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Sample records for basis vi hfodd

  1. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VII) HFODD (v2.49s): a new version of the program

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N; McDonnell, J; Satula, W; Sheikh, J A; Staszczak, A; Stoitsov, M; Toivanen, P

    2011-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49s) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite temperature formalism for the HFB and HF+BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead...

  2. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite temperature formalism for the HFB and HF+BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  3. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; McDonnell, J.; Satuła, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite-temperature formalism for the HFB and HF + BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex-breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected. New version program summaryProgram title:HFODD (v2.49t) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 190 614 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 985 898 Distribution

  4. Structural Basis for Platelet Collagen Responses by the Immune-type Receptor Glycoprotein VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horii,K.; Kahn, M.; Herr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of circulating platelets by exposed vessel wall collagen is a primary step in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke, and drugs to block platelet activation have successfully reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In humans and mice, collagen activation of platelets is mediated by glycoprotein VI (GPVI), a receptor that is homologous to immune receptors but bears little sequence similarity to known matrix protein adhesion receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of the collagen-binding domain of human GPVI and characterize its interaction with a collagen-related peptide. Like related immune receptors, GPVI contains 2 immunoglobulin-like domains arranged in a perpendicular orientation. Significantly, GPVI forms a back-to-back dimer in the crystal, an arrangement that could explain data previously obtained from cell-surface GPVI inhibition studies. Docking algorithms identify 2 parallel grooves on the GPVI dimer surface as collagen-binding sites, and the orientation and spacing of these grooves precisely match the dimensions of an intact collagen fiber. These findings provide a structural basis for the ability of an immunetype receptor to generate signaling responses to collagen and for the development of GPVI inhibitors as new therapies for human cardiovascular disease.

  5. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bui, Nhat Khai [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trunk, Katharina; O’Rourke, Patrick E. F.; Rao, Vincenzo A. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vollmer, Waldemar [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Coulthurst, Sarah J., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk; Hunter, William N., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  6. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan DL-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant; Bui, Nhat Khai; Trunk, Katharina; O'Rourke, Patrick E F; Rao, Vincenzo A; Vollmer, Waldemar; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Hunter, William N

    2013-12-01

    Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-D-glutamic acid and L-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure-activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1-Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2-Rap2a orthologues suggest that the specificity of these immunity proteins for neutralizing effectors is fold-dependent and that in cases where the fold is conserved sequence differences contribute to the specificity of effector-immunity protein interactions.

  7. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  8. Molecular basis for agonism in the BB3 receptor: an epitope located on the interface of transmembrane-III, -VI, and -VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gbahou, F; Holst, B; Schwartz, T W

    2010-01-01

    located in the receptor. It is concluded that activation of the BB3 receptor is dependent upon an epitope in the main ligand-binding pocket at the interface between TM-III, TM-VI, and TM-VII that corresponds to the site where, for example, activating metal ion sites have been constructed previously in 7TM...

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    OpenAIRE

    Harmatz Paul; Nicely Helen; Valayannopoulos Vassili; Turbeville Sean

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly ...

  10. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  12. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKDUA LECIONOu vi longe atendis min?—Danuta:Saluton,Banjo!—Barbara:Saluton!—D:Cu vi longe atendis min?—B:Tute ne.Mi jus venis i tien.—D:Mi esperas,ke nun vi estas libera.—B:Mi estas tute libera,do ni povas iriien,kien vi deziras.—D:Bone.Mi proponas do,ke unue niiru al magazenoj fari aetojn kaj

  13. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKA LECIONOKiom da mono vi bezonas?—Barbara:Mi foriras aeti ion pormani.u vi deziras ion de mi?—Sinjoro Petro(la edzo de Barbara):Aetu por mi skatolon da cigaredoj aǔeble...aetu por mi du skatolojn dacigaredoj kaj unu skatolon da alume-toj.—B:Bone.u vi ankoraǔ deziras ion?—P:Ne,dankon.Estasio.u vihavas monon?

  14. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKKVARA LEOIONOMi havas por vi surprizon—Barbara:Bonan matenon!—Petro:Bonan matenon,mia kara!—B Mi havas pot vi surprizon.—P:Viiam havas pot mi surprizojn.—B:Sed hodiaǔ mi parolas treserioze."Okaze de via naskitago ak-

  15. Vi, de civiliserede

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?......Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?...

  16. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce the risk by controlling their blood sugar. Alternative Names Abducens paralysis; Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  17. Dioxouranium(VI) heterochelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamal, A. (Regional Engineering Coll., Kurukshetra (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Kumar, D. (Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Applied Sciences and Humanities)

    1982-01-01

    The paper describes the synthesis and characterization of new dioxouranium(VI) heterochelates, the ligands used being orthophenanthroline, 2,2'-dipyridyl, 3-aminopyridine, orthophenylenediamine, ethylenediamine, trimethylenediamine, tetramethylenediamine, hexamethylenediamine and the Schiff base derived from benzoylhydrazide and salicylaldehyde.

  18. u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKTRIA LECIONOMi preferas bonan glaciaonBarbara kaj Danuta faris aetojnkaj nun ili estas en kafejo kaj interparo-las.—Danuta:Kion vi trinkos, Banjo?—Barbara:Mi ankoraǚ ne scias. Sedmi tre soifas kaj ankaǚ malsatas.—D:Mi ankaǚ devas ion mani. Sed itie en la menuo ne estas manajoj...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type VI mucopolysaccharidosis type VI Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), also known as Maroteaux- ...

  20. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  1. u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKSESA LECIONO Oni povas ci tie bone babili Ni trovigas en la restoracio "Fabelo", kie okazas nun la naskigtaga festeno de Petro. —Danuta: "Fabelo" estas tre agrabla. —K: Jes, oni povas ci tie bone mangi kaj ankau bone babili, car la orkestro ne estas tro brua. —D: Ec la plej bona orkestro Renas, kiam gi estas tro brua. —K: Vi pravas. Rigardu, tie en la an

  2. Intelsat VI antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  3. Vi lever i en verden af ting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Vi lever i en verden af ting Vi lever i en verden af ting. Menneskeligt frembragte påvirkninger, konstruktioner og manipulationer af vores natur, hvis det da er vores natur. Vi lever også i et særligt innovations-regime, hvor vi bliver vurderet på og defineret af, hvad og hvordan vi kan bidrage med...

  4. Protostars and Planets VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    The Protostars and Planets book and conference series has been a long-standing tradition that commenced with the first meeting led by Tom Gehrels and held in Tucson, Arizona, in 1978. The goal then, as it still is today, was to bridge the gap between the fields of star and planet formation as well as the investigation of planetary systems and planets. As Tom Gehrels stated in the preface to the first Protostars and Planets book, "Cross-fertilization of information and understanding is bound to occur when investigators who are familiar with the stellar and interstellar phases meet with those who study the early phases of solar system formation." The central goal remained the same for the subsequent editions of the books and conferences Protostars and Planets II in 1984, Protostars and Planets III in 1990, Protostars and Planets IV in 1998, and Protostars and Planets V in 2005, but has now been greatly expanded by the flood of new discoveries in the field of exoplanet science. The original concept of the Protostars and Planets series also formed the basis for the sixth conference in the series, which took place on July 15-20, 2013. It was held for the first time outside of the United States in the bustling university town of Heidelberg, Germany. The meeting attracted 852 participants from 32 countries, and was centered around 38 review talks and more than 600 posters. The review talks were expanded to form the 38 chapters of this book, written by a total of 250 contributing authors. This Protostars and Planets volume reflects the current state-of-the-art in star and planet formation, and tightly connects the fields with each other. It is structured into four sections covering key aspects of molecular cloud and star formation, disk formation and evolution, planetary systems, and astrophysical conditions for life. All poster presentations from the conference can be found at www.ppvi.org. In the eight years that have passed since the fifth conference and book in the

  5. ViFiLite Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ViFiLite is a wireless infrastructure that utilizes the advantages of a V-band technology in supporting data gathering for structural health monitoring as well as...

  6. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  7. Basis Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Projective measurement can increase the entropy of a state $\\rho$, the increased entropy is not only up to the basis of projective measurement, but also has something to do with the properties of the state itself. In this paper we define this increased entropy as basis entropy. And then we discuss the usefulness of this new concept by showing its application in explaining the success probability of Grover's algorithm and the existence of quantum discord. And as shown in the paper, this new co...

  8. Prevalence and genetic analysis of phenotypically Vi- negative Salmonella typhi isolates in children from Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulickal, Anoop S; Callaghan, Martin J; Kelly, Dominic F; Maskey, Mitu; Mahat, Sandeep; Hamaluba, Mainga; Dongol, Sabina; Adhikari, Neelam; Thorson, Stephen; Basynat, Buddha; Murdoch, David R; Farrar, Jeremy J; Pollard, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide (ViPS) protects Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Typhi (S.Typhi) in vivo by multiple mechanisms. Recent microbiological reports from typhoid endemic countries suggest that acapsulate S.Typhi may occur in nature and contribute to clinical typhoid fever that is indistinguishable from disease caused by capsulate strains. The prevalence and genetic basis of ViPS-negative S.Typhi isolates in children from Kathmandu, Nepal, were tested in 68 isolates. Although 5.9% of isolates tested negative for capsular expression by slide agglutination tests, a novel multiplex PCR assay and individual PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of all 14 genes responsible for the synthesis, transportation and regulation of the ViPS. These data suggest that phenotypically acapsulate S.Typhi may not have a genetic basis for the same.

  9. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  10. Status report on the National Research Council`s BEIR VI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douple, E.

    1995-10-01

    The objectives of the committee on Biological Radiation Effects of Ionizing Radiation VI (BEIR) are to : assist the EPA in phase I by collecting and evaluating information on ongoing studies and results of studies published since the BEIR VI report of 1988 on the health effects of exposure to radon progeny; to perform a full scale reassessment of the health effects if a phase II study is warranted on the basis of phase I results. The BEIR VI working groups consists of miner data sets and analysis; residential studies; smoking and nonsmoking interactions; exposure and dosimetry; cellular and molecular studies; risk models and uncertainties; and animal studies.

  11. Type VI collagen in extracellular, 100-nm periodic filaments and fibrils: identification by immunoelectron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Filaments and fibrils that exhibit a 100-nm axial periodicity and occur in the medium and in the deposited extracellular matrix of chicken embryo and human fibroblast cultures have been tentatively identified with type VI collagen on the basis of their similar structural characteristics (Bruns, R. R., 1984, J. Ultrastruct. Res., 89:136-145). Using indirect immunoelectron microscopy and specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, we now report their positive identification with collagen VI ...

  12. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3 ± 0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  13. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-10-15

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3+/-0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  14. Study of reduction of chromium (VI by calcium polysulfide using spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batukhan Tatykaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents  the results of the study on reduction  of  Cr2O72-   to   Cr3 +  by aqueous solution of calcium polysulfide  using spectrophotometric method. Concentrations  of Cr (VI were determined on the basis of the absorption spectrum at the wavelength range 350 - 372 nm. The change of the concentration of Cr (VI during on reduction by calcium polysulfide has been shown.  The influence of pH on the rate of reducing of Cr (VI to Cr (III was considered: the rate of reducing of hexavalent chromium decreases with increasing pH. The data obtained show that recycling Cr (VI in industrial scale potentially effective at  the pH = 5.

  15. Rare mycetes of Romania, VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denes PAZMANY

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper it's a new contribution to the knowledge of the Macromycetes growing in Romania. There are presented 52 species collected from Central Transylvania, mostly of them new for mycoflora of the whole country. The chorological code used for the localization (MTB is that presented by D. PAZMANY (1986. In the enumeration of the species the paper follows KREISEL's system from "Handbuch fur Pilzfreunde VI" (1975: the species are grouped in 2 classes and 6 orders, mostly of them belongs to the order Agaricales. Ecological, chorological and taxonomical problems are discussed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  17. ■u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKSEPA LECIONO Cu tio ci estas gripo? Barbara estas malsana kaj nun estas ce si kuracisto —Kuracisto: Bonan tagon! —Barbara: Bonan tagon! —Petro: Bonan tagon, sinjoro! —K: Vi efektive malbone aspektas, Kio estas al vi, sinjorino? —B: Mitre malbone fartas. Miaj kapo kaj gorgo doloras.

  18. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  19. The chemistry of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI), and plutonium (VI) in aqueous carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic behavior of carbonate ion as a ligand that interacts with the hexavalent actinyl ions of U, Np, and Pu was examined by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The first-order rate parameter, k, that describes the exchange between bulk solution and bound carbonate decreases with increasing pH. At a pH of 10.0, and 25 degrees C, the respective values of k for the U(VI), Np(VI) complexes are 27.1 ± 0.3, 64.7 ± 3.3, and 706 ± 29. The variation of k with temperature was used to calculate the values of activation enthalpy ΔH double-dagger = 53 and 42 kJ mol-1; and activation entropy ΔS double-dagger = - 40 and - 71 J mol-1 K-1 for the uranyl and neptunyl systems, respectively. In this paper a plausible reaction scheme for the exchange reaction is considered. The influence of these slow carbonate-exchange reactions on selected electron-transfer reactions is noted

  20. Econophys-Kolkata VI Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the book is to present the ideas and research findings of active researchers such as physicists, economists, mathematicians and financial engineers working in the field of “Econophysics,” who have undertaken the task of modeling and analyzing systemic risk, network dynamics and other topics. Of primary interest in these studies is the aspect of systemic risk, which has long been identified as a potential scenario in which financial institutions trigger a dangerous contagion mechanism, spreading from the financial economy to the real economy. This type of risk, long confined to the monetary market, has spread considerably in the recent past, culminating in the subprime crisis of 2008. As such, understanding and controlling systemic risk has become an extremely important societal and economic challenge. The Econophys-Kolkata VI conference proceedings are dedicated to addressing a number of key issues involved. Several leading researchers in these fields report on their recent work and al...

  1. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L-1 U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L-1 Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  2. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  3. Delineation and Diagnostic Criteria of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poretti Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome type VI (OFD VI represents a rare phenotypic subtype of Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD. In the original report polydactyly, oral findings, intellectual disability, and absence of the cerebellar vermis at post-mortem characterized the syndrome. Subsequently, the molar tooth sign (MTS has been found in patients with OFD VI, prompting the inclusion of OFD VI in JSRD. We studied the clinical, neurodevelopmental, neuroimaging, and genetic findings in a cohort of 16 patients with OFD VI. We derived the following inclusion criteria from the literature: 1 MTS and one oral finding and polydactyly, or 2 MTS and more than one typical oral finding. The OFD VI neuroimaging pattern was found to be more severe than in other JSRD subgroups and includes severe hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypoplastic and dysplastic cerebellar hemispheres, marked enlargement of the posterior fossa, increased retrocerebellar collection of cerebrospinal fluid, abnormal brainstem, and frequently supratentorial abnormalities that occasionally include characteristic hypothalamic hamartomas. Additionally, two new JSRD neuroimaging findings (ascending superior cerebellar peduncles and fused thalami have been identified. Tongue hamartomas, additional frenula, upper lip notch, and mesoaxial polydactyly are specific findings in OFD VI, while cleft lip/palate and other types of polydactyly of hands and feet are not specific. Involvement of other organs may include ocular findings, particularly colobomas. The majority of the patients have absent motor development and profound cognitive impairment. In OFD VI, normal cognitive functions are possible, but exceptional. Sequencing of known JSRD genes in most patients failed to detect pathogenetic mutations, therefore the genetic basis of OFD VI remains unknown. Compared with other JSRD subgroups, the neurological findings and impairment of motor development and cognitive functions in OFD

  4. Structural Investigation of Methanol {6-[(2-oxidopropyl)iminomethyl] phenolato} dioxidomolybdenum(VI) by X-Ray Crystallography and DFT Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Iran SHEIKHSHOAIE; Yousef EBRAHIMIPOUR; Mahdiyeh SHEIKHSHOAEE

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the computational calculations of a cis-dioxomolybdenum(VI) complex by using density functional theory (DFT) with a DZP basis set (double zeta polarized basis set). The Schiff base 2-((E)-(2-hydroxypropylimino)methyl)-6-methoxyphenol was treated with MoO2(acac)2 in dry methanol to produce the mononuclear complex methanol{2-methoxy-6-[(2-oxidopropyl) iminomethyl]phenolato} dioxidomolybdenum(VI), whose structure has been solved and successfully refined in the monoclinic sp...

