threat trends. Species conservation targets were set based on level of endangerment, scope for survival, and population growth/decline trends. Protection targets were set for water resources according to their runoff modulus and recharge modulus. SCP utilizes the key concept of irreplaceability, which is a measure, varying from zero to one, indicating the importance of an area ( planning unit) for the achievement of regional conservation targets. A map of irreplaceability values is therefore a base map of conservation planning. Finally, we combined irreplaceability values with vulnerability factors ( factors threatening the ecology of the region) to design different planning options. Results were as follows:( 1 ) High conservation value areas accounted for about 16% of the whole region and were generally distributed along river and lake ecosystems. Specifically, at headwater intersections, such as the intersection of the Heilongjiang and Wusulijiang, the junction of the

  10. It′s like herding monkeys into a conservation enclosure: The formation and establishment of the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Saunders

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript examines a project that is representative of an emerging trend of new generation Integrated Conservation Development Projects in parts of Africa that combine socio-economic development with an emphasis on local institutional change. These ′local′ projects are interlinked with global networks of conservation interests that provide technical expertise and resourcing. In the Jozani-Chawka Bay area, project planners brokered a community governance and benefit sharing agreement that has been lauded as a watershed moment for conservation policy in Zanzibar. Key hurdles for establishing Zanzibar′s first national park, the Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park, were limiting community access to customary forest resources, farmer-red colobus monkey conflict, and setting up a supportive institutional arrangement. The conflict resolution and institutional strategies adopted by the conservation planners with the aid of international funding provide insights that help explain why the project has been able to maintain a ′fragile′ localised compliance with conservation goals at the Jozani-Pete village. This has been achieved despite lingering resentment over red colobus crop damage claims, and perceptions of insignificant conservation related benefits flowing to individuals and communities. This finding raises broader concerns about whether containment strategies to ground fragile project arrangements are conducive to engendering the longer term support of local communities for new generation Integrated Conservation Development Projects.

  11. Incorporating future change into current conservation planning: Evaluating tidal saline wetland migration along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Osland, Michael J.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, quantified the potential for landward migration of tidal saline wetlands along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. Our analyses focused exclusively on tidal saline wetlands (that is, mangrove forests, salt marshes, and salt flats), and we combined these diverse tidal saline wetland ecosystems into a single grouping, “tidal saline wetland.” Collectively, our approach and findings can provide useful information for scientists and environmental planners working to develop future-focused adaptation strategies for conserving coastal landscapes and the ecosystem goods and services provided by tidal saline wetlands. The primary product of this work is a public dataset that identifies locations where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is expected to occur under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. In addition to identifying areas where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is possible because of the absence of barriers, these data also identify locations where landward migration of these wetlands could be prevented by barriers associated with current urbanization, future urbanization, and levees.

  12. Incorporating future change into current conservation planning: Evaluating tidal saline wetland migration along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Osland, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, quantified the potential for landward migration of tidal saline wetlands along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. Our analyses focused exclusively on tidal saline wetlands (that is, mangrove forests, salt marshes, and salt flats), and we combined these diverse tidal saline wetland ecosystems into a single grouping, “tidal saline wetland.” Collectively, our approach and findings can provide useful information for scientists and environmental planners working to develop future-focused adaptation strategies for conserving coastal landscapes and the ecosystem goods and services provided by tidal saline wetlands. The primary product of this work is a public dataset that identifies locations where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is expected to occur under alternative future sea-level rise and urbanization scenarios. In addition to identifying areas where landward migration of tidal saline wetlands is possible because of the absence of barriers, these data also identify locations where landward migration of these wetlands could be prevented by barriers associated with current urbanization, future urbanization, and levees.

  13. Survey of Waterbird Resource in Cixi Hangzhou Bay Wetland Center in Zhejiang Province%浙江慈溪杭州湾湿地中心水鸟资源调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕咏; 殷世雨; John Howes; 朱冰润

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl specialists from Wedands International - China Office surveyed water birds at Cixi Hangzhou Bay Wetland Centre and adjacent wetlands during August 21 -22 2009 using line transect and point - count methods.In total,46 waterbird species of 7 families were recorded.The maximum count during the survey period was more than 10 000 waterbirds,including 26 species of migratory shorebirds.This paper lists the recorded species,the counts,decribes species distribution,and discusses the importance of migratory waterbirds at the wetland center.We also discuss the importance of Hangzhou Bay Wetland Centre in the East Asian - Australasian Migratory Bird Flyway and make recommendations for promotion and improvement of the protection of migratory waterbirds in Hangzhou Bay Wetland Center.%湿地国际-中国办事处项目组水鸟专家于2009年8月21~22日对浙江杭州湾湿地中心项目区及其邻近湿地的水鸟进行了全面调查。本次调查,采用定点观测与路线调查相结合的方法,共统计到水鸟7科46种,数量超过1万只,其中迁徙的鸻鹬类为26种。描述了杭州湾湿地中心迁徙水鸟的种类、数量分布及其重要性。为全面评估和了解杭州湾湿地中心的水鸟资源,为杭州湾湿地中心正在建设的野生动物湿地管理提供本底数据和依据。并对将来改善杭州湾湿地中心迁徙水鸟的保护提出了建议。

  14. The Effect of Climate Change on Land Use and Wetlands Conservation in Western Canada: An Application of Positive Mathematical Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of climate change on land use in the Prairie Pothole Region of Western Canada, with particular emphasis on how climate change will impact wetlands. A multi-region Positive Mathematical Programming model calibrates land use in the area to observed acreage in 2006. Polic

  15. Extending REDD+ to mangroves and wetlands for small island states and a case study for the conservation of mangroves and inter-tidal mudflats in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Heng LYE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly discusses the prospects of using coastal wetlands as REDD+ projects for small island states. The paper contends that the city-state of Singapore would do well to enhance existing laws to more specifically address the challenges and threats faced in conserving mangroves and inter-tidal mudflats, and support their conservation and rehabilitation, not just to facilitate the implementation of REDD+ projects but also to meet other goals like biodiversity conservation and climate change adaptation. The proposal is to expand Sungei Buloh to encompass the mudflats at Kranji which is home to the mangrove horseshoe crab (Carcinoscrorpius rotundicauda; aligned with inter-tidal and coastal management strategies advanced under the auspices of the Ramsar Convention, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the IUCN. However, there are considerable challenges in maintaining an intact eco-system in the face of rapid development, not only in Singapore itself but also in the neighbouring state of Johor, Malaysia. The paper examines the specific legal strategies that will be required to meet the various objectives of conservation in the context of Singapore's laws and the challenges posed by the development plans of both Singapore and Malaysia.

  16. 7 CFR 12.30 - NRCS responsibilities regarding wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NRCS responsibilities regarding wetlands. 12.30 Section 12.30 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.30 NRCS responsibilities regarding wetlands. (a) Technical...

  17. Michigan Wetlands: Yours To Protect. A Citizen's Guide to Local Involvement in Wetland Protection. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikiel, Wilfred

    This guidebook is designed to assist concerned Michigan citizens, local governments, conservation organizations, landowners, and others in their efforts to initiate wetlands protection activities. Chapter 1 focuses on wetland functions, values, losses, and the urgent need to protect wetland resources. Chapter 2 discusses wetland identification and…

  18. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    FERTILE LAND:The Qixing River Wetland in Heilongjiang Province was recently named a wetland of international importance at the Sixth Asian Wetland Symposium held in Wuxi City, east China’s Jiangsu Province, on October 13

  19. 海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系构建及其在泉州湾的应用%Spatial plan zoning system for marine biodiversity conservation and a case study of the Quanzhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利; 王金坑; 蒋金龙; 傅世锋; 戴娟娟; 欧阳玉蓉

    2012-01-01

    基于海岸带综合管理的理念,通过海域生态环境敏感性评价与海域生物多样性保护重要性评价,综合利用地理相关分析法、空间叠置法等定性和定量分区相结合的方法进行海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区划界,提出了海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系,将规划区域划分为生物多样性重点保护区、生物多样性养护区和生物多样性保护重点监督区.以福建泉州湾为案例,应用海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系,得出泉州湾生物多样性保护极重要地区是泉州湾河口湿地省级自然保护区,泉州湾生物多样性保护比较重要地区是晋江河口、洛阳江河口、晋江南岸地区及清源山.泉州湾海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区方案共划定26个分区,包括生物多样性重点保护区3个,生物多样性养护区14个,生物多样性保护重点监督区9个.泉州湾的应用结果表明,本研究提出的海洋生物多样性保护空间规划分区体系具有一定的可行性和可操作性,可为泉州湾生物多样性保护管理提供重要科学依据.%Based on the integrated coastal zone management, according to the assessment of the sensitivity of marine ecological environment and the importance of marine biodiversity conservation, the boundaries of marine biodiversity conservation zones are created by using quantitative and qualitative studies such as geographical correlation analysis and spatial overlapping. Further, a spatial plan zoning system for marine biodiversity conservation was established, which divided the planning areas into key protected areas, and proposed biodiversity conservation areas and biodiversity supervision areas. The system was then applied to Quanzhou Bay, Fujian Province. The results indicated that the key biodiversity conservation area is Quanzhou Bay Wetland Provincial Nature Reserve, the more important area for biodiversity conservation is the

  20. 湿地自然保护区保护价值评价方法%An evaluation index system classifying the conservation value of wetland nature reserves based on AHP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙锐; 崔国发; 雷霆; 郑姚闽

    2013-01-01

    relevant national criterion to facilitate the analysis of this application and evaluation method, 1) nature reserve for ocean and seacoast ecosystem, 2) nature reserve for inland wetlands and water area ecosystem, and 3) nature reserve for wildlife types.The three wetland types within the nature reserve wetland system were further divided into four smaller types 1) offshore and coastal wetlands, 2) riverine, 3 ) lacustrine wetlands, and 4 ) marsh wetlands.Meanwhile, the Golden section method was used to assign indicators.Each set of indicators was calculated using frequency percentiles, with the values of 62% , 38% , and 0% representing the high, medium, low value by threshold, respectively.The assignment method was (62%-100% ) as the high value niche section assignment 1, (38%-62% ) as interval assignment 0.62, and (0-38% ) as low range assignment 0.38.The final results were calculated from the nature reserve conservation value index formula.In this paper, 8 nature reserves were analyzed from the offshore and coastal wetlands as the main body of ocean and seacoast ecosystem type, 13 nature reserves of marsh wetlands were analyzed as the main body of inland wetlands and water area ecosystem type and 6 nature reserves of riverine wetlands were analyzed as the main body of wildlife type and classified for each type of protection index on a case-by-case basis, respectively.The results showed the evaluation method used to classify wetlands on the basis of waterbird protection may objectively and fairly reflect the value of wetlands needed to protect water birds.Furthermore, this evaluation index system may be used to classify the wetland nature reserve system using a protection index and provides the foundation to plan and reconstruct the wetland ecosystem nature reserves and change their protection status.%提出了一套侧重水鸟保护的湿地自然保护区保护价值评价方法.该方法建立的指标体系经过专家咨询和会议讨论确定指标,采用层次

  1. STUDY ON WETLAND LOSS AND ITS REASONS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems with many functions. But the general public and government lack a comprehensive understanding of the importance of wetland benefits, thus making blindly exploitation, wetland resources decreasing and losing biodiversity. So wetlands in China, as in most countries, have suffered heavily from the pressure of development and have confronted with the threats of loss. The paper takes Sanjiang Plain marshes, lakes in the middle reaches of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River, coastal wetlands and mangroves as cases to study wetland loss in China, and puts forward main existing reasons of wetland loss, such as blindly reclamation and exploitation of wetland resources,over-exploitation of bio-resources in wetland, etc. More recently, there has been a growing recognition of the benefits of wetlands and a wide range of legal and regulatory initiatives have been undertaken which are designed to improve wetland management and conservation. On the basis of the above analysis, the paper brings forward some suggestions on wetland conservation.

  2. National Wetlands Inventory - Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate...

  3. 75 FR 33822 - Los Esteros Critical Energy Facility Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Bay Checkerspot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... the Bay Checkerspot Butterfly and Serpentine Endemic Plant Species, Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY... maintenance of the Los Esteros Critical Energy Facility (LECEF) located in Santa Clara County, California. The... (Streptanthus albidus albidus), Santa Clara Valley dudleya (Dudleya setchellii), and Tiburon...

  4. 黄淮海地区跨流域湿地生态系统保护网络体系优化%Optimization of conservation network system for inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓龙; 李晓文; 张明祥; 杨殿林; 张黎娜; 张贵龙

    2012-01-01

    By using systematic conservation planning ( SCP) method, and taking catchment as planning unit, an optimization of conservation network system for the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region was conducted, with a comprehensive consideration of 3-dimensional (lateral, longitudinal and vertical) connectivity and Inter-basin Water Transfer Project and by the methods of irreplaceability analysis and gap identification. The efficacy of the optimized conservation network system was evaluated, as compared with the existing conservation network system. According to the principles of irreplaceability and connectivity, the wetland conservation gaps could be divided into two types, i. e. , be conserved in priority and in general. After the optimization, the conservation status of the inter-basin wetland ecosystem in Huang-Huai-Hai Region had an overall improvement. The conserved percentage of the wetland types was from about 20% up to 46. 8% , and, for each wetland type, its conserved level increased to some extent, almost above 40% . Both in the near future and in the long term, more attention should be paid to the conservation of lake wetland. In addition, the integration of ecosystem service function and biodiversity and the combination of protection with restoration would be the main task for the wetland ecosystem conservation planning in the future.%运用系统保护规划方法,以集水区为保护规划单元,综合考虑三维(3D)连接性(横向、纵向、垂向)和跨流域调水工程,通过不可替代性分析和保护空缺识别,对黄淮海地区跨流域湿地生态系统保护网络体系优化进行研究,并通过与已有保护体系对比,评估了优化体系的效用.结果表明:依据不可替代性大小和连接性原则,湿地保护空缺可分为优先保护空缺和一般保护空缺;黄淮海地区湿地生态系统保护体系经过优化后,湿地保护状况整体上有较大改观,其中所有湿地类

  5. Neotropical coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropical region, which includes the tropical Americas, is one of the world's eight biogeographic zones. It contains some of the most diverse and unique wetlands in the world, some of which are still relatively undisturbed by humans. This chapter focuses on the northern segment of the Neotropics (south Florida, the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America), an area that spans a latitudinal gradient from about 7 N to 29 N and 60 W to 112 W. Examples of coastal wetlands in this realm include the Everglades (Florida, USA), Ten Thousand Islands (Florida, USA), Laguna de Terminos (Mexico), Twin Cays (Belize), and Zapata Swamp (Cuba). Coastal wetlands are dominated by mangroves, which will be emphasized here, but also include freshwater swamps and marshes, saline marshes, and seagrass beds. The aim of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of Neotropical coastal wetlands of the North American continent, with an emphasis on mangroves, since this is the dominant vegetation type and because in-depth coverage of all wetland types is impossible here. Instead, the goal is to describe the environmental settings, plant and animal communities, key ecological controls, and some conservation concerns, with specific examples. Because this book deals with wetlands of North America, this chapter excludes coastal wetlands of South America. However, much of the information is applicable to mangrove, marsh, and seagrass communities of other tropicaI regions.

  6. 安徽湿地保护管理现状与发展对策%Current Status and Development Strategies of Wetland Conservation and Management in Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢琳琳; 顾长明

    2012-01-01

    安徽湿地资源具有面积大、类型多、分布不均、水系发达、水质差别大和生物物种丰富等特点。安徽湿地保护面临着人口增长和经济快速发展的双重压力,湖泊围垦、泥沙淤积、环境污染、过度渔猎、江湖隔绝、生物入侵、基建和城市化对湿地保护构成严重威胁。本文在详细分析安徽湿地资源保护管理现状和存在问题的基础上,提出了实施湿地恢复与重建工程、完善法规、加强科研宣教、健全组织机构、建立湿地监测网络、增加资金投入等一系列全面推进安徽湿地保护管理工作的措施。%The wetland resources of Anhui Province have characteristics including large surface area,multiple wetland types, uneven distribution,well - developed water systems,varied water quality,and abundant wildlife.Wetland protection in Anhui Province faces pressure from human population growth and rapid economic development.There are many serious threats to wetland protection including lake reclamation,sediment deposition,environment pollution,overfishing,isolation of river and lake,biological invasions,infrastructure construction,and urbanization.Based on the current status and existing problems of the wetland resources conservation and management in Anhui provinces we offer recommendations to guide future policy formulation and implementation of wetland conservation and management.These include implementation of programs on wetland restoration and reconstruction,improving and perfecting laws and regulations,strengthening scientific research and public education, reinforcement of management organizations,construction of wetland monitoring system,and increasing financial support.

  7. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour.

  8. 泉州湾河口湿地自然保护区鸟类多样性调查%The Survey of the Avian Diversity of Quanzhou Bay Wetland Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄磊; 陈友铃; 纪剑锋; 陈若海; 叶思敏; 刘小萍

    2013-01-01

    2011年10月-2012年9月对泉州湾湿地自然保护区鸟类多样性进行调查,综合历史资料和本次调查记录,结果表明:泉州湾湿地自然保护区鸟类有13目35科170种,其中《中日候鸟保护协定》有75种、《中澳候鸟保护协定》有44种、国家二级保护鸟类19种、福建省重点保护鸟类21种。根据居留状况分析,冬候鸟72种,占42.35%;留鸟54种,占31.76%;旅鸟27种,占15.88%;夏候鸟17种,占10%。区系从属情况为:古北界鸟类97种,占57.06%;东洋界鸟类69种,占40.59%;广布界鸟类4种,占2.35%。分析了泉州湾湿地自然保护区鸟类保护存在的问题,并提出了保护建议。%The bird species diversity was surveyed in Quanzhouwan Bay Wetland Nature Reserve during October , 2011 to Septem-ber,2012.According to the comprehensiveness of the historical data and the investigation ,the results showed that 170 species of birds were recorded at Quanzhouwan Bay Wetland Nature Reserve , including 75 species which were recorded in China-Japanese Bird Protection Agreement and 44 in China-Australia Migratory Bird Protection Agreement .There were 19 species under second-grade state protection .21 species were under special provincial protection of Fujian .According to the status analysis of residence ,72 spe-cies were winter migrant birds , accounting for 42.35%,54 species were resident birds , accounting for 31.76%, 27species were passing migrant birds,accounting for15.88%,and 17 species were summer migrant birds ,accounting for 10%.According to the flora affiliates,97species were Palearctic realm , accounting for 57.06%, 69 species were Oriental realm , accounting for 40.59%, and 4 species were widespread birds , accounting for 2.35%.This survery analyzed the existing problems of birds protection in Quanzhou Bay Wetland Nature Reserve , and put forward suggestions to protect .

  9. Wetland Reclamation and Habitat Damage Assessment in Jiaozhou Bay%基于生境等价分析法的胶州湾湿地围垦生态损害评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京梅; 王晓玲

    2013-01-01

    Assessing habitat damage resulting from wetland reclamation is important for developing marine ecological damage compensation policy. The process of reclamation in Jiaozhou Bay has become increasingly serious in recent decades, and has affected the ecological environment and wetland habitats. Here, we summarize relevant research in this field and introduce habitat equivalency analysis (HEA) to the Chinese research community. The two main indicators in this assessment are biological diversity and the ability of water quality clarification. Using HEA we found that the area of wetland reclamation in Jiaozhou Bay is 2264 hm2 and the level of habitat damage is approximately 54.5%. By planting salt marshes as a form of restoration and where the service level is equivalent to that of the damaged area, the scale of the restoration project should be 358 hm2 to achieve initial habitat service levels of filled wetlands. With reference to the average public value of different ocean ecosystem services, the habitat service damage is worth 42.64 million CNY per year. Whether the services provided by the restoration project match losses caused by reclamation requires further study. Sensitivity analysis on the discount rate and the time required to reach base service levels should now be examined.%评估湿地围垦的生态损害,对目前迫切需要制定的海洋生态损害补偿政策以及生态修复计划具有重要的现实意义.本文针对黄海胶州湾湿地围垦,运用生境等价分析法,完成了围垦湿地的生境受损量、补偿量及补偿面积的评估.结果显示:1988年-1997年期间,胶州湾湿地围垦面积约为2264hm2,生境损害程度为54.5%.假设通过人工种植沼泽植被来修复受损湿地生境,且修复生境所提供的服务等于受损区域的生境服务,则修复工程的规模为358hm2,才能达到补偿受损湿地生境服务水平的目标.进一步参照不同类型海洋生态系统的平均公益价值标准,该

  10. Use of Land Use Land Cover Change Mapping Products in Aiding Coastal Habitat Conservation and Restoration Efforts of the Mobile Bay NEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Swann, Roberta; Smooth, James

    2010-01-01

    The Mobile Bay region has undergone significant land use land cover change (LULC) over the last 35 years, much of which is associated with urbanization. These changes have impacted the region s water quality and wildlife habitat availability. In addition, much of the region is low-lying and close to the Gulf, which makes the region vulnerable to hurricanes, climate change (e.g., sea level rise), and sometimes man-made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Land use land cover change information is needed to help coastal zone managers and planners to understand and mitigate the impacts of environmental change on the region. This presentation discusses selective results of a current NASA-funded project in which Landsat data over a 34-year period (1974-2008) is used to produce, validate, refine, and apply land use land cover change products to aid coastal habitat conservation and restoration needs of the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (MB NEP). The project employed a user defined classification scheme to compute LULC change mapping products for the entire region, which includes the majority of Mobile and Baldwin counties. Additional LULC change products have been computed for select coastal HUC-12 sub-watersheds adjacent to either Mobile Bay or the Gulf of Mexico, as part of the MB NEP watershed profile assessments. This presentation will include results of additional analyses of LULC change for sub-watersheds that are currently high priority areas, as defined by MB NEP. Such priority sub-watersheds include those that are vulnerable to impacts from the DWH oil spill, as well as sub-watersheds undergoing urbanization. Results demonstrating the nature and permanence of LULC change trends for these higher priority sub-watersheds and results characterizing change for the entire 34-year period and at approximate 10-year intervals across this period will also be presented. Future work will include development of value-added coastal habitat quality

  11. Bird Diversity and Conservation Strategy in the Reclaimed Hexi Wetland of Poyang Lake%鄱阳湖荷溪退田还湖湿地区域鸟类多样性及其保护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬皆

    2011-01-01

    调查了鄱阳湖荷溪区域湿地鸟类资源,并对164种鸟类的种类组成、区系特点、珍稀濒危性、鸟类季节性、生态分布进行了分析,针对湿地鸟类保护中存在的问题,提出了保护对策.%Wetland bird resources and their diversity in the reclaimed Hexiwetland of Poyang Lake were studied by investigating the species composition,the avifauna characteristics, the status of rare and endangered species, theseasonal changes, and ecological distribution of the 164 bird species. Existingproblems in wetland bird protection were identified and a conservation strategywas proposed.

  12. Management of wetlands for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Gray,; Heath M. Hagy,; J. Andrew Nyman,; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires an understanding of basic ecosystem processes, animal and plant life history strategies, and principles of wildlife management. Management techniques that are used differ depending on target species, coastal versus interior wetlands, and available infrastructure, resources, and management objectives. Ideally, wetlands are managed as a complex, with many successional stages and hydroperiods represented in close proximity. Managing wetland wildlife typically involves manipulating water levels and vegetation in the wetland, and providing an upland buffer. Commonly, levees and water control structures are used to manipulate wetland hydrology in combination with other management techniques (e.g., disking, burning, herbicide application) to create desired plant and wildlife responses. In the United States, several conservation programs are available to assist landowners in developing wetland management infrastructure on their property. Managing wetlands to increase habitat quality for wildlife is critical, considering this ecosystem is one of the most imperiled in the world.

  13. Presettlement Vegetation and Natural Fire Regimes of the Grand Bay/Banks Lake Natural Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project was to develop maps of the original vegetation and original fireregimes of the Grand Bay-Old Field Bay-Banks Lake wetland complex to...

  14. Island characteristics within wetlands influence waterbird nest success and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Ackerman, Josh; Herzog, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coastal waterbird populations are threatened by habitat loss and degradation from urban and agricultural development and forecasted sea level rise associated with climate change. Remaining wetlands often must be managed to ensure that waterbird habitat needs, and other ecosystem functions, are met. For many waterbirds, the availability of island nesting habitat is important for conserving breeding populations. We used linear mixed models to investigate the influence of pond and island landscape characteristics on nest abundance and nest success of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA, based on a 9-year dataset that included >9,000 nests. Nest abundance and nest success were greatest within ponds and on individual islands located either 4 km from San Francisco Bay. Further, nest abundance was greater within ponds with relatively few islands, and on linear-shaped, highly elongated islands compared to more rounded islands. Nest success was greater on islands located away from the nearest surrounding pond levee. Compared to more rounded islands, linear islands contained more near-water habitat preferred by many nesting waterbirds. Islands located away from pond levees may provide greater protection from terrestrial egg and chick predators. Our results indicate that creating and maintaining a few, relatively small, highly elongated and narrow islands away from mainland levees, in as many wetland ponds as possible would be effective at providing waterbirds with preferred nesting habitat.

  15. Estuarine ecology : A report on Santa Clara County Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report on the Santa Clara County wetlands was written just prior to the establishment of the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The report summarizes...

  16. ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS AT THE CATCHMENT SCALE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe an approach to assessing the ecological condition of two classes of wetlands in the Nanticoke River watershed, a subwatershed in the Chesapeake Bay drainage of North America. We used the hydrogeomorphic (HGM) approach to assess the ecological condition of wetlands al...

  17. Freshwater Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  18. Water supply from wetlands in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mihayo, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper gives a brief discussion on water supply from wetlands in Tanzania. The majordrainage basins in Tanzania are described and the status and role of the Division of WaterResearch in the monitoring of water resources and data collection from wetlands and watersources are highlighted. The role of wetlands in the hydrological cycle, and the utilisation ofwetlands as water supply sources are discussed. The need for conservation and protection ofwetlands and other water sources is outlined.

  19. Direction and magnitude of change in soil use for a wetland area in Chile: Puren marshes, a priority site for biodiversity conservation (stage 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Varas, Alejandra

    2014-05-01

    Land managers and policymakers need information about soil change caused by anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors to predict the effects of management on soil function, compare alternatives, and make decisions. This is particularly relevant in highly fragile ecosystems such as wetlands or humid systems. The wetlands require the presence of three key components: hydric soils, hydrophytic vegetation and wetland hydrology. Therefore, the presence of hydric soils in humid systems is essential for the existence of a wetland. In Chile, one of the geographic zones with the greatest diversity of humid systems is the coast of the Araucanía Region, which contains one of the largest and most threatened humid systems of the region, Puren Marshes, whose soils are only generically described as alluvial terraces and miscellaneous swamp. In this area, studies have reported a high intensity of anthropogenic activity, generating soil erosion, loss of wetland coverage and landscape alteration. For this first stage of a main investigation about the vulnerability of hydric soils to changes in patterns of soil use, the objective was to characterize the variables of soil use in the Puren Marshes and determinate the direction and magnitude of change in soil use in the study area for the period between 1994 and 2007 (the official reports indicate that until 1994, the total area of Puren Marshes was 1147 ha). For the analyses, were used official reports of soil use, the coverages were obtained from the project map databases "Catastro y Evaluación de los Recursos Vegetacionales Nativos de Chile" 1993 and its update for La Araucanía, Regional Government of La Araucanía 2011, DMF CONAF 2010 and IGM 2007. The map information was processed in ARCGIS 9.3.1 software under UTM coordinates, datum WGS 84 and 18 South Time extended. Was developed a multitemporal analysis by construction of transition matrix and confusion matrix. The results obtained show that for the period analysed, the

  20. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  1. 7 CFR 1410.11 - Farmable Wetlands Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farmable Wetlands Program. 1410.11 Section 1410.11... Wetlands Program. (a) In addition to other allowable enrollments, land may be enrolled in this program through the Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP) within the overall Conservation Reserve Program provided...

  2. 浅谈阿尔泰山湿地保护与可持续利用%Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wetland in Altay Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿勒泰·塔依巴扎尔; 王勤

    2014-01-01

    There are varieties of wetlands such as rivers, lakes and swamps distributed in Altay Mountains, which ultimately form the Ulungur River and Ertix River. Because of some reasons such as irrigation infrastructure development, wetland reclamation for agriculture and over-grazing, the wetlands degradation becomes a problem which can not be ignored. In general, the resilience of the wetlands in Altay Mountains was not lost,strategies and measures such as institutional capacity building, awareness building, enforcement and ecological restoration should be implemented so as to protect and sustainably manage the wetland resources which would finally contribute to the local and Xinjiang socio-economic sustainable development.%阿尔泰山分布着众多的河流、湖泊、沼泽等湿地,蕴育了我们赖以生存的额尔齐斯河和乌伦古河。由于各种原因和历史变革,湿地退化已不容忽视,但目前尚未失去自我修复能力。依据阿尔泰山湿地保护与可持续利用存在的问题和制约因素,应尽快建立机构、明确职责、加强湿地教育科研和执法力度,采取实施退耕、退牧还湿、生态补水、人工恢复等措施,保护与合理利用阿尔泰山珍贵的湿地资源,为阿勒泰地区乃至新疆经济社会的可持续发展做出贡献。

  3. Impact Analysis of Coastal Engineering Projects on Mangrove Wetland Area Change with Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, two large scale coastal engineering projects have been carried out in the Deep Bay surrounded by Shenzhen City and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. One project is Shenzhen River channel regulation and the other is the sea reclamation along the seashore on the Shenzhen side. The two projects are very close to the two national nature reserves, specifically Futian in Shenzhen and Mai Po in Hong Kong, which are important wetland ecosystems worldwide. This paper aims to identify and monitor the mangrove wetland changes with time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper images pre and post to the two engineering projects being launched. Coupled analysis of the image interpretation results and tidal data acquired at the same time in the context of the two works reveals that the mangrove wetland area has increased from year 1989 to 1994, and has changed little from year 1994 to 2002. Binary coding is applied to reveal the distribution image of mangrove at each phase, and the coding image shows that the construction of the two coastal engineering projects has caused frequent changes in mangrove spatial distribution. The study also shows that the change is not significant regarding to the precision of the method and the natural evolution of mangrove wetland, and the projects do not cause apparently influences upon the two national mangrove conservation zones at least for the research time period.

  4. Environmental Assessment: Impoundment Rehabilitation on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to rehabilitate the wetland impoundments of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The environmental assessment describes...

  5. Management Plan Montezuma Wetlands Complex 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Montezuma Wetlands Complex Project (MWC) is a land conservation and management project jointly sponsored by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New York State...

  6. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    Watching flocks of waterfowl taking off and landing in the large expanse of wetland near his home is a favorite pastime of Li Qiwen a middle-aged primary school teacher in Weichang Township,Luobei County in Heilongjiang Province.The wetland is home to hundreds of species of birds,including rare white storks and red-crowned cranes,as well as more common geese and ducks.

  7. Study of Panjin Wetlands Along Bohai Coast (Ⅱ): Ecological Water Requirement of Shuangtaizi Estuarine Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tieliang; ZHOU Linfei; ZHAO Be; YANG Peiqi

    2009-01-01

    Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland along the Bohai Sea coast, the biggest bulrush wetland in the world, has been listed in The Record of Important International Wetland Conservation District'. Taking the year of 2 000 as an example, the minimum, the most suitable and the maximum ecological water requirement of Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland are calculated in this paper based on both ecological theory and Geological Information System technology. In addition, the remote sensing technique is adopted in the data acquisition process. Moreover, the total water requirement and the unit area water requirement for different wetland types are obtained. The result is very important for water resources planning, ecological conservation and regional agriculture structure ad-justment in Shuangtaizi. Meanwhile, this study can serve as a useful example for calculating the ecological water requirement in other similar estuarine wetlands.

  8. Capitalized amenity value of urban wetlands: a hedonic property price approach to urban wetlands in Perth, Western Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Tapsuwan, Sorada; Ingram, Gordon; Burton, Michael P.; Brennan, Donna C.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 60 per cent of potable water supplied to Perth, Western Australia, is extracted from the groundwater system that lies below the northern part of the metropolitan area. Many of the urban wetlands are groundwater-dependent and excessive groundwater extraction and climate change have resulted in a decline in water levels in the wetlands. In order to inform decisions on conserving existing urban wetlands, it is beneficial to be able to estimate the economic value of the urban wetlands. Appl...

  9. 大连湾保守污染物迁移三维模型及应用%Three-dimensional model of conservative pollutant migration and its application in the Dalian Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 张宁川

    2013-01-01

    Based on an unstructured grid,finite-volume coastal ocean model and coupled the Lagrangian particle tracking model and the conservative pollutant transport diffusion model,the hydrodynamic change,the tidal-induced residual current,the conservative pollutant transport,the trajectories of characteristic particles and different artificial islands influence on conservative pollutant transport were simulated.It was verified that the results of the ocean model agreed well with the field observed data.The results showed that tidal-induced residual current presented the form of clockwise semivortex flow; the direction of residual current in the bay estuary was NE,and the direction of conservative pollutant migration was the same as the residual current direction; the self-purification capacity of conservative pollutants in the bay estuary was better than that in the bottom,and such capacity in the northern bay was better than that in the southern bay;the pollutant in the sub bays was difficult to diffuse out.Both of artificial island scenarios would reduce the self-purification capacity of the Xiangshuitao Bay and the Choushuitao Bay,and the impact of scenario 2 was greater than that of scenario 1 ;the artificial island 1 would also reduce the self-purification capacity of the Hongtuduizi Bay,but scenario 2 would improve its water quality.%采用基于有限体积法和非结构化网格的三维潮流模型,同时耦合拉格朗日粒子追踪模型和保守污染物输运扩散模型.模拟了大连湾内的水动力变化、潮致余流场分布、保守污染物的输移和特征粒子的运动轨迹;同时研究了不同人工岛对湾内污染物迁移的影响.模拟的潮流场与实测数据吻合较好.结果表明:湾内潮致余流呈顺时针半涡形态,湾口潮致余流呈NE方向;湾内保守污染物主要随潮致余流的方向而迁移,湾口的迁移扩散快于湾中,湾内北部的污染物能较快扩散到湾外,湾内南部的污染物易在

  10. Virginia ESI: Wetlands (Wetland Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the coastal wetlands for Virginia, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  11. Conservation = Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Daget, Jacques; Gaigher, I.C.; Ssentongo, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    African freshwater fishes are endangered by over exploitation of live fish for aquarists and for exports, intensive fishing of species with low resilience, introduction of exotic species, pollution, general environmental modification by man. Therefore, to ensure conservation to fish species, it is necessary to increase basic knowledge in order to provide guidelines and a scientific basis for conservation measures. The three main lines for the development of a fish conservation policy are publ...