  5. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  6. Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI; Manifestacoes radiologicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtelli, Celso Montenegro [Hospital Sao Domingos, Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: celso@mednet.com.br

    2002-10-01

    The radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (muco polysaccharide VI) are reported. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases. (author)

  7. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  8. VI Olympic Winter Games Oslo 1952

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The official report, “VI Olympic Winter Games Oslo 1952” published by the Organising Committee is quite detailed. It consists of one bilingual English/Norwegian volume. It is thus the first bilingual official report of the Winter Games. Part I: VI Olympic Winter Games Oslo ; Historical ; Installations ; Organising the Games.- Part II: Programme of the Winter Games ; Invitations to the National Olympic Committees ; The torch relay from Morgedal to Oslo.- Part III: The sports events ; Results ;...

  9. Bioremediation of Chromium (VI from Textile Industry’s Effluent and Contaminated Soil Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine bacterial colonies were screened for the Cr(VI removal efficiency and out of these three bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus sp. were isolated from soil and used to remove Cr(VI from aqueous solution. The effect of time and concentrations on the removal rate of hexavalent chromium were studied using batch experiment. Maximum Cr (VI removal was noted 75.0% by Bacillus sp. at 10mg/l, 69.70% by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 40mg/l and 90.88% by Pseudomonas putida at 10mg/l of synthetic solution, during 96 hours. Among these three bacteria, the maximum Cr(VI removal was reported by Pseudomonas putida on lower concentration. On the basis of highest removal rate, Pseudomonas putida was selected and used for further chromium removal from samples. It was found to be removed the highest Cr(VI by 82.92%, from effluent and 74.41% from soil during 96 hours. The present study depicts that bacteria removes chromium efficiently and this could be used for industrial waste management and other environmental contaminants.

  10. Advances in preparation of modified activated carbon and its applications in the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. L.; Liang, M. N.; Li, H. H.; Zhu, Z. J.

    2016-08-01

    The wastewater in which Cr(VI) is not fully treated has drawn environment researchers’ attention increasingly, due to its environmental pollution and harms to human health. Thus a high efficiency of modified activated carbon (MAC) to remove Cr(VI) has become one of the hot topics among environmental material research. This paper introduces the modification methods from the physical structure features and chemical properties of the activated carbon (AC) surface. At the same time, it briefly analyses the chemical characteristics of Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions, and on the basis of the aforementioned introduces the modification methods of the surface chemical characteristics of AC, such as: oxidation modification, reduction modification, loaded metal modification, and microwave modification. Combining studies on removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions by MAC in recent years, this paper anticipates the new trends of preparing MAC and the points in absorption research, offering some suggestions for future studies.

  11. Structural Investigation of Methanol {6-[(2-oxidopropyliminomethyl] phenolato} dioxidomolybdenum(VI by X-Ray Crystallography and DFT Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran SHEIKHSHOAIE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the computational calculations of a cis-dioxomolybdenum(VI complex by using density functional theory (DFT with a DZP basis set (double zeta polarized basis set. The Schiff base 2-((E-(2-hydroxypropyliminomethyl-6-methoxyphenol was treated with MoO2(acac2 in dry methanol to produce the mononuclear complex methanol{2-methoxy-6-[(2-oxidopropyl iminomethyl]phenolato} dioxidomolybdenum(VI, whose structure has been solved and successfully refined in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with a = 6.755 Å, b = 15.835 Å, c = 13.119 Å, V = 1388.79 Å3, and Z = 4.

  12. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040+/-0.010 and 0.055+/-0.015 g gdry (-1), respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0 x 10(14) mol 1(-1) Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment. PMID:15381325

  13. Duration of Vi antibodies in participants vaccinated with Typhim Vi (Typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine) in an area not endemic for typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeschle, James E; Decker, Michael D

    2010-02-10

    After a single injection of Typhim Vi (typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine), serum antibody concentrations were monitored for 3 years in 37 adults who resided where typhoid fever was not endemic. Anti-Vi antibody concentrations declined progressively during the study, to levels that support the current US recommendation for revaccination every 2 years.

  14. BASIS RISK FOR RICE

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, Yoshie Saito; Turner, Steven C.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a cross hedging model for rice that minimizes basis risk and accounts for the existence of the nonstationary nature of basis. Basis is treated as an endogenous variable and model for basis risk are developed.

  15. Geothermal Program Review VI: proceedings. Beyond goals and objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Program Review VI was comprised of six sessions, including an opening session, four technical sessions that addressed each of the major DOE research areas, and a session on special issues. The technical sessions were on Hydrothermal, Hot Dry Rock, Geopressured and Magma resources. Presenters in the technical sessions discussed their R and D activities within the context of specific GTD Programmatic Objectives for that technology, their progress toward achieving those objectives, and the value of those achievements to industry. The ''Special Issues'' presentations addressed several topics such as the interactions between government and industry on geothermal energy R and D; the origin and basis for the programmatic objectives analytical computer model; and international marketing opportunities for US geothermal equipment and services. The unique aspect of Program Review VI was that it was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's Industry Round Table on Federal R and D. The Round Table provided a forum for open and lively discussions between industry and government researchers and gave industry an opportunity to convey their needs and perspectives on DOE's research programs. These discussions also provided valuable information to DOE regarding industry's priorities and directions.

  16. Seroprevalence of anti Vi antibodies and immunogenicity of Typhim Vi vaccine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Faridi, M M A; Aggarwal, Anju; Kaur, Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 250 children between 6 months to 5 years of age to determine seroprevalence of anti Vi antibodies and to measure seroresponse and percent seroconversion to TyphimVi polysaccharide vaccine in children 2-5 years of age. Fifty children each were enrolled between 6 to 12 months of age (Group A), between 1- 2 years of age(Group B), between 2-3 years of age (Group C), between 3-4 years of age (Group D) and between 4-5 years of age (Group E). Anti-Vi antibody baseline titres were determined in all children. Children in Groups C to E were vaccinated with Typhim Vi vaccine. Baseline and postvaccination antibody titres were determined by ELISA. Test sera which had antibody levels >1 microg/ml were scored as seropositive. Of 250 children, 3 had base line anti-Vi antibodies >1 microg/ml. Following immunization overall seroconversion rate was 77.5% with 65.3%, 78.2% and 88% children showing seroconversion in Groups C, D and E respectively. Seroconversion was significantly more in Group E children compared to Group C (p=0.0148). There were no significant adverse reactions following vaccination. The study highlights very low prevalence of baseline anti Vi antibodies in children between 6 months and less than 5 years of age and shows high immunogenicity and safety of Typhim Vi polysaccharide vaccine in children 2-5 years of age.

  17. Energy Transfer between U(VI) and Eu(III) Ions Adsorbed on a Silica Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of chemical behavior of actinide in a groundwater flow is important for assessing the possibility of their migration with water flows in a radioactive waste disposal site. Uranium is ubiquitous in the environment and a major actinide in a nuclear fuel cycle. Americium and curium having isotopes of long half life are minor actinides in a spent fuel. If a minor actinide coexists with uranium in a groundwater flow, some interactions between them could be expected such as minor actinide adsorption onto uranium precipitates and competition with each other for an adsorption to a mineral surface site. Eu(III) ion is frequently used as a chemical analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III) ions in a migration chemistry. The luminescent spectra of U(VI) and Eu(III) ions show a dependency on the coordination symmetry around them, and the changes in intensity or bandwidth of spectra can yield valuable information on their local environment. The luminescent lifetime also strongly depends on the coordination environment, and its measurement is valuable in probe studies on micro-heterogeneous systems. The excited U(VI) ion can be quenched through Stern.Volmer process, hydrolysis of excited species, exciplex formation, electron transfer or energy transfer. In case of U(VI)-Eu(III) system, the interaction between two ions can be studied by measuring the effect of Eu(III) ion on the quenching of U(VI) ion luminescence. There are only a few investigations on the interaction between an excited U(VI) ion and a lanthanide(III) ion. In perchlorate solution, the energy transfer to Eu(III) ion occurred only in solutions of pH>3.87. In this study, the quenching of U(VI) luminescence by Eu(III) on a silica surface was measured. The results will be discussed on the basis of a chemical interaction between them

  18. Edaphic characteristics of Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) forests in the Višegrad area

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević Velibor D.; Knežević Milan N.; Košanin Olivera D.; Kapović-Solomun Marijana B.; Lučić Radovan J.; Eremija Saša M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of soil research in Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) forest communities in the Višegrad area, carried out to determine the basic soil characteristics and eco-production potential of forest habitats as an important basis and framework for the successful management of these forests on the principles of sustainable development. Austrian pine forests in this region are an important and ecologically valuable community. The complex...

  19. Basis selection in LOBPCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetmaniuk, U.; Lehoucq, R.

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of our paper is to discuss basis selection for Knyazev's locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate gradient (LOBPCG) method. An inappropriate choice of basis can lead to ill-conditioned Gram matrices in the Rayleigh-Ritz analysis that can delay convergence or produce inaccurate eigenpairs. We demonstrate that the choice of basis is not merely related to computing in finite precision arithmetic. We propose a representation that maintains orthogonality of the basis vectors and so has excellent numerical properties.

  20. 77 FR 52116 - Title VI; Final Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations,'' 77 FR 27534, May 10... complying with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The purpose of this Circular is to provide... Ontiveros, Office of Civil Rights, Federal Transit Administration, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Room...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enhancements In Lieu of LEV Retrofitting • Eductors. Many chemical baths are currently mixed via air agitation... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  2. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  3. Behaviour of chromium(VI) in stormwater soil infiltration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Ingvertsen, Simon T.; Jensen, Marina B.;

    2013-01-01

    mm in 2 h) and extreme (100 mm in 3 h) rain events. The objectives were to understand the behaviour of the anionic and toxic Cr(VI) in soil at neutral pH and to asses treatment efficiency towards Cr(VI). During normal rain events Cr(VI) was largely retained (more than 50, even though pH was neutral...

  4. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  5. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given

  6. Uranium(VI) retention on quartz and kaolinite. Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of uranium in the geosphere is an important issue for safety performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories, or in the context of contaminated sites due to mining activity related to nuclear field. Under aerobic conditions, the fate of uranium is mainly governed by the ability of minerals to sorb U(VI) aqueous species. Hence, a thorough understanding of U(VI) sorption processes on minerals is required to provide a valuable prediction of U(VI) migration in the environment. In this study, we performed sorption/desorption experiments of U(VI) on quartz and kaolinite, for systems favouring the formation in solution (i) of UO22+ and monomeric hydrolysis products or (ii) of di-/tri-meric uranyl aqueous species, and / or U(VI)-colloids or UO2(OH)2 precipitates, or (iii) of uranyl-carbonate complexes. Particular attention was paid to determine the surface characteristics of the solids and their modification due to dissolution/precipitation processes during experiments. A double layer surface complexation model was applied to our experimental data in order to derive surface complexation equilibria and intrinsic constants which allow a valuable description of U(VI) retention over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, initial concentration of uranium [0.1-10μM] and solid - solution equilibration time. U(VI) sorption on quartz was successfully modeled by using two sets of adsorption equilibria, assuming (i) the formation of the surface complexes SiOUO2+, SiOUO2OH and SiO(UO2)3(OH)5, or (ii) the formation of the mono-dentate complex SiO(UO2)3(OH)5 and of the bidentate complex (SiO)2UO2. Assumptions on the density of each type of surface sites of kaolinite and on their acid-base properties were made from potentiometric titrations of kaolinite suspensions. We proposed on such a basis a set of surface complexation equilibria which accounts for U(VI) uptake on kaolinite over a wide range of chemical conditions, with aluminol edge sites as predominant surface

  7. CPE OF URANIUM (VI USING IONIC LIQUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANAA NAÏT-TAHAR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud point extraction (CPE was used to extract uranium (VI from an aqueous solution in acetate media. The methodology used is based on the formation of uranyl-ionic liquid (I complexes and uranyl-D2EHPA soluble in a micellar phase of non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-100. The uranium (VI complexes are then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase at ambient temperature. The ionic liquid (IL used as a chelating agent was synthesized and characterized in this study. It is composed of N-butyl N’-triethoxy methyl imidazolium cation and diethylhexylphosphate (D2EHPA-H as anion. The effect of the IL on the extraction efficiency was studied in presence and in absence of IL’s cation in acetate medium.

  8. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  9. Vi behøver innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2007-01-01

    -Produktion og Maskiner. Innovation og bæredygtighed er to områder som vi i Skandinavien giver meget stor opmærksomhed for at kunne vedligeholde vores globale konkurrencekraft og stærke velfærdssamfund. Gennem årene har mange brancher bidraget til skabelsen af vidensbaserede innovationer, og det faktum, at de......Analyse: Vi behøver innovation En ny miljøbølge ruller, og danske virksomheder bør ride med Af Tim McAloone, fredag 02. feb 2007 kl. 04:50 Tim McAloone Lektor og ph.d. ved Institut for mekanik, energi og konstruktion ved DTU. Tim McAloone skriver fremover jævnligt kommentarer i Ingeniøren...... Danmark? Svaret er, at vi har brug for innovation, og i denne kontekst betyder innovation følgede: Fornyelse af teknologierne relateret til vedvarende energikilder. Opfindelse af nye måder til at kæde energikilder sammen på, for at kunne sikre et optimalt bidrag til produktion, lagring og distribution af...

  10. Development of Vi conjugate - a new generation of typhoid vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Shousun Chen

    2013-11-01

    Typhoid fever remains to be a serious disease burden worldwide with an estimated annual incidence about 20 million. The licensed vaccines showed moderate protections and have multiple deficiencies. Most important of all, none of the licensed typhoid vaccines demonstrated protection for children under 5 years old. These limitations impeded successful implementation of typhoid vaccination programs. To improve immunogenicity Vi was conjugated to rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vi-rEPA showed higher and longer lasting anti-Vi IgG in adults and children than Vi alone in high endemic areas. In school-age children and adults, the immunity persisted more than 8 years. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized efficacy trial in 2- to 5-year-old children, Vi-rEPA conferred 89% protective efficacy against typhoid fever and the protection lasted at least 4 years. When given concomitantly with infant routine vaccines, Vi-rEPA was safe, immunogenic and showed no interference with the routine vaccines. Vi conjugate vaccine was also attempted and successfully demonstrated by several other laboratories and manufactures. Using either rEPA or different carrier proteins, such as diphtheria or tetanus toxoid, recombinant diphtheria toxin (CRM197), the Vi conjugates synthesized was significantly more immunogenic than Vi alone. Recently, two Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugates were licensed in India for all ages, starts as young as 3 month old. This new generation of typhoid vaccine opens up a new era for typhoid prevention and elimination.

  11. Phytoremediation potential and nutrient status of Barringtonia acutangula Gaerth. Tree seedlings grown under different chromium (CrVI) treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Tripathi, Durgesh Kumar; Chauhan, Devendra Kumar

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of different chromium (CrVI) treatments on seedlings of semi-aquatic plant Barringtonia acutangula, hydroponic experiments were conducted. Results revealed that B. acutangula could tolerate much higher CrVI concentration accumulated about 751-2,703 mg kg(-1) dry weight in roots and 50-1,101 mg kg(-1) dry weight in shoots, respectively, under 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 mM chromium treatments. CrVI exposure at 1.0-4.0 mM does not exhibit toxicity signs; however, up to 4.0 mM CrVI exposure causes significant decline in growth parameters. Content of macronutrients such as Ca and K decreased under different Cr treatments in roots and shoots, while Mg content of roots and shoots did not influence at the range of 1.0-4.0 mM Cr; however, significant decrease at 5.0 mM Cr, besides P content, significantly shows increasing trends, respectively. Interestingly, sulfur content of roots and shoots show increasing trends at 1.0-2.0 mM Cr; however, severe decrease of up to 3.0-5.0 mM is shown in CrVI treatments. Furthermore, micronutrients content were enhanced under CrVI treatments excluding Cu and Fe since they show significant reduction in shoots as well as in roots. Bioaccumulation factor were also calculated on the basis of results obtained which shows the value of >1 without viewing chromium toxicity symptoms. This study demonstrated that B. acutangula could tolerate CrVI concentrations up to 1.0-4.0 mM Cr which may be useful in chromium phytoremediation programs. PMID:24399023

  12. Prevention of typhoid fever in Nepal with the Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, I L; Lowe, C U; Thapa, R; Gurubacharya, V L; Shrestha, M B; Cadoz, M; Schulz, D; Armand, J; Bryla, D A; Trollfors, B

    1987-10-29

    We conducted a pilot study followed by a large clinical trial in Nepal of the use of the capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi (Vi) as a vaccine to prevent typhoid fever. In the pilot study, involving 274 Nepalese, there were no significant side effects of the Vi vaccine; about 75 percent responded with a rise in serum antibodies of fourfold or more. In the clinical trial, residents of five villages were given intramuscular injections of either Vi or, as a control, pneumococcus vaccine dispensed in coded, randomly arranged, single-dose syringes. There were 6907 participants, of whom 6438 were members of the target population (5 to 44 years of age); each was visited every two days. Those with temperatures of 37.8 degrees C or higher for three consecutive days were examined and asked to give blood for culture. Typhoid was diagnosed as either blood culture-positive or clinically suspected on the basis of bradycardia, splenomegaly, and fever, with a negative blood culture. Seventeen months after vaccination, the codes were broken for the 71 patients meeting the criteria for either culture-positive or clinically suspected typhoid. The attack rate of typhoid was 16.2 per 1000 among the controls and 4.1 per 1000 among those immunized with Vi (P less than 0.00001). The efficacy of Vi was 72 percent in the culture-positive cases, 80 percent in the clinically suspected cases, and 75 percent in the two groups combined. These data provide evidence that Vi antibodies confer protection against typhoid. Surveillance continues to determine the duration of Vi-induced immunity.

  13. Safety Basis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities

  14. Safety Basis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  15. Role of anions and reaction conditions in the preparation of uranium(VI), neptunium(VI), and plutonium(VI) borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuao; Villa, Eric M; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-03-21

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO(2)[B(8)O(11)(OH)(4)] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO(2)(2+), surrounded by BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra to create an AnO(8) hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI). PMID:21291194

  16. Basis Tensor Gauge Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Daniel J H

    2016-01-01

    We reformulate gauge theories in analogy with the vierbein formalism of general relativity. More specifically, we reformulate gauge theories such that their gauge dynamical degrees of freedom are local fields that transform linearly under the dual representation of the charged matter field. These local fields, which naively have the interpretation of non-local operators similar to Wilson lines, satisfy constraint equations. A set of basis tensor fields are used to solve these constraint equations, and their field theory is constructed. A new local symmetry in terms of the basis tensor fields is used to make this field theory local and maintain a Hamiltonian that is bounded from below. The field theory of the basis tensor fields is what we call the basis tensor gauge theory.

  17. Symmetry Adapted Basis Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, John Scales; Rettrup, Sten; Avery, James Emil

    automatically with computer techniques. The method has a wide range of applicability, and can be used to solve difficult eigenvalue problems in a number of fields. The book is of special interest to quantum theorists, computer scientists, computational chemists and applied mathematicians....... eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for the Hamiltonian of a many-particle system is usually so difficult that it requires approximate methods, the most common of which is expansion of the eigenfunctions in terms of basis functions that obey the boundary conditions of the problem. The computational effort needed...... in such problems can be much reduced by making use of symmetry-adapted basis functions. The conventional method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets is through the application of group theory, but this can be difficult. This book describes an easier method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets...

  18. Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (muco polysaccharide VI) are reported. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases. (author)

  19. DBC solvent extraction of U(VI) from thiocyanate medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The extraction behavior of uranium(VI) from thiocyanate medium with dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) in nitrobenzene and the effects of alkali cations on the extraction were investigated. The results showed that the uranium (VI) can be effectively extracted in the presence of potassium cation, uranium (VI) is extracted as complex anionic species UO2(SCN)-3, and the stoichiometry of the extracted complex is KUO2(SCN)32DBC(o).

  20. Oral–Facial–Digital Syndrome type VI with self mutilations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 2.5 year old female, 2nd in order of birth of 1st cousin consanguineous marriage, with the typical features of Oral–Facial–Digital Syndrome type VI (OFDS VI including midline pseudo cleft upper lip, sublingual nodule, molar tooth sign by MRI brain, bilateral mesoaxial polydactyly (hexadactyly, and developmental delay. The patient had self mutilations which was not reported before in OFDS VI except once.

  1. Reduction U(VI) using jones reductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of dissolved oxide uranium in sulfuric acid use of reductor Jones Zn (Hg) was carried out. The reduced uranium sulfate solution was analyzed its U(IV) by measuring its absorbance on 652 nm and compared to oxidation U(IV) solution with KMnO4 solution. It was found that the comparison was in a good agreement. However, measuring of absorbance of U(VI) solution on 429 nm result of oxidation U(IV) with KMnO4 solution was not change. (author)

  2. Farvel til globaliseringen som vi kendte den

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Vi er endt med en krise, som rækker langt ud over det globale monetære system, fordi den ideologiske ortodoksi, der skabte den, har ført til udflytning af millioner af arbejdspladser, tæring af nationalstaternes sammenhængskraft og overgreb på naturen. Kronikken refererer bl.a. til John Maynard K...... Keynes og en artikel af økonomen Robert Skidelsky i The American Prospect. Udgivelsesdato: 12. januar 2009...

  3. Extractive removal of chromium (VI) from industrial waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Archana; Pal, Chandana; Sahu, K K

    2008-11-30

    Extractive removal of Cr (VI) was carried out from chloride solutions using cyanex 923 mixed with kerosene. The efficiency of this extractant was studied under various experimental conditions, such as concentration of different mineral acids in the aqueous phase, concentration of cyanex 923 and Cr (VI) present in the initial aqueous feed, temperature and time of extraction, organic to aqueous (O/A) phase ratio. Percentage Cr (VI) extraction decreases with the increase in temperature at varying concentration of cyanex 923. The interference of the impurities usually associated with Cr (VI) such as Cr (III), Cu, Ni, Fe (II), Zn, Chloride and sulphate, etc., were examined under the optimized conditions and only Zn was found to interfere. Under the optimum experimental conditions 98.6-99.9% of Cr (VI) was extracted in 3-5 min at O/A of 2 with the initial feed concentration of 1g/L of Cr (VI). The extracted Cr (VI) was quantitatively stripped with 1M NaOH and the organic phase obtained after the stripping of Cr (VI) was washed with dilute HCl solution to neutralize any NaOH trapped/adhered to the solvent and then with distilled water. This regenerated solvent was reused in succeeding extraction of chromium (VI). Finally a few experiments were performed with the synthetic effluent from an electroplating industry.

  4. Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress. Vi vil nemlig nå det hele og presser konstant nye aftaler ind i vores kalender. Det eneste, der hjælper, er at ’gøre intet’ – men kan man overhovedet det? Udgivelsesdato: 30.09.09......Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress. Vi vil nemlig nå det hele og presser konstant nye aftaler ind i vores kalender. Det eneste, der hjælper, er at ’gøre intet’ – men kan man overhovedet det? Udgivelsesdato: 30.09.09...

  5. Immunogenicity of a new Salmonella Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccine--vax-TyVi--in Cuban school children and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azze, Rolando Felipe Ochoa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos Martínez; Iniesta, Mónica Ginebra; Marchena, Xenia Rosa Ferriol; Alfonso, Vivian María Rodríguez; Padrón, Franklin Tomás Sotolongo

    2003-06-20

    A randomized, controlled, double blind study was carried out in Cuban children and teenagers aged 9-13 years to evaluate the immunogenicity of vax-TyVi-Salmonella Typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccine-with respect control vaccines. Serum samples were taken before and 21 days after the immunization, and ELISA was used for the determination of antibodies to Vi polysaccharide. Subjects who received vax-TyVi and TYPHIM Vi (Pasteur-Mérieux) showed seroconversion rates of 85.61 and 78.36%, respectively. The geometric mean titer (GMT) values for Vi antibodies induced after vaccination were 6.27 microg/ml (5.40-7.38 microg/ml) and 5.97 microg/ml (5.01-7.10 microg/ml), respectively. In contrast, subjects receiving the tetanus toxoid vaccine showed 0% seroconversion.

  6. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  7. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  8. 14 CFR 1214.804 - Services, pricing basis, and other considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to a pro rata share of the standard service listed in paragraph (i) of this section, the following... basis for establishing the standard flight price: (i) A pro rata share of the Shuttle services normally... accordance with the shared-flight scheduling provisions of the Shuttle policy. (vi) A pro rata share of...

  9. Uranium(VI) uptake by synthetic calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immobilization of U(VI) by C-S-H phases under conditions relevant for the cementitious near field of a repository for radioactive waste has been investigated. C-S-H phases have been synthesized using two different procedures: the 'direct reaction' method and the 'solution reaction' method. The stabilities of alkaline solutions of U(VI) (presence of precipitates or colloidal material) were studied prior to sorption and co-precipitation tests in order to determine the experimental U(VI) solubility limits. These U(VI) solubility limits were compared with the U(VI) solubilities obtained from thermodynamic speciation calculations assuming the presence of combinations of different solid U(VI) phases. The solid phase controlling U(VI) solubility in the present experiments was found to be CaUO4s). The U(VI) uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms on C-S-H phases with different C:S ratios were determined under various chemical conditions; e.g., sorption and co-precipitation experiments and different pH's. U(VI) was found to sorb fast and very strongly on C-S-H phases with distribution ratios (Rd values) ranging in value between 103 L kg-1 and 106 L kg-1. Both sorption and co-precipitation experiments resulted in Rd values which were very similar, thus indicating that no additional sorption sites for U(VI) were generated in the co-precipitation process. Furthermore, C-S-H synthesis procedures did not have a significant influence on U(VI) uptake. The U(VI) sorption isotherms were found to be non-linear, and further, increasing Ca concentrations resulted in increasing U(VI) uptake. The latter observation suggests that U(VI) uptake is controlled by a solubility-limiting process, while the former observation further indicates that pure Ca-uranate is not the solubility-limiting phase. It is proposed that a solid solution containing Ca and UO22+ could control U(VI) uptake by C-S-H phases. (authors)

  10. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Vairo,1–3 Andressa Federhen,1,3,4 Guilherme Baldo,1,2,5–7 Mariluce Riegel,1,6 Maira Burin,1 Sandra Leistner-Segal,1,8 Roberto Giugliani1,5,6,81Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Department of Genetics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Clinical Research Group on Medical Genetics, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 4Post-Graduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 5Gene Therapy Center, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 6Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 7Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 8Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in a Siamese/short-haired European cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, B; Marino, F; Mazzullo, G; Trusso, A; De Maria, R; Amedeo, S; Divari, S; Castagnaro, M

    2002-10-01

    A 3-year-old Siamese/short-haired European cat was referred for clinical disease characterized by dwarfism, facial dysmorphia, paralysis, small and curled ears, corneal clouding and large areas of alopecia. X-ray examination showed multiple bone dysplasia. On the basis of clinical features a form of mucopolysaccharidosis was suspected. The cat, killed at the owner's request, presented several severe skeletal deformities such as long caudal limbs, enlarged thorax with sunken breastbone, vertebral ankylosis in many spinal segments and visceral involvement. Histologically, the cat showed diffuse vacuolization and enlargement of cells in cartilage, bone and visceral organs. Ultrastructurally, membrane-bound vacuoles were filled with fibrillar and fluffy-material or concentrically whorled lamellae. Arylsulphatase B activity was 3.24 nm/mg/h in the affected cat and 30.6 in a normal age-matched control (NC). The L-iduronidase activity was slightly increased. Quantitation of total glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) revealed a 4.5-fold increase in the affected cat as compared with NC, while electrophoretic run of specific GAGs [chondroitin sulphate (CA); hyaluronan (HA); heparan sulphate (HS); dermatan sulphate (DS); keratan sulphate (KS)] performed on a cellulose acetate sheet, showed a striking increase in the DS band. On densitometric analysis of the electrophoretic run stained with Alcian Blue 8GX, the absorption of DS was eight-fold increased as compared with NC. The clinical and morphological features, and the biochemical findings, were consistent with the diagnosis of feline mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

  12. From BASIS to MIRACLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; E. Lechner, Ruep;

    2015-01-01

    Results based on virtual instrument models for the first high-flux, high-resolution, spallation based, backscattering spectrometer, BASIS are presented in this paper. These were verified using the Monte Carlo instrument simulation packages McStas and VITESS. Excellent agreement of the neutron cou...... are pivotal to the conceptual design of the next generation backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES at the European Spallation Source....

  13. [Remediation of chromium (VI) contaminated soils using permeable reactive composite electrodes technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong-Bing; Liu, Fang; Ma, Jin; Zhang, Chang-Bo; He, Guo-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Electrokinetic transport processes have been shown to have potential for the effective removal of heavy metals from soils. However, pH changes near the anode and cathode limit their widespread application in the remediation of contaminated soils. Permeable reactive composite electrodes (PRCE) were made by attaching reactive materials such as Fe(0) and zeolite to the electrodes, and the effects of the composite electrodes on pH control, chromium removal efficiency and Cr speciation changes were studied in the electrokinetic remediation process of Cr( VI) contaminated soil. Composite electrodes consisting of permeable reactive materials gave better pH control and Cr removal efficiency compared to traditional electrodes, and a Fe(0) + zeolite reactive layer in the anode exhibited the best performance compared to zeolite or Fe(0) alone. After 5 days of electrokinetic remediation with a DC voltage of 2 V x cm(-1), the Fe(0) + zeolite reactive layer lowered the pH fluctuation, maintained the soil pH in the range of 5.5 to 8.5, raised the Cr(VI) removal efficiency up to 97% in any soil section, produced lower Cr(III) residues, enhanced the amount of Cr retention up to 8 and 1.8 times respectively, and transformed 98% of the Cr(VI) into lower toxicity Cr(III). This study provides a theoretical basis for the exploitation of permeable reactive composite electrodes which are a practical option for future applications. PMID:22452223

  14. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  15. Kandinsky's "Composition VI": Heideggerian Poetry in Noah's Ark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    The author will begin his investigation of Wassily Kandinsky's painting "Composition VI" with Kandinsky's own commentary on the painting. He will then turn to the analysis of Kandinsky and the "Compositions" in John Sallis's book "Shades." Using this analysis as his point of departure, the author will consider how "Composition VI" resonates with…

  16. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  17. Dioxouranium (VI) complexes of macrocyclic ligands derived from 2.6-diacetyl pyridine-bis(thiosemicarbazone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dioxouranium(VI) complex of 2.6-diacetylpyridine-bis(thiosemicarbazone), (DAPTC), [UO2(DAPTC) (NO3)2] and its reactions with diketones are described. The complexes so obtained have been characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, electrical conductance and spectral (i.r. and electronic) data. The parent complex reacts with β-diketones to form a complex of the type [UO2(mac)(NO3)2], where mac is a macrocyclic ligand derived by the condensation of DAPTC and a β-diketone. The ligand, DAPTC, acts as a neutral, terdentate ligand having coordination sites at pyridine nitrogen and two azomethine nitrogens. 27 refs

  18. Biosorption of uranium (VI) by immobilized Aspergillus fumigatus beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of uranium (VI) ions by immobilized Aspergillus fumigatus beads was investigated in a batch system. The influences of solution pH, biosorbent dose, U (VI) concentration, and contact time on U (VI) biosorption were studied. The results indicated that the adsorption capacity was strongly affected by the solution pH, the biosorbent dose and initial U (VI) concentration. Optimum biosorption was observed at pH 5.0, biosrobent dose (w/v) 2.5%, initial U (VI) concentration 60 mg L-1. Biosorption equilibrium was established in 120 min. The adsorption process conformed to the Freunlich and Temkin isothermal adsorption models. The dynamic adsorption model conformed to pseudo-second order model.

  19. Photovoltaic effects in II-VI heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bube, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Photovoltaic effects have been investigated in II-VI heterojunctions prepared by close-space vapor transport, vacuum evaporation, spray pyrolysis and sputtering. Solar efficiencies of about 8% have been measured for the following systems: (a) n-CdS film deposited on single crystal p-CdTe by vacuum evaporation, (b) n-ZnCdS film deposited on single crystal p-CdTe by spray pyrolysis, and (c) n-Indium-Tin Oxide film deposited on single crystal p-CdTe by sputtering in an inert atmosphere. Open-circuit voltages greater than 0.8 V have been measured in heterojunctions of type (b) and (c), as well as in CdTe p-n homojunctions produced by ion implantation.

  20. Thermal decomposition of potassium dioxodiaquaperoxyoxalatouranate(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailaja, B.B.V.; Kebede, Tesfahun; Prasada Rao, M.S

    2003-09-04

    Potassium dioxodiaquaperoxyoxalatouranate(VI) was obtained by reaction of uranyl nitrate with oxalic acid and then hydrogen peroxide in the presence of potassium ion. The complex was subjected to chemical analysis. The thermal decomposition behavior of the complex was studied using TG, DTA and DTG techniques. The solid complex salt and the intermediate product of its thermal decomposition were characterized using IR absorption and X-ray diffraction spectra. Based on the data from these physicochemical investigations, the structural formula of the complex was proposed as K{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2})C{sub 2}O{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].