  12. INFLUENCE OF FRESHWATER DISCHARGE ON ZOOPLANKT COMMUNITY DISTRIBUTION IN THE MUDFLAT WETLANDS OF THE HANGZHOU BAY%淡水排放对杭州湾湿地浮游动物群落分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李共国; 屠霄霞; 王佩儿; 王自磐; 廖何朝兴; 杨季芳

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the spatiotemporal distribution of zooplankton species composition,abundance and biodiversity in the mudflat wetlands of Hangzhou Bay,40 samples were conducted at middle to high tide levels in five sampling stations (S1-S3 for discharge area,and S4-S5 for non-discharge area) in April (spring),July (summer),October (autumn),2010 and January (winter),2011.A total of 38 species of zooplankton (15 Rotifera,4 Cladocera,19 Copepoda) were found.The annual average density (88.89 ind./L) and biomass (0.41 mg/L) of zooplankton in the discharge area were much higher than those,i.e.,4.21 ind./L and 0.10 mg/L,respectively,in the non-discharge area.The dominant species of rotifers and copepods in the discharge area were Brachionus calyciflorus and Sinocalanus dorrii,respectively,and Calanus sinicus dominated copepods in the non-discharge area.Water nutrient concentrations,community density,and biomass of the zooplankton at middle tide level in stations S2-S3 were much higher than those at high tide level.The zooplankton community in the mudflat wetlands,the effects of the freshwater discharge,tidal creek spread,and tidal conditions determined the temporal pattern of the main zooplankton species,and the tidal creek spread and tidal conditions explained differences in composition and structure between the middle and the high tide level.%于2010年4月至2011年1月对杭州湾南岸滩涂湿地5个断面(S1-S3为排水区,S4-S5为非排水区)的高潮位和中潮位分别进行浮游动物群落结构的周年调查,共发现浮游动物38种(轮虫15种,枝角类4种,桡足类19种).排水区浮游动物年平均密度88.89 ind./L,生物量0.41 mg/L,非排水区平均密度仅4.21 ind./L,生物量0.10 mg/L.排水区轮虫和桡足类的第一优势种分别为萼花臂尾轮虫(Brachionus calyciflorus)和汤匙华哲水蚤(Sinocalanus dorrii),而非排水区第一优势种为中华哲水蚤(Calanus sinicus).S2-S3断面中潮位的水体营养盐浓度、

  13. Quantitative Change of Nitrifying Bacteria at Quanzhou Bay Estuary Wetland%泉州湾河口湿地土壤硝化细菌的数量变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴沿友; 张颖; 朱咏莉; 刘荣成

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative change of nitrifying bacteria in different plots and vegetation types at the Quanzhou Bay estuary wetland was studied. A real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) method was established to identify and quantify Nitrobacter. spp, Nitrospira. spp and Nitrosornonas. spp in the soil under different vegetation types. The results showed that there was a significant difference in quantity of the three nitrifying bacteria genera in the soil at different plots and under differ- ent vegetation types. The quantity of the three nitrifying bacteria genera in the Soil under vegetations was higher than that in the new alluvial soil without plants and bared land. The quantity of the nitrifying bacteria in the soil under Avicennia marina was lowest in the soil under other vegetations. The amount of Nitrosomonas. spp in the soil under native Aegiceras cornicula- turn was higher than that under other mangroves. The quantity of Nitrobacter. spp and nitrosomonas, spp in the soil under Spartina alterniflora was higher than that under mangroves. Quantitative change of nitrifying bacteria is related with the veg- etation types and soil phys-chemical factors.%为了解硝化细菌在泉州湾湿地中不同区域和不同植被土壤中的数量变化规律,应用实时荧光定量PCR方法分别对不同红树林植被土壤中的硝化杆菌属、硝化螺菌属、亚硝化单胞菌属进行鉴定和相对定量。结果表明:不同区域并口不同植被土壤中三属硝化细菌相对数量有显著差异,有植被土壤高于空地矛芦裸地;在有植被的土壤中,白骨壤下土壤最低;原生桐花树的硝化螺茵属数量明显高于其他植被主壤,互花米草的硝化杆菌属和亚硝化单胞菌属数量明显都高于红树林植被土壤。硝化细菌数量变化与植被类型和土壤的理化因子有关。

  14. Golf courses and wetland fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Colding, Johan; Lundberg, Jakob; Lundberg, Stefan; Andersson, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Golf courses are often considered to be chemical-intensive ecosystems with negative impacts on fauna. Here we provide evidence that golf courses can contribute to the support and conservation of wetland fauna, i.e., amphibians and macroinvertebrates. Comparisons of amphibian occurrence, diversity of macroinvetebrates, and occurrence of species of conservation concern were made between permanent freshwater ponds surveyed on golf courses around Sweden's capital city, Stockholm, and off-course p...

  15. 拉鲁湿地国家级自然保护区鸟类资源及其保护对策%Bird Resources and Its Conservation in Lhalu Wetland Nature Reserve of Lhasa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴桑; 次仁; 普布; 拉多

    2009-01-01

    three years' fieldwork, including two bird species which are the national first-grade protected wildlife and 7 species that are the national second- grade protected wildlife. Also, two bird species are the second-grade protected wildlife in Tibetan Autonomous Region. There were 39 species of palearctic realm, 17 cosmopolitan species, 3 endemic species, and 3 species of oriental realm. In addition, 24 bird species are resident birds, 12 bird species are summer birds and 24 bird species are winter birds, and 2 bird species are passing bird. According to the present status of bird resources in Lhalu wetland, detailed countermeasures or approaches for the diversity conservation of bird habitat as well as water bird protection are suggested.

  16. Wetlands ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. R. (Principal Investigator); Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ERTS imagery analyzed provides approximately 2/3 coverage of the test site. Analysis was made using visual methods, density slicing, and multispectral analysis. Preliminary conclusions reached are that most, if not all, of the investigation objectives can be met. Saline and near-saline wetlands can be delineated from ERTS-1 images as the wetland-upland boundaries and land-water interface are clearly defined. Major plant species or communities such as Spartina alterniflora (high and low vigor forms), Spartina patens/Distichlis spicata, and Juncus roemarianus can be discriminated and spoil disposal areas identified.

  17. 中国红树林湿地资源及其保护%The mangrove wetland resources and their conservation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乔民; 隋淑珍

    2001-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands are evergreen tree and shrub communities mainly consisting of mangrove plants, usually growing on the upper part of tidal flat of tropical and subtropical coasts, and periodically inundated by tidal water. Mangroves are naturally distributed in Hainan, Guangxi, Guangdong, Taiwan and Fujian provinces, with an area of about 15,000 ha.There are 26 exclusive mangrove species and 11 semi-exclusive mangrove species in China. The mangrove wetland in China has low direct economic values, but plays an important role in protecting coastline, keeping coastal biodiversity and fishery resources, clarifying sea water, beautifying environment, and so on. It is a coastal ecologically critical area that is specially easy to be undervalued.The mangrove areas have been sharply reduced because of human s unreasonable exploiting activities,such as des-troying mangroves for agricultural and salt fields, for aquaculture ponds and for urban construction, and the mangrove wetland resources are in danger and need urgent efficient management and protection. Eighteen mangrove natural reserves have been established. It is essential to attract scientists to take an active part in scientific researches on mangrove wetlands, to spread the knowledge about mangrove environmental functions, to reverse its decline trend and to achieve the ecological restoration and sustainable deve-lopment of mangrove wetland ecosystem.%红树林是我国海岸湿地类型之一,自然分布于海南、广西、广东、福建、台湾等省区。现有面积约 1.5万 hm2,包括 26种真红树 ,11种半红树。中国红树林湿地直接经济价值不高,而防浪护岸、维持海岸生物多样性和渔业资源、净化水质、美化环境等生态环境功能显著,属于特别容易被价值低估的海岸生态关键区。 1960年代以来的毁林围海造田或造盐田,毁林围塘养殖,毁林围海搞城市建设等人类不合理开发活动,使红树林面积剧减

  18. Using remote sensing to research Beijing wetlands dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Wenji; GONG; Zhaoning; GONG; Huili; LI; Xiaojuan; ZHANG; Songmei; LI; Jing

    2006-01-01

    In Beijing, where wetlands are important to municipal freshwater conservation and biodiversity retention, three different types of wetlands were identified: riverside wetlands, wetlands surrounding lakes and reservoirs, and wetlands in municipal parks.Remote sensing technology was applied in combination with field investigations to monitor and analyze the changes in these wetlands, and a combination of fusion technologies,Landsat TM/ETM+ and IKONOS imaging, was used to investigate and map them. This study indicates that not only have wetland areas been reduced by half, but also their ecological environments have been degraded because of rapid economic development and population increase. Suggestions based on this research are made to reconstruct the ecological environment of the wetlands and return them to their previous state.

  19. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  20. Understanding a Century of Change in an Estuary: Tampa Bay. Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, C. J.; Yates, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    During the 20th century, Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida changed from a largely pristine subtropical estuary to a busy waterway with commercial ports and extensive coastal urbanization. The estuary has been physically altered through dredging and construction and its biogeochemical, sedimentary and hydrological balances have been changed. Environmental indicators show that the health of the estuary has been significantly impacted. Long-term restoration and conservation efforts in the next decades will need to be made in the presence of sustained population expansion, increased use of water resources, developments of ports, bay-wide dredging, construction of pipelines, and increased large ship traffic. The Tampa Bay integrated modeling program has helped rationalize, and organize our understanding of the ways that the ecosystem has changed and we have simulated the bay as it was at the ends of the 19th and 20th centuries. This involves submodels of hydrodynamics, hydrology, wave climate, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes. A key element in this research is the recognition by the USGS Integrated Science Study that estuarine systems function as a dynamic interplay among biologic, geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and chemical processes. Integrated modeling also relies heavily on synthesis modeling of historical and modern data for the estuary and the Tampa Bay study has included a major collection program for physical data between 2004 and 2006. An important part of the integrated modeling program has been public outreach including training in the development of submodels by state agencies, universities and community groups. The present paper reviews the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Models with conclusions about some of the major anthropogenic impacts. Examples include restoration projects based on the predictions of submodels developed by local agencies for wetland habitats around the Bay and studies by port authorities using submodels of short

  1. Urban wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Salm, N.; Bellmann, C.; Hoeijmakers, S.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. This is a manual meant for designers who are interested in water purifications within the boundaries of a project, presenting constructed wetlands. It is a guide to quickly provide you with project relevant

  2. Use of Isotopic and Related Techniques for Increasing Water Conservation and Yield Production in a Part of Anzali Wetland in the Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water scarcity and uneven distribution of rainfall are the most important limiting factors for the development of agriculture in the Islamic Republic of Iran. In order to assess water quality, quantity and seasonal variation in isotopic signatures of oxygen-18 (δ18O) and hydrogen-2 (δ2H) a water and nutrient balance and nutrient uptake study was carried out in 30 different wetlands in the north of Iran (Abbandans). Water samples were collected in winter, spring and summer of 2010 and 2011 and analysed for chemical and isotopic compositions. Data showed that highest δ18O and δ2H were recorded in summer (- 1.15‰ and -12.11‰ for δ18O and δ2H) and the lowest δ18O and δ2H were recorded in winter (-7.50‰ and -47.32‰ for δ18O and δ2H), respectively. The δ18O and δ2H signatures showed that the water at the Abbandan were enriched from spring (-3.57 and -27.72‰) to summer (-1.15 and -12.12‰), respectively. The relationship between δ18O and δ2H for pond water and local/global precipitation showed that rainfall and snowmelt can be a major source of water for these Abbandans. Water and nutrient balance based on input, output and storage showed that on average 7.6 million cubic meters of water along with 86 tonnes of nitrogen (N) and 17 tonnes of phosphorus (P) were captured and stored by these wetlands and are available for irrigating downstream rice crops. Flood irrigation of this water at a rate of 10 000 m3 ha-1 over the growing season (April to September) was able to produce rice in an area of 730 ha with a yield of 3.5 tons ha-1. However, changing the irrigation method from flood to an eight-day irrigation interval was able to cultivate 1 500 ha with similar yield and significantly increased water use efficiency and reduced energy use. The results of the study are useful to identify the sources of water in wetlands and to improve land and water management practices to optimize the capture and storage of water and nutrients for downstream

  3. Strength in Numbers: Describing the Flooded Area of Isolated Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie M.; Haag, Kim H.

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of isolated, freshwater wetlands are scattered across the karst1 landscape of central Florida. Most are small (less than 15 acres), shallow, marsh and cypress wetlands that flood and dry seasonally. Wetland health is threatened when wetland flooding patterns are altered either by human activities, such as land-use change and ground-water pumping, or by changes in climate. Yet the small sizes and vast numbers of isolated wetlands in Florida challenge our efforts to characterize them collectively as a statewide water resource. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida alone, water levels are measured monthly in more than 400 wetlands by the Southwest Florida Water Management Distirct (SWFWMD). Many wetlands have over a decade of measurements. The usefulness of long-term monitoring of wetland water levels would greatly increase if it described not just the depth of water at a point in the wetland, but also the amount of the total wetland area that was flooded. Water levels can be used to estimate the flooded area of a wetland if the elevation contours of the wetland bottom are determined by bathymetric mapping. Despite the recognized importance of the flooded area to wetland vegetation, bathymetric maps are not available to describe the flooded areas of even a representative number of Florida's isolated wetlands. Information on the bathymetry of isolated wetlands is rare because it is labor intensive to collect the land-surface elevation data needed to create the maps. Five marshes and five cypress wetlands were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000 to 2004 as part of a large interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida. The wetlands are located either in municipal well fields or on publicly owned lands (fig. 1). The 10 wetlands share similar geology and climate, but differ in their ground-water settings. All have historical water-level data and multiple vegetation surveys. A comprehensive report by Haag and

  4. W.R. Grace: Plant Uses Six Sigma Methodology and Traditional Heat Balance Analysis to Identify Energy Conservation Opportunities at Curtis Bay Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-01

    The plant-wide energy assessment at W. R. Grace's Curtis Bay Works helped identify four projects with combined potential savings of $840,000 per year. A separate, unique project that would partner W. R. Grace with the City of Baltimore to recover and use landfill gas (methane) to cogenerate steam and electricity was also identified during the assessment. If implemented, the project would recover gas from the landfill to replace 40% of the electricity and 65% of the fuel currently required to produce steam at Curtis Bay Works. Annual savings are estimated at $900,000 to $1.2 million.

  5. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  6. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  7. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  8. Effects of a cattail wetland on water quality of Irondequoit Creek near Rochester, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.; Bernard, John M.; Seischab, Franz K.

    2000-01-01

    A 6-year (1990-96) study of the Ellison Park wetland, a 423-acre, predominantly cattail (Typha glauca) marsh in Monroe County, N.Y., was conducted to document the effect that this wetland has on the water quality of Irondequoit Creek, which flows through it. Irondequoit Creek drains 151 square miles of mostly urban and suburban land and is the main tributary to Irondequoit Bay on Lake Ontario. The wetland was a sink for total phosphorus and total suspended solids (28 and 47 percent removal efficiencies, respectively, over the 6-year study period). Sedimentation and vegetative filtration appear to be the primary mechanisms for the decrease in loads of these constituents. Total nitrogen loads were decreased slightly by the wetland; removal efficiencies for ammonia-plusorganic nitrogen and nitrate-plus-nitrite were 6 and 3 percent, respectively. The proportions of total phosphorus and total nitrogen constituents were altered by the wetland. Orthophosphate and ammonia nitrogen were generated within the wetland and represented 12 percent of the total phosphorus output load and 1.8 percent of total nitrogen output load, respectively. Conservative chemicals, such as chloride and sulfate, were littleaffected by the wetland. Concentrations of zinc, lead, and cadmium showed statistically significant decreases, which are attributed to sedimentation and filtration of sediment and organic matter to which these elements adsorb. Sediment samples from open-water depositional areas in the wetland contained high concentrations of (1) trace metals, including barium, manganese, strontium, zinc (each of which exceeded 200 parts per million), as well as chromium, copper, lead, and vanadium, and (2) some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Persistent organochlorine pesticides, such as chlordane, dieldrin, DDT and its degradation products (DDD and DDE), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s), also were detected, but concentrations of these compounds were within the ranges often found in

  9. Study on Measures about the Youth Volunteers'Ecological Knowledge Training——A Case of Mangrove Protection in Estuarine Wetland in Quanzhou Bay%青年志愿者生态知识培训对策探讨——以泉州湾河口湿地红树林保护为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘怀如; 袁怡圃; 邱玲; 卢昌义

    2011-01-01

    Based on the public's opinions and analyzing the actural situation of the mangrove protection in estuarine wetland in Quanzhou Bay.Measures on the youth volunteers' ecological knowledge training system has been proposed building by improving the serving level of volunteers and enhancing the experts' guaidance.Investigation on mangrove protection zone shoud be done.A website 'about mangrove science popularizing education would be cooperatively built.%在调查公众意见基础上,针对泉州湾河口湿地红树林保护的具体情况,提出青年志愿者生态知识培训的主要对策有:加强专家指导提高志愿服务水平;组织红树林保护区实地考察活动;协作建设红树林生态科普教育网站.

  10. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  11. Analysis of conservative tracer measurement results using the Frechet distribution at planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel and showing the effect of clogging processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical process, developed in Maple environment, has been successful in decreasing the error of measurement results and in the precise calculation of the moments of corrected tracer functions. It was proved that with this process, the measured tracer results of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C) can be fitted more accurately than with the conventionally used distribution functions (Gaussian, Lognormal, Fick (Inverse Gaussian) and Gamma). This statement is true only for the planted HSFCW-Cs. The analysis of unplanted HSFCW-Cs needs more research. The result of the analysis shows that the conventional solutions (completely stirred series tank reactor (CSTR) model and convection-dispersion transport (CDT) model) cannot describe these types of transport processes with sufficient accuracy. These outcomes can help in developing better process descriptions of very difficult transport processes in HSFCW-Cs. Furthermore, a new mathematical process can be developed for the calculation of real hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dispersion coefficient values. The presented method can be generalized to other kinds of hydraulic environments.

  12. North American Wetlands and Mosquito Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle E. Sakolsky-Hoopes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are valuable habitats that provide important social, economic, and ecological services such as flood control, water quality improvement, carbon sequestration, pollutant removal, and primary/secondary production export to terrestrial and aquatic food chains. There is disagreement about the need for mosquito control in wetlands and about the techniques utilized for mosquito abatement and their impacts upon wetlands ecosystems. Mosquito control in wetlands is a complex issue influenced by numerous factors, including many hard to quantify elements such as human perceptions, cultural predispositions, and political climate. In spite of considerable progress during the last decades, habitat protection and environmentally sound habitat management still remain inextricably tied to politics and economics. Furthermore, the connections are often complex, and occur at several levels, ranging from local businesses and politicians, to national governments and multinational institutions. Education is the key to lasting wetlands conservation. Integrated mosquito abatement strategies incorporate many approaches and practicable options, as described herein, and need to be well-defined, effective, and ecologically and economically sound for the wetland type and for the mosquito species of concern. The approach will certainly differ in response to disease outbreaks caused by mosquito-vectored pathogens versus quality of life issues caused by nuisance-biting mosquitoes. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the ecological setting and context for mosquito control in wetlands, present pertinent information on wetlands mosquitoes, review the mosquito abatement options available for current wetlands managers and mosquito control professionals, and outline some necessary considerations when devising mosquito control strategies. Although the emphasis is on North American wetlands, most of the material is applicable to wetlands everywhere.

  13. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  14. 滨海湿地鸟类的动物生态与保护生物学研究%Research of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology About Coast Wetland Birds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小麟

    2011-01-01

    The research areas of animal ecology and conservation biology group in recent 10 years focus on the relationship between animal biodiversity and its environments, ecology and key impact factors af animal reproduction, contamination transfer and enrichment processes along the food chain of waterbirds, molecular techniques for identification of bird species or sex, population genetic diversity and its impact factors, endangered mechanism of rare and threaten animals, conservation of animal diversity and its habitats. The methods used in our studies are ecological or molecular and the animals focused are the vertebrates, especially ardeids and other waterbirds in coast wetlands.%采用生态学研究方法和分子生物学技术.以滨海湿地鸟类等脊椎动物为研究对象,尤其以鹭科鸟类为主,研究动物多样性与环境的相互关系,分析鸟类繁殖生态及其关键环境影响因素,探讨滨海湿地鸟类食物链的污染物转移与富集规律,建立鸟类物种及性别的分子生物学鉴定技术,分析鹭科鸟类种群遗传多样性及其影响因素,探讨濒危物种的致危机制,以期促进生物多样性及其栖息地的保护.

  15. Wetland features and landscape context predict the risk of wetland habitat loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Kevin J; Flather, Curtis H

    2011-04-01

    Wetlands generally provide significant ecosystem services and function as important harbors of biodiversity. To ensure that these habitats are conserved, an efficient means of identifying wetlands at risk of conversion is needed, especially in the southern United States where the rate of wetland loss has been highest in recent decades. We used multivariate adaptive regression splines to develop a model to predict the risk of wetland habitat loss as a function of wetland features and landscape context. Fates of wetland habitats from 1992 to 1997 were obtained from the National Resources Inventory for the U.S. Forest Service's Southern Region, and land-cover data were obtained from the National Land Cover Data. We randomly selected 70% of our 40 617 observations to build the model (n = 28 432), and randomly divided the remaining 30% of the data into five Test data sets (n = 2437 each). The wetland and landscape variables that were important in the model, and their relative contributions to the model's predictive ability (100 = largest, 0 = smallest), were land-cover/ land-use of the surrounding landscape (100.0), size and proximity of development patches within 570 m (39.5), land ownership (39.1), road density within 570 m (37.5), percent woody and herbaceous wetland cover within 570 m (27.8), size and proximity of development patches within 5130 m (25.7), percent grasslands/herbaceous plants and pasture/hay cover within 5130 m (21.7), wetland type (21.2), and percent woody and herbaceous wetland cover within 1710 m (16.6). For the five Test data sets, Kappa statistics (0.40, 0.50, 0.52, 0.55, 0.56; P < 0.0001), area-under-the-receiver-operating-curve (AUC) statistics (0.78, 0.82, 0.83, 0.83, 0.84; P < 0.0001), and percent correct prediction of wetland habitat loss (69.1, 80.4, 81.7, 82.3, 83.1) indicated the model generally had substantial predictive ability across the South. Policy analysts and land-use planners can use the model and associated maps to prioritize

  16. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterization of Perdido Bay historical seagrass coverage, 1940 (NODC Accession 0000604)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GIS representations of 1940 Historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC).

  17. "Wetlands: Water Living Filters?",

    OpenAIRE

    Dordio, Ana; Palace, A. J.; Pinto, Ana Paula

    2008-01-01

    Human societies have indirectly used natural wetlands as wastewater discharge sites for many centuries. Observations of the wastewater depuration capacity of natural wetlands have led to a greater understanding of the potential of these ecosystems for pollutant assimilation and have stimulated the development of artificial wetlands systems for treatment of wastewaters from a variety of sources. Constructed wetlands, in contrast to natural wetlands, are human-made systems that are designed, bu...

  18. Soil carbon in natural, cultivated, and restored depressional wetlands in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerial extent of wetland ecosystems have decreased dramatically since precolonial times due to the conversion of these areas for human use. Wetlands provide various ecosystem services, and conservation efforts are being made to restore wetlands and their functions, including soil carbon storage. Thi...

  19. 胶州湾湿地海域水体和表层沉积物环境质量评价%Environmental aualitv assessment of water body and surface sediment in the sea area of Jiaozhou Bay wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洪瑞; 陈聚法; 崔毅; 赵俊; 杨风

    2011-01-01

    Based on the investigation data from 48 sampling stations in the sea area of Jiaozhou Bay wetland in 2009, and by using Nemerow index, eutrophication index ( El) , and Hakanson potential ecological risk index, an assessment was conducted on the environmental quality of water body and surface sediment in the sea area. According to the assessment on the 16 indicators including pH, dissolved oxygen ( DO) , dissolved inorganic nitrogen ( DIN) , dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIP) , chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) , petroleum hydrocarbons, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg, As, hexachlorocyolohexane (HCH) , dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) , conform, and faecal coli-form, the water quality was at moderate and serious pollution level in the tidal reach of Dagu River, at slight and moderate pollution level in the intertidal zone, and at slight pollution level in the shallow sea. The eutrophication level differed markedly with the regions, being very serious in the tidal reach of Dagu River (El value 58. 13-327. 89), serious in the intertidal zone (El value 1. 34-19. 96) , and slight in the shallow sea (El value 0. 65-2. 10). The surface sediments in the sea area were basically at slight pollution level. The sediment quality was at slight pollution level in the tidal reach of Dagu River, at slight and moderate pollution level in the intertidal zone, and at cleaner and slight pollution level in the shallow sea. The pollution parameter ( C/ ) and contamination index (Cd) of the heavy metals in the surface sediments were low, suggesting that the pollution de-gree was at a lower level. The Cu and Zn were the primary pollution factors in the sediments. The potential ecological risk parameter (£,') and risk index (RI) of the heavy metals in the surface sediments were lower, indicating a slight ecological risk of heavy metals pollution.%基于2009年对胶州湾湿地48个站点的调查数据,采用内梅罗(Nemerow)指数、富营养指数(EI)和Hakanson潜在生态危害指数法对

  20. Wonderful Wetlands: An Environmental Education Curriculum Guide for Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King County Parks Div., Redmond, WA.

    This curriculum guide was designed to give teachers, students, and society a better understanding of wetlands in the hope that they learn why wetlands should be valued and preserved. It explores what is meant by wetlands, functions and values of wetlands, wetland activities, and wetland offerings which benefit animal and plant life, recreation,…

  1. Forecasting climate change impacts on the distribution of wetland habitat in the Midwestern United states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garris, Heath W; Mitchell, Randall J; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Barrett, Linda R

    2015-02-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns brought on by climate change threaten to alter the future distribution of wetlands. We developed a set of models to understand the role climate plays in determining wetland formation on a landscape scale and to forecast changes in wetland distribution for the Midwestern United States. These models combined 35 climate variables with 21 geographic and anthropogenic factors thought to encapsulate other major drivers of wetland distribution for the Midwest. All models successfully recreated a majority of the variation in current wetland area within the Midwest, and showed that wetland area was significantly associated with climate, even when controlling for landscape context. Inferential (linear) models identified a consistent negative association between wetland area and isothermality. This is likely the result of regular inundation in areas where precipitation accumulates as snow, then melts faster than drainage capacity. Moisture index seasonality was identified as a key factor distinguishing between emergent and forested wetland types, where forested wetland area at the landscape scale is associated with a greater seasonal variation in water table depth. Forecasting models (neural networks) predicted an increase in potential wetland area in the coming century, with areas conducive to forested wetland formation expanding more rapidly than areas conducive to emergent wetlands. Local cluster analyses identified Iowa and Northeastern Missouri as areas of anticipated wetland expansion, indicating both a risk to crop production within the Midwest Corn Belt and an opportunity for wetland conservation, while Northern Minnesota and Michigan are potentially at risk of wetland losses under a future climate.

  2. HYDROGEOMORPHIC INFLUENCES ON MACROPHYTES AS HABITAT IN GREAT LAKES WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used rapid survey techniques to map saubmergerd, floating and emergent vegetation in 10 coastal wetlands of Lake Superior. Density and structure of plant beds in "bay," "main channel," and "side channel" areas was evaluated from cover indices and presence/dominance by growth f...

  3. 加强大庆湿地保护工作促进大庆生态环境健康发展%Strengthen the Daqing Wetland Conservation to Promote the Healthy Development of the Ecological Environment of Daqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程淑波

    2014-01-01

    大庆湿地具有重要的价值,是大庆生态安全体系的重要组成部分,也是经济社会可持续发展的重要基础。为了大力开展大庆湿地保护工作,应在新城区的核心区域建设湿地公园,做好湿地科研和保护、规划、编制工作,开展湿地资源调查、评价和监测工作,加强对大庆湿地保护管理和湿地保护工作的宣传、教育。%Daqing wetland has an important value, is an important part of daqing ecological security system, also is the important foundation of sustainable economic and social development. In order to vigorously promote the daqing wetland protection work, should be the core of the new area construction of wetland park, wetland research and protection, planning, preparation work, wetland resources survey, evaluation and monitoring work, enhancing the management daqing wetland protection and wetland protection work of propaganda and education.

  4. Percent Wetland Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  5. Percent Wetland Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  6. Artesian Wetlands Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Artesian Wetlands Survey includes data on the wetlands in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. Data recorded includes location, area of influence, area inundated,...

  7. Ecological classification of wetland plant associations in the Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In response to concerns regarding the conservation and management of wetland biodiversity within the Lahontan Valley, The Nature Conservancy, in cooperation with...

  8. Ecosystem development after mangrove wetland creation: plant-soil change across a 20-year chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Spivak, Amanda C.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Lessmann, Jeannine M.; Almario, Alejandro E.; Heitmuller, Paul T.; Russell, Marc J.; Krauss, Ken W.; Alvarez, Federico; Dantin, Darrin D.; Harvey, James E.; From, Andrew S.; Cormier, Nicole; Stagg, Camille L.

    2012-01-01

    Mangrove wetland restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to compensate for mangrove wetland losses. However, ecosystem development and functional equivalence in restored and created mangrove wetlands are poorly understood. We compared a 20-year chronosequence of created tidal wetland sites in Tampa Bay, Florida (USA) to natural reference mangrove wetlands. Across the chronosequence, our sites represent the succession from salt marsh to mangrove forest communities. Our results identify important soil and plant structural differences between the created and natural reference wetland sites; however, they also depict a positive developmental trajectory for the created wetland sites that reflects tightly coupled plant-soil development. Because upland soils and/or dredge spoils were used to create the new mangrove habitats, the soils at younger created sites and at lower depths (10-30 cm) had higher bulk densities, higher sand content, lower soil organic matter (SOM), lower total carbon (TC), and lower total nitrogen (TN) than did natural reference wetland soils. However, in the upper soil layer (0-10 cm), SOM, TC, and TN increased with created wetland site age simultaneously with mangrove forest growth. The rate of created wetland soil C accumulation was comparable to literature values for natural mangrove wetlands. Notably, the time to equivalence for the upper soil layer of created mangrove wetlands appears to be faster than for many other wetland ecosystem types. Collectively, our findings characterize the rate and trajectory of above- and below-ground changes associated with ecosystem development in created mangrove wetlands; this is valuable information for environmental managers planning to sustain existing mangrove wetlands or mitigate for mangrove wetland losses.

  9. Redeeming the Weeping Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Renowned as the"Kidneys of the Earth,"wetlands are one of the three major ecosystems of the planet,along with forests and seas.With 10 percent of the world’s wetlands,China ranks number one in terms of the area of wetlands in Asia,and fourth in the world.China’s wetlands are abundant in type(containing all-natural and man-made types listed in the Convention

  10. Wetlands in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Wetlands are shallow marine waters and wet areas in cluding rivers, lakes and marshes. According to scientists, even reservoirs and paddy fields fall into the category. Wetlands are classified into over 40 types but accounts for only 6% of the earth's total land area. Human beings inhabit by water and grass because wetlands provide us with water and wet soil.

  11. Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Smith, Kevin G.; Lund, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    The Wetland Resources Action Planning (WRAP) toolkit is a toolkit of research methods and better management practices used in HighARCS (Highland Aquatic Resources Conservation and Sustainable Development), an EU-funded project with field experiences in China, Vietnam and India. It aims...... to communicate best practices in conserving biodiversity and sustaining ecosystem services to potential users and to promote the wise-use of aquatic resources, improve livelihoods and enhance policy information....

  12. Study on biodiversity and conservation strategies in national wetland park of Yingzhou West Lake%颍州西湖国家湿地公园生物多样性及保护对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘生杰; 隋娟娟; 李永民; 聂超

    2012-01-01

    Yingzhou West Lake,a national wetland park,provides good habitats for various species for their survival and reproduction,so that resources of animal and plant are rich in the wetland park.But wetland area gradually dwindling,environmental pollution,unreasonable utilization of biological resources,short of money and feeble scientific research on wetland are faced in wetland protection in Yingzhou West Lake.The development of urbanization,tourism also have a negative impact on ecological environment of the wetland park.So advices such as restoring vegetation,returning farmlands to lake,pollution control,perfecting laws,increasing investment,strengthening scientific research and publicity on the wetland,promoting community economy are given to protect the wetland park.%颍州西湖国家湿地公园的良好生境为多种生物提供了生存和繁衍条件,动植物资源丰富。西湖湿地保护面临面积不断减少、环境污染、生物资源利用不合理、经费不足、科研薄弱及城镇化、旅游开发对生境影响等问题。提出恢复植被、退田还湖、防治污染、完善法规、增加投入、加强科研与宣传、促进社区经济发展等湿地保护建议。

  13. Developing a spatially-explicit climate adaptation framework for estuarine ecosystems of the San Francisco Bay: climate adaptation for decision support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides recommended resource allocations for conserving four subregions of SanFrancisco (SF) Bay, including North Bay, Suisun, Central Bay and South...

  14. Vegetation establishment success in restored carolina bay depressions on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina - phase one.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharitz, Rebecca, A.; Mulhouse, John, M.

    2004-05-01

    Successful wetlands restoration must re-establish or enhance three parameters: wetland hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 2000). On the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, restoration of small Carolina bay depression-wetlands was initiated in FY 2001 to provide wetland acreage for mitigation banking (US DOE 1997). Sixteen small depressions that had historically been drained for agricultural purposes were selected for restoration, and an additional four were initially chosen to serve as non-restored controls. Restoration treatments included plugging the existing ditches to increase water volume retention and wetland hydroperiod and clear-cutting removal of woody vegetation in the interiors. Planned endpoints of the restoration were herbaceous meadow and forested savanna bay interiors, and pine savanna and pine/hardwood forested bay margins (Barton and Singer 2001). To promote forested savanna interiors, saplings of bald cypress and swamp tupelo were planted following removal of the woody species.

  15. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterization of historical seagrass coverage in St. Andrew Bay, Florida, 1953 (NODC Accession 0000608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Graphical representation of historical seagrass coverage in St. Andrew Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC) in...

  16. Land use in Korean tidal wetlands: impacts and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  17. Land Use in Korean Tidal Wetlands: Impacts and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R.; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  18. SWS European Chapter Meeting on wetland restoration-Challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Brix, Hans; Kronvang, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction Wetland loss and degradation in Europe have been extreme andare still ongoing. By way of example, at least two-thirds of all shal-low lakes, bogs and wet meadows have been lost in Denmark since1784. The challenge for wetland scientists in Europe is to reversethe loss of wetlands...... and promote the protection of existing wet-lands and work for restoration of degraded wetlands.The EU Habitats Directive (HD) and the EU Water FrameworkDirective (WFD) are important policy instruments in wetland con-servation. Thus, restoration of wetlands and constructed wetlandshave become increasingly...... popular as mitigation options in RiverBasin Management Plans under the WFD to reduce nitrogen andphosphorus losses from fields to catchments.An important task for wetland scientists is to enhance our basicand applied understanding of the interlinked hydrological, bio-geochemical and ecological processes...