  1. Design basis 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.; Soerensen, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-09-01

    Design Basis Program 2 (DBP2) is comprehensive fully coupled code which has the capability to operate in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain. The code was developed during the period 1991-93 and succeed Design Basis 1, which is a one-blade model presuming stiff tower, transmission system and hub. The package is designed for use on a personal computer and offers a user-friendly environment based on menu-driven editing and control facilities, and with graphics used extensively for the data presentation. Moreover in-data as well as results are dumped on files in Ascii-format. The input data is organized in a in-data base with a structure that easily allows for arbitrary combinations of defined structural components and load cases. (au)

  2. Six-fold Coordinated Carbon Dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, V; Yoo, C; Klepeis, J; Jenei, Z

    2006-03-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent while silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and represents one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of a new extended-solid phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}): a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this new extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2}--a prototypical molecular solid, and SiO{sub 2}--one of Earth's fundamental building blocks. The phase diagram suggests a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and proposes that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III, and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the caxis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  3. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae (LLNL)

    2008-06-16

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO{sub 2}: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2} (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO{sub 2} (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  4. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

    2007-01-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO2) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO2 transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO2 tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO2: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO2-II (refs 1,2) above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO2-V (refs 3-5) and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO2 (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO2 (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO2-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II (refs 1,2), III (refs 7,8) and IV (refs 9,10). The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P42/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp3 hybridization. PMID:17160005

  5. Clinical significance of type VI pit pattern subclassification in determining the depth of invasion of colorectal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Kanao; Shinji Tanaka; Shiro Oka; Iwao Kaneko; Shigeto Yoshida; Koji Arihiro; Masaharu Yoshihara; Kazuaki Chayama

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether subclassification of the type VI pit pattern on the basis of magnifying colonoscopy findings is useful in determining the type and depth of invasion of colorectal neoplasms.METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 272 colorectal neoplasms (117 dysplasias and 155 submucosal invasive carcinomas; 228 patients) with a type V pit pattern [type VI, n = 202; type VN,n = 70 (Kudo and Tsuruta classification system)]. We divided lesions with a type VI pit pattern into two subclasses, mildly irregular lesions and severely irregular lesions, according to the prominent and detailed magnifying colonoscopy findings.We examined the relation between these two subclasses and histology/invasion depth.RESULTS: One hundred and four lesions (51.5%) were judged to be mildly irregular, and 98 lesions (48.5%) were judged to be severely irregular. Ninety-seven (93.3%)mildly irregular lesions showed dysplasias or submucosal invasion of less than 1000 μm (SM < 1000 μm).Fifty-five (56.1%) severely irregular lesions showed submucosal invasion equal to or deeper than 1000 μm (SM ≥ 1000 μm). Mild irregularity was found significantly more often in dysplasias or lesions with SM < 1000 μm than in lesions with SM ≥ 1000 μm (P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Subclassification of the type VI pit pattern is useful for identifying dysplasias or lesions with SM < 1000 μm.

  6. Synthesis and Structural Studies of 1-Deoxybaccatin VI Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN,Hai-Xia; WANG,Dian-Long; CHEN,Jian-Min; CHEN,Min-Qin

    2008-01-01

    Synthesis and crystal structures of 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives, and the influence of C(9), C(10), and C(13) substituents of the tetracyclic moiety on molecular conformations were investigated. Comparison of conformations of 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives reveals subtle conformational variations in the tetracyclic ring system due to deacetylation at C(10) and C(13), and 9,10-acetonide. Additionally, C(2)-benzoyl group exhibits an unexpected conformational flexibility in 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives, which may be relevant to the bioactivity of taxanes.

  7. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  8. ITER technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following on from the Final Report of the EDA(DS/21), and the summary of the ITER Final Design report(DS/22), the technical basis gives further details of the design of ITER. It is in two parts. The first, the Plant Design specification, summarises the main constraints on the plant design and operation from the viewpoint of engineering and physics assumptions, compliance with safety regulations, and siting requirements and assumptions. The second, the Plant Description Document, describes the physics performance and engineering characteristics of the plant design, illustrates the potential operational consequences foe the locality of a generic site, gives the construction, commissioning, exploitation and decommissioning schedule, and reports the estimated lifetime costing based on data from the industry of the EDA parties

  9. BIOSORPTION OF CR (VI BY RESTING CELLS OF ASPERGILLUS SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sen , M. Ghosh Dastidar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cr(VI from aqueous solution was studied in a batch bioreactor using the resting cells of filamentous fungal biomass (Aspergillus sp. isolated from industrial wastewaters. The specific Cr(VI removal (mg/g of dried biomass decreased with increase in pH and increased with increase in initial Cr(VI concentration, upto 500 mg/L. By increasing biomass concentration from 2.4 to 5.2 g/L, the specific metal removal remained almost constant. The studies carried out by using the resting cells from various stages of growth indicated maximum Cr(VI removal of 34.8 mg/g using the biomass from the beginning of the stationary phase. The adsorption equilibrium constants Qº (42.9 mg/g and b (0.0091/mg were obtained from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  10. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  11. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  12. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  13. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  14. Experience with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, L; Debois, H; Fletcher, M; Dumas, R

    1999-09-01

    Typhoid fever remains an important health threat in many parts of the world, with an estimated 16 million cases and 600,000 deaths occurring each year. The emergence of Salmonella typhi strains multiply resistant to antibiotics has complicated the treatment of this disease. Field experience of 8 years shows that a vaccine composed of purified Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi, given as a single intramuscular or deep subcutaneous injection, has consistent immunogenicity and efficacy. Side effects, based on reports since 1989, are infrequent and mild. Furthermore, the Vi vaccine may be administered simultaneously with other common "travel" vaccines, at two different sites of injection, without affecting immunogenicity and tolerability. This review presents an update of the development and clinical experience with the Salmonella typhi Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi; Pasteur Mérieux Connaught, France).

  15. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  16. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  17. Plan of propagation and communication experiments using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Shingo

    1988-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite VI is scheduled to be launched by an H-II rocket. The missions of ETS-VI are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using millimeter waves and optical beams and fix satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. Several kinds of frequency bands will be used for the communications missions. However, these frequencies can be used for propagation experiments.

  18. Green Chemical Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid, Robina

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and technology of manipulating materials at atomic and molecular scale with properties different from bulk. Semiconductor QDs are important class of nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties owing to the quantum confinement effect. Size dependent optical properties make research on semiconductor QDs more attractive in the field of nanotechnology. Semiconductor QDs are usually composed of combination of elements from groups II–VI, III–V, or IV–VI ...

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Case Report) Brain MRI and MR Spectroscopy Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Fuldem Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with multisystem involvement which is determined by mutations in the arylsulfatase B (ARSB) gene. Herein, we report the radiological findings of a case of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI which showed progression of periventricular lesions on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and slight elevation of myoinositole and no other significant pathological peak on magnetic resonance (MR) spectro...

  20. Robotics Vision for a Scouting Rover - PRoViScout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paar, G.; Woods, M.; Pullan, D.; Proviscout Team

    2011-10-01

    The FP7-SPACE Project ProViScout (Planetary Robotics Vision Scout, scheduled from April 2010 to September 2012) aims to demonstrate the feasibility of vision-based autonomous sample identification & selection in combination with vision-based navigation for a long range scouting/exploration mission on a terrestrial planet along with the robotic elements required. The paper gives an overview of the PRoViScout technical and scientific objectives, envisaged solutions and achievements so far.

  1. Vi har intet lært - hvornår lærer vi det?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en kerneakti......WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en...

  2. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI

  3. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U022+, was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L-1. In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g-1. In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U022+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion. (author)

  4. Molecular evolution of type VI intermediate filament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanabin, transitin and nestin are type VI intermediate filament (IF proteins that are developmentally regulated in frogs, birds and mammals, respectively. Tanabin is expressed in the growth cones of embryonic vertebrate neurons, whereas transitin and nestin are found in myogenic and neurogenic cells. Another type VI IF protein, synemin, is expressed in undifferentiated and mature muscle cells of birds and mammals. In addition to an IF-typical α-helical core domain, type VI IF proteins are characterized by a long C-terminal tail often containing distinct repeated motifs. The molecular evolution of type VI IF proteins remains poorly studied. Results To examine the evolutionary history of type VI IF proteins, sequence comparisons, BLAST searches, synteny studies and phylogenic analyses were performed. This study provides new evidence that tanabin, transitin and nestin are indeed orthologous type VI IF proteins. It demonstrates that tanabin, transitin and nestin genes share intron positions and sequence identities, have a similar chromosomal context and display closely related positions in phylogenic analyses. Despite this homology, fast evolution rates of their C-terminal extremity have caused the appearance of repeated motifs with distinct biological activities. In particular, our in silico and in vitro analyses of their tail domain have shown that (avian transitin, but not (mammalian nestin, contains a repeat domain displaying nucleotide hydrolysis activity. Conclusion These analyses of the evolutionary history of the IF proteins fit with a model in which type VI IFs form a branch distinct from NF proteins and are composed of two major proteins: synemin and nestin orthologs. Rapid evolution of the C-terminal extremity of nestin orthologs could be responsible for their divergent functions.

  5. Thermal stabilization of chromium(VI) in kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Chiu, Shu-Yuan; Tsai, Hsien-Neng; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2002-11-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) by heating may be a useful detoxification mechanism for thermal immobilization. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the change of speciation of chromium in 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin further heated at 500, 900, or 1100 degrees C was studied. The 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample was prepared by mixing 1.5 L of 0.257 M CrO3 solution (pH 0.71) with 0.5 kg of kaolin powder for 48 h, and then the slurry was heated (dried) at 105 degrees C until a constant weight was reached. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure method was used to determine the percentage of leached chromium from all heated samples. In all 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples, Cr2O3 transformed from the hydrated Cr(VI) by a 4-h heat application was identified by the X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as the key species that is leaching-resistant due to its low solubility. For the 1100 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample, the Fourier transform of its EXAFS spectrum indicates that the intensity of the peaks at 2.45 (Cr-Cr shell of Cr2O3) and 5.00 A (Cr-Cr and Cr-O shells of Cr2O3) without phase shift correction is either relatively smaller or disappearing, compared with that of the 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples. It is suggested that chromium octahedra were bridged to silica tetrahedra and incorporated in minerals formed at 1100 degrees C, such as mullite or sillimanite, since these phases were detected by XRD. Cr of this form is not easily leached. PMID:12433175

  6. GeneViTo: Visualizing gene-product functional and structural features in genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promponas Vasilis J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of increasing amounts of sequence data from completely sequenced genomes boosts the development of new computational methods for automated genome annotation and comparative genomics. Therefore, there is a need for tools that facilitate the visualization of raw data and results produced by bioinformatics analysis, providing new means for interactive genome exploration. Visual inspection can be used as a basis to assess the quality of various analysis algorithms and to aid in-depth genomic studies. Results GeneViTo is a JAVA-based computer application that serves as a workbench for genome-wide analysis through visual interaction. The application deals with various experimental information concerning both DNA and protein sequences (derived from public sequence databases or proprietary data sources and meta-data obtained by various prediction algorithms, classification schemes or user-defined features. Interaction with a Graphical User Interface (GUI allows easy extraction of genomic and proteomic data referring to the sequence itself, sequence features, or general structural and functional features. Emphasis is laid on the potential comparison between annotation and prediction data in order to offer a supplement to the provided information, especially in cases of "poor" annotation, or an evaluation of available predictions. Moreover, desired information can be output in high quality JPEG image files for further elaboration and scientific use. A compilation of properly formatted GeneViTo input data for demonstration is available to interested readers for two completely sequenced prokaryotes, Chlamydia trachomatis and Methanococcus jannaschii. Conclusions GeneViTo offers an inspectional view of genomic functional elements, concerning data stemming both from database annotation and analysis tools for an overall analysis of existing genomes. The application is compatible with Linux or Windows ME-2000-XP operating

  7. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uygun, Murat, E-mail: muygun@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Kocarl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Vocational and Training School (Turkey); Feyzioglu, Esra; Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Caka, Mueserref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO{sub 3} solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m{sup 2}/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  8. Biosorption of aqueous chromium(VI) by Tamarindus indica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Bhuptawat, Hitendra Kumar; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2006-05-01

    The effectiveness of low cost agro-based materials namely, Tamarindus indica seed (TS), crushed coconut shell (CS), almond shell (AS), ground nut shell (GS) and walnut shell (WS) were evaluated for Cr(VI) removal. Batch test indicated that hexavalent chromium sorption capacity (q(e)) followed the sequence q(e)(TS) > q(e)(WS) > q(e)(AS) > q(e)(GS) > q(e)(CS). Due to high sorptive capacity, tamarind seed was selected for detailed sorption studies. Sorption kinetic data followed first order reversible kinetic fit model for all the sorbents. The equilibrium conditions were achieved within 150 min under the mixing conditions employed. Sorption equilibria exhibited better fit to Freundlich isotherms (R>0.92) than Langmuir isotherm (R approximately = 0.87). Hexavalent chromium sorption by TS decreased with increase in pH, and slightly reduced with increase in ionic strength. Cr(VI) removal by TS seems to be mainly by chemisorption. Desorption of Cr(VI) from Cr(VI) laden TS was quite less by distilled water and HCl. Whereas with NaOH, maximum desorption achieved was about 15.3%. When TS was used in downflow column mode, Cr(VI) removal was quite good but head loss increased as the run progressed and was stopped after 200 h.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of type VI collagen in superficial fibromatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, G; Colombatti, A; Lanzafame, S

    1995-10-01

    The expression of type VI collagen was studied immunohistochemically in 26 cases of superficial fibromatoses (palmar, plantar and penile) using an immunoperoxidase method for light microscopic visualization. The polyclonal antibody against type VI collagen used in this study was isolated from human placenta and its specifity was tested by immunoblotting assay. All cases consisted of multiple nodules showing a variable degree of cellularity and fibrosis. Depending on the predominant histological appearance of these nodules, each case was assigned to the three following phases: proliferative, involutional and residual. Morphologically normal palmar and plantar aponeuroses were included as controls. Immunohistochemical findings showed that type VI collagen was present as longitudinal thin fibers in normal palmar and plantar aponeuroses. A differential expression of this collagen was found in the different stages of superficial fibromatoses. Type VI collagen was markedly expressed as a distinct fibrillar network in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding proliferating stromal cells in proliferative and involutional phases. Its expression completely disappeared from the connective tissue undergoing fibrotic transformation during involutional and residual phases. The results of the present study suggest that type VI collagen is an extracellular marker of stromal tissue proliferation and is involved in the early phases of tissue remodelling occurring in the superficial fibromatoses.

  10. Treatment of combined sewer overflows using ferrate (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rohan; Ray, Ajay K; Sharma, Virender K; Nakhla, George

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted on the treatment of combined sewer overflows using ferrate (VI) [Fe (VI)]. At a Fe (VI) dose of 0.24 mg/L, total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), total biochemical oxygen demand (TBOD5), soluble biochemical oxygen demand (SBOD5), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and soluble TN removal efficiencies of 71, 75, 69, 68, 72, 83, 64, 38, and 36%, respectively, were achieved. Kinetic studies revealed that a contact time of only 15 minutes is sufficient to achieve secondary effluent criteria. An innovative technique of using primary sludge (PS) and thickened waste activated sludge as a source for the in situ synthesis of ferrate was developed. A comparative study of treatment efficiencies achieved by Fe (VI) generated from different sources was done. At 0.1 mg/L dose of Fe (VI) synthesized from PS, TCOD, SCOD, TSS, VSS, TP, and TN removal efficiencies of 60, 62, 63, 67, 30, and 25%, respectively, were achieved. PMID:25509525

  11. Abiotic reductive immobilization of U(VI) by biogenic mackinawite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U(VI) reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe 1+x S, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U(VI) abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS, and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U(VI) indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of sulfide-bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U(VI) reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction. PMID:23373896

  12. Organomolybdenum (VI) and lithium Organomolybdate (VI) and (V) Complexes with C,N-Chelating Aminoaryl Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    van Koten, G.; Brandts, J.A.M.; Leur, M. de; Gossage, R. A.; Spek, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of new, five-coordinate molybdenum bis(imidoaryl) complexes [Mo(NAr)2(C-N)X] (Ar = C6H3i-Pr2-2,6; C-N = [C6H4(CH2NMe2)-2]-; X = Cl (1), Me (2), Et (3), Bu (4), CH2SiMe3 (5), (p-tolyl) (6), (C-N) (7)) is reported. The solid-state structure of 2 has been elucidated by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Compounds 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 react with alkyl- or aryllithium compounds to form lithium molybdate(VI) derivatives, of which [Li(DME)Mo(NAr)2(C-N)(Me)(p-tolyl)] (10),...

  13. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu- O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu-Ligand bonds, like Pu-OH(-), show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu-ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu-Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  14. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Du

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC basis set. The Pu– O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  15. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  16. John Prados, La guerre du Viêt-nam

    OpenAIRE

    Cadeau, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Si les écrits ayant pour objet la guerre d’Indochine sont abondants, les ouvrages de référence relatifs à la guerre américaine du Viêt-nam se révèlent plutôt rares dans l’historiographie française. La récente parution du livre de John Prados, La guerre du Viêt-nam, vient combler cette lacune. Cette publication, qui aurait pu aussi bien s’appeler Histoire politique de la guerre du Viêt-nam tant elle se focalise sur une approche analytique des événements politiques au détriment de l’étude des o...

  17. Manifestações radiológicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Montenegro Turtelli

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available O autor relata as alterações radiológicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI (mucopolissacárides VI observadas em dois irmãos. Foram realizadas radiografias convencionais do esqueleto e estudo por ressonância magnética do sistema nervoso central. As alterações osteoarticulares são bem conhecidas e em geral semelhantes às das outras mucopolissacárides. O estudo por ressonância magnética do sistema nervoso central pode colaborar no diagnóstico diferencial dessas doenças, avaliar a extensão das lesões e ajudar no controle evolutivo.The author reports the radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (mucopolysaccharide VI. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already been well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases.

  18. Dealing with uncertainty together. Summary of Annex VI (1996-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Annex VI, the work of the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) increasingly reached out to the international community. Especially in connection with the preparation for the Conferences of Parties under the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), the analytic tools and databases developed by ETSAP proved their worth in national analyses of greenhouse gas emission restrictions, multinational comparisons of such responses, and evaluations of the benefits of international co-operation. Anticipating the urgent need for this kind of capability, the ETSAP community improved the well-established MARKAL energy systems model and extended it in new directions. These included linking national models, expanding system boundaries in time and place, joining MARKAL with economic models, adding material flows, and developing approaches to treating uncertainty. In various forms, the MARKAL progeny now provide fully integrated energy/economy/environment models. These enable the simultaneous assessment of multiple, linked issues such as energy security, atmospheric acidification and climate change. Almost alone among the models being used to evaluate greenhouse gas emission reductions, the MARKAL models are based explicitly on the specific technologies that must produce the reductions. The basis for this achievement is the international network of systems analysts that has been built up under the aegis of the International Energy Agency (IEA) during the past two decades. During Annex VI, the Republic of Korea and Turkey joined the active members of the IEA Implementing Agreement: Australia, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United States and the Commission of the European Union. The group meets semiannually, usually in joint workshops with other groups doing related work, to report progress, provide peer review, and build on each other's accomplishments. Participants co-operate in model development

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Case Report Brain MRI and MR Spectroscopy Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Donmez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with multisystem involvement which is determined by mutations in the arylsulfatase B (ARSB gene. Herein, we report the radiological findings of a case of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI which showed progression of periventricular lesions on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and slight elevation of myoinositole and no other significant pathological peak on magnetic resonance (MR spectroscopy. MR spectroscopy as well as the clinical findings helped us to exclude some of the diseases in the differential diagnosis.

  20. Apollonius de Perge, Coniques tome 4, livres VI et VII

    CERN Document Server

    Rashed, Roshdi

    2009-01-01

    Book VI of the Konika is essentially devoted to the question of the identity and similarity of two conic sections, or two parts of conic sections. In Book VII Apollonius deals with the various relationships between the lengths of diameters and conjugate diameters. The results are applied to the exposition of a number of problems, as well as to some problems which Apollonius indicates will be demonstrated and solved in Book VIII, which was lost in Antiquity. Books VI and VII have only survived in an Arabic translation, and are presented here in a critical edition, together with a faithful trans

  1. Neutron cross section standards evaluations for ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron cross section standards are now being evaluated as the initial phase in the development of the new ENDF/B-VI file. These standards evaluations are following a somewhat different process compared with that used for earlier versions of ENDF. The primary effort is concentrated on a simultaneous evaluation using a generalized least squares program, R-matrix evaluations, and a procedure for combining the results of these evaluations. The ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation procedure is outlined, and preliminary simultaneous evaluation and R-matrix results are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs

  2. VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación al Desarrollo

    OpenAIRE

    Universitat Politècnica de València - Centro de Cooperación al Desarrollo

    2013-01-01

    La presente publicación recoge los trabajos presentados al VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación para el Desarrollo, celebrado en Valencia. El congreso está organizado por el Comité Universitario Valenciano de Relaciones internacionales y Cooperación, que integra a las cinco universidades valencianas Universitat Politècnica de València - Centro de Cooperación al Desarrollo (2013). VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación al Desarrollo. Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València. http://hdl...

  3. Bethlem myopathy and engineered collagen VI triple helical deletions prevent intracellular multimer assembly and protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamandé, S R; Shields, K A; Kornberg, A J; Shield, L K; Bateman, J F

    1999-07-30

    Mutations in the genes that code for collagen VI subunits, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are the cause of the autosomal dominant disorder, Bethlem myopathy. Although three different collagen VI structural mutations have previously been reported, the effect of these mutations on collagen VI assembly, structure, and function is currently unknown. We have characterized a new Bethlem myopathy mutation that results in skipping of COL6A1 exon 14 during pre-mRNA splicing and the deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the alpha1(VI) chain. Sequencing of genomic DNA identified a G to A transition in the +1 position of the splice donor site of intron 14 in one allele. The mutant alpha1(VI) chains associated intracellularly with alpha2(VI) and alpha3(VI) to form disulfide-bonded monomers, but further assembly into dimers and tetramers was prevented, and molecules containing the mutant chain were not secreted. This triple helical deletion thus resulted in production of half the normal amount of collagen VI. To further explore the biosynthetic consequences of collagen VI triple helical deletions, an alpha3(VI) cDNA expression construct containing a 202-amino acid deletion within the triple helix was produced and stably expressed in SaOS-2 cells. The transfected mutant alpha3(VI) chains associated with endogenous alpha1(VI) and alpha2(VI) to form collagen VI monomers, but dimers and tetramers did not form and the mutant-containing molecules were not secreted. Thus, deletions within the triple helical region of both the alpha1(VI) and alpha3(VI) chains can prevent intracellular dimer and tetramer assembly and secretion. These results provide the first evidence of the biosynthetic consequences of structural collagen VI mutations and suggest that functional protein haploinsufficiency may be a common pathogenic mechanism in Bethlem myopathy. PMID:10419498

  4. Dioxouranium (VI) complexes of macrocyclic ligands derived from 2. 6-diacetyl pyridine-bis(thiosemicarbazone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, H.D.S.; Sengupta, S.K.; Tripathi, S.C.

    The dioxouranium(VI) complex of 2.6-diacetylpyridine-bis(thiosemicarbazone), (DAPTC), (UO/sub 2/(DAPTC) (NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/) and its reactions with diketones are described. The complexes so obtained have been characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, electrical conductance and spectral (i.r. and electronic) data. The parent complex reacts with ..beta..-diketones to form a complex of the type (UO/sub 2/(mac)(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/), where mac is a macrocyclic ligand derived by the condensation of DAPTC and a ..beta..-diketone. The ligand, DAPTC, acts as a neutral, terdentate ligand having coordination sites at pyridine nitrogen and two azomethine nitrogens. 27 refs.

  5. Nanostructure, thermoelectric properties, and transport theory of V2VI3 and V2VI3/IV-VI based superlattices and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this work is to review the thermoelectric properties, the microstructures, and their correlation with theoretical calculations and predictions for recent chalcogenide based materials. The main focus is put on thin multilayered Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 films, and bulk V2VI3/IV-VI mixed systems. For all films a systematic characterization of the thermoelectric properties as well as the micro- and nanostructure was performed. The degree of crystallinity of the multilayered films varied from epitaxial systems to polycrystalline films. Other multilayered thin films revealed promising thermoelectric properties. (SnSe)1.2TiSe2 thin films with rotational disorder yielded the highest Seebeck coefficient published to date for analogous materials. For bulk V2VI3/IV-VI mixed systems insides are given into a complete ''material to module'' process resulting in a high performance thermoelectric generator using (1-x)(GeTe) x(Bi2Se0.2Te2.8) (x = 0.038). Cyclic heating of this system with x = 0.063 resulted in a drastic change of the micro- and nanostructure observed by ex situ and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Consequently a degradation of ZT at 450 C from ∝2.0 to ∝1.0 was observed, while samples with x = 0.038 showed a stable ZT of 1.5. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Adsorption Properties of Bentonite with In Situ Immobilized Polyaniline Towards Anionic Forms of Cr(VI), Mo(VI), W(VI), V(V)

    OpenAIRE

    Kateryna RYABCHENKO; Elina YANOVSKA; Mariya MELNYK; Dariusz STERNIK; Olga KYCHKIRUK; Valentun TERTYKH

    2016-01-01

    A new composite material bentonite-PANI was synthesized by in situ immobilization of polyaniline (PANI) on the surface of natural mineral bentonite. It was established as a result of the modification of bentonite a surface area and an interlayer distance of mineral decrease and particles of bentonite transformed of irregular shape with different porosity on irregularly shaped particles of smaller size. It has been found that the total Cr(VI) ions extraction took place under the acid condition...

  7. Adsorption Properties of Bentonite with In Situ Immobilized Polyaniline Towards Anionic Forms of Cr(VI, Mo(VI, W(VI, V(V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna RYABCHENKO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new composite material bentonite-PANI was synthesized by in situ immobilization of polyaniline (PANI on the surface of natural mineral bentonite. It was established as a result of the modification of bentonite a surface area and an interlayer distance of mineral decrease and particles of bentonite transformed of irregular shape with different porosity on irregularly shaped particles of smaller size. It has been found that the total Cr(VI ions extraction took place under the acid conditions (pH=1 – 2 and W(VI ions have been well adsorbed in the pH range from 1 to 8 by the composite bentonite-PANI unlike the initial mineral. Whereas adsorption of oxo anions of V(V and Mo(VI made up some 50%. It is proved that the in situ immobilization of bentonite by polyaniline leads to increasing the value of adsorption capacity towards the investigated ions compared with the initial mineral. It was established that the adsorption properties of the synthesized composite with respect to the studied oxo ions were worse than the adsorption properties of composite vermiculite-PANI, similar to the composite Sokyryntsyy clinoptilolite-PANI and better than composites of polyaniline with Podilskyy saponite and Karelian shungite.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.6976

  8. Fe(III), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) mediated Cr(VI) reduction in alkaline media using a Halomonas isolate from Soap Lake, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEngelen, Michael R; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R; Pinkart, Holly C

    2008-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is one of the most widely distributed environmental contaminants. Given the carcinogenic and mutagenic consequences of Cr(VI) exposure, the release of Cr(VI) into the environment has long been a major concern. While many reports of microbial Cr(VI) reduction are in circulation, very few have demonstrated Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions. Since Cr(VI) exhibits higher mobility in alkaline soils relative to pH neutral soils, and since Cr contamination of alkaline soils is associated with a number of industrial activities, microbial Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions requires attention.Soda lakes are the most stable alkaline environments on earth, and contain a wide diversity of alkaliphilic organisms. In this study, a bacterial isolate belonging to the Halomonas genus was obtained from Soap Lake, a chemically stratified alkaline lake located in central Washington State. The ability of this isolate to reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) was assessed under alkaline (pH = 9), anoxic, non-growth conditions with acetate as an electron donor. Metal reduction rates were quantified using Monod kinetics. In addition, Cr(VI) reduction experiments were carried out in the presence of Fe(III) to evaluate the possible enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction rates through electron shuttling mechanisms. While Fe(III) reduction rates were slow compared to previously reported rates, Cr(VI) reduction rates fell within range of previously reported rates. PMID:18401687

  9. The effectiveness of four organic matter amendments for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chien-Chih; Cheng, Chia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Juang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2009-01-30

    This paper compared the effectiveness of four organic materials for decreasing the amounts of soil extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils using the DOWEX M4195 resin-extraction method. Organic matters were added into Cr(VI)-spiked soils [500 mg Cr(VI)(kgsoil)(-1)] in the form of sugarcane dregs compost (SCDC), cattle-dung compost (CDC), soybean meal (SBM) and rice bran (RB), in the amounts of 0, 1%, and 2% by dry weight, respectively. The results indicated that adding only 1% organic matter to the studied soils could effectively decrease the amount of soil resin-extractable Cr(VI) after 12 days of incubation. The decrease of resin-extractable Cr(VI) by organic materials was mainly the result from the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) supported by the XANES spectroscopy. Among the four tested organic materials, SBM and RB had higher effectiveness in decreasing soil resin-extractable Cr(VI) than CDC and SCDC. This result may be due to the fact that SBM and RB have more dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and protein than CDC and SCDC. Therefore, it was concluded that the contents of DOC and protein are the main factors that determine the effectiveness of organic materials for decreasing the amounts of soil available Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils. PMID:18524481

  10. Phonemicization for the Generation of Vi-syllable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Radilla-Ávila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the application of linguistic rules for the creation of vi-syllables of phrases written in the Spanish language in order to increase the believability of the labial synchronization in virtual characters. Especially, we describe the implementation of the phonological transcription and Syllabication as part of Phonemicization's process.

  11. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  12. ViPiA: A Project for European Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folinas, Dimitris; Manthou, Vicky; Vlachopoulou, Maro

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Pre-Incubator Accelerator (ViPiA) is a two-year project funded by the European Commission. The main goal of the programme is to create a training package for would-be entrepreneurs to assist them in developing their new venture concepts to a level at which they become attractive to potential investors. This paper describes and…

  13. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  14. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  15. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ..., Community Planning and Development. 5. Lubbock Field Office Order of Succession a. Senior Management Analyst... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy...

  16. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  17. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe56. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ''tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ''tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use

  18. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  19. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  20. Protective activity of Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, K P; Gilbertson, I T; Koornhof, H J; Robbins, J B; Schneerson, R; Schulz, D; Cadoz, M; Armand, J

    1987-11-21

    The protective efficacy against typhoid fever of a single intramuscular injection of 25 micrograms of the Vi capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was assessed in a randomised double-blind controlled trial. Vaccination of 11,384 children was followed by 21 months' surveillance. 47 blood-culture-proven cases of typhoid occurred in children who received meningococcal A + C CPS vaccine and 19 cases in those vaccinated with Vi CPS. Protective efficacy was 60% calculated from the day of vaccination and 64% from 6 weeks after vaccination. Surveillance also included 11,691 unvaccinated children; 173 cases occurred in this group. Protective efficacy in relation to the unvaccinated group was 77.4% and 81.0% after 21 months, calculated immediately and 6 weeks after vaccination, respectively. Vaccination was associated with minimum local side-effects, and an increase in anti-Vi antibodies occurred, as measured by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody levels remained significantly raised at 6 and 12 months post vaccination. Vi CPS is thus a safe and effective means of typhoid vaccination.

  1. Paisaje del viñedo: patrimonio y recurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vicente Elías

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La propuesta de que el paisaje del viñedo sea el complemento a la visita a la bodega, siendo esta el eje del turismo del vino, es el objetivo de este trabajo. Repasando los conceptos variables de patrimonio, llegamos al paisaje del viñedo como recurso, formando parte del patrimonio natural. Pero este no se puede desvincular de los otros aspectos patrimoniales, por lo que la cultura tradicional es el soporte de la tipología de paisaje que queremos proponer y que va contrastar con los nuevos paisajes del viñedo que surgen de las recientes técnicas en los cultivos y de la actual vitivicultura, emparejada con una moderna “cultura del vino”. El análisis de las diversas normativas, que salvaguardan el paisaje y la comprobación del escaso valor legal del paisaje del viñedo, es otro puntal de este trabajo que trata de unir paisaje con cultura tradicional como recursos del Turismo del Vino, integrados en las Rutas del Vino.

  2. Distribution of type VI collagen expression in synovial tissue and cultured synoviocytes: relation to fibronectin expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, J; Carsons, S E

    1991-01-01

    Type VI collagen has recently been shown to be an important component of connective tissue. Double label immunofluorescence procedures were used to immunolocalize type VI collagen in normal and rheumatoid synovium and its distribution was compared with that of fibronectin. In normal synovium type VI collagen is expressed in the synovial membrane but not in the interstitium of the villus. In rheumatoid synovium, however, type VI collagen is extensively deposited in both the interstitial connec...