  19. Wetland Management - A Success Story In Transition - Restoration of Bhoj Wetland, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgal, M. K.; Tech, B. M.; Miwwa

    Wetlands are beautiful, biologically diverse, hydrologically disperse and ecological vibrant landscape world wide, embracing soils, water, plants, animals and human be- ing. The population growth in the catchment of wetlands led to multifarious human interventions for deriving maximum benefit from the wetlands and their catchments neglecting and disrespecting the principles of sustainability. This act of destruction has been pronounced in developing countries which are under the grip of poverty, illiteracy and lack of environmental education. SBhoj WetlandS is a Lake situated ´ in Central India, Earthen Dam across the river KOLANS in 1061 AD by then ruler king BHOJ. Till 1950 this Wetland was served as a principal source of water supply, even not requiring filtration. As the city grew and the wetland started getting encir- cled by habitation and urban development, the anthropogenic pressures on the lake increased, thus accelerating the process of eutrophication, making the water unfit for human consumption without due treatment due to deterioration of quality of water. For the conservation and management of Bhoj Wetland (Lake Bhopal) a project is under- taken in the financial assistance from Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC, Japan). The project envisages tackle various issues of conservation and management ofn the wetlands under a multi prongs strategies and manner. Although these issues are deeply interrelated and interlinked but for operational and management ease, these issues have been divided into various sub projects which are being tackled indepen- dently, albeit with undercurrent knowledge and understanding of the related issues and interconnectivity with each other. The Project itself is an apt example of the spectrum of varied problems and issues that come to light when attempts are made for sustain- able conservation and management of a wetland. The Project as envisaged intends to conserve and manage through 14 sub projects as under:- Sub

  20. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  1. Accumulation/dispersion of heavy metals in the saline soil of the Jianzhou Bay northeastern coastal wetland%胶州湾滨海湿地盐渍土壤中重金属的聚集与分散特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学刚; 袁华茂; 许思思; 段丽琴; 李宁; 张默; 宋金明

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinization is a worldwide resource and ecological problem, and systemic study on saline soil is the foundation for its bioremediation. The accumulation/dispersion of heavy metals in the saline soils was discussed based on the research on the saline soils in the northeastern coastal wetland of Jiaozhou Bay. The variations of Cu and Zn concentrations in saline soils of the Jiaozhou Bay northeastern coast were great and their concentrations were higher than the soil background values; the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr had little difference between sample stations but were higher than the background values; the variations of As and Mo concentration were not prominence and their concentrations were lower than the background values; the distribution was similar to V ,Co and Ni, the concentrations of which in the northern part were somewhat higher than the soil background values whereas in the southern part were slight lower than the soil background values. Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Ni were "elements accumulated by saline soil" and As, Co, V, Mo "elements dispersed by saline soil". As, Co, Ni, V, Mo, Cu, Zn and Pb of saline soils in the northeastern coast of the Jiaozhou Bay mainly came from soil parent materials and were not influenced by anthropogenic activities, whereas Cr and Cd mainly originated from industrial and agricultural inputs by Qingdao besides the parent materials. Pb and Zn in most of the saline soil were not polluted, but light polluted in some areas of the northeast coastal in the Jiaozhou Bay. Half of the studied stations had no pollution of Cu and Cr, but the other half stations were polluted slightly by Cu and Zn. However, there was mild to moderate pollution for Cd. The pollution severity of the heavy metals in the region followed the order of Cd〉〉Cu〉Cr〉〉Zn〉 Pb〉〉Ni〉V 〉Co〉As〉Mo. Beside the effect of material source, the concentrations of heavy metals in saline soils of the northeastern coast of the Jiaozhou Bay

  2. ESTIMATION OF ECOLOGICAL SERVICE VALUES OF WETLANDS IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bin; LI Bo; ZHONG Yang; NAKAGOSHI Nobukazu; CHEN Jia-kuan

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai is a coastal metropolitan city with various types of natural wetlands, which account for 23.5% of its total area. According to the definition of wetland in Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, the wetlands of Shanghai were classified into 4 types: coastal, riverine, lacustrine, and reservoir and pond wetlands. In order to examine the roles of wetlands in the life-support system of Shanghai, we calculated the area of each type of the wetlands using GIS technique, and then measured the ecological service values of different ecosystems in Shanghai based on the classification of ecosystem services proposed by COSTANZA et al. (1997). The estimated annual value of ecosystem services in the study area was 7.3×109US$/a for the total area of 1 356 700ha, among which about 97% was provided by the wetlands. Effective conservation and management of wetlands are therefore crucial to Shanghai's sustainable development. The limitations of the evaluation method for ecosystem service value were also discussed in the present paper.

  3. Case Studies on Coastal Wetlands and Water Resources in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O Nwankwoala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands play a very important role in the sustenance of both the surface andgroundwater resources of the country. It is sad to observe that the country is fast losingher wetlands, as the rich wetlands are being seriously threatened by a number ofanthropogenic and biophysical factors. Some of the notable human actions includepopulation pressure, rapid urbanization, mining, oil and industrial waste pollution,overgrazing, logging, dam construction, transportation routes and other physicalinfrastructure. Others factors are uncontrolled tilling for crop production andunprecedented/unregulated land reclamation. Subsidence, saltwater intrusion, sandstorm, desertification and droughts, invasion by alien floral and faunal species as well asmarine and coastal erosion are natural threats to wetlands in Nigeria. Wetlandsdestruction affects negatively water supply and water resources management. This studyexamines in great detail the fate of wetlands in the face of climate change andrecommends that efforts should be made to accurately document the country’s wetland.The paper therefore suggested sustainable options for wetlands and water resourcesmanagement in Nigeria. This, the paper opined, can be done through the strengtheningof wetlands preservation and conservation regulation, mitigating the effects of climatechange as well as the development of deliberate restoration programmes and policiesaimed at sustaining degraded wetlands in Nigeria.

  4. Freshwater Wetlands: A Citizen's Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc., Hobart, NY.

    The purpose of this "primer" for the general public is to describe the general characteristics of wetlands and how wetland alteration adversely affects the well-being of humans. Particular emphasis is placed on wetlands in New York State and the northeast. Topics discussed include wetland values, destruction of wetlands, the costs of wetland…

  5. Colorado wetlands initiative : 1997-2000 : Protecting Colorado's wetlands resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Colorado Wetlands Initiative is an endeavor to protect wetlands and wetland-dependent wildlife through the use of voluntary, incentive-based mechanisms. It is a...

  6. Importance of Carolina Bays to the Avifauna of Pinelands in the Southeastern United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapka, Stephen, J.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2011-07-01

    Abstract - Past anthropogenic activity has led to the destruction or alteration of Carolina bay wetlands throughout the southeastern United States. Presently, urban development, combined with a 2001 ruling by the US Supreme Court relaxing protection of isolated wetlands, poses an increasing threat to these and other isolated wetland systems; however, little information exists on the importance of these wetland systems to birds. We compared breeding and wintering bird communities of upland pine (Pinus spp.) forests with and without Carolina bays. Estimated species richness was greater in pine forests with Carolina bays than without during the winter (31.7 ± 1.3 [mean ± SE] vs. 26.9 ± 1.2; P = 0.027), but not in the breeding season (27.9 ± 2.2 vs. 26.3 ± 2.2; P = 0.644). Total relative abundance did not differ between pine forests with Carolina bays and those without in either the breeding (148.0 ± 16.0 vs. 129.4 ± 10.4 birds/40 ha; P = 0.675) or winter (253.0 ± 36.4 vs. 148.8 ± 15.1 birds/40 ha; P = 0.100) seasons. However, 23 species, 43% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in pine forests with bays during the breeding season, and 20 species, 30% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in such sites during winter. In contrast, only 6 and 1 species were observed only in pine forests without bays during the breeding and winter seasons, respectively, indicating that few species were negatively affected by the presence of bays. Thus, Carolina bays appear to enrich the avifauna of pine forests in the southeastern United States.

  7. 四方湖湿地资源现状及保护管理对策%Current Status of Wetland Resources of Sifang Lake and Strategies for Conservation and Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝静

    2012-01-01

    四方湖湿地是淮河中游重要的淡水湖泊湿地,生物多样性丰富,具有调蓄防洪、保护生物多样性、维护生态平衡等多项功能.由于不合理的开发利用,四方湖湿地生物多样性下降,生态环境出现了退化的趋势.采取有力措施,保护和恢复四方湖湿地生态功能,迫在眉睫.分析了四方湖湿地资源现状及存在问题,提出了四方湖湿地资源保护及恢复对策.%Sifang lake wetland is an important freshwater lake wetland in the middle reaches of Huaihe River, which is rich in biodiversity, and have a number of ecological functions such as regulation of waleT storage and flood control,protection of biological diversity and maintenance of ecological balance. Due to irrational exploitation and utilization, the biodiversity of the wetland appeared to dccrease and the environmental conditions tended to degrade. Effective measures need to be taken urgently to protect and restore ecological function of Sifang lake wetland. Based on a review of the current status and existing problems of the wetland resources of the lake, strategies for protection and restoration of wetland resources of Sifang Lake were proposed.

  8. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - Montana Wetland and Riparian Framework - Map Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Montana Wetland and Riparian Framework represents the extent, type, and approximate location of wetlands, riparian areas, and deepwater habitats in Montana....

  9. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-07-14

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376,970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50,519.13 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  10. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Institute (United States))

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  11. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  12. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher

    2007-12-15

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ≈ 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

  13. The potential of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Olley, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Moreton Bay, in South East Queensland, Australia, is a Ramsar wetland of international significance. A decline of the bay's ecosystem health has been primarily attributed to sediments and nutrients from catchment sources. Sediment budgets for three catchments indicated gully erosion dominates the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas erosion from cultivated soils is the primary sediment source in Blackfellow Creek. Sediment tracing with fallout-radionuclides confirmed subsoil erosion processes dominate the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas in Blackfellow Creek cultivated and subsoil sources contribute >90% of sediments. Other sediment properties are required to determine the relative sediment contributions of channel bank, gully and cultivated sources in these catchments. The potential of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources is presented. The conservativeness of these sediment properties was examined through evaluating particle size variations in depth core soil samples and investigating whether they remain constant in source soils over two sampling occasions. Varying conservative behavior and source discrimination was observed. TN in the

  14. Urbanization, Forest Vulnerability and Resource Land Loss in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, C.; Goetz, S. J.; Jantz, P.

    2004-12-01

    The contemporary pattern of urban development in industrialized countries is increasingly taking the form of low density, decentralized residential and commercial development. In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which is located within the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, dispersed development patterns have been linked to habitat fragmentation and declining water quality. Our objectives were to document how this urbanization process has expanded throughout the watershed and to explore how lands comprising the natural resource base, particularly forests, have been replaced by a matrix of the built environment. We accomplished this by mapping impervious surface cover (houses, roads, etc) across the ~168,000 km2 area using a time series of satellite imagery. We calculated metrics of land use change and used these to estimate the loss of resource lands across the region. We conservatively estimate that 334 km2 of forest, 888 km2 of agriculture and 2 km2 of wetlands have been converted to impervious surfaces between 1990 and 2000. We also used the time series to calibrate a spatial model of urban land use change, and forecasted future development patterns in Maryland out to 2030 under different policy scenarios. Using Maryland Department of Natural Resources' (DNR) Strategic Forest Lands Assessment (SFLA), which evaluates forest resources in terms of their economic and ecologic value, and Maryland's Green Infrastructure, which identifies ecologically valuable patches of contiguous forests and wetlands, we evaluated the vulnerability of natural resources in Maryland. Threats associated with loss and fragmentation were identified.

  15. Reconstruction of Anacostia wetlands: success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, R.S.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    . Revegetation, which is a product of direct plantings (16 species comprised of 350,000 plants) and by establishment of volunteer plants, must be considered successful. Remarkably, full vegetation cover was achieved by the end of the first year (1993). Species diversity is high with 100-130 wetland species occupying portions of the wetland. Good species differentiation (incipient plant communities) can be noted at areas of sediment elevation differences. There is a good range of predominant species (five to eight) with rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides) initially being dominant but in later years becoming codominant. Even the native wild rice (Zizania aquatica) is making a substantive comeback. Invasive plants such as purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and phragmites (Phragmites australis) are being watched and dealt with as appropriate. There has been important habitat creation, and a resulting increase in fauna can be expected, particularly as the acreage reconstructed at Kenilworth has more than doubled with similarly reconstructed wetlands at Kingman Lake (42 acres), which were completed during the summer of 2000, just a quarter of a mile down river. One of the challenges with the Kingman marsh reconstruction has been protecting against the grazing pressure of native Canada geese (Branm canadensis). In the long run, these revived Anacostia wetlands are bound to improve local conditions and will contribute to a rejuvenated Chesapeake Bay system.

  16. Evaluation of a market in wetland credits: entrepreneurial wetland banking in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Morgan; Hayden, Nicholas

    2008-06-01

    With the rise of market-led approaches to environmental policy, compensation for permitted discharge of dredge or fill material into wetlands under Section 404 of the U.S. Clean Water Act has been purchased increasingly from entrepreneurial third-party providers. The growth of this practice (i.e., entrepreneurial wetland banking) has resolved many challenges associated with wetland compensation. But it has also produced (1) quantifiable temporal loss of wetland ecological functions, (2) spatial redistribution of wetland area, and (3) a degree of regulatory instability that may pose a threat to entrepreneurial compensation as a sustainable component of wetland-compensation policy. We used achieved compensation ratios, lapse between bank credit sale and the attainment of performance standards, distance between impact and bank site, and changes in bank market area to examine these 3 factors. We analyzed data from a census of all such transactions in the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled from site visits, Corps databases, and contacts with consultants and Section 404 permittees. Entrepreneurial banking provided compensation at a lower overall ratio than nonbank forms of compensation. Approximately 60% of bank credits were sold after site-protection standards were met but before ecological performance standards were met at the bank site. The average distance between bank and impact site was approximately 26 km. The area of markets within which established banks can sell wetland credits has fluctuated considerably over the study period. Comparing these data with similar data for other compensation mechanisms will assist in evaluating banking as an element of conservation policy. Data characterizing the performance of entrepreneurial wetland banks in actual regulatory environments are scarce, even though it is the most established of similar markets that have become instrumental to federal policy in administering several major environmental

  17. Characterising and modelling groundwater discharge in anagricultural wetland on the French Atlantic coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. Weng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between a wetland and its surrounding aquifer was studied in the Rochefort agricultural marsh (150 km2. Groundwater discharge in the marsh was measured with a network of nested piezometers. Hydrological modelling of the wetland showed that a water volume of 770,000 m3 yr–1 is discharging into the marsh, but that this water flux essentially takes place along the lateral borders of the wetland. However, this natural discharge volume represents only 20% of the artificial freshwater injected each year into the wetland to maintain the water level close to the soil surface. Understanding and quantifying the groundwater component in wetland hydrology is crucial for wetland management and conservation. Keywords: wetland, hydrology, groundwater, modelling, marsh

  18. Matéria orgânica e textura do solo em veredas conservadas e antropizadas no bioma Cerrado Organic matter and texture of the soil in conserved and altered wetlands in the Cerrado biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo F. de Sousa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As veredas são ecossistemas úmidos, geralmente associados a solos hidromórficos e ao afloramento do lençol freático, ocorrendo com frequência nas proximidades das nascentes e cursos d'água da região do Cerrado. Este trabalho objetivou estudar os solos de veredas situadas no bioma Cerrado, em ambientes conservados e antropizados (em áreas agrícolas e de pecuária, por meio da determinação da textura e da matéria orgânica do solo. Três veredas foram selecionadas para amostragem de solo, sendo: uma conservada, circundada por vegetação natural; uma área antropizada, com pastagem em seu entorno e uma outra, também antropizada, com culturas anuais (agricultura em seu entorno. As amostras de solo foram coletadas em diferentes profundidades, ao longo de linhas de referência dispostas segundo sua posição no relevo, nos terços superior, médio e inferior de uma das vertentes, acompanhando de modo aproximado o sentido da linha de drenagem da vereda. Verificou-se que os teores de argila na região inferior do relevo são maiores em ambientes antropizados e os teores de silte são maiores na vereda adjacente à área agrícola. No terço inferior das vertentes os teores de matéria orgânica são menores em veredas adjacentes às áreas com pastagens e agricultura.Veredas (a type of wetland are humid ecosystems, generally associated to hydromorphic soils and shallow water table, which occur frequently in the neighborhood of the springs and watercourses in the Cerrado region. The objective of this work was to study wetland soils located in undisturbed (native forest and disturbed (agriculture and pasture environments by means of determination of the soil texture and organic matter contents. Three wetlands were selected for this study: undisturbed wetland, surrounded by natural vegetation; disturbed wetland, surrounded by pasture areas; and disturbed wetland, surrounded by cultivated areas. Soil samples were collected at three different

  19. Good Wetland Agricultural Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengsdijk, H.; Zingstra, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    Within the Guiding Agriculture Wetland Interaction (GAWI) project the Driver!Pressure!State! Impact!Response (DPSIR) approach has been adopted to describe and analyse agriculture!wetland interactions. The DPSIR approach provides a consistent framework to analyse the complex causal chain among driver

  20. Research Advances on Marine Ecological Effect and Repairing Techniques of Coastal Mangrove Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Na; Chen, Pimao; Qiao, Peipei; Qin, Chuanxin

    2014-01-01

    Coastal mangrove wetland is one of the areas whose global ecological environmental conditions have severely changed. Its ecosystem is vulnerable to damaged. The international community has paid attention to conservation and wisely use of mangrove wetland. This paper describes five parts of coastal mangrove wetland at home and abroad, including seawater’s purification effect of nitrogen and phosphorus, seawater’s adsorption of heavy metals, the functions of carbon sequestration and climate...

  1. Establishing baseline conditions to inform adaptive management of South San Francisco Bay salt ponds: A comparison of waterbird abundance from the 1980s to the 2000s

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 30,000 acres of wetlands within the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) provide critical habitat for over one million waterbirds...

  2. Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledvina, Joseph A.

    2008-05-01

    Research on the effects of wetland restoration on reptiles and amphibians is becoming more common, but almost all of these studies have observed the colonization of recently disturbed habitats that were completely dry at the time of restoration. In a similar manner, investigations herpetofaunal responses to forest management have focused on clearcuts, and less intensive stand manipulations are not as well studied. To evaluate community and population responses of reptiles and amphibians to hydrology restoration and canopy removal in the interior of previously degraded Carolina bays, I monitored herpetofauna in the uplands adjacent to six historically degraded Carolina bays at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for four years after restoration. To evaluate the effects of forest thinning on upland herpetofauna, forests were thinned in the margins of three of these bays. I used repeated measures ANOVA to compare species richness and diversity and the abundance of selected species and guilds between these bays and with those at three reference bays that were not historically drained and three control bays that remained degraded. I also used Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) to look for community-level patterns based treatments.

  3. San Francisco Bay regional sediment management strategy development

    OpenAIRE

    Goeden, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC), in continued partnership with the San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategies (LTMS) Agencies, is undertaking the development of a Regional Sediment Management Plan for the San Francisco Bay estuary and its watershed (estuary). Regional sediment management (RSM) is the integrated management of littoral, estuarine, and riverine sediments to achieve balanced and sustainable solutions to sediment related need...

  4. Addressing the Multiple Drivers of Wetland Ecosystems Degradation in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, J.; Ndimele, P. E.; Odunuga, S.; Akanni, A.; Kosemani, B.; Ahove, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several body of knowledge have noted the importance of wetland ecosystems in climate moderation, resource supply and flood risk reduction amongst others. Relevant as it may, rapidly increasing population and uncontrolled urban development poses a challenge in some regions and require understanding of the ecosystem components and drivers of change over a long period of time. Thus, the main thrust of this paper is to analyse multiple drivers of wetland ecosystems degradation in the last 30 years in the Lagos megacity using field study, desktop review, satellite data and laboratory analysis. Key drivers identified includes: conversion of wetlands to settlements and waste sink, land use planning that neglects wetland conservation and restoration, ineffective legal status for wetlands, over exploitation leading to degradation and fragmentation of wetland ecosystems governance. In stemming further loss of this vital ecosystem, this study adopted and proposed respectively, the Drivers, Pressure, State, Impact and Response (DPSIR) and Integrated Planning Approach (IPA) frameworks in analysing policy and governance issues in wetland development. These analyses figured out amongst others, strict conservation and sustainable use of wetland resources, habitat restoration, climate adaptation measures, legal protection and wetland management institution as major responses to current multiple pressures facing wetland ecosystems in Lagos. For these frameworks to be made meaningful, weak coordination among government agencies and institutional capacity in implementation and law enforcement, unsustainable resource extraction by private/business organization and issues on alternative sources of income on the part of the local communities amongst others needs to be addressed.

  5. New Jersey (USA) wetlands past, present and future: using sediment archives to inform and guide wetland protection, restoration and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nicole; Clear, Jennifer; Horton, Benjamin; Nikitina, Daria; Enache, Mihaela; Potapova, Marina; Frizzera, Dorina; Procopio, Nicholas; Vane, Christopher; Shaw, Timothy; Walker, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Due to the rapid and pervasive loss of coastal wetland ecosystems and the enumerable services they provide, recent attention has been given to their protection and restoration. Knowledge gaps exist, however, that limit the efficacy of restoration efforts, particularly regarding response times of wetland ecosystems to natural (storms and sea-level rise) and anthropogenic impacts and the appropriate indices or metrics of ecosystem health to be incorporated in management practices to achieve restoration goals. Here we present results from monitoring studies and stratigraphic investigations from marshes across the New Jersey, USA shoreline from Delaware Bay to Raritan Bay (~210 km of coastline that vary in degree of urbanization and anthropogenic disturbances) that address these limitations. In Delaware Bay, we identify a series of abrupt contacts (mud-peat couplets) from a sequence spanning the past two thousand years that we infer result from erosive storm events. By dating the base of these contacts and the return to high salt marsh peat, we are able to estimate the recovery time of marshes under varying rates of sea-level rise. In marshes from Great Sound to Raritan Bay, we use microfossils (e.g., foraminifera, diatoms) as indices of ecosystem health. We monitor the response of microfossils to natural (e.g., changes in salinity or inundation frequency from sea-level rise) and anthropogenic (e.g., nutrient loading) influences and apply quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstruction techniques to sediment archives to understand the relative influence of these factors on New Jersey wetlands over the past two thousand years. These results can be used to inform future coastal wetland restoration targets and as a model to develop site-specific goals in other regions.

  6. Estado del conocimiento de humedales del norte patagónico (Argentina: aspectos relevantes e importancia para la conservación de la biodiversidad regional State of the knowledge of north Patagonian wetlands (Argentina: major aspects and importance for regional biodiversity conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA G PEROTTI

    2005-12-01

    wetland is due to land use, species introduction, and the interaction of these disturbances with climate change. In this paper we summarize geographic, geomorphological and climatic information of several wetlands located in North Patagonia (Argentina. Besides, we present information on aquatic vegetation, fish and amphibian fauna distributions and endemisms with the aim of emphasizing the importance of wetlands to sustain regional biodiversity. Finally, we highlight the processes impacting wetlands at present time and point out the importance of obtaining basic information for management and conservation strategies

  7. Guidance manual for constructed wetlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, John Bryan; Shutes, R. Brian E.; Revitt, D. Mike

    2003-01-01

    This Guidance Manual was produced to provide up to date information on the design, costs, construction, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands used for the treatment of highway runoff. Information is provided on the different types of wetlands and their mode of operation, the design and planting of a wetland system and the retrofitting of treatment structures, the performance and costs of wetlands and their operation and maintenance requirements. The benefits of wetlands in encoura...

  8. Fish utilisation of wetland nurseries with complex hydrological connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ben; Johnston, Ross; Baker, Ronald; Sheaves, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The physical and faunal characteristics of coastal wetlands are driven by dynamics of hydrological connectivity to adjacent habitats. Wetlands on estuary floodplains are particularly dynamic, driven by a complex interplay of tidal marine connections and seasonal freshwater flooding, often with unknown consequences for fish using these habitats. To understand the patterns and subsequent processes driving fish assemblage structure in such wetlands, we examined the nature and diversity of temporal utilisation patterns at a species or genus level over three annual cycles in a tropical Australian estuarine wetland system. Four general patterns of utilisation were apparent based on CPUE and size-structure dynamics: (i) classic nursery utlisation (use by recently settled recruits for their first year) (ii) interrupted peristence (iii) delayed recruitment (iv) facultative wetland residence. Despite the small self-recruiting 'facultative wetland resident' group, wetland occupancy seems largely driven by connectivity to the subtidal estuary channel. Variable connection regimes (i.e. frequency and timing of connections) within and between different wetland units (e.g. individual pools, lagoons, swamps) will therefore interact with the diversity of species recruitment schedules to generate variable wetland assemblages in time and space. In addition, the assemblage structure is heavily modified by freshwater flow, through simultaneously curtailing persistence of the 'interrupted persistence' group, establishing connectivity for freshwater spawned members of both the 'facultative wetland resident' and 'delayed recruitment group', and apparently mediating use of intermediate nursery habitats for marine-spawned members of the 'delayed recruitment' group. The diversity of utilisation pattern and the complexity of associated drivers means assemblage compositions, and therefore ecosystem functioning, is likely to vary among years depending on variations in hydrological connectivity

  9. Fish utilisation of wetland nurseries with complex hydrological connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Davis

    Full Text Available The physical and faunal characteristics of coastal wetlands are driven by dynamics of hydrological connectivity to adjacent habitats. Wetlands on estuary floodplains are particularly dynamic, driven by a complex interplay of tidal marine connections and seasonal freshwater flooding, often with unknown consequences for fish using these habitats. To understand the patterns and subsequent processes driving fish assemblage structure in such wetlands, we examined the nature and diversity of temporal utilisation patterns at a species or genus level over three annual cycles in a tropical Australian estuarine wetland system. Four general patterns of utilisation were apparent based on CPUE and size-structure dynamics: (i classic nursery utlisation (use by recently settled recruits for their first year (ii interrupted peristence (iii delayed recruitment (iv facultative wetland residence. Despite the small self-recruiting 'facultative wetland resident' group, wetland occupancy seems largely driven by connectivity to the subtidal estuary channel. Variable connection regimes (i.e. frequency and timing of connections within and between different wetland units (e.g. individual pools, lagoons, swamps will therefore interact with the diversity of species recruitment schedules to generate variable wetland assemblages in time and space. In addition, the assemblage structure is heavily modified by freshwater flow, through simultaneously curtailing persistence of the 'interrupted persistence' group, establishing connectivity for freshwater spawned members of both the 'facultative wetland resident' and 'delayed recruitment group', and apparently mediating use of intermediate nursery habitats for marine-spawned members of the 'delayed recruitment' group. The diversity of utilisation pattern and the complexity of associated drivers means assemblage compositions, and therefore ecosystem functioning, is likely to vary among years depending on variations in hydrological

  10. A survey of the wetlands and floodplains of the borrow area and wetland/shorebird complex for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.; Yin, S.; Hlohowskyj, I.

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting cleanup operations at the Weldon Spring site, St. Charles, Missouri, that will include development of a 77-ha (191-acre) soil borrow area. Eight wetlands, including riverine and palustrine emergent wetland types and totaling 0.9 ha (2.2 acres), will be eliminated during excavation of the borrow area. A 23-ha (57-acre) wetland/shorebird complex will be created at the Busch Conservation Area. The complex will include 2 ha (5 acres) of palustrine emergent wetland as mitigation for wetland losses in the borrow area.

  11. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Bird

    Full Text Available Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m; although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%, relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%. The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  12. 湿地生物地球化学过程研究进展%Advance in Study on the Biogeochemical Process in Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白军红; 邓伟; 朱颜明

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands are special ecosystems with distinctive biogeochemical circulation.Wetland soil locates where biogeochemical conversions take place,and its Eh value strongly influences the biogeochemical conversion procedure of elements. This paper analyzed the biogeochemical conversion procedure of essential elements such as C,N,P and S,the main environmental factors influencing the biogeochemical circulation in wetlands,and summarized important characters of the biogeochemical circulation in wetlands.It is concluded that controlling pollution and reinforcing conservation and management of wetlands will keep positive biogeochemical circulation in wetlands.

  13. Surficial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in different estuary wetlands in the Pearl river, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Honggang; Cui, Baoshan [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Kejiang [Xinjiang Research Center of Water and Wastewater Treatment, Xinjiang Deland Co., LTD., Urumqi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A total of 87 soil profiles sampled from five types of wetlands in the Pearl River estuary were analyzed to investigate the surficial and vertical distributions of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn). The results show that wetlands directly connected with rivers (e.g., riparian wetlands, estuarine wetlands, and mangrove wetlands) has much higher metal concentrations than those indirectly connected with rivers (e.g., pond wetlands and reclaimed wetlands). The river water is the major pollution source for all investigated heavy metals. The vertical distribution of heavy metals can be classified into three patterns: (i) linear distribution pattern. The concentration of heavy metals gradually decreases with an increase in soil depth (for riparian and estuarine wetlands); (ii) irregular and stable pattern (for pond and reclaimed wetlands); and (iii) middle enrichment pattern (for mangrove wetlands). In addition to river-borne inputs, a variety of vegetation composition, hydraulic conditions, and human activities also contribute to the variation in distribution of heavy metals in different wetlands. Soil properties (e.g., particle size, pH, salinity, and SOM) also affect the distribution of trace metals in each soil layer. The major pollution source of heavy metals is industrial wastewater. Other sources include agriculture and domestic premises, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides a sound basis for the risk assessment of heavy metals in the studied wetlands and for wetland conservation in general. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. WaterWetlands_NWI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — VCGI downloaded NWI quads from the US FWS web site and reprojected to VCS NAD83. NWI digital data files are records of wetlands location and classification as...

  15. Classics of Artifical Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    By the construcfion of frraced fields over the past cenfuries,the Hani people created wetland in the ailao Mountains,an area where there originally was no such land ,which greatly improved the local ecosystem.

  16. Wetlands Inventory Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Nevada wetlands inventory is a unit of a nationwide survey undertaken by the Fish and Wildlife Service to locate and tabulate by habitat types the important...

  17. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health interactions are many. There is a need to take into account the landscape, spatial boundaries, and cross-boundary interactions in water development projects as well as alternative methods to provide water for human needs. The research challenges that need to be addressed are discussed.

  18. Wetlands; 1 : 1 000 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most valuable swamps and other hydrophilic associations represent wetlands. In the years 1991 - 2000, 261 specialists carried out their inventory. Apart from these localities another 1,050 locally important wetlands were identified while more than 500 wetlands were identified geographically, i.e. without characterisation of flora and fauna, which prevented their categorisation. The source material used for mapping of wetlands was provided by the Centre for Wetland Mapping of the Slovak Union of Nature and Landscape Conservationists in Prievidza. Mapping of wetlands in Slovakia continues and its main aim is to: (1) cartographically process the yet not investigated territories, for instance, the districts of Humenne, Zlate Moravce, and other; (2) explore fauna and flora of more than 500 geographically identified wetlands; (3) update the state of biota of internationally and nationally important wetlands; (4) involve more specialists in inventory of wetlands. (authors)

  19. A conceptual approach to evaluating grassland restoration potential on Huron Wetland Management District, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To assist with the Comprehensive Conservation Plan process, Huron Wetland Management District (WMD) requested that information be synthesized on ecological...

  20. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  1. Futures Analysis of Urban Land Use and Wetland Change in Saskatoon, Canada: An Application in Strategic Environmental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sizo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a scenario-based approach to strategic environmental assessment (SEA for wetland trend analysis and land use and land cover (LUC modeling in an urban environment. The application is focused on the Saskatoon urban environment, a rapidly growing urban municipality in Canada’s prairie pothole region. Alternative future LUC was simulated using remote sensing data and city spatial planning documentation using a Markov Chain technique. Two alternatives were developed and compared for LUC change and threats to urban wetland sustainability: a zero alternative that simulated trends in urban development and wetland conservation under a business as usual scenario, in the absence of prescribed planning and zoning actions; and an alternative focused on implementation of current urban development plans, which simulated future LUC to account for prescribed wetland conservation strategies. Results show no improvement in future wetland conditions under the city’s planned growth and wetland conservation scenario versus the business as usual scenario. Results also indicate that a blanket wetland conservation strategy for the city may not be sufficient to overcome the historic trend of urban wetland loss; and that spatially distributed conservation rates, based on individual wetland water catchment LUC peculiarities, may be more effective in terms of wetland conservation. The paper also demonstrates the challenges to applied SEA in a rapidly changing urban planning context, where data are often sparse and inconsistent across the urban region, and provides potential solutions through LUC classification and prediction tools to help overcome data limitations to support land use planning decisions for wetland conservation.

  2. 北京翠湖湿地鸟类资源现状及保护对策%Current Status and Conservation Strategy of Bird Resources in Cuihu Wetland in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 李晓光; 商晓静; 刘颖杰; 王博宇; 张富春; 李晓京

    2012-01-01

    A systematic survey on bird resources was performed from 2009 to 2011 in Cuihu wetland in Beijing. The results showed that 166 bird species belonging to 40 families of 17 orders were recorded in Cuihu wetland, including 108 species of non-passerine birds and 58 species of passerine. According to their residence types, the number of passing birds species is the biggest, followed by resident birds and summer migrant birds, the number of winter migrant birds is the least. There are a variety of rare and endangered birds in Cuihu wetland. Among them, 34 species were listed in the national key protected wild animals of China (2003), 68 species were listed in the protected wild animals of Beijing (2007). Meanwhile, there are many birds were included in the list for protection by bilateral agreements, such as "China-Japan Migratory Bird Protection Agreement" and "China-Australia Migratory Bird Protection Agreement". Cuihu wetland was rich in bird biodiversity, and plays an important role in the protection of wildlife and migratory birds.%2009-2011年对翠湖湿地鸟类进行了调查.结果发现:翠湖湿地记录到鸟类17目40科166种,其中非雀形目鸟类108种,雀形目58种.从居留型来看,旅鸟种类数量最多,留鸟和夏候鸟次之,冬候鸟最少.翠湖湿地拥有多种珍稀濒危鸟类,其中属于国家重点保护野生动物(2003)的34种,属于北京市保护野生动物(2007)的68种;翠湖湿地还拥有一些被列入双边国际协定保护中的候鸟,如《中日候鸟保护协定》、《中澳候鸟保护协定》.翠湖湿地鸟类生物多样性十分丰富,在保护野生动植物和候鸟方面发挥着重要的作用.

  3. [Research progress on wetland ecotourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Long; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Wetland is rich in biodiversity and cultural diversity, possessing higher tourism value and environmental education and community participation functions. Wetland ecotourism reflects the sustainable development of tourism economy and wetland protection, having received great concern from governments and scholars at home and abroad. This paper summarized the related theories and practices, discussed the research advances in wetland ecotourism from the aspects of significance, progress, contents, methods and results, and pointed out the important research fields in the future, aimed to accelerate the development of wetland ecotourism research and to provide reference about the resources exploitation, environment protection, and scientific administration of wetland and related scenic areas.

  4. An Initial Assessment of the Economic Value of Coastal and Freshwater Wetlands in West Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Eppink, Florian V.; Luke M. Brander; Alfred J. Wagtendonk

    2014-01-01

    Many countries in West Asia, defined in this study as the Arabic-speaking countries of the Arabian Peninsula plus Turkey and Iran, have enacted environmental conservation laws but regional underlying drivers of environment change, such as rising incomes and fast-growing populations, continue to put pressure on remaining wetlands. This paper aims to inform conservation efforts by presenting the first regional assessment of the economic value of coastal and freshwater wetlands in West Asia. Usi...

  5. Bayes and empirical Bayes: do they merge?

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Sonia; Scricciolo, Catia

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian inference is attractive for its coherence and good frequentist properties. However, it is a common experience that eliciting a honest prior may be difficult and, in practice, people often take an {\\em empirical Bayes} approach, plugging empirical estimates of the prior hyperparameters into the posterior distribution. Even if not rigorously justified, the underlying idea is that, when the sample size is large, empirical Bayes leads to "similar" inferential answers. Yet, precise mathematical results seem to be missing. In this work, we give a more rigorous justification in terms of merging of Bayes and empirical Bayes posterior distributions. We consider two notions of merging: Bayesian weak merging and frequentist merging in total variation. Since weak merging is related to consistency, we provide sufficient conditions for consistency of empirical Bayes posteriors. Also, we show that, under regularity conditions, the empirical Bayes procedure asymptotically selects the value of the hyperparameter for ...

  6. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - MO 2012 East West Gateway Wetlands (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Cowardin’s Classification of Wetlands and Deep Water Habitats of the United States (http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/wetlands/classwet/index.htm), together with...

  7. Metro Multnomah Wetlands - Multnomah Channel Wetland Restoration Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Multnomah Channel Wetland Restoration Monitoring Project characterizes wetlands use by juvenile salmonids and other fishes in the Multnomah Channel Marsh...