  3. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  4. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Hart

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  5. Investigations on photoelectrocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) over titanium dioxide anode and metal cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reductions of Cr(VI) based on TiO2 thin films were investigated under various conditions. Photogenerated electrons transferred from TiO2 thin film to cathode can contribute to PEC reduction of Cr(VI) only when the Fermi level of cathode lies above the chemical potential of Cr(VI), almost independent on the applied voltage of the direct current. In addition, the TiO2-coated anode is the major site that accommodates the PEC reduction of Cr(VI) with hole scavenger citric acid, regardless of the Fermi level of the cathode. Although electron transfer from TiO2 to Cr(VI) is an exothermic process, the photogenerated holes in TiO2 can markedly hamper Cr(VI) reduction over the TiO2 thin film by oxidizing the lower-valence Cr back to Cr(VI), which may be counteracted by the citric acid. This research provides some in-depth insights on developing photocatalysts which enable highly efficient PEC reduction of Cr(VI) in the future. - Highlights: • Cr(VI) reduction on TiO2 photoanode is dominant with the addition of citric acid. • Cr(VI) is reduced on photocathode with Fermi level above Cr(VI) chemical potential. • Photogenerated holes can hamper Cr(VI) photoreduction over TiO2

  6. Annexin VI is attached to transverse-tubule membranes in isolated skeletal muscle triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, G; Hidalgo, C

    2002-07-15

    Annexin VI is a 68-kDa protein of the Annexin family, a group of Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-binding proteins widely distributed in mammalian tissues including skeletal muscle. We investigated a) which membrane system contributes Annexin VI to skeletal muscle triads, and b) whether Annexin VI removal affects triad integrity or function. Annexin VI was present in isolated triads and transverse tubules but not in heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, indicating that Annexin VI binds to either free or triad-attached transverse tubules. Extraction with EGTA of Annexin VI from triads did not alter their migration as a single band in sucrose density gradients or their ouabain binding-site density, indicating that triad integrity does not require Annexin VI. Caffeine-induced Ca2+ release kinetics and Ca2+ uptake rates were likewise not affected by Annexin VI removal from triads, suggesting that Annexin VI is not involved in these functions. Annexin VI purified from rabbit skeletal muscle displayed Ca2+-dependent binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine. Binding saturated at 1/20 molar ratio phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate/phosphatidylcholine and was optimal at free [Ca2+] > or = 20 mM. Extraction of Annexin VI from triads did not affect the generation of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, or phosphatidic acid by endogenous lipid kinases, suggesting that despite its capacity to bind to negatively charged phospholipids, Annexin VI does not affect the kinase activities responsible for their generation.

  7. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  8. Persistence of antibody titres three years after vaccination with Vi polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacket, C O; Levine, M M; Robbins, J B

    1988-08-01

    After a single injection of purified Vi polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid fever, serum titres were followed in student volunteers by passive haemagglutination assay and by radioimmunoassay. Elevated Vi antibody titres were still present after 36 months. This preliminary study should be followed by further investigations on the extent and duration of protection provided by Vi vaccine, and on volunteers in endemic areas.

  9. Synergetic Transformations of Multiple Pollutants Driven by Cr(VI)-Sulfite Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yukun; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wang, Zhaohui; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-10-20

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is often deemed necessary to detoxify chromium contaminants; however, few investigations utilized this reaction for the purpose of treating other industrial wastewaters. Here a widely used Cr(VI)-sulfite reaction system was upgraded to simultaneously transform multiple pollutants, namely, the reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of sulfite and other organic/inorganic pollutants in an acidic solution. As(III) was selected as a probe pollutant to examine the oxidation capacity of a Cr(VI)-sulfite system. Both (•)OH and SO4(•-) were considered as the primary oxidants for As(III) oxidation, based on the results of electron spin resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and specific radicals quenching. As(III)-scavenging, oxidative radicals greatly accelerated Cr(VI) reduction and simultaneously consumed less sulfite. In comparison with a Cr(VI)-H2O2 system with 50 μM Cr(VI), Cr(VI), the sulfite system had excellent performance for both As(III) oxidation and Cr(VI) reduction at pH 3.5. Moreover, in this escalated process, less sulfite was required to reduce Cr(VI) than the traditional Cr(VI) reduction by sulfite process. This effectively improves the environmental compatibility of this Cr(VI) detoxification process, alleviating the potential for SO2 release and sulfate ion production in water. Generally, this study provides an excellent example of a "waste control by waste" strategy for the detoxification of multiple industrial pollutants. PMID:26384045

  10. 77 FR 13980 - Guidance to Federal Financial Assistance Recipients Regarding the Title VI Prohibition Against...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Title VI Prohibition Against National Origin Discrimination Affecting Persons With Limited English... Title VI prohibition against national origin discrimination as it affects limited English proficient... activities may violate the prohibition under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000d,...

  11. Interaction of aerobic soil bacteria with plutonium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the interaction of Pu(VI) with Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588 and Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 14577, representatives of the main aerobic groups of soil bacteria present in the upper soil layers. The biosorption studies have shown that these soil bacteria accumulate high amounts of Pu(VI). The relative sorption efficiency toward Pu(VI) related to the amount of biomass used decreased with increasing biomass concentration due to increased agglomeration of the bacteria resulting in a decrease of the number of available complexing groups. Spores of Bacillus sphaericus showed a higher biosorption than the vegetative cells at low biomass concentration which decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration. At higher biomass concentrations (> 0.7 g/L), the vegetative cells of both strains and the spores of B. sphaericus showed comparable sorption efficiencies. Investigations on the pH dependency of the biosorption and extraction studies with 0.01 M EDTA solution have shown that the biosorption of plutonium is a reversible process and the plutonium is bound by surface complexation. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that one third of the initially present Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V) after 24 hours. Kinetic studies and solvent extraction to separate different oxidation states of Pu after contact with the biomass provided further information on the yield and the kinetics of the bacteria-mediated reduction. Long-term studies showed that also 16% of Pu(IV) was formed after one month. The slow kinetics of this process indicate that under our experimental conditions the Pu(IV) was not a produced by microbial reduction but seemed to be rather the result of the disproportionation of the formed Pu(V) or autoreduction of Pu(VI). (orig.)

  12. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh; Giammar, Daniel; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-15

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  13. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  14. Determination of a quantum efficiency of A^II B^VI compounds on the basis of photoacoustic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliński, M.; Bychto, L.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2005-10-01

    The method of determination of the quantum efficiency η of irradiative relaxation processes in semiconductors is introduced and discussed. The correlation of the amplitude photoacoustic spectra in the high absorption region with the annealing process is used to estimate the values of η. The values of η, both for as grown and annealed crystals were determined and have been discussed. The results are presented for microphone and piezoelectric detection methods.

  15. Pu(VI) hydrolysis: further evidence for a dimeric plutonyl hydroxide and contrasts with U(VI) chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean D; Neu, Mary P

    2006-02-20

    A significant fraction of plutonium that is soluble in environmental waters and other aqueous solutions can be present as complexes of plutonyl, PuO2(2+). Few thermodynamic data are available for this ion, representing a problematic gap in plutonium chemistry and in the forecasting of radionuclide behavior under contamination and nuclear repository conditions. To address this need and more accurately determine the stoichiometry and stability of the basic hydrolytic products, we completed complimentary potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of plutonium(VI) hydrolysis over the concentration range of 10(-2) to 10(-5) M Pu(VI). Dinuclear hydroxide species (PuO2)2(OH)2(2+) and (PuO2)2(OH)4(0)(aq) with hydrolysis constants log beta(2,2) = -7.79 +/- 0.20 and log beta(4,2) = -19.3 +/- 0.5 are indicated in all experiments of millimolar Pu(VI), 0.10 M NaNO3 solutions at 25 degrees C. At lower Pu(VI) concentrations, at and below 10(-4) M, the monomeric species PuO2OH+ and PuO2(OH)2(0)(aq) form with hydrolysis constants of log beta(1,1) = -5.76 +/- 0.07 and log beta(2,1) = -11.69 +/- 0.05, respectively. Distinct optical absorbance bands at 842 and 845 nm are reported for the mononuclear and dinuclear first hydrolysis species. Standard hydrolysis constants at zero ionic strength were calculated from the experimentally determined constants using the specific ion interaction theory. The Pu(VI) hydrolysis species and constants are compared with results from previous studies for plutonium and uranium. Major differences between uranyl and plutonyl hydrolysis are described. PMID:16472001

  16. Recent Developments of Ferrate (VI) Salts as Cathode Meterial in High Capacity Batteries%铁(VI)酸盐正极材料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁中直; 周震涛; 李伟善

    2002-01-01

      The ferrate (VI) salts that have Fe element in an unusual VI valence state may be one of the best choices of high-energy batteries' cathode material, because ferrates (VI) are capable of the three-electron reduction, their reduction and decomposition products are nontoxic and environment-benign. One and a half century after the K2FeO4 synthesis, the chemistry and electrochemistry remains relatively unknown because of the incorrect knowledge of ferrates (VI) instability. The studies of ferrates (VI) used as cathode have been renewed recently. Many achievements have been made after the Israeli scientist Dr. Stuart Licht published their results on Science magazine that the alkaline ferrate (VI)/Zn batteries can provide 50% higher capacity than conventional alkaline batteries. In this article, the reasons of ferrate (VI) salts’ instability, methods of avoiding ferrate (VI) salts' decomposition and influences of some modifiers such as SrTiO3, Co2O3,MnO2,In2O3,KMnO4, (CFx)n on electrochemical characteristics of ferrate (VI) cathode are reviewed.%  铁(VI)酸盐中的Fe具有不寻常的高价态+6价,可以进行3电子还原放电反应,其还原产物及分解产物无毒无害,具有新一代“绿色电池”的重要特征。铁(VI)酸盐合成一个半世纪以来,由于认为它不稳定至今其化学和电化学性质并不很清楚。直到1999年以色列科学家Licht博士在Science上发表研究结果表明铁(VI)酸盐/Zn电池可以获得比常规碱性电池多50%的容量,铁(VI)酸盐高能电池才又引起深入的研究。本文综述了近年来铁(VI)酸盐作为高能电池正极活性物质的研究进展,包括改善铁(VI)酸盐稳定性的方法、掺杂修饰(如SrTiO3, Co2O3,MnO2,In2O3,KMnO4,(CFx)n等)等改善铁(VI)酸盐正极电化学性能的技术等。

  17. The Vi conjugate typhoid vaccine is safe, elicits protective levels of IgG anti-Vi, and is compatible with routine infant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Lin, Feng-Ying C; Canh, Do Gia; Son, Nguyen Hong; Anh, Dang Duc; Mao, Nguyen Duc; Chu, Chiayung; Hunt, Steven W; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel; Szu, Shousun C

    2011-05-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious problem in developing countries. Current vaccines are licensed for individuals who are 5 years old or older. A conjugate of the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) bound to recombinant exoprotein A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Vi-rEPA) enhanced Vi immunogenicity and protected 2- to 5-year-olds in Vietnam. In this study, Vi-rEPA was evaluated for use in infants. A total of 301 full-term Vietnamese infants received Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccines alone or with Vi-rEPA or Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, and 6 months and Vi-rEPA or Hib-TT alone at 12 months. Infants were visited 6, 24, and 48 h after each injection to monitor adverse reactions. Maternal, cord, and infant sera were assayed for IgG anti-Vi and for IgG antibodies to Hib CP and the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis toxins at 7, 12, and 13 months. No vaccine-related serious adverse reactions occurred. In the Vi-rEPA group, the IgG anti-Vi geometric mean (GM) increased from the cord level of 0.66 to 17.4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) at 7 months, declined to 4.76 EU at 12 months, and increased to 50.1 EU 1 month after the 4th dose (95% of infants had levels of ≥ 3.5 EU, the estimated protective level). Controls had no increase of the IgG anti-Vi GM. Infants with cord anti-Vi levels of <3.5 EU responded with significantly higher IgG anti-Vi levels than those with levels of ≥ 3.5 EU. Anti-diphtheria, -tetanus, and -pertussis toxin levels were similar in all groups. Vi-rEPA was safe, induced protective anti-Vi levels, and was compatible with EPI vaccines, and it can be used in infants. High cord IgG anti-Vi levels partially suppressed infant responses to Vi-rEPA.

  18. Immunization with the conjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇ against Salmonella typhi induces Vi-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Fabio; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Rondini, Simona; Pozzi, Gianni; Martin, Laura B; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-09-21

    Typhoid fever is a public health problem, especially among young children in developing countries. To address this need, a glycoconjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇, composed of the polysaccharide antigen Vi covalently conjugated to the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM₁₉₇, is under development. Here, we assessed the antibody and cellular responses, both local and systemic, following subcutaneous injection of Vi-CRM₁₉₇. The glycoconjugate elicited Vi-specific serum IgG titers significantly higher than unconjugated Vi, with prevalence of IgG1 that persisted for at least 60 days after immunization. Vi-specific IgG, but not IgA, were present in intestinal washes. Lymphocytes proliferation after restimulation with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ was observed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. These data confirm the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ and demonstrate that the vaccine-specific antibody and cellular immune responses are present also in the intestinal tract, thus strengthening the suitability of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ as a promising candidate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi.

  19. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi is a B1b antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A.; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B.; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A.; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R.; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. Here, we have characterised the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with Typhim Vi rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone (MZ) B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific antibody secreting cells and protective antibody and Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer induced specific antibody after Vi immunization. Furthermore, antibody derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi antigen. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early antibody responses to non-Vi antigens. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce antibody-mediated protection, was reduced after infection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi antigen and targeting non-Vi antigens as sub-unit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies. PMID:23162127

  20. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella typhi is a B1b antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Ross, Ewan A; López-Macías, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F

    2012-12-15

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi Ag from Salmonella typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. In this study, we have characterized the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific Ab-secreting cells and protective Ab in Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer-induced specific Ab after Vi immunization. Furthermore, Ab derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi Ag. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early Ab responses to non-Vi Ags. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce Ab-mediated protection, was reduced postinfection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that, in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi Ag, and targeting non-Vi Ags as subunit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies.

  1. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution by dried activated sludge biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch experiments were conducted to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using activated sludge biomass. The effects of acid pretreatment of the biomass, initial pH, biomass and Cr(VI) concentrations on Cr(VI) removal efficiency were investigated. Proton consumption during the removal process and the reducing capacity of sludge biomass were studied. The results show that acid pretreatment could significantly improve Cr(VI) removal efficiency and increase Cr(VI) reducing capacity by 20.4%. Cr(VI) removal was remarkably pH-dependent; lower pH (pH = 1, 2) facilitated Cr(VI) reduction while higher pH (pH = 3, 4) favored sorption of the converted Cr(III). Lower Cr(VI) concentration as well as higher biomass concentration could accelerate Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) reduction was not the only reason for proton consumption in the removal process. Pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model could successfully simulate Cr(VI) removal except under higher pH conditions (pH = 3, 4).

  2. Sorption behavior of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto fracture-filling clays in Beishan granite, Gansu: Application to selecting the site of high-level radwaste repository in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN; Maozhong; LUO; Xingzhang; WANG; Ju; JIN; Yuanxin; WAN

    2005-01-01

    The first results of sorption experiments of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto original (unpurified) fracture-filling clays from No.1 monzonitic granite intrusion, Beishan area, Gansu Province, China are reported. The monzonitic granite intrusion is a potential location for a high-level radwaste (HLW) repository in China. The present experimental results show that the maximum U(VI) sorption reached 92% at near-neutral Ph and the distribution coefficient (Kd) was 1226 Ml/g. A high sorption capacity of the fracture-filling clays in host rock on radioactive elements is necessary for HLW deep geological disposal repository. No preferential sorption of 234U onto the clays was found. Finally, the sorption of U(VI) onto the clays was also modeled using a surface complexation model.

  3. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lu, Na [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  4. FTIR Spectroscopic Characterization Of II-VI Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. L. E.; Szofran, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    Combination of commercial Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with computer and special-purpose software constitutes highly automated facility for acquisition and processing of infrared transmission or reflection spectral image data. Intended principally to acquire transmission spectra of some compounds of elements in groups II and VI of periodic table. System used to characterize specimens of II/VI alloy semiconductors grown by directional solidification and quenching. Transmission-edge maps helpful in studies of flows, gradients of temperature, and coefficients of diffusion in solidifying melts. Data acquired by system include optical characteristics, and they both verify and complement data obtained by such other techniques as measurements of density and x-ray-dispersion analysis.

  5. O VI and H_2 Lines in Sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Labrosse, N; Habbal, S R; Brown, D; Labrosse, Nicolas; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Brown, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Sunspots are locations on the Sun where unique atmospheric conditions prevail. In particular, the very low temperatures found above sunspots allow the emission of H_2 lines. In this study we are interested in the radiation emitted by sunspots in the O VI lines at 1031.96 A and 1037.60 A. We use SOHO/SUMER observations of a sunspot performed in March 1999 and investigate the interaction between the O VI lines and a H_2 line at 1031.87 A found in the Werner band. The unique features of sunspots atmospheres may very well have important implications regarding the illumination of coronal O+5 ions in the low corona, affecting our interpretation of Doppler dimming diagnostics.

  6. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  7. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayant Murthy

    2002-03-01

    We have examined 426 Voyager fields distributed across the sky for O VI ( 1032/1038 Å) emission from the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. No such emission was detected in any of our observed fields. Our most constraining limit was a 90% confidence upper limit of 2600 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the doublet emission in the direction (l, b) = (117.3, 50.6). Combining this with an absorption line measurement in nearly the same direction allows us to place an upper limit of 0.01 cm-3 on the electron density of the hot gas in this direction. We have placed 90% confidence upper limits of less than or equal to 10,000 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the O VI emission in 16 of our 426 observations.

  8. Contribution to the study of the redox couple Np(VI)/Np(V) in the presence of uranium(VI) in solutions of nitric acid and nitrous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was the subject of a spectrometric study of the Np(VI) reduction reaction in nitric acid solutions (4 to 5 M) containing variable concentrations (1.5 to 3.5 x 10-3 M) of nitrous acid. A low nitrous acid concentration and a high nitric acid concentration were found to favor the stabilization of Np(VI). The stoichiometric coefficients of nitrous acid and nitric acid in the Np(VI) reduction reaction were determined thermodynamically, although only the reaction order with respect to HNO2 could be calculated from a kinetic analysis. Adding nitrate ions to a HNO3/HNO2 solution enhanced the stability of neptunium at oxidation state +VI, but also increased the reduction rate. When uranium(VI) was added to the HNO3/HNO2 solutions, the total quantity of neptunium at oxidation state +V (either free or as a Np(V)-U(VI) complex) remained practically unchanged, as did the Np(VI) reduction rate. The electrochemical behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was investigated in a weak acidic medium by voltammetry with an ultra-micro-electrode (UME). The oxidation wave limiting current variation was a linear function of the Np(V) concentration when a gold UME was used, but not with a platinum UME; the reduction wave limiting current variation versus the Np(V) concentration was linear with either gold or platinum UMEs. The presence of the Np(V)-U(VI) complex in the neptunium solutions was characterized by a shift in the normal apparent potential of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple toward anodic potentials consistent with the previously determined values of the complexation constants. (author)

  9. Spectrophotometric study of neptunium (VI) complexation by nitrate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neptunium(VI) complexation by nitrate ions was investigated by visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry, a technique suitable for observing the appearance and evolution of the species in solution. In the absence of reference spectra for Np(VI) nitrate- complexes, mathematical (factor analysis) tools were used to interpret the spectra. These chemo-metric techniques were first tested and validated on a simpler chemical system: Np(VI)complexation by the SiW11O398- anion. The test media used to investigate Np(VI) nitrate- complexes generally contain nitrate and perchlorate salts at high concentrations (high ionic strength). Media effects arising from the presence of cations, acidity or the perchlorate ion concentration are therefore significant, and no doubt account for the scattered values of the complexation constants published in the literature. The evolution of the neptunium spectra according to the parameters of the reaction medium illustrated these effects and allowed them to be quantified by a global 'perturbation constant'. In order to minimize the spectrum modifications due to media effects, the neptunium nitrate-complexes were studied at constant ionic strength in weak acidic media (2 mol.kg-1H2O) in the presence of sodium salts. The bulk formation constants and the spectrum of the NpO2(NO3)+ complex were determined for ionic strength values of 2.2, 4, 6 and 8 mol.kg-1H2O. The constants remained on the same order of magnitude regardless of the ionic strength; the thermodynamic constant β10 determined from them according to specific interaction theory is thus probably of little significance. Conversely, the bulk constants can be corrected for the effects of the perchlorate ions by taking the global 'perturbation constant' into account. (author)

  10. Morphological Heterogeneity of Layer VI Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Abrams, Svetlana; Pinhas, Alex; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the basic neuronal building blocks of the neocortex is a necessary first step toward comprehending the composition of cortical circuits. Neocortical layer VI is the most morphologically diverse layer and plays a pivotal role in gating information to the cortex via its feedback connection to the thalamus and other ipsilateral and callosal corticocortical connections. The heterogeneity of function within this layer is presumably linked to its varied morphological composition. Howe...

  11. Interaction of aerobic soil bacteria with plutonium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the interaction of Pu(VI) with Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588 and Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 14577, representatives of the main aerobic groups of soil bacteria present in the upper soil layers. The accumulation studies have shown that these soil bacteria accumulate high amounts of Pu(VI). The sorption efficiency toward Pu(VI) decreased with increasing biomass concentration due to increased agglomeration of the bacteria resulting in a decreased total surface area and number of available complexing groups. Spores of Bacillus sphaericus showed a higher biosorption than the vegetative cells at low biomass concentration which decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration. At higher biomass concentrations (> 0.7 g/L), the vegetative cells of both strains and the spores of B. sphaericus showed comparable sorption efficiencies. Investigations on the pH dependency of the biosorption and extraction studies with 0.01 M EDTA solution have shown that the biosorption of plutonium is a reversible process and the plutonium is bound by surface complexation. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that one third of the initially present Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V) after 24 hours. Kinetic studies and solvent extraction to separate different oxidation states of Pu after contact with the biomass provided further information on the yield and the kinetics of the bacteria-mediated reduction. Long-term studies showed that also 16% of Pu(IV) was formed after one month. The comparison of the amount of Pu(IV) formed during that time period with literature data of the Pu(V) disproportionation, indicated that the Pu(IV) seemed to be rather the result of the disproportionation of the formed Pu(V) than of a further microbial reduction

  12. ViSQOL: an objective speech quality model

    OpenAIRE

    Kokaram, Anil; KOKARAM, ANIL CHRISTOPHER; Harte, Naomi; HINES, ANDREW

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Export Date: 27 August 2015 This paper presents an objective speech quality model, ViSQOL, the Virtual Speech Quality Objective Listener. It is a signal-based, full-reference, intrusive metric that models human speech quality perception using a spectro-temporal measure of similarity between a reference and a test speech signal. The metric has been particularly designed to be robust for quality issues associated with Voice over IP (VoIP) transmission. This paper describes the a...

  13. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  14. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  15. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  16. Vi har brug for en ny værdipolitik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Den stærke fokusering på udlændingespørgsmålet har bidraget til at forarme et politisk klima, som i forvejen lider under mangel på visioner. Derved har vi undladt at tage hul på en nødvendig og mere dybtgående værdipolitisk debat om, hvad der sker med det danske samfund og dets værdigrundlag....

  17. Stark Broadening in Compact Stars: Xe VI Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    We will consider Stark broadening of non hydrogenic spectral lines in the impact approximation in compact stars: pre-white dwarf and white dwarf atmospheres. In order to show an example, Stark broadening parameters have been calculated, using the impact semiclassical perturbation approach for four Xe VI spectral lines. Obtained results have been used to demonstrate the influence of Stark broadening in DA and DB white dwarf atmospheres.

  18. Grimsel test site - Phase VI: review of accomplishments and next steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grimsel Test Site owned and operated by Nagra is located in the Swiss Alps (www.grimsel.com). The sixth Phase of investigations was started in 2003 with a ten-year planning horizon. With the investigations and projects of Phase VI the focus is shifted more towards projects assessing perturbation effects of repository implementation and projects evaluating and demonstrating engineering and operational aspects of the repository system. More than 17 international partners participate in the various projects, which form the basic organisational 'elements' of Phase VI, each one further structured in field-testing, laboratory studies, design and modelling tasks, as appropriate. Each project phase is planned with a duration of 3 to 5 years, to facilitate all practical and administrative aspects, ensuring flexibility for updating the overall plan with the recent findings. Scientific and engineering interaction among the different projects is ensured via the annual international meeting and ad-hoc meetings, as appropriate. As Phase VI approaches its mid-term point, a review of the accomplishments to date is performed to provide a sound basis for the detailed planning of the next steps. The accomplishments to date are described and assessed below; the opportunities with the on-going projects as well as new projects - currently under discussion - are also presented and discussed. The on-going projects include: studies of the long-term diffusion with emphasis on the processes in the rock matrix (LTD); colloid studies under in-situ generation conditions and migration velocities closer to velocities expected in an actual repository site (CFM); studies of the long-term cement interactions with natural systems (LCS); evaluation of full-scale engineered systems under simulated heat production and long-term natural saturation (NF-Pro/FEBEX); gas migration through engineered barrier systems (GMT); emplacement of shot-crete low-pH plug (ESDRED/Module IV); test and evaluation of

  19. Thermal detoxification and bloating of chromium(VI) with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y.-L., E-mail: yulin@thu.edu.t [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, H.-F.; Peng, Y.-S.; Yang, J.-C. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Paul Wang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environmental Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-Y.; Shih, W.-L.; Hsu, C.-C. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    This study stabilizes and bloats Cr(VI)-sorbed bentonite by heating at high temperature. Cr leaching decreases with increasing temperatures. Heating the sample at 1100 {sup o}C results in a non-detectable Cr concentration in the leachate, equivalent to a Cr leaching percent less than 0.001% (i.e., Cr TCLP concentration <0.018 mg of Cr L{sup -1} of leachate). Morphology observed with a scanning electron microscopy indicates the occurrence of sintering of the sample heated at 1100 {sup o}C. The heated samples also show the occurrence of a vesicant process at 1100 {sup o}C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that heating at 500 {sup o}C for 4 h can convert approximately 87% Cr(VI) into Cr(III) that is negligibly toxic; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected to be the most abundant Cr species. After heating at higher temperatures, namely 900-1100 {sup o}C, almost all doped Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III) as inferred from the height of the pre-edge peak of XANES spectra and/or from XANES simulation.

  20. Chemical filtration of Cr (VI) with electrospun chitosan nanofiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Yanxiang; Yang, Chuanfang

    2016-04-20

    Chitosan nanofibers (average diameter of 75nm) were electrospun on polyester (PET) scrim to form composite nanofiber membranes with controlled pore size. The membranes were then stacked as a membrane bed for chemical filtration of Cr (VI) of 1-5mg/L. The performance of the bed with respect to loading capacity at breakthrough, bed saturation and utilization efficiency were carefully investigated. The results showed that while these three parameters were dependent on pH, flow rate, flow distribution and packed pattern of the membrane, the latter two were less affected by feed Cr (VI) concentration and bed length. The maximum bed loading capacity for 1mg/L Cr (VI) filtration at breakthrough was found to be 16.5mg-chromium/g-chitosan, higher than the static adsorption capacity of 11.0mg-chromium/g-chitosan using nanofiber mats, indicating the membranes' better potential for dynamic adsorption. The minimum bed length required to avoid breakthrough was determined to be three layers of stacked membranes with nanofiber deposition density of 1g/m(2) by applying bed depth service time (BDST) model. PMID:26876857

  1. Characterization of uranium(VI) sorption by organobentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U(VI) sorption on the bentonite modified by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) was studied in the concentration range: 0.0001-0.001 mol/dm3 in the aqueous phase and in the pH range: 3-10. The experiments concerning the pH influence on the molar absorption coefficient cb of U(VI) in the bentonite phase showed that the species: UO22+, UO2(OH)+, UO2(OH)2 UO2(OH)3-, UO2(OH)42-, (UO2)3(OH)5+, (UO2)3(OH)7-, present in the aqueous phase, are responsible for uranium sorption. Their sorption parameters K were determined and it is evident that for higher concentrations of HDTMA+ cations in the bentonite phase, i.e. for b96-b157 bentonite, the presence of anionic species: UO2(OH)3-, UO2(OH)42-, and (UO2)3(OH)7- in the aqueous phase results in the increase of U(VI) molar absorption coefficient cb in the sorbent phase.

  2. The Galactic Halo's O VI Resonance Line Intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, R L; Sallmen, S M; Shelton, Robin L.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Sallmen, Shauna M.

    2006-01-01

    We used FUSE to observe ultraviolet emission from diffuse O VI in the hot gas in the Galactic halo. By comparing our result with another, nearby observation blocked by an opaque cloud at a distance of 230~pc, we could subtract off the contribution from the Local Bubble, leading to an apparent halo intensity of I_{OVI} = 4680^{+570}_{-660} photons/cm^2/s/sr. A correction for foreground extinction leads to an intrinsic intensity that could be as much as twice this value. Assuming T ~ 3 x 10^5 K, we conclude that the electron density, n_e, is 0.01-0.02 /cm^3, the thermal pressure, p/k, is 7000-10,000 K/cm^3, and that the hot gas is spread over a length of 50-70 pc, implying a small filling factor for O VI-rich gas. ROSAT observations of emission at 1/4 keV in the same direction indicate that the X-rays are weaker by a factor of 1.1 to 4.7, depending on the foreground extinction. Simulated supernova remnants evolving in low density gas have similar O VI to X-ray ratios when the remnant plasma is approaching colli...

  3. Skal vi have reklame-TV i Danmark?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Prehn

    1989-08-01

    Full Text Available Under stor ståhej fik vi reklamer i 1987 (TV-Syd og året efter kom turen til næsten resten af Danmark. Seertallene lever endnu ikke op til lovens forudsætninger, og reklamesel- skabet (TVR har derfor blandet sig uhørt kraftigt i den offentlige debat om reklamernes placering og programlægningen. Dette stemmer ikke særlig godt med de vandtætte skodder mellem reklamer og programlægning, som politikerne havde lovet os. Hvilke yderligere løftebrud er nødvendige i frem- tiden, hvis vi skal have TV betalt via reklamer? Ole Prehn gennemgår de politiske forudsætninger, beregninger af de så- kaldte kontaktpriser for TV-reklame og seertallene. Han når frem til, at reklamestrukturen i TV langt fra har nået sit endelige udviklingsstade i Danmark. Vi har endnu reklame-TV til gode.

  4. Solubility of plutonium(VI) carbonate in saline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean D.; Runde, Wolfgang; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-06-01

    Among the plutonium oxidation states found to form in the environment, mobile plutonium(VI) can exist under oxidizing conditions and in waters with high chloride content due to radiolysis effects. We are investigating the solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) carbonate under conditions relevant to natural waters and brines such as those found near some geologic radioactive waste repositories. The solid Pu(VI) phase PuO 2CO 3(s) was prepared and its solubility was measured in NaCl and NaClO 4 solutions in a CO 2 atmosphere as a function of pH and ionic strength (0.1-5.6 m). The concentration of soluble plutonium in solution was calculated from spectroscopic data and liquid scintillation counting. Spectroscopic measurements also revealed the plutonium oxidation state. The apparent solubility product of PuO 2CO 3(s) was determined at selected electrolyte concentrations to be, log Ks,0 = -13.95 ± 0.07 (0.1 m NaCl), log Ks,0 = -14.07 ± 0.13 (5.6 m NaCl), and log Ks,0 = -15.26 ± 0.11 (5.6 m NaClO 4). Specific ion interaction theory was used to calculate the solubility product at zero ionic strength, logKs,0∘=-14.82±0.05.

  5. Nopalea cochenillifera, a potential chromium (VI) hyperaccumulator plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adki, Vinayak S; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A

    2013-02-01

    Hexavalant chromium [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation in in vitro grown Nopalea cochenillifera Salm. Dyck. plants was investigated. A micropropagation protocol was establish for a rapid multiplication of N. cochenillifera and [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation was studied in in vitro grown cultures. Cr concentration was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy in roots and shoots to confirm plant's hyperaccumulation capacity. Plants showed tolerance up to 100 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) without any significant changes in root growth after 16 days treatment; whereas, chlorophyll content in plants treated with 1 and 10 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) were not so different than the control plant. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation increased significantly (p 100 μM) inhibited the activities of CAT and SOD. Roots accumulated a maximum of 25,263.396 ± 1,722.672 mg Cr Kg(-1) dry weight (DW); while the highest concentration of Cr in N. cochenillifera shoots was 705.714 ± 32.324 mg Cr Kg(-1) DW. N. cochenillifera could be a prospective hyperaccumulator plant of Cr(VI) and a promising candidate for phytoremediation purposes. PMID:22914913

  6. Implementation of MP{_}Lite for the VI Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiyi Chen

    2002-12-31

    MP{_}Lite is a light weight message-passing library designed to deliver the maximum performance to applications in a portable and user friendly manner. The Virtual Interface (VI) architecture is a user-level communication protocol that bypasses the operating system to provide much better performance than traditional network architectures. By combining the high efficiency of MP{_}Lite and high performance of the VI architecture, they are able to implement a high performance message-passing library that has much lower latency and better throughput. The design and implementation of MP{_}Lite for M-VIA, which is a modular implementation of the VI architecture on Linux, is discussed in this thesis. By using the eager protocol for sending short messages, MP{_}Lite M-VIA has much lower latency on both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet. The handshake protocol and RDMA mechanism provides double the throughput that MPICH can deliver for long messages. MP{_}Lite M-VIA also has the ability to channel-bonding multiple network interface cards to increase the potential bandwidth between nodes. Using multiple Fast Ethernet cards can double or even triple the maximum throughput without increasing the cost of a PC cluster greatly.