  8. Wetland suitability and connectivity for trans-Saharan migratory waterbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Merken

    Full Text Available To complete their life cycle waterbirds rely on patchily distributed and often ephemeral wetlands along their migration route in a vast unsuitable matrix. However, further loss and degradation of remaining wetland habitats might lead to a configuration and size of stopovers that is no longer sufficient to ensure long-term survival of waterbird populations. By identifying optimal conservation targets to maintain overall habitat availability en route, we can accommodate an as yet absent functional connectivity component in larger management frameworks for migratory waterbirds, such as the Ramsar Convention and the EU Natura 2000 Network. Using a graph-based habitat availability metric (Equivalent Connected Area we determine the functional connectivity of wetland networks for seven migratory waterbirds with divergent habitat requirements. Analyses are performed at two spatial extents both spanning the Mediterranean Sea and centered around Greece (Balkan-Cyrenaica and Greece-Cyrenaica. We create species-specific suitable habitat maps and account for human disturbance by species-specific disturbance buffers, based on expert estimates of Flight Initiation Distances. At both spatial extents we quantitatively determine the habitat networks' overall functional connectivity and identify wetland sites that are crucial for maintaining a well-connected network. We show that the wetland networks for both spatial extents are relatively well connected and identify several wetland sites in Greece and Libya as important for maintaining connectivity. The application of disturbance buffers results in wetland site-specific reduction of suitable habitat area (0.90-7.36% and an overall decrease of the network's connectivity (0.65-6.82%. In addition, we show that the habitat networks of a limited set of species can be combined into a single network which accounts for their autoecological requirements. We conclude that targeted management in few but specific wetland

  9. The current status, threats and protection way of Sanjiang Plain wetland, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUZhi-qiang; LIUTong

    2005-01-01

    The Sanjiang Plain is a vast area of alluvial floodplains and low hills in northeast Heilongjiang Province. It is the largest tract of wetlands in China and East Asia outside of Siberia. 28 wetland nature reserves exist on the Sanjiang Plain, and three of them have been listed as wetlands of international importance to water bird conservation by the Ramsar Convention Bureau. The wetlands of Sanjiang Plain are noteworthy for its rich biodiversity, but they continue to decline in area and deteriorate in quality currently. The main threats or constrains, immediate cause, root cause and required response are analyzed in this paper, and the four aspects opinion such as improvement of watershed management, enhancement of protection and restoration of habitats and biodiversity, alternative livelihoods of rural residents living in and near natural wetland reserve, and reinforcement of capacity building of natural reserves are brought forward as the effective measures for the Sanjiang Plain wetland protection.

  10. The Research of Ecology-Oriented Reasonable Deployment of Water Resources at Shuangtaizi Estuary Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaofeng; WANG Tieliang; SU Fangli; ZHOU Linfei; LI Bo

    2011-01-01

    Shuangtaizi estuary wetland, the largest natural conservation district in China, and one of the best preserved, largest ecological lands with the most complete vegetation types in the world, is located in Panjin city, Liaoning Province. In rccent years,the degradation of Shuangtaizi estuary wetland is very serious. In order to rescue lives in the wetland and protect valuable natural resources, the information system of Shuangtaizi estuary wetland was built with ‘3S' technology, and the minimum, optimum, and maximum eco-environmental water requirements were calculated respectively. Furthermore, for restoring the ecological functions of wetland and preventing wetland degradation, the balance between supply and demand of water resource was analyzed, and an optimal allocation scheme of water resources was proposed based on three kinds of equilibrium.

  11. Drainage investment and wetland loss: an analysis of the national resources inventory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Soil Conservation Service (SCS) conducts a survey for the purpose of establishing an agricultural land use database. This survey is called the National Resources Inventory (NRI) database. The complex NRI land classification system, in conjunction with the quantitative information gathered by the survey, has numerous applications. The current paper uses the wetland area data gathered by the NRI in 1982 and 1987 to examine empirically the factors that generate wetland loss in the United States. The cross-section regression models listed here use the quantity of wetlands, the stock of drainage capital, the realty value of farmland and drainage costs to explain most of the cross-state variation in wetland loss rates. Wetlands preservation efforts by federal agencies assume that pecuniary economic factors play a decisive role in wetland drainage. The empirical models tested in the present paper validate this assumption.

  12. Restored agricultural wetlands in Central Iowa: habitat quality and amphibian response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Clay; Rebecca A. Reeves,; Smalling, Kelly; Klaver, Robert W.; Vandever, Mark; Battaglin, William A.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are declining throughout the United States and worldwide due, partly, to habitat loss. Conservation practices on the landscape restore wetlands to denitrify tile drainage effluent and restore ecosystem services. Understanding how water quality, hydroperiod, predation, and disease affect amphibians in restored wetlands is central to maintaining healthy amphibian populations in the region. We examined the quality of amphibian habitat in restored wetlands relative to reference wetlands by comparing species richness, developmental stress, and adult leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) survival probabilities to a suite of environmental metrics. Although measured habitat variables differed between restored and reference wetlands, differences appeared to have sub-lethal rather than lethal effects on resident amphibian populations. There were few differences in amphibian species richness and no difference in estimated survival probabilities between wetland types. Restored wetlands had more nitrate and alkaline pH, longer hydroperiods, and were deeper, whereas reference wetlands had more amphibian chytrid fungus zoospores in water samples and resident amphibians exhibited increased developmental stress. Restored and reference wetlands are both important components of the landscape in central Iowa and maintaining a complex of fish-free wetlands with a variety of hydroperiods will likely contribute to the persistence of amphibians in this landscape.

  13. Prerequisites for understanding climate-change impacts on northern prairie wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Post van der Burg, Max; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) contains ecosystems that are typified by an extensive matrix of grasslands and depressional wetlands, which provide numerous ecosystem services. Over the past 150 years the PPR has experienced numerous landscape modifications resulting in agricultural conversion of 75–99 % of native prairie uplands and drainage of 50–90 % of wetlands. There is concern over how and where conservation dollars should be spent within the PPR to protect and restore wetland basins to support waterbird populations that will be robust to a changing climate. However, while hydrological impacts of landscape modifications appear substantial, they are still poorly understood. Previous modeling efforts addressing impacts of climate change on PPR wetlands have yet to fully incorporate interacting or potentially overshadowing impacts of landscape modification. We outlined several information needs for building more informative models to predict climate change effects on PPR wetlands. We reviewed how landscape modification influences wetland hydrology and present a conceptual model to describe how modified wetlands might respond to climate variability. We note that current climate projections do not incorporate cyclical variability in climate between wet and dry periods even though such dynamics have shaped the hydrology and ecology of PPR wetlands. We conclude that there are at least three prerequisite steps to making meaningful predictions about effects of climate change on PPR wetlands. Those evident to us are: 1) an understanding of how physical and watershed characteristics of wetland basins of similar hydroperiods vary across temperature and moisture gradients; 2) a mechanistic understanding of how wetlands respond to climate across a gradient of anthropogenic modifications; and 3) improved climate projections for the PPR that can meaningfully represent potential changes in climate variability including intensity and duration of wet and dry periods. Once

  14. Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Wetland Grant Database (WGD) houses grant data for Wetland Program Development Grants (created by EPA in 1990 under the Clean Water Act Section 104(b)(3)...

  15. Managing the wetlands. People and rivers: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, P

    1993-01-01

    At the current population growth rate in Africa, the population will reach 1 billion by 2010. Water is needed to sustain these people, yet rainfall in Africa is erratic. Africans are already confronting a shortage of freshwater. Agriculture supports 66% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa. Sound agricultural development is needed to curb rural-urban migration, but a constant supply of freshwater is essential. Major rivers (the Limpopo in southern Africa and the Save/Sabi in Zimbabwe and Mozambique) now flow only seasonally. The flows of the Chari-Logona, the Nile, and the Zambezi are falling. Continual mismanagement of Africa's river basins coupled with current projections of global climate change will expand desiccation. All but the White Nile and the Zaire rivers flood seasonally every year, thereby expanding Africa's wetlands. Wetlands have been targeted for development projects (e.g., hydroelectric projects and large dams), largely to meet urban-industrial demands. Development planners tend to ignore the economic value of the wetlands. For example, the Niger Inland Delta sustains 550,000 people, 1 million cattle, and 1 million sheep. Wetlands replenish ground water and serve as natural irrigation. River basin planning often results in environmentally disastrous schemes which do not understand local management practices. Hydrologists, engineers, geologists, and economics design these schemes, but sociologists, anthropologists, and development experts should be included. The unfinished Jonglei Canal in southern Sudan would have adversely affected 400,000 pastoralists. The Volta River Authority's Akosombo Dam displaced 84,000 people and flooded the most productive agricultural land in Ghana. A sustainable future in Africa depends on understanding the interactions of human uses and the ways in which they relate to the natural variations in river flow. The IUCN Wetlands Programme, based on the principles of the World Conservation Strategy, is working with

  16. Constructed Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Vymazal

    2010-01-01

    The first experiments using wetland macrophytes for wastewater treatment were carried out in Germany in the early 1950s. Since then, the constructed wetlands have evolved into a reliable wastewater treatment technology for various types of wastewater. The classification of constructed wetlands is based on: the vegetation type (emergent, submerged, floating leaved, free-floating); hydrology (free water surface and subsurface flow); and subsurface flow wetlands can be further classified accordi...

  17. Threats to the Nyando Wetland.

    OpenAIRE

    Masese, F.O.; Raburu, P. O.; Kwena, F.

    2012-01-01

    All over the world, wetlands are hot spots of biodiversity and as a result they supply a plethora of goods and services to people living within them and in their adjoining areas. As a consequence, increased human pressure pose the greatest challenge to the well-being of wetlands, with Climate Change and nutrient pollution becoming increasingly important. Globally, the processes that impact on wetlands fall into five main categories that include the loss of wetland area, changes to the water r...

  18. Prediction CH4 Emissions from the Wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain of Northeastern China in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Yanyu; Yu, Lijun; Zhang, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The Sanjiang Plain has been experienced significant wetland loss due to expanded agricultural activities, and will be potentially restored by the China National Wetland Conservation Action Plan (NWCP) in future. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of future climate warming and wetland restoration on wetland CH4 emissions in northeast China. We used an atmosphere-vegetation interaction model (AVIM2) to drive a modified biogeophysical model (CH4MODwetland), and projected CH4 flux variations from the Sanjiang Plain wetlands under different Representative Concentration Pathway scenarios throughout the 21st century. Model validation showed that the regressions between the observed and simulated CH4 fluxes by the modified model produced an R2 of 0.49 with a slope of 0.87 (pclimate change and wetland restoration. Regional wetland restoration planning should be directed against different climate scenarios in order to suppress methane emissions. PMID:27409586

  19. San Diego Bay Bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Brueggeman, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The San Diego Bay Bibliography references the scientific & gray literature on the Bay up through 1994 and it is NOT current. Compiled from numerous resources (including Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, Regional Water Quality Control Board, & local library catalogs), it is not comprehensive since so the Bay literature is elusive. In addition, there can be duplicate references varying in completeness. The San Diego Bay Bibliography is the outcome of discussion and networking within ...

  20. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen B; Manker, Craig R; Pigati, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-24

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated (14)C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  1. Ensuring Disaster Risk Reduction via Sustainable Wetland Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, S. W.; Lindborg, R.; Nyström, S.; Silengo, M.; Tumbo, M.; Koutsouris, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems around the world are increasingly being targeted as land use development 'hotspots' under growing concerns of climate variability and food security. Anthropogenic encroachment on natural wetland ecosystems can have direct consequences locally through loss of biodiversity and regionally through increased disaster risks associated with, for example, flooding. We consider two regionally-relevant wetland ecosystems in eastern Africa, namely Zambia's Lukanga Swamps and Tanzania's Kilombero Valley, experiencing varying trajectories of development under climatic variations. These regions have been targeted for inclusive, multi-stakeholder initiatives that aim at developing agricultural potential through combinations of large and small scale irrigation schemes. Through our data-driven analysis we highlight the potential for shifts in hydrologic regime of each wetland ecosystem which can have significant regional impacts on disaster risks. In the case of the Lukanga Swamps, wetlands maintain water table fluctuations that help mitigate water cycling with implications for the downstream flooding impact of annual rains. With regards to Kilombero Valley, understanding seasonal changes in hydrological processes and storages provides the cornerstone for managing future water resource impacts/feedbacks under different scenarios of land management. This work emphasizes the need to tailor strategies towards sustainable uses of wetlands that reduce disaster risks regionally while contributing to improved community health and wellbeing. It remains an open (and fundamental) question of how to best define management recommendations and activities that not only achieve climate resiliency but also are acceptable for stakeholders without compromising the balance between ecosystem service supply and biodiversity conservation.

  2. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen B; Manker, Craig R; Pigati, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-24

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated (14)C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming. PMID:26554007

  3. Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gnaneswar Gude, Veera; Magbanua, Benjamin; Truax, Dennis D; Martin, James L

    2016-10-01

    An update on the current research and development of the treatment technologies, which utilize natural processes or passive components in wastewater treatment, is provided in this paper. The main focus is on wetland systems and their applications in wastewater treatment (as an advanced treatment unit or decentralized system), nutrient and pollutant removal (metals, industrial and emerging pollutants including pharmaceutical compounds). A summary of studies involving the effects of vegetation, wetland design and modeling, hybrid and innovative systems, storm water treatment and pathogen removal is also included. PMID:27620086

  4. Constructed Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vymazal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The first experiments using wetland macrophytes for wastewater treatment were carried out in Germany in the early 1950s. Since then, the constructed wetlands have evolved into a reliable wastewater treatment technology for various types of wastewater. The classification of constructed wetlands is based on: the vegetation type (emergent, submerged, floating leaved, free-floating; hydrology (free water surface and subsurface flow; and subsurface flow wetlands can be further classified according to the flow direction (vertical or horizontal. In order to achieve better treatment performance, namely for nitrogen, various types of constructed wetlands could be combined into hybrid systems.

  5. Wetland inventory, assessment and monitoring: practical techniques and identification of major issues. Proceedings of Workshop 4. Supervising Scientist Report 161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2nd International Conference on Wetlands and Development aimed to review progress in wetland conservation and development since the 1st Conference (Malaysia, 1995). The conference reviewed trends in wetland development and management, and identified issues and solutions which could benefit agencies and individuals concerned with the wise use of wetlands at all levels. Special focus was given to Africa, with the aim of developing new partnerships, networks and programs for the future. Endorsements for the conference were received from the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention to Combat Desertification, the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, the UN Economic Commission for Africa, and the World Heritage Convention. More than 40 donors provided funds to the conference. The Conference was opened by the Senegalese Minister of Environment and Nature Protection, in the presence of the Senegalese Minister of Foreign Affairs. The Conference included 5 workshops covering: 1. Strategies for wise use of wetlands: Best practices in participatory management; 2. Strategies for conserving migratory waterbirds; 3. Integrated wetlands and water resources management; 4. Wetland inventory, assessment, monitoring and valuation; 5. Mechanisms for financing the wise use of wetlands. The proceedings of workshop 4 are presented in this report

  6. FGD liner experiments with wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsch, W.J.; Ahn, C.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment often requires impermeable liners not only to protect groundwater resources but also to ensure that there is adequate water in the wetland to support appropriate aquatic life, particularly wetland vegetation. Liners or relatively impervious site soils are very important to the success of constructed treatment wetlands in areas where ground water levels are typically close to the ground surface. This study, carried out at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, investigated the use of FGD material from sulfur scrubbers as a possible liner material for constructed wetlands. While several studies have investigated the use of FGD material to line ponds, no studies have investigated the use of this material as a liner for constructed wetlands. They used experimental mesocosms to see the effect of FGD liner materials in constructed wetlands on water quality and on wetland plant growth. This paper presents the results of nutrient analyses and physicochemical investigation of leachate and surface outflow water samples collected from the mesocosms. Plant growth and biomass of wetland vegetation are also included in this paper. First two year results are reported by Ahn et al. (1998, 1999). The overall goal of this study is the identification of advantages and disadvantages of using FGD by-product as an artificial liner in constructed wetlands.

  7. Effect of wetland management: are lentic wetlands refuges of plant-species diversity in the Andean-Orinoco Piedmont of Colombia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Pacheco, Johanna I; Rös, Matthias; Escobar, Federico; Castro-Lima, Francisco; Verdú, José R; López-Iborra, Germán M

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated degradation of the wetlands and fragmentation of surrounding vegetation in the Andean-Orinoco Piedmont are the main threats to diversity and ecological integrity of these ecosystems; however, information on this topic is of limited availability. In this region, we evaluated the value of 37 lentic wetlands as reservoirs of woody and aquatic plants and analyzed diversity and changes in species composition within and among groups defined according to management given by: (1) type (swamps, heronries, rice fields, semi-natural lakes, constructed lakes and fish farms) and (2) origins (natural, mixed and artificial). A total of 506 plant species were recorded: 80% woody and 20% aquatic. Of these, 411 species (81%) were considered species typical of the area (Meta Piedmont distribution). Diversity patterns seem to be driven by high landscape heterogeneity and wetland management. The fish farms presented the highest diversity of woody plants, while swamps ranked highest for aquatic plant diversity. Regarding wetland origin, the artificial systems were the most diverse, but natural wetlands presented the highest diversity of typical species and can therefore be considered representative ecosystems at the regional scale. Our results suggest that lentic wetlands act as refuges for native vegetation of Meta Piedmont forest, hosting 55% of the woody of Piedmont species and 29% of the aquatic species of Orinoco basin. The wetlands showed a high species turnover and the results indicated that small wetlands (mean ± SD: size = 11 ± 18.7 ha), with a small area of surrounding forest (10 ± 8.6 ha) supported high local and regional plant diversity. To ensure long-term conservation of lentic wetlands, it is necessary to develop management and conservation strategies that take both natural and created wetlands into account. PMID:27602263

  8. Ecosystem Services Valuation of Lakeside Wetland Park beside Chaohu Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wetland ecosystems are one of the three great ecosystems on Earth. With a deepening of research on wetland ecosystems, researchers have paid more and more attention to wetland ecosystem services such as flood mitigation, climate control, pollution prevention, soil-erosion prevention, biodiversity maintenance, and bio-productivity protection. This study focuses on a lakeside wetland ecosystem in Hefei, a city in central China, and estimates the value of ecosystem services such as material production, air purification, water conservation, biodiversity, recreation, species conservation, education and scientific research. We adopted the market value method, carbon tax method, afforestation cost method, shadow engineering method and contingent value method (CVM using questionnaire survey data during the study period. The results show that the total value of the ecosystem services of Lakeside Wetland Park was 144 million CNY in 2015. Among these services, the value of society service is the maximum at 91.73 million CNY, followed by ecological service and material production service (42.23 million CNY and 10.43 billion CNY in 2015 respectively. When considering wetland ecosystems for economic development, other services must be considered in addition to material production to obtain a longer-term economic value. This research reveals that there is scope for more comprehensive and integrated model development, including multiple wetland ecosystem services and appropriate handling of wetland ecosystem management impacts.

  9. Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Tanja Maria; Lentini, Pia Eloise; Lumsden, Linda Faye; Wintle, Brendan Anthony; van der Ree, Rodney

    2016-07-01

    Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands

  10. Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Tanja Maria; Lentini, Pia Eloise; Lumsden, Linda Faye; Wintle, Brendan Anthony; van der Ree, Rodney

    2016-07-01

    Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands

  11. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  12. Modeling Tidal Wetland Resiliency in the Face of Predicted Accelerated Sea-Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, L. M.; Callaway, J.; Morris, J. T.; Kelly, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal wetland ecosystems are dynamic coastal habitats that, in California, often occur at the complex nexus of aquatic environments, diked and leveed baylands, and modified upland habitat. Because of their prime location and rich peat soil, many wetlands have been reduced, degraded, and/or destroyed, and yet their important role in carbon sequestration, nutrient and sediment filtering, and as habitat requires us to further examine their sustainability in light of predicted climate change. Predictions of climate change effects for the San Francisco Bay Estuary present a future with reduced summer freshwater input and increased sea levels. We examined the applicability and accuracy of the Marsh Equilibrium Model (MEM), a zero-dimensional model that models organic and inorganic accretion rates under a given rate of sea-level rise. MEM was calibrated using data collected from salt and brackish marshes in the San Francisco Bay Estuary to examine wetland resiliency under a range of sea-level rise and suspended sediment concentration scenarios. At sea-level rise rates 100 cm/century and lower, wetlands remained vegetated. Once sea levels rise above 100 cm, marshes begin to lose ability to maintain elevation, and the presence of adjacent upland habitat becomes increasingly important for marsh migration. The negative effects of sea-level rise on elevations were compounded as suspended sediment concentrations decreased. Results from this study emphasize that the wetland landscape in the bay is threatened with rising sea levels, and there are a limited number of wetlands that will be able to migrate to higher ground as sea levels rise.

  13. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Status Report II 2000-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Christopher

    2006-07-13

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ≈ 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report. Post restoration monitoring will continue through 2005. A final report to the Mitigation Bank Review Team will be submitted in mid-2006.

  14. Research Advances on Marine Ecological Effect and Repairing Techniques of Coastal Mangrove Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na; LI; Pimao; CHEN; Peipei; QIAO; Chuanxin; QIN

    2014-01-01

    Coastal mangrove wetland is one of the areas whose global ecological environmental conditions have severely changed. Its ecosystem is vulnerable to damaged. The international community has paid attention to conservation and wisely use of mangrove wetland. This paper describes five parts of coastal mangrove wetland at home and abroad,including seawater’s purification effect of nitrogen and phosphorus,seawater’s adsorption of heavy metals,the functions of carbon sequestration and climate regulation,implant restoration techniques and the status of protection and management. And research trends of coastal mangrove wetland were proposed,in order to provide reference for the restoration and protection of China’s coastal mangrove wetland.

  15. The wetlands of Magdalena medio Antioqueno from a physical and socio-cultural perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetlands are ecosystems with environmental and ecological importance that require of a new methodological and legal focus that allows developing conservation policies in agreement with the natural and socio-cultural conditions. In the Magdalena Medio Antioqueno, CORANTIOQUIA region, were recognized 362 wetlands, divided in two main groups; in Puerto Nare and Puerto Berrio to the south prevails herbaceous wetlands without permanent surface water, locally known as Bajos. In Yondo the wetlands have permanent surface water. The environmental dynamic depends from the geomorphologic and hydrological conditions and are affected in a differential way by the human action. The region is the result of a long occupation process that begins in prehistoric times and had changed depending on the different historical moments. This complex social configuration has given origin to diverse perceptions and types of appropriation of the wetlands what explains the identified environmental circumstances

  16. Natural wetland emissions of methylated trace elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, B.; Lenz, M.; Charlet, L.; Berg, M.; Winkel, L.H.E.

    2014-01-01

    Natural wetlands are well known for their significant methane emissions. However, trace element emissions via biomethylation and subsequent volatilization from pristine wetlands are virtually unstudied, even though wetlands constitute large reservoirs for trace elements. Here we show that the averag

  17. Restoration of Bhoj Wetlands At Bhopal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S. S.; Kulshrestha, M.; Wetland Project, Bhoj

    Bhoj Wetlands comprise the two lakes at Bhopal, India. These wetlands are listed amongst the 21 lakes recognized by Ministry of Environment and Forest, India and are under consideration for Ramsar lake status. The twin lakes have a total water- spread area of 32.29 sq. kms and catchment area of 370.6 sq. kms and both lakes support a rich and diverse range of flora and fauna. Currently with the help of 7055-m Yen soft loan from Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), a comprehen- sive project called the Bhoj Wetland Project has been launched for Eco-conservation management of twin lakes and this is one of the most reputed projects of its kind being undertaken in India. This paper presents details of the various works being undertaken for restoration of these wetlands at Bhopal. The Bhoj Wetlands are located at Bhopal, a city founded in 11th century AD by King Bhoj and which became known for the worst industrial Gas tragedy in 1984 when thousands lost their lives. The city is still recovering and the Bhoj Wetland Project is playing a very crucial role in improving the overall environmental status of the City. These wetlands are at present facing acute en- vironmental degradation due to pollution from a number of sources such as inflow of untreated sewage and solid waste, silt erosion and inflow from catchment, commercial activities like washing of clothes and cleaning of vehicles etc., inflow of agricultural residues and pesticides, and encroachment by builders all of which are fast eroding the rich eco-culture, flora fauna in and around the wetlands. The Bhoj Wetland Project is being implemented since the year 1995 and is scheduled to end in March 2002. The project works are being undertaken under the overall aegis of Ministry of Housing Environment, Govt. of Madhya Pradesh (M.P.) State, India. All the detailed project reports (DPRs) and preliminary ground work was undertaken by the in-house staff of Bhoj Wetland project, resulting in huge amounts of

  18. Tampa Bay: Chapter N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Larry; Spear, Kathryn; Cross, Lindsay; Baumstark, René; Moyer, Ryan; Thatcher, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida’s largest open-water estuary and encompasses an area of approximately 1036 km2 (400 mi2) (Burgan and Engle, 2006; TBNEP, 2006). The Bay’s watershed drains 5,698 km2 (2,200 mi2) of land and includes freshwater from the Hillsborough River to the north east, the Alafia and Little Manatee rivers to the east, and the Manatee River to the south (Figure 1). Freshwater inflow also enters the bay from the Lake Tarpon Canal, from small tidal tributaries, and from watershed runoff. Outflow travels from the upper bay segments (Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay) into Middle and Lower Tampa Bay. Southwestern portions of the water shed flow through Boca Ciega Bay into the Intracoastal Waterway and through the Southwest Channel and Passage Key Inlet into the Gulf of Mexico. The average depth in most of Tampa Bay is only 3.4 m (11 ft); however, 129 km (80 mi) of shipping channels with a maximum depth of 13.1 m (43 ft) have been dredged over time and are regularly maintained. These channels help to support the three ports within the bay, as well as commercial and recreational boat traffic.

  19. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava M Tabak

    Full Text Available Sea Level Rise (SLR caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  20. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Nava M; Laba, Magdeline; Spector, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Hydrological Connectivity Between a Forested Coastal Wetland and Regulated Waters of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D. D.; Wilcox, B. P.; Jacob, J. S.; Sipocz, A.; Munster, C.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid urbanization, industry, and agriculture have put enormous developmental pressure on coastal forested wetlands along the Texas coast. At least 97,000 acres of freshwater forested wetlands on the Texas coast have been lost since 1955, amid much larger losses of other coastal wetland types (TPWD-Texas Wetlands Conservation Plan, 1996). Some coastal wetlands are protected by federal regulations under the Clean Water Act in an effort to maintain wetland hydrological and ecological services, such as water quality improvement and flood control. However, federal protection of many important coastal wetlands is dependent upon documented proof of a hydrologic connection to federally protected Waters of the United States and reasonable influence on the quality of those waters. This study focuses on a 13 acre catchment of coastal flatwoods wetland with an ambiguous legal status because of a possible , but undocumented, hydrologic connection to regulated Waters of the United States. Documentation of the hydrologic connectivity of this type of wetland is critical because of the geographic extent of similar wetlands and their contributions to water quality. The objective of the study was to determine if a hydrologic connection exists, and if so, to quantify the strength of the connection. A surface connection was established based on runoff and rainfall data collected since April of 2005, with the wetland discharging surface water directly into an adjacent protected wetland. The connection was weak during dry years, but in years with average rainfall, surface runoff accounted for a much more significant portion of the water budget. These results suggest that runoff water from similar wetlands contributes directly to protected wetland waters, and may influence water quality downstream.

  2. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Nava M; Laba, Magdeline; Spector, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary. PMID:27043136

  3. Restoration of ailing wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswald J Schmitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide.

  4. Connecting carbon and nitrogen storage in rural wetland soil to groundwater abstraction for urban water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David Bruce; Feit, Sharon J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether groundwater abstraction for urban water supply diminishes the storage of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and organic matter in the soil of rural wetlands. Wetland soil organic matter (SOM) benefits air and water quality by sequestering large masses of C and N. Yet, the accumulation of wetland SOM depends on soil inundation, so we hypothesized that groundwater abstraction would diminish stocks of SOM, C, and N in wetland soils. Predictions of this hypothesis were tested in two types of subtropical, depressional-basin wetland: forested swamps and herbaceous-vegetation marshes. In west-central Florida, >650 ML groundwater day(-1) are abstracted for use primarily in the Tampa Bay metropolis. At higher abstraction volumes, water tables were lower and wetlands had shorter hydroperiods (less time inundated). In turn, wetlands with shorter hydroperiods had 50-60% less SOM, C, and N per kg soil. In swamps, SOM loss caused soil bulk density to double, so areal soil C and N storage per m(2) through 30.5 cm depth was diminished by 25-30% in short-hydroperiod swamps. In herbaceous-vegetation marshes, short hydroperiods caused a sharper decline in N than in C. Soil organic matter, C, and N pools were not correlated with soil texture or with wetland draining-reflooding frequency. Many years of shortened hydroperiod were probably required to diminish soil organic matter, C, and N pools by the magnitudes we observed. This diminution might have occurred decades ago, but could be maintained contemporarily by the failure each year of chronically drained soils to retain new organic matter inputs. In sum, our study attributes the contraction of hydroperiod and loss of soil organic matter, C, and N from rural wetlands to groundwater abstraction performed largely for urban water supply, revealing teleconnections between rural ecosystem change and urban resource demand.

  5. The contribution of reserves and anthropogenic habitat for functional connectivity and resilience of ephemeral wetland networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. R.; Uden, D.; Angeler, D.; Hellman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Functional connectivity of reserves and other suitable habitat patches is crucial for persistence of spatially structured populations, and therefore for resilience. To maintain or increase connectivity at spatial scales larger than individual patches, conservation actions may focus on creating and maintaining reserves or influencing management actions taken on non-reserves. We assess functional connectivity of isolated wetlands within an intensively managed agricultural matrix. Using a graph-theoretic approach, we assessed the functional connectivity and spatial distribution of wetlands in the Rainwater Basins, Nebraska, U.S.A. at four assumed anuran dispersal distances. We compare the contemporary wetlands landscape to the historical landscape and putative future landscapes and evaluate the importance of individual and aggregated reserve and non-reserve wetlands for maintaining connectivity. Connectivity was greatest in the historical landscape, where wetlands were also the most densely distributed. The construction of irrigation reuse pits for water storage has substantially increased connectivity in the current landscape, but because their distribution is more uniform than historical wetlands, larger and longer-dispersing species may be favored over smaller, shorter-dispersing species. Because of their relatively low number, wetland reserves did not affect connectivity as greatly as non-reserve wetlands or irrigation reuse pits; however, they provide the highest-quality anuran habitat. Future levels of connectivity in the region will be directly impacted by the planned removal of irrigation reuse pits, and on non-reserve wetlands. Multi-scale spatial and temporal assessments of the effects of landuse change and conservation actions on landscape connectivity may be used to direct and prioritize conservation actions, and should also be useful for reserve network and landscape resilience assessments.

  6. Chesapeake Bay Watershed - Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers through science, restoration, and partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase, which has doubled since 1950, resulting in degraded water quality, loss of habitat, and declines in populations of biological communities. Since the mid-1980s, the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a multi-agency partnership which includes the Department of Interior (DOI), has worked to restore the Bay ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has the critical role of providing unbiased scientific information that is utilized to document and understand ecosystem change to help assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in the Bay and its watershed. The USGS revised its Chesapeake Bay science plan for 2006-2011 to address the collective needs of the CBP, DOI, and USGS with a mission to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Bay ecosystem. The USGS science themes for this mission are: Causes and consequences of land-use change; Impact of climate change and associated hazards; Factors affecting water quality and quantity; Ability of habitat to support fish and bird populations; and Synthesis and forecasting to improve ecosystem assessment, conservation, and restoration.

  7. A Combined Modeling Approach to Evaluate Water Quality Benefits of Riparian Buffers in the Jobos Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jobos Bay Watershed, located in south-central Puerto Rico, is a tropical Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Special Emphasis Watershed. The purpose of CEAP is to quantify environmental benefits of conservation practices and includes field and watershed modeling. In Jobos Bay, the goa...

  8. Diversity and abundance of amphibian species in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeje Kassie Teme; Mengistu Wale Mollaleign; Asersie MekonnenAregie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the population status, abundance and diversity of amphibians found in Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Methods: The present study dealed with amphibian diversity at Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland during the period of August 2015 to September 2015. Transect line and visual encounter survey methods were used in careful visual estimation and amphibians were recorded in all possible habitats of the study area. Results: The total of 251 individuals of amphibians within 12 species grouped into 5 families were recorded in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Chefa wetland had the highest species abundance as well as richness with a total of 231 individuals falling in 11 species. Conclusions: This study reveals that the Chefa wetland is rich in amphibian diversity and supports many more species. Further studies are needed on molecular basis, population structure, habitat use by amphibians for better understanding and also imposing several conservation strategies in Chefa wetland.

  9. Diversity and abundance of amphibian species in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeje Kassie Teme

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the population status, abundance and diversity of amphibians found in Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Methods: The present study dealed with amphibian diversity at Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland during the period of August 2015 to September 2015. Transect line and visual encounter survey methods were used in careful visual estimation and amphibians were recorded in all possible habitats of the study area. Results: The total of 251 individuals of amphibians within 12 species grouped into 5 families were recorded in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Chefa wetland had the highest species abundance as well as richness with a total of 231 individuals falling in 11 species. Conclusions: This study reveals that the Chefa wetland is rich in amphibian diversity and supports many more species. Further studies are needed on molecular basis, population structure, habitat use by amphibians for better understanding and also imposing several conservation strategies in Chefa wetland.

  10. Tropical wetlands and REDD+: Three unique scientific challenges for policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Friess

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The carbon sequestration and storage value of terrestrial habitats is now increasingly appreciated, and is the basis for Payment for Ecosystem Service (PES policies such as REDD+. Tropical wetlands may be suitable for inclusion in such schemes because of the disproportionately large volume of carbon they are able to store. However, tropical wetlands offer a number of unique challenges for carbon management and policy compared to terrestrial forest systems: 1 Tropical wetlands are dynamic and subject to a wide range of physical and ecological processes that affect their long-term carbon storage potential – thus, such systems can quickly become a carbon source instead of a sink; 2 Carbon dynamics in tropical wetlands often operate over longer time-scales than are currently covered by REDD+ payments; and 3 Much of the carbon in a tropical wetland is stored in the soil, so monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV needs to adequately encapsulate the entire ecosystem and not just the vegetative component. This paper discusses these physical and biological concepts, and highlights key legal, management and policy questions that must be considered when constructing a policy framework to conserve these crucial ecosystems.

  11. Remote sensing of water quality and contaminants in the California Bay-Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichot, C. G.; Downing, B. D.; Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Gierach, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The California Bay-Delta is a highly altered ecosystem largely reclaimed from wetlands for agriculture, and millions of acres of farmland and Californians rely on the Bay-Delta for their water supply. The Bay-Delta also harbors important habitats for many organisms, including commercial and endangered species. Recently, the Delta Stewardship Council developed a two component mission (coequal goals) to 1) provide a more reliable water supply for California while 2) protecting, restoring, and enhancing the Bay-Delta ecosystem. Dissolved organic carbon, turbidity, and contaminants such as methylmercury represent important water quality issues for water management and in the context of wetland restoration in the Bay-Delta, and can threaten the achievement of the coequal goals. Here, we use field measurements of optical properties, chemical analyses, and remotely sensed data acquired with the airborne Portable Remote Imaging SpectroMeter (PRISM ; http://prism.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html) to demonstrate these water quality parameters and the study of their dynamics in the Bay-Delta are amenable to remote sensing. PRISM provides high signal-to-noise, high spatial resolution (~2 m), hyperspectral measurements of remote-sensing reflectance in the 350-1050 nm range, and therefore has the adequate resolutions for water quality monitoring in inland, optically complex waters. Remote sensing of water quality will represent a valuable complement to existing in situ water quality monitoring programs in this region and will help with decision-making to achieve the co-equal goals.

  12. Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation using wetland plants: An ecosustainable approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, P.K. [Mizoram Central University, Tanhril (India). School for Earth Science & Natural Resource Management

    2008-07-01

    This review addresses the global problem of heavy metal pollution originating from increased industrialization and urbanization and its amelioration by using wetland plants both in a microcosm as well as natural/field condition. This review mentions salient features of wetland ecosystems, their vegetation component, and the pros and cons involved in heavy metal removal. Wetland plants are preferred over other bio-agents due to their low cost, frequent abundance in aquatic ecosystems, and easy handling. Constructed wetlands proved to be effective for the abatement of heavy metal pollution from acid mine drainage; landfill leachate; thermal power; and municipal, agricultural, refinery, and chlor-alkali effluent. the physicochemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating heavy metals. Typha, Phragmites, Eichhornia, Azolla, Lemna, and other aquatic macrophytes are some of the potent wetland plants for heavy metal removal. Biomass disposal problem and seasonal growth of aquatic macrophytes are some limitations in the transfer of phytoremediation technology from the laboratory to the field. However, the disposed biomass of macrophytes may be used for various fruitful applications. An ecosustainable model has been developed through the author's various works, which may ameliorate some of the limitations. The creation of more areas for phytoremediation may also aid in wetlands conservation. Genetic engineering and biodiversity prospecting of endangered wetland plants are important future prospects in this regard.

  13. APPLICATION OF ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS TO ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL VULNERABILITY OF WETLANDS IN THE JIANGHAN PLAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-lei; NING Long-mei; HU Wang-bin

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands in the Jianghan Plain are important components of wetland types in lake area in the middle and lower reaches the Changjiang (Yangtze) River and they fulfill many uses and functions related to hydrology,waste assimilation, ecosystem productivity and biodiversity. Owing to natural factors and human activities, especially excessive reclamation from lakes, the shrinking process of the lakes has been accelerated. Wetland ecosystem has shown the characteristics of vulnerability. According to the analysis of wetland ecological function in the Jianghan Plain, this paper presented an index system related to productivity, stability and environmental capacity. By using the method of Analytic Hierarchy Process, we computed the values of the relative weights of the indexes, and evaluated the vulnerability level of the wetland ecosystem by the method of multi-indexes. The case study showed that the fragile extent of wetland ecosystem in the Jianghan Plain is 5.6. This means that the wetland ecosystem in the Jiang-han Plain is laid to the state of middle vulnerability. Therefore, the wetland conservation and eco-rehabilitation in the Jianghan Plain should be paid attention to.

  14. Processes contributing to resilience of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify processes that contribute to resilience of coastal wetlands subject to rising sea levels and to determine whether the relative contribution of these processes varies across different wetland community types. We assessed the resilience of wetlands to sea-level rise along a transitional gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW) to marsh by measuring processes controlling wetland elevation. We found that, over 5 years of measurement, TFFWs were resilient, although some marginally, and oligohaline marshes exhibited robust resilience to sea-level rise. We identified fundamental differences in how resilience is maintained across wetland community types, which have important implications for management activities that aim to restore or conserve resilient systems. We showed that the relative importance of surface and subsurface processes in controlling wetland surface elevation change differed between TFFWs and oligohaline marshes. The marshes had significantly higher rates of surface accretion than the TFFWs, and in the marshes, surface accretion was the primary contributor to elevation change. In contrast, elevation change in TFFWs was more heavily influenced by subsurface processes, such as root zone expansion or compaction, which played an important role in determining resilience of TFFWs to rising sea level. When root zone contributions were removed statistically from comparisons between relative sea-level rise and surface elevation change, sites that previously had elevation rate deficits showed a surplus. Therefore, assessments of wetland resilience that do not include subsurface processes will likely misjudge vulnerability to sea-level rise.

  15. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company’s...

  16. Indicators of hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological integrity for estimating potential loss of ecosystem services from wetlands on domesticated landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Aldred, D.; Spargo, A.; Bayley, S.

    2012-12-01

    these indicators over the past years. For a time series of wetlands loss we derive these indicators of functions and benefits to estimate changes in the provision of specific aquatic ecosystem services on the landscape. Last, we develop formulae for integrating these indicators to determine whether a specific wetland or wetland complex should be prioritized for conservation, exemplifying potential trade-offs among ecosystem services in setting conservation targets on this wetland dominated landscapes. The proposed theoretical framework evolved from close collaboration between scientists and resource managers, and will inform those engaged in developing wetland policies for a broad range of jurisdictions.

  17. Use of Geographic Information Systems to examine cumulative impacts of development on Mobile Bay, AL and Galveston Bay, TX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Databases from Mobile Bay, Alabama and Galveston Bay, Texas were compiled using ARC/INFO Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to examine the cumulative impacts from urbanization and industrialization on these two Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The databases included information on wetland habitats, pollution sources, metal contamination, bird-nesting sites, and oyster reefs, among others. A series of maps were used to represent the impacts within and between each ecosystem. These two estuaries share many similarities in the types of developmental pressures that each experience. However, difference in the magnitude of industrial activity, pollution loading, and urban growth coupled with distinct hydrodynamic and geochemical differences in sediment mineralogy, freshwater inflows and salinity regimens results in differing responses. With growing human population and extensive oil and gas development, the demands on Galveston Bay are quite different than those placed on Mobile Bay which has lower growth and less extensive oil and gas infrastructure. Mobile Bay tends to retain whatever contamination enters into the system because of the high levels of clay and organic carbon found in its sediment. Some of these chemicals bioaccumulate, posing an extra risk to natural resources. Geographic Information Systems provide natural resource managers with the technology to manage complex databases. The analytical and mapping capabilities of GIS can be used to consider cumulative effects in a regional context and to develop plans to protect ecologically sensitive areas

  18. 7 CFR 2.61 - Chief, Natural Resources Conservation Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the functions of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, including furnishing photographs, mosaics... Management, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 117, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp... sections 1238-1238C (16 U.S.C. 3838-3838c) and the Conservation Stewardship Program authorized by...

  19. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M. Ross

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change.

  20. 40 CFR 230.41 - Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wetlands. 230.41 Section 230.41... Aquatic Sites § 230.41 Wetlands. (a)(1) Wetlands consist of areas that are inundated or saturated by...) Where wetlands are adjacent to open water, they generally constitute the transition to upland....

  1. Hydrology of Mid-Atlantic Freshwater Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrology is a key variable in the structure and function of a wetland; it is a primary determinant of wetland type, and it drives many of the functions a wetland performs and in turn the services it provides. However, wetland hydrology has been understudied. Efforts by Riparia s...

  2. 杭州湾4种植物盐胁迫下种子萌发能力与分布的关系%Correlation of seed germination capacities under salt stress with four plant species distribution in the Hangzhou Bay Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶小齐; 吴明; 王琦; 蒋科毅; 邵学新

    2012-01-01

    In the Hangzhou Bay Wetlands, plant species occupy different habitats. It is not clear whether the distribution pattern of plant species was related to their ability to germinate under salt stress conditions. Soils from the habitats of four populations of Suaeda glauca, Suaeda australis , Phragmites australis , and Artemisia lavandulifolia were sampled respectively and soil salt content, pH, and water content were analyzed and compared. The percent germination of their seeds when exposed to 0-50 g · L-1 NaCl solution was measured by germinating 30 seeds in three Petri dishes respectively in an illumination incubator at 28 ℃. Finally, correlation between germination percent of seeds for the four species exposed to a 20 g · L-1 NaCl solution versus soil salt content, pH, and water content was analyzed. Results for the four species showed that the soil salt content of the growth habitats was S. glauca > S. australis > P. australis > A. lavandulifolia; soil pH was P. australis > A. lavandulifolia > S. glauca and S. australis; and soil water content was S. glauca > P. australis > 5. australis > A. lavandulifolia. With the NaCl solution (0-50 g·L-1), the percent germination decreased signifi-cantly (P S. australis > P. australis > A. lavandulifolia. After replacement of NaCl solution (0-50 g·L-1) with distilled water, the seed germination percent remarkably increased (P < 0.01). But the final germination capacity was in the same order as before the replacement. In addition, only the soil salt content was strongly related to percent germination of the four seed-types exposed to 20 g · L-1 NaCl solution (P < 0.05). These results indicated that soil salt content was an important limiting factor for seed germination, and the distribution pattern of the four plant species was generally related to their habitat's soil salt content and the ability of the seeds to germinate at high NaCl concentrations.%为了探明杭州湾湿地植物碱蓬Suaedae glauca

  3. Tidal wetlands of the Yaquina and Alsea River estuaries, Oregon: Geographic Information Systems layer development and recommendations for National Wetlands Inventory revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Laura S.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Janousek, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    -scale wetland restoration and conservation action planning. Several new prioritization sites (not included in the 1999 prioritization) were identified in each estuary, consisting of NWI polygons formerly classified as nontidal wetland or upland. The GIS products of this project improve the accuracy and utility of the NWI data, and provide useful tools for estuarine resource management.

  4. Reef Fish Surveys for Fagatele Bay, American Samoa, 2007 (NODC Accession 0068717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish surveys were conducted in November 2007 using visual census techniques at Fagatele Bay under the guidance of Dr. Alison Green, the Nature Conservancy. This...

  5. Reef fish survey data from Fagatele Bay, American Samoa during November of 2007 (NODC Accession 0068717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish surveys were conducted in November 2007 using visual census techniques at Fagatele Bay under the guidance of Dr. Alison Green, the Nature Conservancy. This...

  6. Role of Wetland Ecosystems In Hydrobioecological Dynamics In Indian Punjab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ladhar, Satnam

    parts of Punjab and important parts of Rajasthan. Over the time water storage capacity of this wetland has reduced to 14740 acre-feet. Ropar Wetland located upstream of Harike Wetland provides drink- ing and irrigation water supplies to most parts of Punjab. Once made for this sole pur- pose, the Wetlands have helped enormous build up of biological resources and their conservation including some rare species. Because of unique wildlife values, Harike Wetland was notified as Wildlife Sanctuary in 1981 and as Ramsar site in 1990. Ropar and another important wetland Kanjli have been designated as national wetlands by 1 the Ministry of Environment &Forests, Govt. of India. All these three wetlands are, however, suffering from encroachments, siltation, weed growth, pollution, and up- stream diversion, which are changing the local hydrological regime. Details shall be discussed. 2

  7. Ecosystem services: developing sustainable management paradigms based on wetland functions and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.; Smith, Loren M.; Conner, William H.; Burkett, Virginia R.; Wilcox, Douglas A.; Hester, Mark W.; Zheng, Haochi

    2013-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century and twentieth century, there was considerable interest and activity to develop the United States for agricultural, mining, and many other purposes to improve the quality of human life standards and prosperity. Most of the work to support this development was focused along disciplinary lines with little attention focused on ecosystem service trade-offs or synergisms, especially those that transcended boundaries of scientific disciplines and specific interest groups. Concurrently, human population size has increased substantially and its use of ecosystem services has increased more than five-fold over just the past century. Consequently, the contemporary landscape has been highly modified for human use, leaving behind a fragmented landscape where basic ecosystem functions and processes have been broadly altered. Over this period, climate change also interacted with other anthropogenic effects, resulting in modern environmental problems having a complexity that is without historical precedent. The challenge before the scientific community is to develop new science paradigms that integrate relevant scientific disciplines to properly frame and evaluate modern environmental problems in a systems-type approach to better inform the decision-making process. Wetland science is a relatively new discipline that grew out of the conservation movement of the early twentieth century. In the United States, most of the conservation attention in the earlier days was on wildlife, but a growing human awareness of the importance of the environment led to the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1969. Concurrently, there was a broadening interest in conservation science, and the scientific study of wetlands gradually gained acceptance as a scientific discipline. Pioneering wetland scientists became formally organized when they formed The Society of Wetland Scientists in 1980 and established a publication outlet to share wetland research

  8. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  9. Humboldt Bay Orthoimages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-meter pixel resolution, four band orthoimages covering the Humboldt Bay area. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  10. Bathymetry in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4x4 meter resolution bathymetric surface for Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The depth values are in meters referenced to...

  11. Logy Bay Fishing Settlement

    OpenAIRE

    S H Parsons and Sons

    2003-01-01

    202 x 151 mm. Showing the small inlet with moored rowing boats and rough wooden shacks built on the cliffside. Lying about seven miles from St. John's, Logy Bay was used as a summertime fishing station.

  12. Biscayne Bay Alongshore Epifauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field studies to characterize the alongshore epifauna (shrimp, crabs, echinoderms, and small fishes) along the western shore of southern Biscayne Bay were started...

  13. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  14. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - MO 2015 Meramec Wetland Complex (GDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MoRAP produced and integrated data to map and rank wetlands for the Meramec River bottomland in Missouri. LiDAR elevation and vegetation height information and air...

  15. Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands ESI: WETLANDS (Wetland Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the coastal wetland habitats for Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands classified according to the Environmental...

  16. Wetlands & Deepwater Habitats - MO 2015 Silver Wetland Complex (GDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MoRAP produced and integrated data to map and rank wetlands for the Upper Silver Creek Watershed in Illinois. LiDAR elevation and vegetation height information and...

  17. Impacts of Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activities on the Ecological Restoration of Wetlands in the Arid Regions of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of the global ecosystem, wetlands and their dynamics greatly influence regional eco-environment systems. To understand the distributions, change processes and temporal-spatial characteristics of the wetlands of the inland river basin in an arid region (Heihe River Basin, HRB, this paper employed multi-source remote sensing data to facilitate multi-temporal monitoring of the HRB wetland using a wetland information extraction method. First, we performed monitoring of these wetlands for the years 2000, 2007, 2011 and 2014; then, we analyzed the variation characteristics of the spatial-temporal dynamics of the wetlands in the HRB over the last 15 years via the landscape dynamic change model and the transformation matrix. In addition, we studied the possible driving mechanisms of these changes. The research results showed that the total area of the HRB wetlands had decreased by 2959.13 hectares in the last 15 years (Since 2000, and the annual average loss was −1.09%. The dynamics characterizing the HRB wetlands generally presented a trend of slow increase after an initial decrease, which can be classified into three stages. From 2000 to 2007, the total wetland area rapidly decreased; from 2007 to 2011, the area slowly decreased; and from 2011 to 2014, the area gradually increased. The dynamic changing processes characterizing the wetland resources were ascribed to a combination of natural processes and human activities. The main driving mechanisms of wetland dynamic changes include climatic conditions, upper reach water inflows, population, water resources, cultivated area, and policy. The findings of this study can served as reference and support for the conservation and management of wetland resources in the HRB.

  18. Land use effects on pesticides in sediments of prairie pothole wetlands in North and South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Scott T; Belden, Jason B; Smith, Loren M; Morrison, Shane A; Daniel, Dale W; Euliss, Betty R; Euliss, Ned H; Kensinger, Bart J; Tangen, Brian A

    2016-09-15

    Prairie potholes are the dominant wetland type in the intensively cultivated northern Great Plains of North America, and thus have the potential to receive pesticide runoff and drift. We examined the presence of pesticides in sediments of 151 wetlands split among the three dominant land use types, Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), cropland, and native prairie, in North and South Dakota in 2011. Herbicides (glyphosate and atrazine) and fungicides were detected regularly, with no insecticide detections. Glyphosate was the most detected pesticide, occurring in 61% of all wetlands, with atrazine in only 8% of wetlands. Pyraclostrobin was one of five fungicides detected, but the only one of significance, being detected in 31% of wetlands. Glyphosate was the only pesticide that differed by land use, with concentrations in cropland over four-times that in either native prairie or CRP, which were equal in concentration and frequency of detection. Despite examining several landscape variables, such as wetland proximity to specific crop types, watershed size, and others, land use was the best variable explaining pesticide concentrations in potholes. CRP ameliorated glyphosate in wetlands at concentrations comparable to native prairie and thereby provides another ecosystem service from this expansive program. PMID:27219502

  19. The evaluation of the value of soil erosion prevention on wetlands in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Wenji; Liu, Hao

    2011-02-01

    Wetland is an important part of the ecological system. It has an important role in soil erosion prevention. Without the protection of wetland, soil erosion will cause two aspects physical loss, including 1) the waste land caused by soil degradation and desertification; 2) nutrient contents loss. This paper takes all wetland in Beijing as object. This research includes investigation and research on indexes of soil erosion prevention in Beijing wetland ecological system. Two aspects of reduction soil waste and prevent soil fertility are studied. Potential and actual soil erosion are calculated using GIS and universal soil erosion equation based on collected data, with the difference of the two amounts is the soil conservation quantify, which will be converted to economic value. Research results show the economic value of Beijing wetland in the soil erosion prevention is 4,962.56 million Yuan. The river and swamp have the highest value; meanwhile, the rural wetland's value of soil erosion resistance is more than in the urban area. Wetland has the extremely vital significance to keep a good ecological environment in Beijing.

  20. Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation using wetland plants: an ecosustainable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar

    2008-01-01

    This review addresses the global problem of heavymetal pollution originating from increased industrialization and urbanization and its amelioration by using wetland plants both in a microcosm as well as natural/field condition. Heavymetal contamination in aquatic ecosystems due to discharge of industrial effluents may pose a serious threat to human health. Alkaline precipitation, ion exchange columns, electrochemical removal, filtration, and membrane technologies are the currently available technologies for heavy metal removal. These conventional technologies are not economical and may produce adverse impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Phytoremediation of metals is a cost-effective "green" technology based on the use of specially selected metal-accumulating plants to remove toxic metals from soils and water. Wetland plants are important tools for heavy metal removal. The Ramsar convention, one of the earlier modern global conservation treaties, was adopted at Ramsar, Iran, in 1971 and became effective in 1975. This convention emphasized the wise use of wetlands and their resources. This review mentions salient features of wetland ecosystems, their vegetation component, and the pros and cons involved in heavy metal removal. Wetland plants are preferred over other bio-agents due to their low cost, frequent abundance in aquatic ecosystems, and easy handling. The extensive rhizosphere of wetland plants provides an enriched culture zone for the microbes involved in degradation. The wetland sediment zone provides reducing conditions that are conducive to the metal removal pathway. Constructed wetlands proved to be effective for the abatement of heavymetal pollution from acid mine drainage; landfill leachate; thermal power; and municipal, agricultural, refinery, and chlor-alkali effluent. the physicochemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating heavy metals. Typha, Phragmites, Eichhornia, Azolla, Lemna, and other aquatic macrophytes are some

  1. Habitat utilization by wetland birds of Munderikadavu, a proposed bird sanctuary in northern Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roshnath

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Munderikadavu is rich in avifaunal diversity. A total of 82 species of birds from 36 families belonging to 13 orders were recorded in the wetland including wetland dependant species. Lowland vegetation had the highest species richness (46 species followed by upland (41 species, aerial (38 species, emergent vegetation (22 species and paddy fields (21 species.  Open water had the lowest species richness. Upland vegetation had the highest species diversity (H′-3.19 followed by aerial (H′-2.52.  There was more species overlap between emergent and low land vegetations (Cm-0.7.  The threats in Munderikadavu wetland were dumping of waste and conversion of cultivation land into shrimp farming area. Thus land use changes need to be regulated in order to conserve the wetland and bird community.  

  2. Transformation processes in constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Dragounová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, constructed wetlands have become a very popular alternative for wastewater treatment, mainly because of its advantages such as long life of the systems, easy maintenance, low operating costs and mainly due to the wide range of substances that can be with the help of constructed wetlands removed from wastewater. The removal of nutrients and other substances from wastewater is influenced by a number of biological, chemical and physical processes. Of these processes are in t...

  3. Module bay with directed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  4. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  5. Effects of Pipeline Construction on Wetland Ecosystems: Russia-China Oil Pipeline Project (Mohe-Daqing Section)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaofei Yu; Guoping Wang; Yuanchun Zou; Qiang Wang; Hongmei Zhao; Xianguo Lu (Key Lab of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Inst. of Geography and Agroecology, Changchun (China)), e-mail: wangguoping@neigae.ac.cn

    2010-07-15

    Although the multiple roles of wetland ecosystems and their value to humanity have been increasingly understood and documented in recent years, the efforts to conserve and restore wetlands are not in harmony with the press for high speed of economy growth. The degradation of wetlands is proceeding, especially in China. Russia- China Oil Pipe-line Project (Mohe-Daqing Section) has already begun in May 2009, and is ongoing. The pipeline runs through four riverine wetlands and two marshlands of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China. Although the project has vital significance of mitigating the energy crisis as well as guaranteeing the energy security of China, it will bring a series of ecological and environmental problems, especially for wetland ecosystems

  6. Modelling Holocene carbon accumulation and methane emissions of boreal wetlands – an Earth system model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Schuldt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the Last Glacial Maximum, boreal wetlands have accumulated substantial amounts of peat, estimated at 180–621 Pg of carbon. Wetlands have significantly affected the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition in the past and will play a significant role in future changes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. In order to investigate those changes with an Earth system model, biogeochemical processes in boreal wetlands need to be accounted for. Thus, a model of peat accumulation and decay was developed and included in the land surface model JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM. Here we present the evaluation of model results from 6000 yr BP to the pre-industrial period. Over this period of time, 240 Pg of peat carbon accumulated in the model in the areas north of 40° N. Simulated peat accumulation rates agree well with those reported for boreal wetlands. The model simulates CH4 emissions of 49.3 Tg CH4 yr−1 for 6000 yr BP and 51.5 Tg CH4 yr−1 for pre-industrial times. This is within the range of estimates in the literature, which range from 32 to 112 Tg CH4 yr−1 for boreal wetlands. The modelled methane emission for the West Siberian Lowlands and Hudson Bay Lowlands agree well with observations. The rising trend of methane emissions over the last 6000 yr is in agreement with measurements of Antarctic and Greenland ice cores.

  7. On Diagnostic Index and Method of Healthy Wetland Food Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Juan Cui; Xin-sheng Zhao; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Wetland food chain is the channel of the matter and energy transfer or flow in the wetland ecosystem. From wetland food chain scission mechanism, the structure and functional characteristics of the wetland food chain scission were analyzed, while building a healthy wetland food chain diagnostic index system. Depending on wetland ecosystem health research results, this study brought forward the wetland food chain structure stability and functions of wetland energy measures and their quantitati...

  8. A study of waterbirds wintering in Mission Bay combining field methods and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Lesley Mika

    Mission Bay (San Diego, California) is located along the Pacific Flyway and is an important habitat for waterbirds in the winter. Little has been documented about this habitat and this project aims to create a baseline to establish an understanding of how waterbirds use Mission Bay, as well as comparing current bird species presence to presence in the past. Mission Bay was divided into grid areas and each was surveyed twice daily at high and low tides. Waterbird activity included foraging, non-foraging, and flying was recorded during each survey over a two-year period from mid-October through January in 2013--2015. Data extracted from this dataset were combined with wetland area, natural area and historic wetland area and was analyzed to understand relationships of independent variables by bird group using a Zero-Inflated Negative Binomial regression model and by waterbird biodiversity using an Ordinary Least Squares regression model. In addition, waterbird habitat was documented across natural and man-made areas. More waterbird species were sighted during contemporary surveys in comparison to historic data from the 1950's and 1970's with similar biodiversity estimates determined for San Diego Bay. Results indicated that geographical area and the presence of wetland habitat significantly affected the biodiversity of waterbirds using Mission Bay in the winter with the highest biodiversity occurring in the largest wetland area in the Kendall-Frost Mission Bay Marsh Preserve. The combination of high biodiversity occurring in the largest wetland area with restricted access to the marsh suggests that human disturbance reduces species richness in this area, confirming the impact of disturbance on sensitive waterbird species cited in other research. Most bird groups favored north Mission Bay with the exception of herons and gulls that preferred southern areas of the bay, likely due to opportunistic interaction with humans, as gulls demonstrated a negative association to

  9. Exposure and Figure Out of Climate Induced Alterations in the Wetlands of Banglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiquee, S. A.; Rahman, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Unique geographic location and geo-morphological conditions of Bangladesh have made the wetlands of this country one of the most vulnerable to climate change. Wetland plays a crucial role in maintaining the ecological balance of ecosystems and cultural figures and which occupy around 50% of the area. Drought, excessive temperature, mountain snowfields and glaciers melting, riverbank erosion, salinity intrusion, flashflood, storm surges, higher water temperatures, precipitation anomalies, coastal cyclones, seasonal anomalies and extremes are main threats to the wetland ecosystem. Enhanced UV-B radiation and increased summer precipitation will significantly increase dissolved organic carbon concentrations altering major biogeochemical cycles and also will result into the expansion of range for many invasive aquatic weeds. Generally, rising temperature will lower water quality through a fall in oxygen concentrations, release of phosphorus from sediments, increased thermal stability, and altered mixing patterns. As a result biodiversity is getting degraded, many species of flora and fauna are getting threatened, and wetland-based ecosystem is getting degenerated. At the same time, the living conditions of local people are deteriorating as livelihoods, socioeconomic institutions, and extensive cultural values as well. For conserving and managing wetlands technology, legislation, educational knowledge, action plan strategy and restoration practices are required. In order to address the human needs in the changing climate community-based adaptation approaches and wetland restoration, practices had been taken in almost every type of wetlands in Bangladesh. Therefore, Bangladesh now needs a comprehensive strategy and integrated system combining political, economic, social, technological approaches and institutional supports to address sustainable wetland restoration, conservation and the newly added crisis, climate change.

  10. Application of Participatory Development Theory in Wetland Ecotourism Initiatives——A Case Study of Baiyangdian in Anxin of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; SONG Jin-Ping; ZHANG Ning

    2008-01-01

    As one of the few ecological wetlands in North China,Baiyangdian bears multiple important ecological functions, including ①adjusting the ecological balance of North China; ②safeguarding the downstream areas, especially Tianjin City, the Beijing - Shanghai Railway and Huabei Oil Field; ③serving as the reservoir for the North - to - South Water Diversion Project and the emergent use of water for Beijing; ④conserving biodiversity. Wetland ecotourism is a scientific and wise use pattern for wetland resources, through which, a source of financing is provided for wetland conservation, economic alternatives are generated for local people to reduce overexploitatian on wetland resources and the public awareness of environmental protection is enhanced. Since wetland ecotourism can benefit the co - existence between human and nature and promote social equity between people, it enjoys broad promise for popularization and implementation. The proactive cooperation and sound interaction between main stakeholders, and the wide participation of the community residents, will guarantee the sustainable development of wetland ecotourism. Based on the analysis of current status of participation and interactive relationships of the main stakeholders in Baiyangdian tourism, this article made an attempt to apply the theory of participatory development to the ecotourism initiatives of Baiyangdian wetland, discussed and brought forward the countermeasures to improve community participation in wetland ecotourism under the guidance of this theory.

  11. Wetlands mitigation: Partnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Matthew C.; Sibrel, Cynthia B.; Gough, Gregory A.

    1996-11-01

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part of the construction of an 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV overhead transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha (13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-tree reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay.

  12. User-Friendly Predictive Modeling of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes and Carbon Storage in Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2015-12-01

    We developed user-friendly empirical models to predict instantaneous fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from coastal wetlands based on a small set of dominant hydro-climatic and environmental drivers (e.g., photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature, water depth, and soil salinity). The dominant predictor variables were systematically identified by applying a robust data-analytics framework on a wide range of possible environmental variables driving wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The method comprised of a multi-layered data-analytics framework, including Pearson correlation analysis, explanatory principal component and factor analyses, and partial least squares regression modeling. The identified dominant predictors were finally utilized to develop power-law based non-linear regression models to predict CO2 and CH4 fluxes under different climatic, land use (nitrogen gradient), tidal hydrology and salinity conditions. Four different tidal wetlands of Waquoit Bay, MA were considered as the case study sites to identify the dominant drivers and evaluate model performance. The study sites were dominated by native Spartina Alterniflora and characterized by frequent flooding and high saline conditions. The model estimated the potential net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) both in gC/m2 and metric tonC/hectare by up-scaling the instantaneous predicted fluxes to the growing season and accounting for the lateral C flux exchanges between the wetlands and estuary. The entire model was presented in a single Excel spreadsheet as a user-friendly ecological engineering tool. The model can aid the development of appropriate GHG offset protocols for setting monitoring plans for tidal wetland restoration and maintenance projects. The model can also be used to estimate wetland GHG fluxes and potential carbon storage under various IPCC climate change and sea level rise scenarios; facilitating an appropriate management of carbon stocks in tidal wetlands and their incorporation into a

  13. Corpus Christi, Nueces, and Aransas Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay and Nueces Bay comprise the middle estuarine portion of Texas’ Coastal Bend region (Figure 1; Burgan and Engle, 2006). Aransas Bay is part of the upper estuarine portion of the region. These bays make up part of the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, one of the many estuarine areas in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program (Holt, 1998). The Coastal Bend region is sub-humid and sub-tropical. Summers are long, hot, and humid, and winters are short and mild. The landscape around the estuaries is dominated by row crops, pastures, and brushy rangeland (Handley and others, 2007). The Nueces River, along with other smaller rivers and creeks, provides freshwater inflow—along with essential nutrients and sediment— into Nueces Bay, which feeds into Corpus Christi Bay (Holt, 1998). Freshwater inflow into the Aransas Bay comes from Mission River, Aransas River, and Copano Creek. The region is relatively dry otherwise and prone to droughts. Corpus Christi receives an average of 76.2 cm (30 in) of rain annually; evaporation usually exceeds 177.8 cm (70 in) (Holt, 1998; Handley and others, 2007). The San Antonio-Nueces Coastal Basin drains into Aransas Bay. The Nueces River basin covers 43,253 km2 (16,700 miles2 ), from northwest of San Antonio, flowing southeast to where it drains into Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays (Holt, 1998). The Nueces-Rio Grande basin covers approximately 18,648 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 km2 (7,200 miles2 ) and flows partially into Corpus Christi Bay (as well as the upper Laguna Madre). The inflow from Nueces River has declined by approximately 20 percent over the past several decades, partly due to construction of lakes and reservoirs, particularly Lake Corpus Christi

  14. COMPARISON OF HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN SURFACE SEDIMENT OF TANJUNG PIAI WETLAND WITH OTHER SITES RECEIVING ANTHROPOGENIC INPUTS ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Tanjung Piai wetland has now been proclaimed to be a wetland of international importance since 2003. Therefore, its heavy metal pollution status should be known and recorded. In this study, sediments in Tanjung Piai wetland were collected in 2002 and 2005 and were analysed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. For comparison purpose, sediments were also collected for metal analysis from a known polluted site at Kg. Pasir Puteh, four jetties and a river. A comparison with the polluted sediment collected from Kg. Pasir Puteh and the established Sediment Quality Criteria showed that Tanjung Piai was not polluted with Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. These background concentrations or baseline data of heavy metals in the sediment is important for future reference. Therefore, Tanjung Piai wetland is a suitable site for sanctuary and wetland conservation and it should be conserved for its pristine conditions in order to support its high biodiversity.

  15. The Fermi's Bayes Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G

    2005-01-01

    It is curious to learn that Enrico Fermi knew how to base probabilistic inference on Bayes theorem, and that some influential notes on statistics for physicists stem from what the author calls elsewhere, but never in these notes, {\\it the Bayes Theorem of Fermi}. The fact is curious because the large majority of living physicists, educated in the second half of last century -- a kind of middle age in the statistical reasoning -- never heard of Bayes theorem during their studies, though they have been constantly using an intuitive reasoning quite Bayesian in spirit. This paper is based on recollections and notes by Jay Orear and on Gauss' ``Theoria motus corporum coelestium'', being the {\\it Princeps mathematicorum} remembered by Orear as source of Fermi's Bayesian reasoning.

  16. The use of remote sensing to quantify wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range, Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teferi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services such as storing and regulating water flows and water quality, providing unique habitats to flora and fauna, and regulating micro-climatic conditions. Conversion of wetlands for agricultural use is a widespread practice in Ethiopia, particularly in the southwestern part where wetlands cover large areas. Although there are many studies on land cover and land use changes in this region, comprehensive studies on wetlands are still missing. Hence, extent and rate of wetland loss at regional scales is unknown. The objective of this paper is to quantify wetland dynamics and estimate wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range (area covering 17 443 km2 in the Upper Blue Nile basin, a key headwater region of the river Nile. Therefore, satellite remote sensing imagery of the period 1986–2005 were considered. To create images of surface reflectance that are radiometrically consistent, a combination of cross-calibration and atmospheric correction (Vogelman-DOS3 methods was used. A hybrid supervised/unsupervised classification approach was used to classify the images. Overall accuracies of 94.1% and 93.5% and Kappa Coefficients of 0.908 and 0.913 for the 1986 and 2005 imageries, respectively were obtained. The results showed that 607 km2 of seasonal wetland with low moisture and 22.4 km2 of open water are lost in the study area during the period 1986 to 2005. The current situation in the wetlands of Choke Mountain is characterized by further degradation which calls for wetland conservation and rehabilitation efforts through incorporating wetlands into watershed management plans.

  17. The use of remote sensing to quantify wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range, Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teferi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide multiple ecosystem services such as storing and regulating water flows and water quality, providing unique habitats to flora and fauna, and regulating micro-climatic conditions. Conversion of wetlands for agricultural use is a widespread practice in Ethiopia, particularly in the southwestern part where wetlands cover large areas. Although there are many studies on land cover and land use changes in this region, comprehensive studies on wetlands are still missing. Hence, extent and rate of wetland loss at regional scale is unknown. The objective of this paper is to quantify wetland dynamics and estimate wetland loss in the Choke Mountain range (area covering 17 443 km2 in the Upper Blue Nile basin, a key headwater region of the river Nile. Therefore, satellite remote sensing images of the period 1986–2005 were considered. To create images of surface reflectance that are radiometrically consistent, a combination of cross-calibration and atmospheric correction (Vogelman-DOS3 methods was used. A hybrid supervised/unsupervised classification approach was used to classify the images. Overall accuracies of 94.1% and 93.5% and Kappa Coefficients of 0.908 and 0.913 for the 1986 and 2005 imageries, respectively were obtained. The results showed that 607 km2 of seasonal wetland with low moisture and 22.4 km2 of open water are lost in the study area during the period 1986 to 2005. The current situation in the wetlands of Choke Mountain is characterized by further degradation which calls for wetland conservation and rehabilitation efforts through incorporating wetlands into watershed management plans.

  18. Designated Wetlands and Setback Distances in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This GIS layer depicts wetlands designated for protection in the state of Iowa. Designated wetland is defined in Iowa Code subsection 459.102(21) as follows: 21....

  19. Wetland Assessment Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (uav) Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M. A.; Greenfield, R.; Tesfamichael, S.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry is a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of wetlands. Accurate planning derived from this technological advancement allows for more effective management and conservation of wetland areas. This paper presents results of a study that aimed at investigating the use of UAV photogrammetry as a tool to enhance the assessment of wetland ecosystems. The UAV images were collected during a single flight within 2½ hours over a 100 ha area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. An AKS Y-6 MKII multi-rotor UAV and a digital camera on a motion compensated gimbal mount were utilised for the survey. Twenty ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a Trimble GPS to achieve geometrical precision and georeferencing accuracy. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) computer vision techniques were used to derive ultra-high resolution point clouds, orthophotos and 3D models from the multi-view photos. The geometric accuracy of the data based on the 20 GCP's were 0.018 m for the overall, 0.0025 m for the vertical root mean squared error (RMSE) and an over all root mean square reprojection error of 0.18 pixel. The UAV products were then edited and subsequently analysed, interpreted and key attributes extracted using a selection of tools/ software applications to enhance the wetland assessment. The results exceeded our expectations and provided a valuable and accurate enhancement to the wetland delineation, classification and health assessment which even with detailed field studies would have been difficult to achieve.

  20. WETLAND ASSESSMENT USING UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Boon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV photogrammetry is a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of wetlands. Accurate planning derived from this technological advancement allows for more effective management and conservation of wetland areas. This paper presents results of a study that aimed at investigating the use of UAV photogrammetry as a tool to enhance the assessment of wetland ecosystems. The UAV images were collected during a single flight within 2½ hours over a 100 ha area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. An AKS Y-6 MKII multi-rotor UAV and a digital camera on a motion compensated gimbal mount were utilised for the survey. Twenty ground control points (GCPs were surveyed using a Trimble GPS to achieve geometrical precision and georeferencing accuracy. Structure-from-Motion (SfM computer vision techniques were used to derive ultra-high resolution point clouds, orthophotos and 3D models from the multi-view photos. The geometric accuracy of the data based on the 20 GCP’s were 0.018 m for the overall, 0.0025 m for the vertical root mean squared error (RMSE and an over all root mean square reprojection error of 0.18 pixel. The UAV products were then edited and subsequently analysed, interpreted and key attributes extracted using a selection of tools/ software applications to enhance the wetland assessment. The results exceeded our expectations and provided a valuable and accurate enhancement to the wetland delineation, classification and health assessment which even with detailed field studies would have been difficult to achieve.

  1. Measuring the Condition of Saline Wetlands Threatened by Agricultural Intensification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The saline wetlands,or "saladas",of Monegros Desert,NE Spain,contain biodiversity that depends on the establishment of a prognostic monitoring system that can warn of approaching irreversible damage.In the context of a lack of existing biodiversity inventories for the saladas,we determined their state of conservation and vulnerability using seven physical indicators:escarpment continuity,cropping,stone dumping,size,water occurrence,distance to roads,and proximity to irrigated areas.These features were combined into three meaningful indexes,i.e.,conservation,current vulnerability,and future vulnerability,thus creating an assessment of the preservation or degradation of saladas in the context of encroaching agricultural irrigation projects.The proposed indexes produced consistent results and showed that a great number of the Monegros wetlands were threatened,regardless of their size or frequency of water occurrence.Only 20% of the saladas studied were classified as being in a good or very good conservation,whereas 50% were in bad or very bad shape.A high current vulnerability was found for 60% of the saiadas.For saladas located in land to be irrigated,we predicted that 73% would have a high or very high future vulnerability.Currently,58% of the saladas were in bad or very bad condition and fully 65% of the saladas,variable in size,presented a bad or very bad prognosis.Our approach provides a monitoring strategy for the conservation of saline wetlands threatened by agricultural intensification,especially irrigation.

  2. A Mechanistically Informed User-Friendly Model to Predict Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes and Carbon Storage from Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, O. I.; Ishtiaq, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a user-friendly modeling tool on MS Excel to predict the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and estimate potential carbon sequestration from the coastal wetlands. The dominant controls of wetland GHG fluxes and their relative mechanistic linkages with various hydro-climatic, sea level, biogeochemical and ecological drivers were first determined by employing a systematic data-analytics method, including Pearson correlation matrix, principal component and factor analyses, and exploratory partial least squares regressions. The mechanistic knowledge and understanding was then utilized to develop parsimonious non-linear (power-law) models to predict wetland carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes based on a sub-set of climatic, hydrologic and environmental drivers such as the photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature, water depth, and soil salinity. The models were tested with field data for multiple sites and seasons (2012-13) collected from the Waquoit Bay, MA. The model estimated the annual wetland carbon storage by up-scaling the instantaneous predicted fluxes to an extended growing season (e.g., May-October) and by accounting for the net annual lateral carbon fluxes between the wetlands and estuary. The Excel Spreadsheet model is a simple ecological engineering tool for coastal carbon management and their incorporation into a potential carbon market under a changing climate, sea level and environment. Specifically, the model can help to determine appropriate GHG offset protocols and monitoring plans for projects that focus on tidal wetland restoration and maintenance.

  3. Natural wetland emissions of methylated trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, Bas; Lenz, Markus; Charlet, Laurent; Berg, Michael; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Natural wetlands are well known for their significant methane emissions. However, trace element emissions via biomethylation and subsequent volatilization from pristine wetlands are virtually unstudied, even though wetlands constitute large reservoirs for trace elements. Here we show that the average volatile fluxes of selenium (health-relevant trace elements will increase with global warming. We suggest that biomethylation and volatilization in wetlands play a crucial role in the mobilization and global biogeochemical cycling of trace elements.

  4. Tlokoeng Valley Community's Conceptions of Wetlands: Prospects for More Sustainable Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokuku, Tšepo; Taylor, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This article explores prospects for community-based water resources management in Tlokoeng Valley, in the northern district of Lesotho. A qualitative survey was conducted to establish the pre-knowledge of the valley community. This provided a basis for a community education programme on wetlands conservation. Fifteen focus group interviews (FGIs)…

  5. The Wetland Ticket System:Redline Protected Wetland Management of Infrastructural Occupation%湿票制度:红线保护下的基建占用湿地管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田富强; 刘鸿明

    2015-01-01

    Infrastructural occupation is reducing wetland area. In order to protect the wetland area above the red line, a wetland ticket system was established following the idea of land-ticket to balance the infrastructure development and conservation of wetland area. The system requires compensation before developing the infrastructure, and balance between development and compensation. The total wetland ticket cannot exceed the maximum limit, i.e. the red line. The advantages of this system include:1) Providing a legal platform for infrastructure development, achieving an orderly wetland management; 2) Compensation fund collected from wetland ticket system can be used for new wetland construction, increasing the supply of more wetlands; 3) Appropriate increase of compensation through improving wetland ticket prices can control the total demand for wetland infrastructure development. The wetland ticket system can prevent illegal disorderly occupation of wetlands by infrastructure development, and increase supply of wetland, as well as control the demand for infrastructure development, and achieve a balance between the two, therefore, stabilizing wetland ecosystem. It was suggested that the system be applied on a wider basis after further improvement.%基建占用减少了湿地面积。为保护湿地红线,借鉴地票思想,建立湿票制度,解决基建占用湿地的合法性和占补平衡问题。规定先补后占、占补平衡,湿票总量不能超过最高限量。一是给基建占用湿地提供合法平台,纳入有序管理;二是湿票资金激励新建湿地,增加湿地供给;三是适度调高湿地生态补偿费,提高湿票价格,控制基建占用湿地总需求。湿票制度杜绝基建非法无序占用湿地,增加供给,抑制需求,实现占补平衡,稳定湿地生态。可在完善制度体系的基础上,试点并推广湿票制度。

  6. North Dakota Wetlands Discovery Guide. Photocopy Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Nancy J., Ed.; And Others

    This booklet contains games and activities that can be photocopied for classroom use. Activities include Wetland Terminology, Putting on the Map, Erosional Forces, Water in...Water out, Who Lives Here?, Wetlands in Disguise, Dichotomous Plant Game, Algae Survey, Conducting an Algal Survey, Water Quality Indicators Guide, Farming Wetlands, Wetlands…

  7. 40 CFR 257.9 - Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) For purposes of this section, wetlands means those areas that are defined in 40 CFR 232.2(r). ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wetlands. 257.9 Section 257.9... Location Restrictions § 257.9 Wetlands. (a) Owners or operators of new units and lateral expansions...

  8. Optimizing Commercial Wetlands in Rural Landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaeij, de A.T.; Linderhof, V.G.M.; Polman, N.B.P.; Reinhard, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial wetlands can contribute to different policy objectives simultaneously. The aim of this study is to investigate the opinion of the Dutch population with respect to commercial wetlands. The commercial wetland functions valued the most by the Dutch population are water treatment and water st

  9. Assessment of Ecological Security of Coastal Wetland Tourism in Shandong Province%山东省滨海湿地旅游生态安全评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑娟; 谌杨杨

    2012-01-01

    滨海湿地生态系统是复杂且脆弱的,探讨旅游对其造成的影响,评价滨海湿地旅游生态安全对保护滨海湿地意义重大.采用PSR模型,从压力、状态、响应3个方面构建评价指标体系,运用生态安全评价方法对以黄河三角洲湿地、长岛湿地和胶州湾湿地为代表的山东省滨海湿地旅游生态安全进行评估.结果表明:黄河三角洲湿地和长岛湿地处于比较安全的状态,胶州湾湿地处于相对安全的状态.根据评价结果及当地滨海湿地旅游发展的现状,分析影响滨海湿地生态安全的因素,并针对这些问题提出了滨海湿地旅游开发应采取的对策.%With the rapid development of wetland tourism, the negative impact of tourism activities on the wetland ecosystem is becoming increasingly prominent. Coastal wetland ecosystem is a complex and fragile ecosystem. It is significant to explore the impact of tourism on the coastal wetland ecosystem and evaluate the ecological safety of coastal wetland tourism. Based on P-S-R model, this paper constructs an evaluation index system in terms of pressure, state and response, and uses ecological safety evaluation method to evaluate the coastal wetland tourism ecological safety of Yellow River delta wetland, Long Island wetland and Jiaozhou bay wetland, which are the representative of coastal wetland of Shandong Province. The results show that Yellow River delta wetland and Long Island wetland are in safe state while Jiaozhou bay wetland is in a relatively safe state. According to the evaluation results and the present situation of coastal wetland tourism development in Shandong Province, the paper analyzes the influential factors in the coastal wetland ecological safety, and then proposes some countermeasures for the development of coastal wetland tourism.

  10. Conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  11. Conservation program and practice effects on ecosystem services in the mid atlantic region of the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Mid-Atlantic Regional (MIAR) Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP-Wetland) study area covers approximately ~58,000 km2 in the eastern United States, including areas of within five states (North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and New...

  12. Investigation of wind and water level for the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project, Point Reyes National Seashore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, John R.; Anima, Roberto J.

    2007-01-01

    Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS), comprising unique elements of geological, biological, and historical interest, is located on the central California coast approximately 60 km northwest of San Francisco. The National Seashore contains nearly 130 km of exposed and protected shorelines, spectacular coastal cliffs and headlands, lagoons, open grasslands, bushy hillsides, and forested ridges. Approximately 30 km of the shoreline are coastal-dune habitat that supports 11 federally listed species, including the threatened western snowy plover and the endangered plants Tidestrom's lupine (Lupinus tidestromii) and beach layia (Layia carnosa). The San Andreas Fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault, trends northwest along the northeastern side of the park. Tomales Bay, which is straight, long, narrow, and shallow, runs along the northeastern boundary of PRNS. The Bay, which fills the northwestern end of a rift valley at the intersection of the San Andreas Fault with the coastline, is approximately 20 km long, 2 km wide, and 6 m deep with mountainous terrain to the southwest and rolling hills to the northeast. Tomales Bay is one of the cleanest estuaries on the West Coast. In winter, approximately 17,000 to 20,000 shorebirds inhabit Tomales Bay and Bodega Bay, which lies directly to the north. At the head of Tomales Bay, the Giacomini Ranch comprises 563 acres of pastureland currently being used for grazing dairy cattle. After more than 50 years of operation as a dairy, the National Park Service acquired the Giacomini property with the intention to restore most of it and the nearby Olema Marsh to tidal wetland. Restoration will add approximately 4% to the existing coastal wetlands in California. The project will return the headwaters of Tomales Bay and two major stream intersections to an intertidal marsh environment, enhancing habitat for both wildlife and fish populations and contributing to the long-term health of Tomales Bay. Prior to the establishment of the ranch

  13. Yaquina Bay Topobathy DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.EPA contracted with the U.S.ACE to obtain intertidal and subtidal bathymetric soundings of Yaquina Bay between Poole Slough and the South Beach Marina in 2002. These data were compiled with U.S.ACE subtidal soundings from 1999, 1998, 2000 and National Ocean Service soundi...

  14. Is the bioproduction number a good index of the trophic state in Mediterranean wetlands?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication is one of the major problems affecting water quality of inland waters. Therefore trophic state evaluation is essential for the conservation, the management and the application of possible future restoration measures. The main aim of this work was to assess the effect of different land uses in the drainage basins of the Mediterranean wetlands on the bioproduction number (BPN, an indicator of the wetland trophic state. For this, we selected seven wetlands with different areal extension of agricultural land in their catchment area. The data obtained from BPN were compared with those obtained from the trophic state index (TSI. The results showed that there is a discrepancy between TSITP, TSIChla and BPN values in our wetlands, and that the application of the BPN for estimating trophic state in Mediterranean wetlands has clear limitations when the organic matter content in surface sediments is low. This occurs in wetlands with a great proportion of drainage area covered by intensive agricultural uses, which causes high soil losses by accelerated erosion. As a conclusion, not only high organic matter contents, as it has been stated in previous literature, but also low organic matter contents limit the validity of BPN.

  15. Model estimation of land-use effects on water levels of northern prairie wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voldseth, Richard A; Johnson, W Carter; Gilmanov, Tagir; Guntenspergen, Glenn R; Millett, Bruce V

    2007-03-01

    Wetlands of the Prairie Pothole Region exist in a matrix of grassland dominated by intensive pastoral and cultivation agriculture. Recent conservation management has emphasized the conversion of cultivated farmland and degraded pastures to intact grassland to improve upland nesting habitat. The consequences of changes in land-use cover that alter watershed processes have not been evaluated relative to their effect on the water budgets and vegetation dynamics of associated wetlands. We simulated the effect of upland agricultural practices on the water budget and vegetation of a semipermanent prairie wetland by modifying a previously published mathematical model (WETSIM). Watershed cover/land-use practices were categorized as unmanaged grassland (native grass, smooth brome), managed grassland (moderately heavily grazed, prescribed burned), cultivated crops (row crop, small grain), and alfalfa hayland. Model simulations showed that differing rates of evapotranspiration and runoff associated with different upland plant-cover categories in the surrounding catchment produced differences in wetland water budgets and linked ecological dynamics. Wetland water levels were highest and vegetation the most dynamic under the managed-grassland simulations, while water levels were the lowest and vegetation the least dynamic under the unmanaged-grassland simulations. The modeling results suggest that unmanaged grassland, often planted for waterfowl nesting, may produce the least favorable wetland conditions for birds, especially in drier regions of the Prairie Pothole Region. These results stand as hypotheses that urgently need to be verified with empirical data.

  16. Sediment accumulation in prairie wetlands under a changing climate: The relative roles of landscape and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagen, Susan; Burris, Lucy E.; Granfors, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment accumulation threatens the viability and hydrologic functioning of many naturally formed depressional wetlands across the interior regions of North America. These wetlands provide many ecosystem services and vital habitats for diverse plant and animal communities. Climate change may further impact sediment accumulation rates in the context of current land use patterns. We estimated sediment accretion in wetlands within a region renowned for its large populations of breeding waterfowl and migrant shorebirds and examined the relative roles of precipitation and land use context in the sedimentation process. We modeled rates of sediment accumulation from 1971 through 2100 using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a sediment delivery ratio and the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition model (USPED). These models predicted that by 2100, 21–33 % of wetlands filled completely with sediment and 27–46 % filled by half with sediments; estimates are consistent with measured sediment accumulation rates in the region reported by empirical studies. Sediment accumulation rates were strongly influenced by size of the catchment, greater coverage of tilled landscape within the catchment, and steeper slopes. Conservation efforts that incorporate the relative risk of infilling of wetlands with sediments, thus emphasizing areas of high topographic relief and large watersheds, may benefit wetland-dependent biota.

  17. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Middle Bay Lighthouse Station in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  18. Methane flux from wetlands areas

    OpenAIRE

    BAKER-BLOCKER, ANITA; Donahue, Thomas M.; MANCY, KHALIL H.

    2011-01-01

    Ebullient gases from Michigan wetlands have been collected and analyzed to deduce in situ methane fluxes. Methane flux has been found to be a function of mean air temperature. This relationship has been utilized to extrapolate observed methane fluxes to estimates of fluxes from the Pripet marshes, Sudd, Everglades, and Ugandan swamps. These four wetlands together provide a yearly source of 6.8 × 1013 g of methane to the atmosphere.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00731.x

  19. Integrated wetlands for food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ray Zhuangrui; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-07-01

    The widespread use of compound pelleted feeds and chemical fertilizers in modern food production contribute to a vast amount of residual nutrients into the production system and adjacent ecosystem are major factors causing eutrophication. Furthermore, the extensive development and application of chemical compounds (such as chemical pesticides, disinfectants and hormones used in enhancing productivity) in food production process are hazardous to the ecosystems, as well as human health. These unsustainable food production patterns cannot sustain human living in the long run. Wetlands are perceived as self-decontamination ecosystems with high productivities. This review gives an overview about wetlands which are being integrated with food production processes, focusing on aquaculture. PMID:27131797

  20. Composition and Dynamics of Migratory and Resident Avian Population in Wintering Wetlands from Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushalendra Kumar JHA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Twelve wetlands occurring in four different ecozones in Uttar Pradesh (UP, India, were selected for studying the winter composition and dynamics of avian populations. Wetland information was collected from office records of the UP Forest department. Bird populations were estimated by transect method and block-in-flock-in-sector method for woodland and aquatic birds, respectively. Across the twelve selected wetlands a total of 486,182 individuals belonging to 161 species of birds on 15,592 ha were recorded during the winter of 2010-11. The data were analyzed to assess the relationship between wetland characteristics and avian populations. Aquatic vegetation, surrounding vegetation, water availability and climate were found as important factors related to avian populations. January was found to be the peak of bird assemblage, while winter times before and after January were the waxing and waning period, respectively. Species richness and species diversity of aquatic birds varied between 18-58 and 1.90-3.20, respectively, and of all bird species between 23-109, and 1.73-3.81, respectively. The density of aquatic birds ranged between 17-384 ha-1. The most common migratory birds in wetlands were Northern Pintail, Common Teal and Greylag Goose. Common resident birds included Asian Openbill, Darter, Little Egret, Common Coot, Little Cormorant, Grey Heron, Purple Heron, Indian Pond Heron, Common Moorhen, Purple Swamphen, Cattle Egret, Indian Sarus Crane and White-throated Kingfisher. For improved conservation of aquatic avian fauna, management prescriptions are suggested for wetlands under current management which could also be extended to other wetlands, whereas conservation of avian fauna to be the emphasis.

  1. Rangeland Privatization and Its Impacts on the Zoige Wetlands on the Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhaoli; WU Ning

    2005-01-01

    The high Zoige Basin (Ruoergai Plateau) on the eastern Tibetan Plateau is a fault depression formed during intensive uplifting of the Tibetan Plateau. The wetland is globally important in biodiversity and is composed of marshes, bogs, fens, wet meadows and shallow water interspersed with low hills and sub-alpine meadows. Most of the Zoige wetlands have long been one of the most important grazing lands in China. Recent rangeland policy has allowed grazing, and usable wetland areas have been being legally allocated to individuals or groups of households on a long-term lease basis. Privatization of the wetland has impacted the Zoige wetlands in aspects of hydrologic condition, landscape and biodiversity. The uneven spatial distribution of water resources on private lands has led to the practice of extracting ground water, which has decreased the perched water table in Zoige. Fencing off the rangelands and grazing on expanding sand dunes have affected landscapes. Variation in the water table has led to the changes in vegetation diversity, resulting in the changes in wildlife and aquatic diversities and ecosystem processes. Making use all year round of the pasture that was previously grazed only in summer has shrunk the daily activity space of wildlife, and the newly erected fences blocked the movement of wild animals looking for food in the snow to lower and open areas. To maintain the favorable conditions of the Zoige wetland ecosystem, the author suggests that, in addition to biophysical research and implementation of conservation practices, there is an immediate need to initiate an integrated management program, increase public awareness of wetland functions and provide better training for the local conservation staff.

  2. Design and Implement a System of Wastewater Treatment Based on Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Dominínguez-Patiño

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The wetlands are considered as a natural passive cleaning of waste water. Is a process characterizes by its simplicity of operation, low or zero-energy consumption and low waste production. These consist of shallow ponds planted with plants. The processes of decontamination are performed simultaneously by its physical, chemical and biological properties. The objectives of this work are design and implement a system of artificial wetlands as an alternative method for treating waste water produced from the Faculty of Chemistry Science and Engineering that allow to reduce the costs of operation, knowing the degree of water pollution to determine how efficient the wetland and, finally improve the health and environmental conditions of the irrigation water. So the first step was to know the degree of water pollution and quantity to determine the wetland process variables. The second step was to determine the kind of plants that allow reducing the water contaminants. The Manning formula was applied to evaluate the free flow and Darcy’s equation for the surface flow by wetlands. A micro-scale prototype was design and built based on buckets. The absorption capacity of several plants (Bacopa monnieri, Nephrolepis exaltata,Tradescantia zebrine was determined. Also we use a natural filter consisting of Tezontle (first layer, sand (second layer, gravel (third layer, sand (fourth layer, Tezontle (fifth layer, gravel (sixth layer, sand (seventh layer and, organic substrate (eighth layer. A wetland decreases more than 60% the cost compared to a water purification plant as everything is based biodegradable materials and not using any energy or sophisticated equipment to water filtration. Wetlands not only help to purify the water, but also help the conservation of flora and fauna that is dependent on wet conditions, as only biodegradable materials are used there is no pollution to the ground, helping the conservation of the environment. Today we are

  3. Incentives to adopt irrigation water saving measures for wetlands preservation: An integrated basin scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikouei, Alireza; Zibaei, Mansour; Ward, Frank A.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryPreserving natural wetlands is a growing challenge as the world faces increased demand for water. Drought, climate change and growing demands by users aggravate the issue. The conflict between irrigated agriculture and wetland services presents a classic case of competition. This paper examines an institutional mechanism that offers an incentive to farmers to adopt water conservation measures, which in turn could reduce overall water use in irrigated agriculture within a selected basin. Reduced water demands could provide the additional water needed for wetland preservation. We present an analytical empirical model implemented through the development of an integrated basin framework, in which least-cost measures for securing environmental flows to sustain wetlands are examined for the Zayandeh-Rud River Basin of central Iran. To test this idea, two policies - one with and one without an incentive - are analyzed: (a) reduced agricultural diversions without a water conservation subsidy, and (b) reduced agricultural diversions with a water conservation subsidy. The policies are evaluated against a background of two alternative water supply scenarios over a 10-year period. Results reveal that a water conservation subsidy can provide incentives for farmers to shift out of flood irrigation and bring more land into production by adopting water-saving irrigation technologies. The policy increases crop yields, raises profitability of farming, and increases the shadow price of water. Although the conservation subsidy policy incurs a financial cost to the taxpayer, it could be politically and economically attractive for both irrigators and environmental stakeholders. Results open the door for further examination of policy measures to preserve wetlands.

  4. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston C Chandler

    Full Text Available The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi, a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014 of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis. Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  5. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Houston C; Rypel, Andrew L; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A; Gorman, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  6. Vegetation Impact and Recovery from Oil-Induced Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Wetland Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Shapiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available April 20, 2010 marked the start of the British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the largest marine oil spill in US history, which contaminated coastal wetland ecosystems across the northern Gulf of Mexico. We used hyperspectral data from 2010 and 2011 to compare the impact of oil contamination and recovery of coastal wetland vegetation across three ecologically diverse sites: Barataria Bay (saltmarsh, East Bird’s Foot (intermediate/freshwater marsh, and Chandeleur Islands (mangrove-cordgrass barrier islands. Oil impact was measured by comparing wetland pixels along oiled and oil-free shorelines using various spectral indices. We show that the Chandeleur Islands were the most vulnerable to oiling, Barataria Bay had a small but widespread and significant impact, and East Bird’s Foot had negligible impact. A year later, the Chandeleur Islands showed the strongest signs of recovery, Barataria Bay had a moderate recovery, and East Bird’s Foot had only a slight increase in vegetation. Our results indicate that the recovery was at least partially related to the magnitude of the impact such that greater recovery occurred at sites that had greater impact.

  7. Sources of mercury to San Francisco Bay surface sediment as revealed by mercury stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Gretchen E.; Blum, Joel D.; Marvin-DePasquale, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations and isotopic compositions were examined in shallow-water surface sediment (0–2 cm) from San Francisco (SF) Bay to determine the extent to which historic Hg mining contributes to current Hg contamination in SF Bay, and to assess the use of Hg isotopes to trace sources of contamination in estuaries. Inter-tidal and wetland sediment had total Hg (HgT) concentrations ranging from 161 to 1529 ng/g with no simple gradients of spatial variation. In contrast, inter-tidal and wetland sediment displayed a geographic gradient of δ202Hg values, ranging from -0.30% in the southern-most part of SF Bay (draining the New Almaden Hg District) to -0.99% in the northern-most part of SF Bay near the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta. Similar to SF Bay inter-tidal sediment, surface sediment from the Alviso Slough channel draining into South SF Bay had a δ202Hg value of -0.29%, while surface sediment from the Cosumnes River and Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta draining into north SF Bay had lower average δ202Hg values of -0.90% and -0.75%, respectively. This isotopic trend suggests that Hg-contaminated sediment from the New Almaden Hg District mixes with Hg-contaminated sediment from a low δ202Hg source north of SF Bay. Tailings and thermally decomposed ore (calcine) from the New Idria Hg mine in the California Coast Range had average δ202Hg values of -0.37 and +0.03%, respectively, showing that Hg calcination fractionates Hg isotopes resulting in Hg contamination from Hg(II) mine waste products with higher δ202Hg values than metallic Hg(0) produced from Hg mines. Thus, there is evidence for at least two distinct isotopic signals for Hg contamination in SF Bay: Hg associated with calcine waste materials at Hg mines in the Coast Range, such as New Almaden and New Idria; and Hg(0) produced from these mines and used in placer gold mines and/or in other industrial processes in the Sierra Nevada region and SF Bay area.

  8. Functional Differences between Natural and Restored Wetlands in the Glaciated Interior Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, John M; Fennessy, M Siobhan; Craft, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    We measured soil properties, carbon and nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus) pools, ambient and potential denitrification, and phosphorus sorption index (PSI) in natural depressional wetlands and depressional wetlands restored through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wetland Reserve Program. We measured the same suite of variables in natural and USDA Conservation Reserve Program-restored riparian buffers and in agricultural fields adjacent to both systems to determine the degree to which ecosystem services are being provided through restoration in different hydrogeomorphic settings. Organic carbon and nutrient pools, PSI, and denitrification were greater in natural than in 5- to 10-yr-old restored depressional wetlands. In riparian soils, carbon and nutrient pools, PSI, and denitrification were comparable between restored and natural systems, suggesting that these services develop quickly after restoration. Restored depressional wetlands had lower soil organic C, N, and P relative to agricultural soils, whereas the opposite trend was observed in restored riparian soils. Four-year-old restored riparian buffers achieved equivalence to natural riparian buffers within 4 yr, whereas restored depressional wetlands took longer to provide these ecosystem services (i.e., PSI, denitrification, C storage) at levels comparable to natural wetlands. Restored depressional wetlands and riparian buffers provide ecosystem services lost through previous conversion to agriculture throughout the Midwest; however, the development of these services depends on hydrodynamics (pulsed versus nonpulsed), parent material, soil texture (sand, clay), and disturbance regime (prescribed fire) of the site. As restoration continues throughout the region, C sequestration and nutrient removal in these systems is expected to increase water quality at the local and regional levels. PMID:25602575

  9. Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1990-11-01

    A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Biogeochemical Controls on Mercury Methylation: A compilation of Data Across Fresh and Saltwater Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, C.; Heyes, A.; Mitchell, C.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Orem, W.; Aiken, G.; Mason, R.

    2007-12-01

    Over the past decade, we have examined the biogeochemical controls on net methylmercury production across a number of wetland ecosystems, including salt marshes in Chesapeake Bay, the freshwater and estuarine Everglades, and a variety of boreal freshwater wetlands in Ontario. The balance between sulfate and sulfide is key for understanding Hg methylation rates among these ecosystems. Sulfate stimulates Hg-methylating sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB) while sulfide creates charged mercury-sulfide complexes that are unavailable for uptake by SRB. Sulfate-stimulation of methylation has been demonstrated in experimental studies that range from pure culture, to sediment and soil amendments, to large-scale field additions. Stimulation of methylation by sulfate has also been demonstrated in freshwater ecosystems impacted by sulfur pollution derived from atmospheric deposition, agriculture and mining. This presentation will present a compilation of field and laboratory studies on the impact of sulfate and sulfide on MeHg production to create a simple, general model for the control of net Hg methylation in surfaces sediments and wetland soils that includes microbial activity (sulfate reduction rate), dissolved sulfide, dissolved organic matter and and soil organic matter. In particular, the model focuses on the balance between sulfate and sulfide, and the optimal concentrations of each for methylation across studies and ecosystems. Data to be presented will include new information from high sulfate and sulfide coastal ecosystems in Chesapeake Bay. Optimal sulfate concentrations for methylation appear to range widely among ecosystems, while the optimal sulfide concentrations are more constant, and often quite low, often in the low micromolar range. However, recent data from estuarine and marine systems suggest that net methylation can proceed at somewhat higher sulfide concentrations when microbial activity is particularly high. By compiling these data, we can begin to

  11. Restoring coastal wetlands that were ditched for mosquito control: a preliminary assessment of hydro-leveling as a restoration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas J.; Tiling, Ginger; Leasure, Pamela S.

    2007-01-01

    The wetlands surrounding Tampa Bay, Florida were extensively ditched for mosquito control in the 1950s. Spoil from ditch construction was placed adjacent to the wetlands ditches creating mound-like features (spoil-mounds). These mounds represent a loss of 14% of the wetland area in Tampa Bay. Spoil mounds interfere with tidal flow and are locations for non-native plants to colonize (e.g., Schinus terebinthifolius). Removal of the spoil mounds to eliminate exotic plants, restore native vegetation, and re-establish natural hydrology is a restoration priority for environmental managers. Hydro-leveling, a new technique, was tested in a mangrove forest restoration project in 2004. Hydro-leveling uses a high pressure stream of water to wash sediment from the spoil mound into the adjacent wetland and ditch. To assess the effectiveness of this technique, we conducted vegetation surveys in areas that were hydro-leveled and in non-hydro-leveled areas 3 years post-project. Adult Schinus were reduced but not eliminated from hydro-leveled mounds. Schinus seedlings however were absent from hydro-leveled sites. Colonization by native species was sparse. Mangrove seedlings were essentially absent (≈2 m−2) from the centers of hydro-leveled mounds and were in low density on their edges (17 m−2) in comparison to surrounding mangrove forests (105 m−2). Hydro-leveling resulted in mortality of mangroves adjacent to the mounds being leveled. This was probably caused by burial of pneumatophores during the hydro-leveling process. For hydro-leveling to be a useful and successful restoration technique several requirements must be met. Spoil mounds must be lowered to the level of the surrounding wetlands. Spoil must be distributed further into the adjacent wetland to prevent burial of nearby native vegetation. Finally, native species may need to be planted on hydro-leveled areas to speed up the re-vegetation process.

  12. Strategies of Protection and Utilization of Wetland Resources in Jiaxing City%嘉兴市湿了资源保护和利用对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾掌根; 王国峰

    2013-01-01

    嘉兴市位于太湖流域水网平原、长江三角洲南缘、杭州湾和钱塘江北岸,域内具有丰富的湿地资源,但由于不合理的开发利用导致自然湿地数量持续减少、湿地生态功能退化乃至丧失。通过对嘉兴市湿地类型和特点进行分析,将嘉兴市湿地划分为滨海(江)湿地(滩涂)、河流湿地、湖泊湿地和人工湿地4种类型。探讨了目前嘉兴市湿地环境存在的主要问题,并针对主要制约因素对湿地的保护和合理利用提出了对策与建议。%Jiaxing is located in the plain of Taihu Basin, the southern margin of the Yangtze River delta, and the north shore of Hangzhou bay and the Qiantang River. There were rich wetland resources in the region. However, irrational development and utilization had resulted in continual reduction in the number of natural wetlands, degradation of ecological functions and even loss of wetlands. An analysis was conducted to divide the wetlands in Jiaxin City into 4 types, coastal (riverside) wetland (mud flat), river wetland, lake wetland, and constructed wetland. Main problems currently existing in wetland environment in Jiaixng City were identified, and strategies were proposed for wetland protection and rational utilization considering the main constraints.

  13. Irrigation of wetlands in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Masija, E.H.

    1993-01-01

    Over 1,164,000 ha of wetland areas are listed as suitable for irrigation, mainly for cropproduction and livestock grazing. Existing and planned irrigation schemes are described forthe ,main river basins where large areas are devoted to rice and sugar cane. Emphasis' isplaced on the value of small scale, farmer-managed irrigation schemes and the rehabilitation of traditional systems.

  14. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  15. Evaluating the potential effects of hurricanes on long-term sediment accumulation in two micro-tidal sub-estuaries: Barnegat Bay and Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.; Ellis, Alisha M.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.

    2016-06-23

    Barnegat Bay, located along the eastern shore of New Jersey, was significantly impacted by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a multidisciplinary study of sediment transport and hydrodynamics to understand the mechanisms that govern estuarine and wetland responses to storm forcing. This report details the physical and chemical characteristics of surficial and downcore sediments from two areas within the bay. Eleven sites were sampled in both the central portion of the bay near Barnegat Inlet and in the southern portion of the bay in Little Egg Harbor. Laboratory analyses include Be-7, Pb-210, bulk density, porosity, x-radiographs, and grain-size distribution. These data will serve as a critical baseline dataset for understanding the current sedimentological regime and can be applied to future storms for understanding estuarine and wetland evolution.

  16. Evaluating the potential effects of hurricanes on long-term sediment accumulation in two micro-tidal sub-estuaries: Barnegat Bay and Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.; Ellis, Alisha M.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Barnegat Bay, located along the eastern shore of New Jersey, was significantly impacted by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a multidisciplinary study of sediment transport and hydrodynamics to understand the mechanisms that govern estuarine and wetland responses to storm forcing. This report details the physical and chemical characteristics of surficial and downcore sediments from two areas within the bay. Eleven sites were sampled in both the central portion of the bay near Barnegat Inlet and in the southern portion of the bay in Little Egg Harbor. Laboratory analyses include Be-7, Pb-210, bulk density, porosity, x-radiographs, and grain-size distribution. These data will serve as a critical baseline dataset for understanding the current sedimentological regime and can be applied to future storms for understanding estuarine and wetland evolution.

  17. Endangered Indian wetlands - Concept For Sustainable Development And Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K.Yadav

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands cover approximately 6% of the world's earth surface and provide critical ecosystem, goods and services including food, fodder, water, medicines, hydrological cycle, shelter, culture, aesthetics, and recreation. Major threat to these ecosystem are agriculture, urbanization, industrialization, over exploitation, pollution, excessive mining, fragmentation, habitat destruction and climatic changes. These above factors have been destroying these ecosystems very rapidly putting them in danger of extinction of a great number of plants and animal species. Therefore, it is necessary to formulate a correct conservation strategy and sound management plan for wetland restoration.

  18. Bayes and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Norman; Neil, Martin; Berger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although the last forty years has seen considerable growth in the use of statistics in legal proceedings, it is primarily classical statistical methods rather than Bayesian methods that have been used. Yet the Bayesian approach avoids many of the problems of classical statistics and is also well suited to a broader range of problems. This paper reviews the potential and actual use of Bayes in the law and explains the main reasons for its lack of impact on legal practice. These include misconceptions by the legal community about Bayes’ theorem, over-reliance on the use of the likelihood ratio and the lack of adoption of modern computational methods. We argue that Bayesian Networks (BNs), which automatically produce the necessary Bayesian calculations, provide an opportunity to address most concerns about using Bayes in the law. PMID:27398389

  19. Discussion on Wetland Park Design%浅谈湿地公园设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国锋

    2012-01-01

    湿地公园是一个新兴的湿地保护概念,融湿地保护与湿地利用于一体,为更好地利用湿地资源,就湿地公园建设的选址、建设范围以及部分规划的要求和规划方法进行介绍。认为湿地公园选址应在城市内部或城市周边;湿地公园布局应能有效调节控制点、线、面等结构要素的配置关系;湿地公园的功能分区应包括湿地保育区、恢复重建区、宣教展示区、休闲区和管理服务区等;湿地公园专项规划要包括保护与恢复规划、宣传教育规划、生态旅游规划、湿地景观规划、基础设施规划、土地利用协调规划和社会经济调控规划。%Wetland park is a new wetland protection concept,melting wetland protection and wetland use in one body.For the purpose of making good use of wetland resource,the location of wetland park construction,construction scope and partial planning demand and method were introduced.It indicated that the location should be within cities or surrounding the cities;Layout of wetland park should regulate control point,line,area structure elements of the relation;The wetland park functional partition should include wetland conservation areas,recovery area,mission exhibit,recreational area and management service area,etc.Wetland park planning should include a special protection and recovery planning,propaganda education planning,ecotourism planning,wetland landscape planning,infrastructure planning,coordination of land use planning and the social and economic regulation plan.

  20. Acid deposition and its implications for nature conservation in Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, G.L.A.; Cooke, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general consideration of acid deposition is given, in terms of the origins and fate of acid deposition and its effects on terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Acid deposition in wetland sites in Britain is discussed, and conclusions are drawn for nature conservation in Britain. (177 refs.)

  1. Austere conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluwstein, Jevgeniy; Moyo, Francis; Kicheleri, Rose Peter

    2016-01-01

    . Our findings suggest that WMAs foster very limited ownership, participation and collective action at the community level, because WMA governance follows an austere logic of centralized control over key resources. Thus, we suggest that it is difficult to argue that WMAs are community-owned conservation...... initiatives until a genuinely devolved and more flexible conservation model is implemented to give space for popular participation in rule-making....

  2. Persistent organic pollutants in wetlands of the Mekong Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triet, Tran; Barzen, Jeb Anthony; Choowaew, Sansanee; Engels, Jon Michael; Ni, Duong Van; Mai, Nguyen Anh; Inkhavilay, Khamla; Soben, Kim; Sethik, Rath; Gomotean, Bhuvadol; Thuyen, Le Xuan; Kyi, Aung; Du, Nguyen Huy; Nordheim, Richard; Lam, Ho Si Tung; Moore, Dorn M.; Wilson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the presence and concentration of persistent organic pollutants (POP) were assessed in surface sediments collected from a wide variety of wetlands located throughout the Mekong Basin in Myanmar, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Of the 39 POPs tested in 531 sediment samples, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites endosulfan, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and endrin were most commonly detected. Even though DDT was banned in the 1990s, some use of DDT may still be occurring in the Mekong Basin. The amount of metabolites for DDT—dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD)—found, however, suggests that use of DDT is on the decline throughout the region. HCB and endrin were found distributed broadly throughout the Mekong Basin but not in high amounts. The concentration and distribution of endosulfan and its metabolites represent a serious problem requiring further study and management action. While the total loading of POPs in wetland sediments of the Mekong Basin was generally low, hotspot sites occurred where concentrations exceeded established ecological risk thresholds. For example, wetlands of the open, dry dipterocarp forest of northern Cambodia and Vietnam as well as wetlands in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam contained high concentrations of some POPs. High concentrations of POPs were detected in some wetlands important for biodiversity conservation. Hotspots identified in wetlands such as the Tonle Sap not only had concentrations of DDT and DDE that exceeded Canadian and U.S. benchmarks, but fauna sampled in the area also showed high degrees of bioaccumulation of the same substances. Further and more extensive attention to monitoring POP presence in water birds, fish, and other aquatic organisms is warranted because of the bioaccumulation of these chemicals at higher levels in the food chain. This study represents a collaboration of eight universities from

  3. Wastewater Treatment Using Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarafraz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The last few decades witnessed sharp focus on environment pollution and its impact on life in nature. Wetlands can be used for biological treatment of wastewater. Problem statement: Scarcity of water is considered as a global problem and Iran is one the countries which is facing water shortage problem. Pollution of water bodies restrict the availability of water for various uses. Treatment of waste water before disposal contributes to water conservation efforts. Constructed wetlands are techniques aim to polish water quality and reduce the harmful effect of effluent. Approach: In this study, four horizontal subsurface flow wetlands (HSSF were constructed at the Research Station of Tehran University, located in Karaj, Iran. The study was carried out from April to September, 2007. Gravel and zeoilte were used in this study as substrate. Gravel-beds with and without plants (called GP and G and gravel-beds mixed with (10% zeolite, with and without plants (called ZP and Z were examined to investigate the feasibility of treating synthetic wastewater which was specifically produced and modified to imitate agricultural wastewater. Results: The results of this study indicated that the system had acceptable pollutant removal efficiency and that both plants were found to be tolerant under the tested conditions. The wetland system could achieve the NO3-N removal of (79% in ZP, (86% in Z, (82% in GP and finally (87.94% in G. As for the P removal, the efficiencies of 93, 89, 81 and 76% were respectively achieved for ZP, GP, Z and G. The outflow concentrations of Pb and Cd were found to be under the detection limit; however, as for Zn, the removal efficiencies of 99.9, 99.76, 99.71 and 99.52% were concluded for ZP, Z, GP and G respectively. Conclusions/Recommendations: It can be concluded that constructed wetlands are efficient in removing Zn, Pb and Cd from agricultural wastewater. Plants types such as Phragmites Australis and Juncus Inflexus can contribute

  4. Wetland modeling and information needs at Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, David B.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1993-01-01

    The marshes in and around Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (the Refuge) are extremely dynamic; expanding and contracting in size both seasonally, due to runoff and subsequent evapotranspiration, and over longer periods, due to climatic variation. The dynamic nature of these marshes results in a diversity of wetland habitats, which support a variety of migratory birds. To maintain this wetland diversity and control the loss of migratory bird habitat in the Lahontan Valley, the Refuge was established and currently manages a complex of marsh units. However, changes in the hydrology, and changes that will occur as a result of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone and Truckee-Carson-Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 101-618, 104 Stat. 3389), greatly affect the Refuge's wetland management capability. In light of these changes, and the legal requirements associated with environmental impact assessments, the Refuge convened a workshop to discuss several aspects of wetland management in the Lahontan Valley. The workshop, described in this report, had three primary objectives: 1. discuss the types and relative proportions of primary wetland habitats that should be provided as described in the settlement act; 2. discuss wetland management models that might be developed to help manage these marshes under hydrologic regimes likely in the future; and 3. discuss future information and monitoring needs, including proposals for valley-wide biodiversity surveys, which would be helpful when considering withdrawn Bureau of Reclamation (BR) lands for possible incorporation into the Refuge. Several presentations at the beginning of the workshop provided a common basis for discussing these objectives. Refuge staff provided background on the history and past management. The Nature Conservatory discussed their role in the settlement act, proposals for valley-wide biodiversity surveys, and results of a literature review for Stillwater Marsh and the Lahontan Valley (Nachlinger

  5. Water Conservation and Water Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water storage can be a viable part of the solution to water conservation. This means that we should include reservoirs. Regardless, one should evaluate all aspects of water conservation principles. Recent drought in California indicates that there is an urgent need to re-visit the techniques used to maintain the water supply-chain mechanism in the entire state. We all recognize the fact that fish and wildlife depend on the streams, rivers and wetlands for survival. It is a well-known fact that there is an immediate need to provide solid protection to all these resources. Laws and regulations should help meet the needs of natural systems. Farmers may be forced to drilling wells deeper than ever. But, they will be eventually depleting groundwater reserves. Needless to say that birds, fish and wildlife cannot access these groundwater table. California is talking a lot about conservation. Unfortunately, the conservation efforts have not established a strong visible hold. The Environmental Protection Agency has a plan called E2PLAN (Narayanan, 2012). It is EPA's plan for achieving energy and environmental performance, leadership, accountability, and carbon neutrality. In June 2011, the EPA published a comprehensive, multi-year planning document called Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. The author has previously reported these in detail at the 2012 AGU fall meeting. References: Ziegler, Jay (15 JUNE 2014). The Conversation: Water conservation efforts aren't taking hold, but there are encouraging signs. THE SACRAMENTO BEE. California. Narayanan, Mysore. (2012). The Importance of Water Conservation in the 21st Century. 72nd AGU International Conference. Eos Transactions: American Geophysical Union, Vol. 92, No. 56, Fall Meeting Supplement, 2012. H31I - 1255.http://www.sacbee.com/2014/06/15/6479862/jay-ziegler-water-conservation.html#storylink=cpy

  6. USGS research on Florida's isolated freshwater wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Arturo E.; Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Metz, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied wetland hydrology and its effects on wetland health and ecology in Florida since the 1990s. USGS wetland studies in Florida and other parts of the Nation provide resource managers with tools to assess current conditions and regional trends in wetland resources. Wetland hydrologists in the USGS Florida Water Science Center (FLWSC) have completed a number of interdisciplinary studies assessing the hydrology, ecology, and water quality of wetlands. These studies have expanded the understanding of wetland hydrology, ecology, and related processes including: (1) the effects of cyclical changes in rainfall and the influence of evapotranspiration; (2) surface-water flow, infiltration, groundwater movement, and groundwater and surfacewater interactions; (3) the effects of water quality and soil type; (4) the unique biogeochemical components of wetlands required to maintain ecosystem functions; (5) the effects of land use and other human activities; (6) the influences of algae, plants, and invertebrates on environmental processes; and (7) the effects of seasonal variations in animal communities that inhabit or visit Florida wetlands and how wetland function responds to changes in the plant community.

  7. Valuing the Recreational Benefits of Wetland Adaptation to Climate Change: A Trade-off Between Species' Abundance and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, Michela; Riera Font, Antoni; Torres Figuerola, Catalina M.

    2015-03-01

    Climate change will further exacerbate wetland deterioration, especially in the Mediterranean region. On the one side, it will accelerate the decline in the populations and species of plants and animals, this resulting in an impoverishment of biological abundance. On the other one, it will also promote biotic homogenization, resulting in a loss of species' diversity. In this context, different climate change adaptation policies can be designed: those oriented to recovering species' abundance and those aimed at restoring species' diversity. Based on the awareness that knowledge about visitors' preferences is crucial to better inform policy makers and secure wetlands' public use and conservation, this paper assesses the recreational benefits of different adaptation options through a choice experiment study carried out in S'Albufera wetland (Mallorca). Results show that visitors display positive preferences for an increase in both species' abundance and diversity, although they assign a higher value to the latter, thus suggesting a higher social acceptability of policies pursuing wetlands' differentiation. This finding acquires special relevance not only for adaptation management in wetlands but also for tourism planning, as most visitors to S'Albufera are tourists. Thus, given the growing competition to attract visitors and the increasing demand for high environmental quality and unique experiences, promoting wetlands' differentiation could be a good strategy to gain competitive advantage over other wetland areas and tourism destinations.

  8. Complex influences of low-head dams and artificial wetlands on fishes in a Colorado River tributary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R.J.; Rahel, F.J.; Hubert, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Low-head dams in arid regions restrict fish movement and create novel habitats that have complex effects on fish assemblages. The influence of low-head dams and artificial wetlands on fishes in Muddy Creek, a tributary of the Colorado River system in the USA was examined. Upstream, fish assemblages were dominated by native species including two species of conservation concern, bluehead sucker, Catostomus discobolus Cope, and roundtail chub, Gila robusta Baird and Girard. The artificial wetlands contained almost exclusively non-native fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas Rafinesque, and white sucker, Catostomus commersonii (Lacep??de). Downstream, fish assemblages were dominated by non-native species. Upstream spawning migrations by non-native white suckers were blocked by dams associated with the wetlands. However, the wetlands do not provide habitat for native fishes and likely inhibit fish movement. The wetlands appear to be a source habitat for non-native fishes and a sink habitat for native fishes. Two non-native species, sand shiner, Notropis stramineus (Cope), and redside shiner, Richardsonius balteatus (Richardson), were present only downstream of the wetlands, suggesting a beneficial role of the wetlands in preventing upstream colonisation by non-native fishes. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. 75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and... program funds for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative. SUMMARY: The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC... Watershed Initiative for agricultural producers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the States of...

  10. Mapping an invasive plant, Phragmites australis, in coastal wetlands using the EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengra, B.W.; Johnston, C.A.; Loveland, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    Mapping tools are needed to document the location and extent of Phragmites australis, a tall grass that invades coastal marshes throughout North America, displacing native plant species and degrading wetland habitat. Mapping Phragmites is particularly challenging in the freshwater Great Lakes coastal wetlands due to dynamic lake levels and vegetation diversity. We tested the applicability of Hyperion hyperspectral satellite imagery for mapping Phragmites in wetlands of the west coast of Green Bay in Wisconsin, U.S.A. A reference spectrum created using Hyperion data from several pure Phragmites stands within the image was used with a Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM) algorithm to create a raster map with values ranging from 0 to 1, where 0 represented the greatest similarity between the reference spectrum and the image spectrum and 1 the least similarity. The final two-class thematic classification predicted monodominant Phragmites covering 3.4% of the study area. Most of this was concentrated in long linear features parallel to the Green Bay shoreline, particularly in areas that had been under water only six years earlier when lake levels were 66??cm higher. An error matrix using spring 2005 field validation points (n = 129) showed good overall accuracy-81.4%. The small size and linear arrangement of Phragmites stands was less than optimal relative to the sensor resolution, and Hyperion's 30??m resolution captured few if any pure pixels. Contemporary Phragmites maps prepared with Hyperion imagery would provide wetland managers with a tool that they currently lack, which could aid attempts to stem the spread of this invasive species. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  12. Plant diversity and biomass of Marudu bay mangroves in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mangroves of Marudu Bay in the state of Sabah is situated at the tip of Borneo Island, and at the southern limit of the Coral Triangle whose waters hold the highest diversity of corals, fish, molluscks, crustaceans and marine plant species in the world. The ecosystem shows a deterioration due to unsustainable fishing, pollution and encroachment, and these are impacting the Marudu Bay coastal communities economically. Fishing is the major economic activity here. Realising the importance of conserving the mangroves to uplift the socio-economic livelihood of the coastal community, a resource inventory of the mangroves and its productivity study were carried out. A total of 16 plant species in 12 genera and 9 families were identified. It was also found that 0.7 ha is capable of capturing all the species in the mangrove forest. The mangrove forests of Marudu Bay are dominated by Rhizopora apiculata and R. mucronata. The highest Importance Value index (IVI) was given by Rhizophora mucronata. Total Above Ground Biomass (TAGB) for 1-ha of mangrove forest in Marudu Bay was estimated to be 98.4 t/ha. It was found in other parallel studies that the mangroves of Marudu Bay are productive ecosystems that provide valuable habitats, nurseries and spawning grounds for various commercially important species of fish and invertebrates such as shrimp besides many species of wildlife. The mangroves at Marudu Bay are not only aesthetically attractive but provide opportunities for ecotourism activities that can be undertaken by the local community inhabiting the area to uplift their meagre income, These activities include mangrove cruising, recreational fishing, educational tourism and mangrove honey production, amongst others. This way, the degradation of the mangrove in Marudu Bay can be halted and reversed. (author)

  13. Research objectives to support the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration initiative-Water Conservation Areas, Lake Okeechobee, and the East/West waterways

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchens, Wiley M.

    1994-01-01

    The South Florida Ecosystem encompasses an area of approximately 28,000 km2 comprising at least 11 major physiographic provinces, including the Kissimmee River Valley, Lake Okeechobee, the Immokalee Rise, the Big Cypress, the Everglades, Florida Bay, the Atlantic Coastal Ridge, Biscayne Bay, the Florida Keys, the Florida Reef Tract, and nearshore coastal waters. South Florida is a heterogeneous system of wetlands, uplands, coastal areas, and marine areas, dominated by the watershe...

  14. A temporal and ecological analysis of the Huntington Beach Wetlands through an unmanned aerial system remote sensing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Talha

    Wetland monitoring and preservation efforts have the potential to be enhanced with advanced remote sensing acquisition and digital image analysis approaches. Progress in the development and utilization of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) as remote sensing platforms has offered significant spatial and temporal advantages over traditional aerial and orbital remote sensing platforms. Photogrammetric approaches to generate high spatial resolution orthophotos of UAV acquired imagery along with the UAV's low-cost and temporally flexible characteristics are explored. A comparative analysis of different spectral based land cover maps derived from imagery captured using UAV, satellite, and airplane platforms provide an assessment of the Huntington Beach Wetlands. This research presents a UAS remote sensing methodology encompassing data collection, image processing, and analysis in constructing spectral based land cover maps to augment the efforts of the Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy by assessing ecological and temporal changes at the Huntington Beach Wetlands.

  15. Inventory of wetland birds occupying WPAs in the Devils Lake Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary focus of this survey was the non-game bird species found in wetlands; game bird species found to be using the wetlands were also recorded. Both...

  16. Some Suggestions for the Construction of Kuihu Lake Provincial Wetland Park%奎湖省级湿地公园建设的几点建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘方伏

    2015-01-01

    本文根据奎湖湿地的实际情况,提出了奎湖湿地公园建设中存在的一些问题,并针对存在的问题,提出了一些建议和措施,为奎湖省级湿地公园建设提供参考。%In May, 2014, Anhui Provincial Wetland Conservation Center gave approval to planned construction of Kuihu Lake Provincial Wetland Park (pilot project), applied for by Forestry Bureau of Nanling County. At present, the construction of Kuihu Lake Provincial Wetland Park has started. According to the actualities of Kuihu Lake wetland, this paper pointed out some existing problems in its construction and put foward some specific suggestions and measures to provide reference for the construction of Kuihu Lake Provincial Wetland Park.

  17. Testing a participatory integrated assessment (PIA approach to select climate change adaptation actions to enhance wetland sustainability: The case of Poyang Lake region in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    2015-06-01

    It should be noted that while the case study evaluated adaptation policies or options to climate change, it was not completed in terms of discussing in detail all the key components of the PIA approach. However, the case study represents the state-of-the-arts research in climate change impact assessment and adaptation option evaluation, particularly in linking with wetland ecosystem sustainability. Findings of the case study have indicated that the potential effects of climate change on wetland sustainability are quite significant. The case has also identified adaptation measures considered by stakeholders to be potentially effective for reducing vulnerability of wetland ecosystems. It is clear that wetland ecosystem sustainability goals will be unachievable without mainstreaming adaptation measures into wetland conservation and health programs under a changing climate.

  18. EnviroAtlas - Potential Wetland Areas - Contiguous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Potential Wetland Areas (PWA) dataset shows potential wetland areas at 30-meter resolution. Beginning two centuries ago, many wetlands were turned...

  19. Thatcher Bay, Washington, Nearshore Restoration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, Joel; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Grossman, Eric E.; Elliott, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The San Juan Archipelago, located at the confluence of the Puget Sound, the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington State, and the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, provides essential nearshore habitat for diverse salmonid, forage fish, and bird populations. With 408 miles of coastline, the San Juan Islands provide a significant portion of the available nearshore habitat for the greater Puget Sound and are an essential part of the regional efforts to restore Puget Sound (Puget Sound Shared Strategy 2005). The nearshore areas of the San Juan Islands provide a critical link between the terrestrial and marine environments. For this reason the focus on restoration and conservation of nearshore habitat in the San Juan Islands is of paramount importance. Wood-waste was a common by-product of historical lumber-milling operations. To date, relatively little attention has been given to the impact of historical lumber-milling operations in the San Juan Archipelago. Thatcher Bay, on Blakely Island, located near the east edge of the archipelago, is presented here as a case study on the restoration potential for a wood-waste contaminated nearshore area. Case study components include (1) a brief discussion of the history of milling operations. (2) an estimate of the location and amount of the current distribution of wood-waste at the site, (3) a preliminary examination of the impacts of wood-waste on benthic flora and fauna at the site, and (4) the presentation of several restoration alternatives for the site. The history of milling activity in Thatcher Bay began in 1879 with the construction of a mill in the southeastern part of the bay. Milling activity continued for more than 60 years, until the mill closed in 1942. Currently, the primary evidence of the historical milling operations is the presence of approximately 5,000 yd3 of wood-waste contaminated sediments. The distribution and thickness of residual wood-waste at the site was determined by using sediment

  20. Forested wetlands constructed for mitigation of destroyed natural wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M.C.; Pugh, S.B.; Deller, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Forested wetlands constructed for mitigation were evaluated at six sites in Maryland to determine the success of these areas for providing suitable wildlife habitat. Natural forested wetlands were used as reference sites. Initial mortality of planted woody shrubs and trees was high (avg. 55%) and mostly attributed to excessive moisture. The number of woody seedlings from natural regeneration was inversely proportional to the amount of grass cover on the site, which was planted for erosion control. The number of volunteer woody seedlings was also inversely proportional to the distance from adjacent natural forests. Preliminary data indicate that cost does not support use of transplants and that enhancement of soil with organic supplements, followed by widespread and heavy seeding of woody plants would be more efficient and effective. Wildlife use of areas measured by avian surveys and trapping of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians showed that in general wildlife species were more representative of open grassland areas than forested habitats. Natural succession of the sites probably will take at least 20-30 years before typical values and functions of forested wetlands are obtained.

  1. Landform design for a fen wetland on a tailings sand deposit in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, G.T.; Papini, A.G.; Scordo, E.B. [BGC Engineering Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wytrykush, C. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed one of the first fens to be established in a post-mining area of the Athabasca oil sands region. The entire watershed is specifically designed to support a wetland, and it will be constructed on a soft tailings deposit. A fen is a peat-accumulating wetland with a water table that is at, or close to, the surface consisting of mineral-saturated water coming from either groundwater or surface water. In order to monitor and adjust the fen design for field conditions, a full hydrological site investigation was launched together with parallel research programs involving the creation of a conservative landform design with controls over surface water and groundwater seepage inputs. Controlling the salinity of fen waters from tailings consolidation and seepage over time is a critical component to fen design. There are a limited number of documented examples of large-scale constructed fen wetlands.

  2. Developing new-generation machinery for vegetation management on protected wetlands in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Dubowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many protected wetlands and (especially fen peatlands in Poland require vegetation management to restore and maintain them as breeding areas for endangered bird species. The current practice of harvesting, baling and transporting grasses, reeds and other vegetation using tracked snow groomers and wheeled farm tractors can conflict with the nature conservation goals for these sites through disturbance of the ground surface and accidents leading to spillage of oil. To address these problems, the Industrial Institute of Agricultural Engineering (PIMR is developing new-generation agricultural machinery that will also be applicable in formal paludiculture. This article describes an innovative method for towing large bales of harvested biomass across wetlands that minimises ground pressure using any vehicle, and the development of amphibian tracked (ATV and hovercraft vehicles for biomass harvesting operations in wetlands.

  3. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    These images of the San Francisco Bay region were acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. Each covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.Upper Left: The color infrared composite uses bands in the visible and reflected infrared. Vegetation is red, urban areas are gray; sediment in the bays shows up as lighter shades of blue. Thanks to the 15 meter (50-foot) spatial resolution, shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen.Upper right: A composite of bands in the short wave infrared displays differences in soils and rocks in the mountainous areas. Even though these regions appear entirely vegetated in the visible, enough surface shows through openings in the vegetation to allow the ground to be imaged.Lower left: This composite of multispectral thermal bands shows differences in urban materials in varying colors. Separation of materials is due to differences in thermal emission properties, analogous to colors in the visible.Lower right: This is a color coded temperature image of water temperature, derived from the thermal bands. Warm waters are in white and yellow, colder waters are blue. Suisun Bay in the upper right is fed directly from the cold Sacramento River. As the water flows through San Pablo and San Francisco Bays on the way to the Pacific, the waters warm up.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for

  4. Slowing the rate of loss of mineral wetlands on human dominated landscapes - Diversification of farmers markets to include carbon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Badiou, P.; Lobb, D.

    2013-12-01

    Canada is the fourth-largest exporter of agriculture and agri-food products in the world (exports valued at 28B), but instability of agriculture markets can make it difficult for farmers to cope with variability, and new mechanisms are needed for farmers to achieve economic stability. Capitalizing on carbon markets will help farmers achieve environmentally sustainable economic performance. In order to have a viable carbon market, governments and industries need to know what the carbon capital is and what potential there is for growth, and farmers need financial incentives that will not only allow them to conserve existing wetlands but that will also enable them to restore wetlands while making a living. In southern Ontario, farmers' needs to maximize the return on investment on marginal lands have resulted in loss of 70-90% of wetlands, making this region one of the most threatened region in terms of wetland degradation and loss in Canada. Our project establishes the role that mineral wetlands have in the net carbon balance by contributing insight into the potential benefits to carbon management provided by wetland restoration efforts in these highly degraded landscapes. The goal was to establish the magnitude of carbon offsets that could be achieved through wetland conservation (securing existing carbon stocks) and restoration (creating new carbon stocks). The experimental design was to focus on (1) small (0.2-2.0 ha) and (2) isolated (no inflow or outflow) mineral wetlands with the greatest restoration potential that included (3) a range of restoration ages (drained (0 yr), 3 yr, 6 yr, 12 yr, 20 yr, 35 yr, intact marshes) to capture potential changes in rates of carbon sequestration with restoration age of wetland. From each wetland, wetland soil carbon pools samples were collected at four positions: centre of wetland (open-water); emergent vegetation zone; wet meadow zone where flooding often occurs (i.e., high water mark); and upland where flooding rarely

  5. Health Assessment of Wetland Ecosystems and Tourism Development in Shandong Province%山东省湿地生态系统健康评价及旅游开发策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑娟; 孟芬芬

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between wetland ecosystems and wetland ecotourism,and then built an ecological environment-tourism development analysis matrix as a model depicting the relationship between wetland ecosystem health and wetland ecotourism.According to the current situation of the environment and tourism development,the wetland ecotourism area can be divided into five types,i.e.,optimal type,suboptimum type,moderate type,recover type,and transition type.Subsequently,a wetland ecosystem health assessment index system was constructed based on the Press-State-Response (PSR) model.The wetland ecosystem health situation of Nansi Lake,the Yellow River Delta and Jiaozhou Bay,Shandong Province,was then evaluated with the fuzzy comprehensive judgment method.Results showed that the three representative wetland areas,Jiaozhou Bay,the Yellow River Delta,and Nansi Lake area have the scores of 0.5612,0.6991,and 0.6493,respectively.According to the maximum membership degree principle,the ecosystem of the Yellow River Delta wetland was in a healthy condition.The Nansi Lake wetland was in a fragile state.However,the Jiaozhou Bay wetland ecosystem was in a status of morbidity.The pressure was relatively less in Shandong wetland ecosystems but the state was severe due to improper utilization and protection of resources.Furthermore,the response mechanism was generally poor.In addition to the Yellow River Delta wetland,government departments relevant to wetland protection management,such as environmental protection efforts and management strategy and policy,seem to be inadequate in Nansi Lake and the Jiaozhou Bay wetland.Some suggestions are given.First,emphasis needs to be placed on integral tourism planning and overall image promotion.Tourism production should be different from underlining local characteristics and avoid vicious competition.It was also important to take unit function division and combine point and axis development.Second,the Yellow River Delta

  6. Effect of the Urbanization of Wetlands on Microclimate: A Case Study of Xixi Wetland, Hangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization affects the microclimate and forms a unique urban climate environment. To deepen the understanding on the microclimate regulation function of an urban wetland, this study analyzed the influence of a suburb wetland’s urbanization process on the local climate through contrast observations of the protected wetland area and the former wetland area in Xixi wetland. Results show that the urbanization of suburb wetlands has an impact on the local microclimate and decreases human comfort, and that wetlands can effectively regulate the microclimate. The fragmentation of urban wetlands caused by urban sprawl decreases their microclimate regulation function, a decrease that is particularly evident in summer. Additionally, wetlands stabilize the microclimate in all seasons. For every land cover type in wetlands, vegetation has a better stabilizing effect on temperature, whereas a water body has a better stabilizing effect on wind speed and humidity. Meteorological conditions also affect the microclimate regulation function of wetlands. Temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and wind speed influence the cooling function of urban wetlands, while solar radiation modifies the humidifying function of urban wetlands.

  7. GlobWetland Africa: Implementing Sustainable Earth Observation Based Wetland Monitoring Capacity in Africa and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tottrup, Christian; Riffler, Michael; Wang, Tiejun;

    that will enable the users to: [i] access and exploit Sentinel data and other relevant contributing missions e.g. ERS, ENVISAT, Landsat and ALOS; [ii] operationally map, assess and inventorize wetlands through a number of dedicated wetland information products and indicators needed for effective wetland management...

  8. Construction and Protection of Qionghai Lake Wetland Ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaiwei; CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Wetland is closely related to survival, reproduction and development of human beings. Due to population growth, industrialization, urbanization and agricultural modernization, wetland ecosystems are suffered from huge pressure of human society and the wetland ecological environment becomes extremely vulnerable. On the basis of analyzing current situations of Qionghai Lake wetland in Xichang City of Sichuan Province, this paper discussed the significance of Qionghai wetland construction and protection, and offered countermeasures and recommendations for solving existing problems in Qionghai wetland.

  9. Origin and geomorphology of the wetlands of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mwanukuzi, P. P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Wetlands are dynamic landforms which vary in both time and space. Tanzania's wetlands areclassified according to the physiography and the environment in which they exist. Coastalwetlands, Rift System wetlands and the wetlands of highland drainage basins are the majorgroups. Coastal wetlands are formed by wave action and tidal influence; beaches and lagoons exist because of wave action; mudflats, marshes, mangrove swamps, estuaries and deltas aretidal in origin. Rift System wetlands occur in t...

  10. Occurence of organic pollutants in constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    TRSKOVÁ, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are wetlands designed to improve the quality of water. In this work, four representatives of typical organic pollutants in Constructed wetlands are studied : DEET, cotinine, coprostanol and galaxolide as the representatives of insecticide, alkaloid,faecal sterol and musk compound respectively. Moreover three different types of extraction techniques : aqueous two phase extraction (ATPE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) - are investiga...

  11. Hydraulic Resistance due to Emergent Wetland Vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Piercy, Candice Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Models to estimate hydraulic resistance due to vegetation in emergent wetlands are crucial to wetland design and management. Hydraulic models that consider vegetation rely on an accurate determination of a resistance parameter such as a friction factor or a bulk drag coefficient. At low Reynolds numbers typical of flows in wetlands, hydraulic resistance is orders of magnitude higher than fully turbulent flows and resistance parameters are functions of the flow regime as well as the vegetation...

  12. Nomination of the Lahontan Valley Wetlands Nevada, U.S.A. as Wetlands of International Importance under the RAMSAR Convention

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a proposal to list the Lahontan Valley Wetlands as a Wetlands of International Importance. The Lahontan Valley Wetlands are an important habitat for...

  13. Methodology for inventory of wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Podestá, Laura; Casanova, Rosario; Beyhaut, Juan Ignacio; Boix, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    An automated methodology for the inventory of wetlands in Uruguay was designed, defining a specific technical criteria for their determination. It was necessary to use a combination of procedures and technological tools (Remote Sensing, Digital Photogrammetry, GIS) to process the available information. The following data has been considered: very low sloped terrains (out of a digital terrain model), soils with characteristical moisture behavior, basins and areas with hydrophile...

  14. Developing a Model using High School Students for Restoring, Monitoring and Conducting Research in Fresh Water Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon in eastern San Francisco Bay is one of the largest sag ponds created by the Hayward Fault that has not been destroyed by urbanization. In the 1990’s Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District designed a constructed wetland to naturally filter stormwater before it entered Tyson Lagoon on its way to the San Francisco Bay. The Math Science Nucleus, a non profit organization, manages the facility that incorporates high school students through community service, service learning, and research. Students do a variety of tasks from landscaping to scientific monitoring. Through contracts and grants, we create different levels of competency that the students can participate. Engineers and scientists from the two agencies involved, create tasks that are needed to be complete for successful restoration. Every year the students work on different components of restoration. A group of select student interns (usually juniors and seniors) collects and records the data during the year. Some of these students are part of a paid internship to insure their regular attendance. Every year the students compile and discuss with scientists from the Math Science Nucleus what the data set might mean and how problems can be improved. The data collected helps determine other longer term projects. This presentation will go over the journey of the last 10 years to this very successful program and will outline the steps necessary to maintain a restoration project. It will also outline the different groups that do larger projects (scouts) and liaisons with schools that allow teachers to assign projects at our facility. The validity of the data obtained by students and how we standardize our data collection from soil analysis, water chemistry, monitoring faults, and biological observations will be discussed. This joint agency model of cooperation to provide high school students with a real research opportunity has benefits that allow the program to

  15. Spatial and temporal modeling of wetland surface temperature using Landsat-8 imageries in Sulduz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Eisavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetland Surface Temperature (WST maps are an increasingly important parameter to understand the extensive range of existing processes in wetlands. The Wetlands placed in neighborhoods of agricultural and industrial lands are exposed to more chemical pollutants and pesticides that can lead to spatial and temporal variations of their surface temperature. Therefore, more studies are required for temperature modeling and the management and conservation of these variations in their ecosystem. Landsat 8 time series data of Sulduz region, Western Azerbaijan province, Iran were used in this study. The WST was derived using a mono-window algorithm after implementation of atmospheric correction. The NDVI (Normalized Differential Vegetation Index threshold method was also employed to determine the surface emissivity. Our findings show that the WST experienced extensive spatial and temporal variations. It reached its maximum value in June and also experienced the highest mean in the same month. In this research, August (2013.12.08 had a lowest spatial standard deviation regarding surface temperature and June (2013.06.28 had the highest one. Wetlands' watersides adjacent to industrial zones have a higher surface temperature than the middle lands of these places. The map obtained from the WST variance over time can be exploited to reveal thermal stable and unstable zones. The outcome demonstrates that land use, land cover effectively contribute to wetland ecosystem health. The results are useful in the water management, preventive efforts against drying of wetland and evapotranspiration modeling. The approach employed in this research indicates that remote sensing is a valuable, low-cost and stable tool for thermal monitoring of wetlands health.

  16. A Review of the Relative Merits of Conserving, Using, or Draining Papyrus Swamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Ilya M. D.; Boar, Rosalind R.; Lugo, Charles

    2011-02-01

    Wetlands are a vital resource, particularly in Africa where livelihoods are closely linked to natural capital. In recent years, extensive drainage has occurred to make way for agriculture. To gain insight into whether drainage is justified, we review the value of African wetlands dominated by Cyperus papyrus in relation to use, conservation and conversion. Evidence suggests that the value derived from low-intensity, multifunctional wetland use far exceeds the value derived from swamp reclamation and generally exceeds that of conservation. At a local level, the main driver of wetland misuse appear to be a breakdown in collaborative management regimes and the main constraint on wetland use, the value of labor and selling-times. Local drivers are linked to regional factors such as the lack of coordinated wetland policies and difficulties in ensuring that legislation is absorbed by all sectors of society. We highlight opportunities for ensuring more effective collaborative management and legislation communication, which capitalize on existing governance structures. In contrast to predictions by Hardin's Tragedy of the Commons model, we argue that effective wetland management is best achieved by preventing privatization and promoting common property management regimes. We also argue that poverty and income inequity are more important drivers of unsustainable resource use than environmental managers commonly acknowledge.

  17. Sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; McKee, Lester J.; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal–estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin–Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The Golden Gate strait is the sole inlet connecting the Bay to the Pacific Ocean, and serves as the conduit for a tidal flow of ~ 8 × 109 m3/day, in addition to the transport of mud, sand, biogenic material, nutrients, and pollutants. Despite this physical, biological and chemical connection, resource management and prior research have often treated the Delta, Bay and adjacent ocean as separate entities, compartmentalized by artificial geographic or political boundaries. The body of work herein presents a comprehensive analysis of system-wide behavior, extending a rich heritage of sediment transport research that dates back to the groundbreaking hydraulic mining-impact research of G.K. Gilbert in the early 20th century.

  18. A blue carbon soil database: Tidal wetland stocks for the US National Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R. A.; Eriksson, M.; Hinson, A.; Najjar, R. G.; Kroeger, K. D.; Herrmann, M.; Holmquist, J. R.; Windham-Myers, L.; MacDonald, G. M.; Brown, L. N.; Bianchi, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal wetlands contain large reservoirs of carbon, and in 2015 the US National Greenhouse Gas Inventory began the work of placing blue carbon within the national regulatory context. The potential value of a wetland carbon stock, in relation to its location, soon could be influential in determining governmental policy and management activities, or in stimulating market-based CO2 sequestration projects. To meet the national need for high-resolution maps, a blue carbon stock database was developed linking National Wetlands Inventory datasets with the USDA Soil Survey Geographic Database. Users of the database can identify the economic potential for carbon conservation or restoration projects within specific estuarine basins, states, wetland types, physical parameters, and land management activities. The database is geared towards both national-level assessments and local-level inquiries. Spatial analysis of the stocks show high variance within individual estuarine basins, largely dependent on geomorphic position on the landscape, though there are continental scale trends to the carbon distribution as well. Future plans including linking this database with a sedimentary accretion database to predict carbon flux in US tidal wetlands.

  19. Genetic Evidence for Contrasting Wetland and Savannah Habitat Specializations in Different Populations of Lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andy E; Cotterill, Fenton P D Woody; Winterbach, Christiaan W; Winterbach, Hanlie E K; Antunes, Agostinho; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    South-central Africa is characterized by an archipelago of wetlands, which has evolved in time and space since at least the Miocene, providing refugia for animal species during Pleistocene arid episodes. Their importance for biodiversity in the region is reflected in the evolution of a variety of specialist mammal and bird species, adapted to exploit these wetland habitats. Populations of lions (Panthera leo) across south-central and east Africa have contrasting signatures of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and biparental nuclear DNA in wetland and savannah habitats, respectively, pointing to the evolution of distinct habitat preferences. This explains the absence of genetic admixture of populations from the Kalahari savannah of southwest Botswana and the Okavango wetland of northern Botswana, despite separation by only 500 km. We postulate that ancestral lions were wetland specialists and that the savannah lions evolved from populations that were isolated during arid Pleistocene episodes. Expansion of grasslands and the resultant increase in herbivore populations during mesic Pleistocene climatic episodes provided the stimulus for the rapid population expansion and diversification of the highly successful savannah lion specialists. Our model has important implications for lion conservation.

  20. Wetlands Spatial-Temporal Distribution Multi-Scale Simulation Using Multi-Agent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Yu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of wetland landscape spatial-temporal distribution not only can reveal the mechanisms and laws of landscape evolution, but achieve the sustainable land use as well as provide supports for wetland conservation and management. In this report, the inland freshwater wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain of China were selected for wetland landscape changing process simulation studies. Results showed that both visual effects of simulation and prediction were good and the total accuracy co-efficiency of points to points was also significantly high (above 82%, which demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of wetland landscape spatial-temporal distribution simulation using Multi-Agent System (MAS. Scales exerted influence on visual effects, simulation accuracies and statistics of landscape index. Scale effects were obvious during simulation process using MAS. It was demonstrated that 60m was the best scale for simulation. It was shown that contagion index lines were exponential distribution while accuracy lines were lognormal distribution with the scale rising, which provided a reference for scale effect assessment and simulation scale selection.

  1. Creative conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentham, Roelof J.

    1968-01-01

    The increasing exploitation of our natural resources, the unlimited occupation of ever more new areas, and the intensification of land-use, make it necessary for us to expand the concept of conservation. But we also need to reconsider that concept itself. For the changing conditions in the present-d

  2. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  3. 湿地的生态功能及保护研究%Study on Ecological Function and Protection of Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程军; 韩晨

    2012-01-01

    首先从作为天然蓄水库、调蓄洪水、保护海岸及控制侵蚀等方面,介绍了湿地的生态功能,然后分析了湿地所面临的威胁和退化现状,最后提出保护湿地生态系统的建议.%The ecological function of wetland is introduced from the angles of natural conservation reservoir, flood irrigation, coastal land protection and erosion management. The threats and degradation of wetland are analyzed. In the end, protection of ecological system of wetland is proposed.

  4. 75 FR 29891 - Special Local Regulation; Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Swim, Great South Bay, NY, in the Federal Register (74 FR 32428). We did not receive any comments or... published at 74 FR 32428 on July 8, 2009, is adopted as a final rule with the following changes: PART 100... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY:...

  5. Wise Use of Wetlands: Current State of Protection and Utilization of Chinese Wetlands and Recommendations for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxia; Yao, Yong; Ju, Meiting

    2008-06-01

    Wetland protection and utilization sometimes appear to be in conflict, but promoting the wise use of wetlands can solve this problem. All countries face the challenge of sustainable development of wetlands to a greater or lesser extent, but the problem is especially urgent in developing countries, such as China, that want to accelerate their economic development without excessive environmental cost. Chinese wetlands contribute greatly to economic development, but improper use of these natural resources has endangered their existence. It is thus necessary to provide scientific guidance to managers and users of wetlands. In this paper, we analyze the present status of Chinese wetland protection and utilization, and discuss problems in six categories: a lack of public awareness of the need for wetland protection; insufficient funding for wetland protection and management; an imperfect legal system to protect wetlands; insufficient wetland research; lack of coordination among agencies and unclear responsibilities; and undeveloped technologies related to wetland use and protection. The wise use of Chinese wetlands will require improvements in four main areas: increased wetland utilization research, scientific management of wetland utilization, improved laws and regulations to protect wetlands, and wider dissemination of wetland knowledge. Based on these categories, we propose a framework for the optimization of wetland use by industry to provide guidance for China and other countries that cannot sacrifice economic benefits to protect their wetlands.

  6. Role of wetland organic matters as photosensitizer for degradation of micropollutants and metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunkyung [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Yonsei-ro 50, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Ho Kyong [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, Sydney 2007, NSW (Australia); Cho, Jaeweon, E-mail: chojw@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Yonsei-ro 50, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Photodegradation of PPCPs was investigated in various NOM enriched solutions. • Direct and indirect photolysis experiments were conducted upon UV irradiation. • PPCPs showed different levels of photodegradation rates depending on their photoreactivity. • Allochthonous NOM inhibited the photolysis of target PPCPs. • Wetland NOM enhanced photodegradation of some conservative PPCPs. - Abstract: Overall photodegradation of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and pharmaceutical metabolites were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environments in various natural organic matter (NOM) enriched solutions. Tested PPCPs exhibited different rates of loss during direct and indirect photolysis. Here, only ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for direct photolysis and UV together with {sup 3}DOM{sup *}for indirect photolysis. Diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole were susceptible to photodegradation, whereas carbamazepine, caffeine, paraxanthine and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) showed low levels of photodegradation rate, reflecting their conservative photoreactivity. During indirect photodegradation, in contrast to the hydrophilic autochthonous NOM, allochthonous NOM with relatively high molecular weight (MW), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and hydrophobicity (e.g., Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) revealed to significantly inhibit the photolysis of target micropollutants. The presence of Typha wetland NOM enhanced the indirect photolysis of well-known conservative micopollutants (carbamazepine and paraxanthine). And atenolol, carbamazepine, glimepiride, and N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole were found to be sensitive to the triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter ({sup 3}DOM{sup *}) with Typha wetland NOM under deoxygenated condition. This suggests that photolysis in constructed wetlands connected to the wastewater treatment plant can enhance the degradation of some anthropogenic micropollutants

  7. Bayes Multiple Decision Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wensong

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach for this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for the use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow in this paper a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through...

  8. Using Natural Geochemical Tracers to Discern the Dominant Sources of Freshwater into Biscayne Bay, Southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, J. C.; Price, R. M.; Swart, P. K.

    2005-05-01

    Biscayne Bay is a sub-tropical estuary located on the carbonate platform of south Florida. The water occupying Biscayne Bay is a balance of saltwater influx from the open ocean and freshwater inputs from precipitation, surface water runoff, and submarine groundwater discharge. The bays watershed includes a total of 3 million inhabitants, the major urban centers of Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, as well as the Everglades system. With the development of south Florida, the natural diffuse groundwater and stream flow into the bay has been replaced by a large system of canals and levees in an effort to control flooding and drain swampland. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan includes changes in the freshwater deliveries to Biscayne Bay from point-source discharges via canals to non-point source discharges via wetlands and groundwater flow. The balance of salinity in Biscayne Bay effects sensitive seagrass and tidal ecosystems including numerous species of corals and other biota. A comprehensive understanding of the flow of freshwater into the bay is crucial to future planned developments and restorations. The goal of this study is to use naturally occurring geochemical constituents as tracers to identify and quantify the sources of freshwater, i.e. rainfall, canal flow, and groundwater, discharge to Biscayne Bay. In this study, discrete samples of precipitation, canal water, terrestrial groundwater, marine groundwater, and bay surface water are collected monthly and analyzed for the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen as well as for major cations and anions. Initial results indicate that fresh groundwater has an isotopic signature (del 18O = -2.66 per mil, del D, -7.60 per mil) similar to rainfall (del 18O = -2.86 per mil, del D =-4.78 per mil). In contrast canal water has a heavy isotopic signature (del 18O = -0.46 per mil, del D = -2.48 per mil) due to evaporation. Thus it is possible to use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to separate canal water from

  9. Towards sustainable management of louisiana's coastal wetland forests: Problems, constraints, and a new beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J.L.; Conner, W.H.; Keim, R.F.; Faulkner, S.P.; Day, J.W.; Gardiner, E.S.; Hughes, M.S.; King, S.L.; McLeod, K.W.; Miller, C.A.; Nyman, J.A.; Shaffer, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    Over 345,000 ha of forested swamps occur throughout the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain. Natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrology and geomorphology at local and landscape levels have reduced the productivity in many of these coastal wetland forests areas and have caused the complete loss of forest cover in some places. A summary and interpretation of the available science, suggestions for policy change, and a multidisciplinary (multi-responsibility) approach were needed to address these issues [in the context of private land]. In response, the Louisiana Governor's office formed a Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use Science Working Group (SWG) and an associated Advisory Panel to provide the Governor with information and suggestions of strategies for environmental and economic utilization, conservation, and protection of Louisiana's coastal wetland forest ecosystem in the long-term. The process of engaging scientists, resource managers, and other stakeholders in this effort is described, and the recommendations of the SWG are presented relative to forestry practices and the potential for sustainable management of coastal wetland forests.

  10. Role of wetland organic matters as photosensitizer for degradation of micropollutants and metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung; Shon, Ho Kyong; Cho, Jaeweon

    2014-07-15

    Overall photodegradation of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and pharmaceutical metabolites were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environments in various natural organic matter (NOM) enriched solutions. Tested PPCPs exhibited different rates of loss during direct and indirect photolysis. Here, only ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for direct photolysis and UV together with (3)DOM(*)for indirect photolysis. Diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole were susceptible to photodegradation, whereas carbamazepine, caffeine, paraxanthine and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) showed low levels of photodegradation rate, reflecting their conservative photoreactivity. During indirect photodegradation, in contrast to the hydrophilic autochthonous NOM, allochthonous NOM with relatively high molecular weight (MW), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and hydrophobicity (e.g., Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) revealed to significantly inhibit the photolysis of target micropollutants. The presence of Typha wetland NOM enhanced the indirect photolysis of well-known conservative micopollutants (carbamazepine and paraxanthine). And atenolol, carbamazepine, glimepiride, and N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole were found to be sensitive to the triplet excited state of dissolved organic matter ((3)DOM(*)) with Typha wetland NOM under deoxygenated condition. This suggests that photolysis in constructed wetlands connected to the wastewater treatment plant can enhance the degradation of some anthropogenic micropollutants by the interaction with (3)DOM(*) in wetlands. PMID:24862465

  11. An Initial Assessment of the Economic Value of Coastal and Freshwater Wetlands in West Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian V. Eppink

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many countries in West Asia, defined in this study as the Arabic-speaking countries of the Arabian Peninsula plus Turkey and Iran, have enacted environmental conservation laws but regional underlying drivers of environment change, such as rising incomes and fast-growing populations, continue to put pressure on remaining wetlands. This paper aims to inform conservation efforts by presenting the first regional assessment of the economic value of coastal and freshwater wetlands in West Asia. Using scenario analysis we find that, dependent on the discount rate used, the present value of the regional economic loss of not protecting wetlands by 2050 is between US dollar 2.3 billion and US dollar 7.2 billion (expressed in 2007 US dollars. The method used for this assessment, however, is not suitable for expressing national realities adequately. We therefore suggest that detailed localized studies are conducted to improve insight into the drivers and the social and economic effects of wetland loss in West Asia.

  12. THEORY AND METHOD FOR WETLAND BOUNDARY DELINEATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the subjectivity of wetland boundary criteria and their causes at present, this paper suggested that, under the condition that the mechanism of wetland formation process has not been understood,"black box" method of System Theory can be used to delineate wetland boundaries scientifically. After analyzing the difference of system construction among aquatic habitats, wetlands and uplands, the lower limit of rooted plants was chosen as the lower boundary criterion of wetlands. Because soil diagnostic horizon is the result of the long-term interaction among all environments, and it is less responsive than vegetation to short-term change, soil diagnostic horizon was chosen as the indicator to delineate wetland upper boundary, which lies at the thinning-out point of soil diagnostic horizon. Case study indicated that it was feasible using the lower limit of rooted plants and the thinning-out point of soil diagnostic horizon as criteria to delineate the lower and upper boundaries of wetland. In the study area, the thinning-out line of albic horizon was coincident with the 55.74m contour line, the maximum horizonerror was less than lm, and the maximum vertical error less than 0.04m. The problem on wetland definition always arises on the boundaries. Having delineated wetland boundaries, wetlands can be defined as follows: wetlands are the transitional zones between uplands and deepwater habitats, they are a kind of azonal complex that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water, with the lower boundary lying at the lower limit of rooted plants, and the upper boundary at the thinning-out line of upland soil diagnostic horizon.

  13. Mitigation of micropollutants inside wetland systems: Impacts of season and flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jens; Herbstritt, Barbara; Schuetz, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    with a diffuse outlet through a densely vegetated zone. A comparison between conservative (NaBr) and non-conservative tracers (UR, SRB) yielded different retention capabilities for the three different FPs and hence wetland elements. During summer (20°C, runoff 0.8 l/s) we repeated the tracer injections using the same protocol. Then the entire wetland was densely vegetated and we expected higher tracer retention due to enhanced biological activity and longer residence times at low flow conditions. However, we observed the opposite, since only one flowpath (FP1) was active and all open water bodies were disconnected due to wetland succession. Regarding retention of micropollutants in our restored wetland we conclude that (a) retention in deep water bodies is decisive, (b) straight sections show relative small retention capabilities, (c) vegetation activity (summer/winter) seems less important for treatment than for flow path development, and (d) in our case photolysis is overall more effective than sorption. These findings highlight the importance of open water bodies for wetland restoration. This study was financed by the PhytoRet-Project (C.21) of the European INTERREG IV program Upper Rhine.

  14. Changes of Urban Wetland Landscape Pattern and Impacts of Urbanization on Wetland in Wuhan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuelei; NING Longmei; YU Jing; XIAO Rui; LI Tao

    2008-01-01

    In this study, remote sensing data of Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in 1996-2001 were selected to ex-tract wetland landscape information. Several landscape indices were used to evaluate the changes of landscape patternwithin the five years, including patch number, patch density, patch fractal dimension, landscape diversity, dominance,evenness, and fragmentation indexes. Then, transformation probabilities of wetland landscapes into non-wetland land-scapes were calculated based on Markov Model, and on these grounds the relationship between changes of wetlandlandscape pattern and urban construction was analyzed. The results showed that fragmentation degree of all wetlandtypes increased, lake area declined, and dominance of natural wetland decreased. The reasons for these results weremainly because of urban construction. According to the features of abundant wetland in Wuhan City, we suggested thatprotection of wetland landscape should cooperate with urban construction, which means wetland should become im-portant part of urban landscape.

  15. 76 FR 38020 - Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina... transit or anchor in a portion of the Lake Erie, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH between 10 p.m. and 10... Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH. (a) Location. The following area is...

  16. Nitrogen retention in natural Mediterranean wetlands affected by agricultural runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. García García

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen retention efficiency in natural Mediterranean wetlands affected by agricultural runoff was quantified and the effect of season and hydrological/chemical loading was examined from March 2007 to June 2008 in two wetland-streams located in Southeast Spain. Nitrate-N (NO3-N, ammonium-N (NH4+-N, total organic nitrogen-N (TON-N and chloride (Cl concentrations were analyzed to calculate nitrogen retention efficiencies. These wetlands consistently reduced water nitrogen concentration throughout the year with higher values for NO3-N (72.3%, even though the mean values of inflow NO3-N concentrations were above 20 mg l−1. Additionally, they usually acted as sinks for TON-N (45.4%, but as sources for NH4+-N. Over the entire study period, the Taray and Parra wetlands were capable of removing a mean value of 1.6 and 0.8 kg NO3-N a day−1, respectively. Retention efficiencies were not affected by temperature variation and did not follow a seasonal pattern. The temporal variability for NO3-N retention efficiency was positively and negatively explained by the net hydrologic retention and the inflow NO3-N concentration (R2adj=0.832, p<0.001, respectively. TON-N retention efficiency was only positively explained by the net hydrologic retention (R2adj=0.1997, p<0.05. No significant regression model was found for NH4+-N. Finally, the conservation of these Mediterranean wetland-streams may act as a tool to not only improves the surface water quality in agricultural catchments, but to also achieve a good ecological status for surface waters, this being the Water Framework Directive's ultimate purpose.

  17. 40 CFR 258.12 - Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... means those areas that are defined in 40 CFR 232.2(r). ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wetlands. 258.12 Section 258.12... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.12 Wetlands. (a) New MSWLF units and...

  18. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  19. Pesticide mass budget in a stormwater wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands are reactive landscape zones that provide ecosystem services, including the improvement of water quality. Field studies distinguishing pesticide degradation from retention to evaluate the sink and source functions of wetlands are scarce. This study evaluated based on a complete mass budget the partitioning, retention, and degradation of 12 pesticides in water, suspended solids, sediments, and organisms in a wetland receiving contaminated runoff. The mass budget showed the following: (i) dissolved pesticides accounted for 95% of the total load entering the wetland and the pesticide partitioning between the dissolved phase and the suspended solids varied according to the molecules, (ii) pesticides accumulated primarily in the dithiocarbamates were degraded under oxic conditions in spring, whereas glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) degradation occurred under reducing conditions during the summer. The complete pesticide mass budget indicates the versatility of the pesticide sink and source functions of wetland systems. PMID:25003558

  20. Progress in Research of Chinese Wetland Parks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yichuan; LI Dongsheng; WANG Shanshan

    2008-01-01

    There has been a rapid development in the construction of wetland parks in China in recent years. This paper discussed the progress in the research of Chinese wetland parks that covered the aspects of wetland resources, landscape and enviroment. The function of wetland parks, the evaluation of landscape and the exploiting of resources; the landscape concept and landscape planning and design; the plant environment, the water environment and the recreation environment were all reviewed. The research of Chinese wetland parks started later but developed rapidly, having remarkable achievements in practice and functional studies, and there are still some shortcomings in the researches to be improved. At last, the key points which should be researched urgently in the future were discussed.

  1. 美国哥伦比亚河下游及河口地区基于生态系统的湿地保护与恢复工作——哥伦比亚河口生态系统恢复工程%Ecosystem-Based Wetland Conservation and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, USA: A Description of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary E.JOHNSON; Blaine D.EBBERTS; Ben D.ZELINSKY

    2012-01-01

    The Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) in the U. S. Pacific Northwest provides programmatic processes, experiences, and lessons applicable to the eco-friendly utilization of the littoral zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China. The CEERP applies an ecosystem-based approach to help mitigate the environmental effects of the Federal Columbia River Power System by working to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary ( LCRE). Wetland ecosystems in the LCRE, which is 235 km long and about 80% tidal freshwater, have been altered significantly by agricultural, industrial, hydrosystem operations, and other practices that disrupt food webs, reduce macrodetritus flux, and restrict rearing and refuge areas for juvenile salmon, among other consequences. The restoration program has five main objectives: 1) understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, e. G. , diking restricting access to and contributions from wetland ecosystems; 2) conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, e. G. , reconnecting wetland areas to the main stem; 3) increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, e. G. , removing invasive plants and restoring emergent marshes; 4) maintain and enhance ecosystem processes, e.g., revitalizing food webs; 5) improve the ecosystem function of salmon performance, e. G. , increasing life-history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. To accomplish these objectives, the CEERP implements an adaptive management process led by the funding agencies and performed in collaboration with regional stakeholders. This paper uses the five phases of the annual CEERP adaptive management cycle-Strategize, Decide, Act, Monitor/Research, and Evaluate-as the context for presenting key results from the program. The paper closes with lessons to consider for ecosystem-based conservation and restoration in the Three Gorges Reservoir.%美

  2. Experiences with Constructed Wetland Systems in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Youngchul; Hwang Gilson; Lee Jin-Woo; Park Je-Chul; Kim Dong-Sup; Kang Min-Gi; Chang In-Soung

    2006-01-01

    In spite of the low temperature during the winter season and the high land environment, the wetland treatment system is gaining popularity in Korea because of its lower construction cost and simplicity in operation and maintenance.Many different types of wetland treatment systems have been built during the last 10 years, among which the free water surface wetland has been predominant. Most of the large-scale systems are government projects for improving the water quality of the streams flowing into the estuary dikes and reservoirs. The covering plants used in this system are different in different areas but cattails and reeds or their combinations are common. Constructed wetlands in Korea can be characterized by their shallow depths and short hydraulic residence times. There is no established flow pattern and configuration rules for constructing wetlands, but many efforts have been made with a view to improving their ecological function. Flow control is the most difficult problem in designing a riverbed or riparian wetland. There have been scores of flow rate control devices developed for wetlands, but none of them guarantee wetlands' safety against flooding. In earlier wetland construction, the building materials were mainly soil. Recently, strong and durable building materials such as rocks, gravel beds, concrete and steel are used at vulnerable places to protect them from erosion. Our investigation indicated that the wetland system would be an appropriate technology because it is not only cheaper to construct, but also requires less maintenance work. However, we suffer from the reduced effectiveness in performance during the winter. We need to evaluate the partial treatment accomplished during 6 to 7 months per year.

  3. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Meaher Park in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  4. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Perdido Pass near Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  5. Farmers' knowledge and perception of agricutural wetland management in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabahungu, N.L.; Visser, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Most of Rwanda's wetlands are being reclaimed under government schemes with the aim of growing rice as the main crop. In the present study, information on farmers' knowledge and perceptions of agricultural wetland management was collected in Cyabayaga and Rugeramigozi wetlands. The two wetlands were

  6. On leadership and success in professional wetland science

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Wetland Scientists and the wetland profession are fortunate to have an abundance of leaders. These leaders respond to the needs of the Society for guidance and direction. They also consistently advance wetland science and improve the quality of wetland management...

  7. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions...

  8. 7 CFR 1410.10 - Restoration of wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration of wetlands. 1410.10 Section 1410.10... Restoration of wetlands. (a) An owner or operator who entered into a CRP contract on land that is suitable for restoration to wetlands or that was restored to wetlands while under such contract, may, if approved by...

  9. Phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water, using constructed wetland systems

    OpenAIRE

    Drizo, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen in waste water from sewerage systems contribute to excessive nutrient enrichment of surface waters, presenting a threat to nature conservation, domestic and industrial water supplies, and recreation. The general objective of this research was to investigate phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water by constructed wetland systems (CWS), which are increasingly being used for low-cost water treatment. Phosphate (P) adsorption capacity and other prope...

  10. Developing new-generation machinery for vegetation management on protected wetlands in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    A.P. Dubowski; K. Zembrowski; A. Rakowicz; Pawlowski, T.; Weymann, S.; L. Wojnilowicz

    2014-01-01

    Many protected wetlands and (especially) fen peatlands in Poland require vegetation management to restore and maintain them as breeding areas for endangered bird species. The current practice of harvesting, baling and transporting grasses, reeds and other vegetation using tracked snow groomers and wheeled farm tractors can conflict with the nature conservation goals for these sites through disturbance of the ground surface and accidents leading to spillage of oil. To address these problems, t...

  11. Amphibian occurrence and aquatic invaders in a changing landscape: Implications for wetland mitigation in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.; Leuthold, N.; Bury, R. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon's Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic approach (AIC) to rank the associations between native amphibian breeding occurrence and wetland characteristics, non-native aquatic predators, and landscape characteristics in a mixed urban-agricultural landscape. Best predictors varied among the five native amphibians and were generally consistent with life history differences. Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) and long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) occurrence was best predicted by the absence of non-native fish. Northern red-legged frog (Rana a. aurora) and northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) were most strongly related to wetland vegetative characteristics. The occurrence of rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa), a migratory species that makes extensive use of terrestrial habitats, was best predicted by greater forest cover within 1 km. The absence of non-native fish was a strong predictor of occurrence for four of the five native species. In contrast, amphibians were not strongly related to native fish presence. We found little evidence supporting negative effects of the presence of breeding populations of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) on any native species. Only the two Ambystoma salamanders were associated with wetland permanence. Northwestern salamanders (which usually have a multi-year larval stage) were associated with permanent waters, while long-toed salamanders were associated with temporary wetlands. Although all the species make some use of upland habitats, only one (rough-skinned newt) was strongly associated with surrounding landscape conditions. Instead, our analysis suggests that within-wetland characteristics best predict amphibian occurrence in this region. We recommend that wetland preservation and

  12. The studying system construction of wetland parks%湿地公园研究体系构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立龙; 陆林

    2011-01-01

    parks played an important role in displaying the diversity of wetland parks and priority should be given to the construction of different types of wetland parks. We investigated and analyzed the diversity dynamics of herbaceous plants under different disturbances in the conservation area of Taiping Lake national wetland park in China, and the results showed that the estuary environment changed under different disturbances, it come up with some protection and restoration strategies towards the main problems in biodiversity conservation in the conservation area of Taiping Lake national wetland park. The paper set up the studying system including research theory, research content, and research method about wetland parks for the first time, and put forward the definition of ecosystem of wetland parks with theoretic innovations. It can promote the progress of monographic study of wetland parks and put forward the advices about the management of wetland parks.%湿地公园是湿地保护性利用新方式,也是生态旅游和生态文明建设新载体,目前国内外兴起湿地公园建设热潮,为湿地保护性利用带来了新机遇.但作为新兴研究领域,目前湿地公园专题研究滞后于其建设与发展,研究基础理论薄弱、研究内容系统性不强、研究方法简单、研究体系不完整,对公园建设的实践指导不足.构建湿地公园研究体系具有重大的理论意义和实践价值.在对国内外研究总结分析的基础上,力图从研究理论体系、研究内容指标体系和研究方法体系等层面对湿地公园研究体系进行初步构建.提出湿地公园生态系统的概念,并将其组成结构研究体系、功能研究体系、影响评价体系和管理体系等作为研究内容的指标体系;对现有研究方法述评分析,构建了以基础理论探讨、规划研究、试验研究和空间分析为主的研究方法体系;指出了未来应注重的研究方法及发展趋势;最后结合

  13. Spatiotemporal analysis of encroachment on wetlands: a case of Nakivubo wetland in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isunju, John Bosco; Kemp, Jaco

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands provide vital ecosystem services such as water purification, flood control, and climate moderation among others, which enhance environmental quality, promote public health, and contribute to risk reduction. The biggest threat to wetlands is posed by human activities which transform wetlands, often for short-term consumptive benefits. This paper aimed to classify and map recent land cover and provide a multi-temporal analysis of changes from 2002 to 2014 in the Nakivubo wetland through which wastewater from Kampala city drains to Lake Victoria in Uganda. The paper contributes through spatially congruent change maps showing site-specific land cover conversions. In addition, it gives insight into what happened to the wetlands, why it happened, how the changes in the wetlands affect the communities living in them, and how the situation could be better managed or regulated in future. The analysis is based on very high resolution (50-62 cm) aerial photos and satellite imagery, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. Overall, the analysis of losses and gains showed a 62 % loss of wetland vegetation between 2002 and 2014, mostly attributable to crop cultivation. Cultivation in the wetland buffering the lake shore makes it unstable to anchor. The 2014 data shows large portions of the wetland calved away by receding lake waves. With barely no wetland vegetation buffer around the lake, the heavily polluted wastewater streams will lower the quality of lake water. Furthermore, with increased human activities in the wetland, exposure to flooding and pollution will be likely to have a greater impact on the health and livelihoods of vulnerable communities. This calls for a multi-faceted approach, coordination of the various stakeholders and engagement of wetland-dependent communities as part of the solution, and might require zoning out the wetland and restricting certain activities to specific zones. PMID:26935734

  14. Spatiotemporal analysis of encroachment on wetlands: a case of Nakivubo wetland in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isunju, John Bosco; Kemp, Jaco

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands provide vital ecosystem services such as water purification, flood control, and climate moderation among others, which enhance environmental quality, promote public health, and contribute to risk reduction. The biggest threat to wetlands is posed by human activities which transform wetlands, often for short-term consumptive benefits. This paper aimed to classify and map recent land cover and provide a multi-temporal analysis of changes from 2002 to 2014 in the Nakivubo wetland through which wastewater from Kampala city drains to Lake Victoria in Uganda. The paper contributes through spatially congruent change maps showing site-specific land cover conversions. In addition, it gives insight into what happened to the wetlands, why it happened, how the changes in the wetlands affect the communities living in them, and how the situation could be better managed or regulated in future. The analysis is based on very high resolution (50-62 cm) aerial photos and satellite imagery, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. Overall, the analysis of losses and gains showed a 62 % loss of wetland vegetation between 2002 and 2014, mostly attributable to crop cultivation. Cultivation in the wetland buffering the lake shore makes it unstable to anchor. The 2014 data shows large portions of the wetland calved away by receding lake waves. With barely no wetland vegetation buffer around the lake, the heavily polluted wastewater streams will lower the quality of lake water. Furthermore, with increased human activities in the wetland, exposure to flooding and pollution will be likely to have a greater impact on the health and livelihoods of vulnerable communities. This calls for a multi-faceted approach, coordination of the various stakeholders and engagement of wetland-dependent communities as part of the solution, and might require zoning out the wetland and restricting certain activities to specific zones.

  15. Determination of the health of Lunyangwa wetland using Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanda, Elijah M. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Msilimba, Golden

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands are major sources of various ecological goods and services including storage and distribution of water in space and time which help in ensuring the availability of surface and groundwater throughout the year. However, there still remains a poor understanding of the range of values of water quality parameters that occur in wetlands either in its impacted state or under natural conditions. It was thus imperative to determine the health of Lunyangwa wetland in Mzuzu City in Malawi in order to classify and determine its state. This study used the Escom's Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index Field Guide to determine the overall characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland and to calculate its combined Wetland Index Score. Data on site information, field measurements (i.e. EC, pH, temperature and DO) and physical characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland were collected from March, 2013 to February, 2014. Results indicate that Lunyangwa wetland is a largely open water zone which is dominated by free-floating plants on the water surface, beneath surface and emergent in substrate. Furthermore, the wetland can be classified as of a C ecological category (score = 60-80%), which has been moderately modified with moderate risks of the losses and changes occurring in the natural habitat and biota in the wetland. It was observed that the moderate modification and risk were largely because of industrial, agricultural, urban/social catchment stressors on the wetland. This study recommends an integrated and sustainable management approach coupled with continuous monitoring and evaluation of the health of the wetland for all stakeholders in Mzuzu City. This would help to maintain the health of Lunyangwa wetland which is currently at risk of being further modified due to the identified catchment stressors.

  16. A generalizable energetics-based model of avian migration to facilitate continental-scale waterbird conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Eric V; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Jacobi, Sarah; Aagaard, Kevin; Coppen, Jorge; Davis, Amélie; Fox, Timothy; Heglund, Patricia; Johnson, Rex; Jones, Malcolm T; Kenow, Kevin; Lyons, James E; Luke, Kirsten; Still, Shannon; Tavernia, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Conserving migratory birds is made especially difficult because of movement among spatially disparate locations across the annual cycle. In light of challenges presented by the scale and ecology of migratory birds, successful conservation requires integrating objectives, management, and monitoring across scales, from local management units to ecoregional and flyway administrative boundaries. We present an integrated approach using a spatially explicit energetic-based mechanistic bird migration model useful to conservation decision-making across disparate scales and locations. This model moves a Mallard-like bird (Anas platyrhynchos), through spring and fall migration as a function of caloric gains and losses across a continental-scale energy landscape. We predicted with this model that fall migration, where birds moved from breeding to wintering habitat, took a mean of 27.5 d of flight with a mean seasonal survivorship of 90.5% (95% Cl = 89.2%, 91.9%), whereas spring migration took a mean of 23.5 d of flight with mean seasonal survivorship of 93.6% (95% CI = 92.5%, 94.7%). Sensitivity analyses suggested that survival during migration was sensitive to flight speed, flight cost, the amount of energy the animal could carry, and the spatial pattern of energy availability, but generally insensitive to total energy availability per se. Nevertheless, continental patterns in the bird-use days occurred principally in relation to wetland cover and agricultural habitat in the fall. Bird-use days were highest in both spring and fall in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and along the coast and near-shore environments of South Carolina. Spatial sensitivity analyses suggested that locations nearer to migratory endpoints were less important to survivorship; for instance, removing energy from a 1036 km2 stopover site at a time from the Atlantic Flyway suggested coastal areas between New Jersey and North Carolina, including the Chesapeake Bay and the North Carolina piedmont, are

  17. A generalizable energetics-based model of avian migration to facilitate continental-scale waterbird conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Jacobi, Sarah; Coppen, Jorge; Davis, Amélie Y.; Fox, Timothy J.; Heglund, Patricia; Johnson, Rex; Jones, Tim; Kenow, Kevin P.; Lyons, James E.; Luke, Kirsten E.; Still, Shannon; Tavernia, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Conserving migratory birds is made especially difficult because of movement among spatially disparate locations across the annual cycle. In light of challenges presented by the scale and ecology of migratory birds, successful conservation requires integrating objectives, management, and monitoring across scales, from local management units to ecoregional and flyway administrative boundaries. We present an integrated approach using a spatially explicit energetic-based mechanistic bird migration model useful to conservation decision-making across disparate scales and locations. This model moves a mallard-like bird (Anas platyrhynchos), through spring and fall migration as a function of caloric gains and losses across a continental scale energy landscape. We predicted with this model that fall migration, where birds moved from breeding to wintering habitat, took a mean of 27.5 days of flight with a mean seasonal survivorship of 90.5% (95% CI = 89.2%, 91.9%) whereas spring migration took a mean of 23.5 days of flight with mean seasonal survivorship of 93.6% (95% CI = 92.5%, 94.7%). Sensitivity analyses suggested that survival during migration was sensitive to flight speed, flight cost, the amount of energy the animal could carry and the spatial pattern of energy availability, but generally insensitive to total energy availability per se. Nevertheless, continental patterns in the bird-use days occurred principally in relation to wetland cover and agricultural habitat in the fall. Bird-use days were highest in both spring and fall in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and along the coast and near-shore environments of South Carolina. Spatial sensitivity analyses suggested that locations nearer to migratory endpoints were less important to survivorship; for instance, removing energy from a 1,036 km2 stopover site at a time from the Atlantic Flyway suggested coastal areas between New Jersey and North Carolina, including Chesapeake Bay and the North Carolina piedmont, are

  18. Back Bay Wilderness area description

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a description of the lands located within the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Within these lands, it designates which area is suitable for...

  19. Annual report, Bristol Bay, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery management activities for Bristol Bay for 1955, including lists of operators, extensive statistics, descriptions of enforcement activities, and...

  20. FL BAY SPECTROUT-DIET

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile spotted seatrout and other sportfish are being monitored annually over a 6-mo period in Florida Bay to assess their abundance over time relative to...