  7. Flavor Democracy: On which basis?

    CERN Document Server

    Rador, T

    2003-01-01

    I argue that flavor democracy should not be considered as a "mere" assumption, but rather a fact that is inherent where there is hierarchy of quark masses. Briefly the crux of the argument is the ambiguity of defining a basis when one introduces a mass matrix. That is there is a degree of freedom of also defining a basis other than the weak eigenbasis with respect to which one can write down mass matrices. Since the ultimate aim is to diagonalize to the mass eigenbasis this is physically equivalent. But not necessarily so for the human eye.

  8. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in II-Vi Semiconductor Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-Lin

    This dissertation is devoted to investigation of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Mn ^{++} ions in II-VI semiconductor heterostructures, in order to determine how EPR is affected by this layered environment and what new information can be extracted by this technique. We first introduce the concept of the effective spin, and we review the theoretical background of the spin Hamiltonian, for describing the ground state of a paramagnetic ion in a solid. The physical origin of the constituent terms in the spin Hamiltonion are discussed, and their characteristics described, for use at later stages in the thesis. We then analyze the effect on EPR of the potential exchange interaction between the localized d-electrons of the Mn^{++} ions and the band electrons. We predict that such exchange interaction can lead to significant changes in the g-factors of Mn ^{++} ions due to the spin polarization of band electrons, resulting in line shifts of EPR spectra. Although such shifts would be too small to be observed for Mn^{++} ions introduced into bulk semiconductors, we show that the shifts can be significantly larger for Mn^ {++} ions in quantum wells, superlattices, and similar heterostructures, due to the electron confinement effect. This effect of the potential exchange interaction on the EPR spectra of Mn^{++} ions leads us to propose to use the Mn ^{++} ions as built-in localized probes for mapping the wave functions of electronic states in II-VI semiconductor quantum wells and superlattices. We then consider the influence of internal strain on the EPR transitions of Mn^{++} in II-VI semiconductor heterostructures. Our analysis of the changes of the Mn^{++} fine structure indicates that EPR can be used to detect even minute amounts of strain (e.g., strain resulting from as little as 0.01% lattice mismatch can readily be measured). Accordingly, we demonstrate EPR to be an ultrasensitive and probably unique tool for small strain measurements in II-VI

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-07-02

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  11. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was foun

  12. GASB's Basis of Accounting Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovlak, Daniel L.

    1986-01-01

    In July 1984, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board began its "Measurement Focus/Basis of Accounting" project, which addresses measurement issues and revenue and expenditure recognition problems involving governmental funds. This article explains the project's background, alternatives discussed by the board, and tentative conclusions and…

  13. Thermodynamic basis for cluster kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Lina; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Xubo;

    2006-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the supercooled region of marginal metallic glasses (MMGs) within the experimental time window, we study the cluster kinetics above the liquidus temperature, Tl, to acquire information on the fragility of the MMG systems. Thermodynamic basis for the stability...

  14. Silicon nanoparticles (SiNp) alleviate chromium (VI) phytotoxicity in Pisum sativum (L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Durgesh Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Chauhan, Devendra Kumar; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2015-11-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of silicon nanoparticles (SiNp) against Cr (VI) phytotoxicity in pea seedlings. Results show that Cr(VI, 100 μM) significantly (P < 0.05) declined growth of pea which was accompanied by the enhanced level of Cr. Additionally, photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters like F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F0 and qP were decreased while NPQ significantly (P < 0.05) increased under Cr(VI) treatment. Superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by Cr(VI). Activities of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase were increased by Cr (VI) while activities of catalase, glutathione reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase were inhibited significantly (P < 0.05). Micro and macronutrients also show decreasing trends (except S) under Cr(VI) treatment. However, addition of SiNp together with Cr(VI) protects pea seedlings against Cr(VI) phytotoxicity hence improved growth was noticed. In conclusion, the results of this study show that Cr(VI) causes negative impact on pea seedlings, however; SiNp protects pea seedlings against Cr(VI) phytotoxicity by reducing Cr accumulation and oxidative stress, and up-regulating antioxidant defense system and nutrient elements.

  15. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg-1 at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg-1. Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  16. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

  17. Immunological evaluation of Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhi vaccine by serum bactericidal assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, H; Tabaraie, B; Maleknia, S; Shapouri, R; Nejati, M; Pour Mirza Gholi, F; Hedayati, M; Sadati, M; Zahednia, S; Sharifat Salmani, A

    2013-02-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhi (S. Typhi) Vi antigen capsular polysaccharide (Vi-CPS) is a licensed vaccine against typhoid fever. As there is no animal model for S. Typhi fever to evaluate the protective efficacy of the Vi-CPS vaccine, a serum bactericidal assay (SBA) is the recommended 'gold standard' to evaluate its potency. Vi-CPS was extracted from S. Typhi Ty6S (CSBPI-B191) using a modified Gotschlich method. Purified Vi-CPS (50 µg) was injected intramuscularly into three groups of five rabbits; group 2 received an additional booster dose of 50 µg Vi-CPS on day 15 and group 3 received two additional boosters on days 15 and 30. The sera obtained from each group were tested by SBA on days 0, 15, 30 and 45. The anti-Vi-CPS titres for groups 1, 2 and 3 on days 15, 30 and 45 were 4, 16 and 16; 4, 32 and 32; and 16, 64 and 64, respectively. Thus, Vi-CPS was shown to be a potent immunogen, as even one dose could induce an efficient bactericidal effect against S. Typhi. Although Vi-CPS is a reliable vaccine, sometimes depolymerization during purification can affect its potency, which can be resolved through a potency test. As the passive haemagglutination test recommended by the World Health Organization does not indicate vaccine potency, we recommend using an SBA to evaluate the bactericidal ability of Vi-CPS.

  18. Silicon nanoparticles (SiNp) alleviate chromium (VI) phytotoxicity in Pisum sativum (L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Durgesh Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Chauhan, Devendra Kumar; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2015-11-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of silicon nanoparticles (SiNp) against Cr (VI) phytotoxicity in pea seedlings. Results show that Cr(VI, 100 μM) significantly (P < 0.05) declined growth of pea which was accompanied by the enhanced level of Cr. Additionally, photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters like F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F0 and qP were decreased while NPQ significantly (P < 0.05) increased under Cr(VI) treatment. Superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by Cr(VI). Activities of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase were increased by Cr (VI) while activities of catalase, glutathione reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase were inhibited significantly (P < 0.05). Micro and macronutrients also show decreasing trends (except S) under Cr(VI) treatment. However, addition of SiNp together with Cr(VI) protects pea seedlings against Cr(VI) phytotoxicity hence improved growth was noticed. In conclusion, the results of this study show that Cr(VI) causes negative impact on pea seedlings, however; SiNp protects pea seedlings against Cr(VI) phytotoxicity by reducing Cr accumulation and oxidative stress, and up-regulating antioxidant defense system and nutrient elements. PMID:26298805

  19. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  20. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-08-18

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation.

  1. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y. S.; Ewing, T. F.; Boyle, J. M.; Yule, T. J.

    2001-08-28

    To enhance task performance in partially structured environment, enhancement of teleoperation was proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couples sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, presented in this paper is a perceptual basis for the motor agents. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extracts environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms--sensor fission, fusion, and fashion--becomes basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  2. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  3. Modification of zirconium diphosphate with salicylic acid and its effect on the uranium (Vi) sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of zirconium diphosphate (ZrP2O7) was modified with salicylic acid and its effect was evaluated on the uranium (Vi) sorption. The modified surface of the material was analyzed with different analytical techniques among which are included the atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This analysis allowed showing that the salicylic acid is being held on the surface of the zirconium diphosphate. The reactivity of modified zirconium diphosphate compared with uranium (Vi) was investigated using the classical method of batch sorption. The analysis of sorption isotherms shows that the salicylic acid has an important effect in the uranium (Vi) sorption. According to the study conducted, the interaction among the uranium (Vi) and the surface of zirconium diphosphate modified with the salicylic acid most likely leads to the complexes formation of binary (U(Vi)/ZrP2O7) and ternary (U(Vi)/salicylate/ZrP2O7) surface. (Author)

  4. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.

  5. Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports

  6. Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, J.C.

    1994-09-09

    The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  7. Penentuan Basis bagi Graf Roda

    OpenAIRE

    Ulfah Dwiyanti Obed, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Misalkan G=(V,E) suatu graf terhubung dan S adalah suatu himpunan bagian dari V. Himpunan S disebut himpunan penentu (resolving set) pada G jika untuk setiap titik pada G memiliki representasi jarak yang berbeda terhadap S. Himpunan penentu dengan banyak anggota (kardinalitas) minimum disebut himpunan penentu minimum (resolving set minimum) atau basis dari G dan kardinalitas himpunan tersebut menyatakan dimensi metrik (metric dimension) graf G, dinotasikan dengan dim(G). Pada skripsi ini t...

  8. Theoretical basis of alveolar sampling.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelman, G R

    1982-01-01

    The conditions under which the partial pressure of a solvent in the alveolar gas is likely to provide a valid index of its partial pressure in the mixed venous blood, and thus of whole-body exposure, is explored on a theoretical basis. Under steady-state conditions, providing the solvent's blood/gas partition coefficient exceeds 10, its mixed venous and alveolar pressures will agree within 10% and become virtually identical during the prolonged expiration necessary to obtain an alveolar sampl...

  9. A physical basis for MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Macleod, Alasdair

    2007-01-01

    MOND is a phenomenological theory with no apparent physical justification which seems to undermine some of the basic principles that underpin established theoretical physics. It is nevertheless remarkably successful over its sphere of application and this suggests MOND may have some physical basis. It is shown here that two simple axioms pertaining to fundamental principles will reproduce the characteristic behaviour of MOND, though the axioms are in conflict with general relativistic cosmology.

  10. Common basis for cellular motility

    OpenAIRE

    Zot, Henry G.; Javier E Hasbun; Minh, Nguyen Van

    2015-01-01

    Motility is characteristic of life, but a common basis for movement has remained to be identified. Diverse systems in motion shift between two states depending on interactions that turnover at the rate of an applied cycle of force. Although one phase of the force cycle terminates the decay of the most recent state, continuation of the cycle of force regenerates the original decay process in a recursive cycle. By completing a cycle, kinetic energy is transformed into probability of sustaining ...

  11. Ética e profética nas Mitológicas de Lévi-Strauss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sztutman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo intenta extrair das Mitológicas de Claude Lévi-Strauss uma ética e uma filosofia política (em princípio, ameríndias. Busca-se aqui a um só tempo responder e estender a provocação de Pierre Clastres, para quem a análise estrutural não teria se ocupado de tamanhas questões. Para realizar esta discussão, o foco será dado em duas obras de Lévi-Strauss: As origens dos modos à mesa, o terceiro volume das Mitológicas, e História de lince, a última das "pequenas mitológicas". Se a primeira finda com um excurso sobre a "moral dos mitos", a segunda principia com uma reflexão sobre a capacidade da mitologia de fornecer leituras da história, por exemplo, o "encontro" com o mundo europeu. Essas leituras, de sua parte, devem estar na base do que a literatura etnológica recente reconheceu como movimentos proféticos.This article focus Claude Lévi-Strauss' reflection on amerindian ethic and political thought. We suggest that we could read many passages of Mythologiques as if they contained sorts of replies as well as developments of some of Pierre Clastres' provocations and critics directed to structuralism. We will analyse particularly two books: Les origines des manières à table, Mythologiques' third volume, and Histoire de lynx, the last of the petites mythologiques. The first one ends with an interesting reflection on the "mythical moralism", while the second one starts with the problem of how amerindian mythologies can offer interpretations of history, interpretations of the "encounter" with europeans, for instance. These, we suppose, must be on the basis of what ethnological recent literature called "prophetic movements".

  12. Improved Bi Film Wrapped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Trace Cr(VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shilin; Xue, Zi-Ling; Xu, Lina; Gu, Yingying; Miao, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    We report here the successful fabrication of an improved Bi film wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (Bi/SWNTs/GCE) as a highly sensitive platform for ultratrace Cr(VI) detection through catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (AdCSV). The introduction of negatively charged SWNTs extraordinarily decreased the size of Bi particles to nanoscale due to electrostatic interaction which made Bi(III) cations easily attracted onto the surface of SWNTs in good order, leading to higher quality of Bi film deposition. The obtained Bi/SWNTs composite was well characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the static water contact angle and the voltammetric measurements. The results demonstrates the improvements in the quality of Bi film deposited on the surface of SWNTs such as faster speed of electron transfer, more uniform and smoother morphology, better hydrophilicity and higher stripping signal. Using diethylene triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as complexing ligand, the fabricated electrode displays a well-defined and highly sensitive peak for the reduction of Cr(III)-DTPA complex at −1.06 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with a linear concentration range of 0–25 nM and a fairly low detection limit of 0.036 nM. No interference was found in the presence of coexisting ions, and good recoveries were achieved for the analysis of a river sample. In comparison to previous approaches using Bi film modified GCE, the newly designed electrode exhibits better reproducibility and repeatability towards aqueous detection of trace Cr(VI) and appears to be very promising as the basis of a highly sensitive and selective voltammetric procedure for Cr(VI) detection at trace level in real samples. PMID:24771881

  13. Improved Bi Film Wrapped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Trace Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ruizhuo; Zhang, Wangyao; Zhou, Shilin; Xue, Zi-Ling; Xu, Lina; Gu, Yingying; Miao, Yuqing

    2013-12-15

    We report here the successful fabrication of an improved Bi film wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (Bi/SWNTs/GCE) as a highly sensitive platform for ultratrace Cr(VI) detection through catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (AdCSV). The introduction of negatively charged SWNTs extraordinarily decreased the size of Bi particles to nanoscale due to electrostatic interaction which made Bi(III) cations easily attracted onto the surface of SWNTs in good order, leading to higher quality of Bi film deposition. The obtained Bi/SWNTs composite was well characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the static water contact angle and the voltammetric measurements. The results demonstrates the improvements in the quality of Bi film deposited on the surface of SWNTs such as faster speed of electron transfer, more uniform and smoother morphology, better hydrophilicity and higher stripping signal. Using diethylene triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as complexing ligand, the fabricated electrode displays a well-defined and highly sensitive peak for the reduction of Cr(III)-DTPA complex at -1.06 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with a linear concentration range of 0-25 nM and a fairly low detection limit of 0.036 nM. No interference was found in the presence of coexisting ions, and good recoveries were achieved for the analysis of a river sample. In comparison to previous approaches using Bi film modified GCE, the newly designed electrode exhibits better reproducibility and repeatability towards aqueous detection of trace Cr(VI) and appears to be very promising as the basis of a highly sensitive and selective voltammetric procedure for Cr(VI) detection at trace level in real samples.

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI phenotypes-genotypes and antibody response to galsulfase

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, Marion M; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Kroos, Marian A.; Nobel, Willemieke; Ruijter, George J.; Özkan, Lale; Plug, Iris; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Halley, Dicky J; van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome; MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B; ARSB) leads to the storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in connective tissue. The genotype-phenotype correlation has been addressed in several publications but the picture is not complete. Since 2007, enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with MPS VI in ...

  15. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A in comparison with bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Peng, Fu-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) oxidative removal of various organic micropollutants mainly depends on the reactivity of Fe(VI) to target micropollutants and coexisting constituents present in source water. This study evaluated the potential of Fe(VI) oxidation of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by using reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation, and investigated the influencing effects of humic acid and clay particles on Fe(VI) removal of TBBPA in comparison with bisphenol A (BPA). The obtained apparent second-order rate constants (k(app)) for Fe(VI) reaction with TBBPA ranged from 7.9(±0.3) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) to 3.3(±0.1) × 10(1) M(-1) s(-1) with the half-life (t1/2) ranging from 1.7 s to 419.3 s at pH 7.0-10 for an Fe(VI) concentration of 10 mg L(-1). Easier oxidation by Fe(VI) was observed for TBBPA than for BPA. Fe(VI) can destroy and transform the TBBPA molecule through β-scission reaction, yielding the chemical species of low bromine-substituted products. More importantly, the oxidation of TBBPA by Fe(VI) led to the loss of its multiple hormonal activities (androgenic, antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activities). The organic component humic acid decreased the TBBPA and BPA reactions with Fe(VI), while the inorganic component montmorillonite had no effect on their removal within the tested concentrations. Increasing the Fe(VI) dosage can reduce the effects of soluble organic matter and clay particles present in source waters on the degradation process, leading to the complete removal of target micropollutants. PMID:24956603

  16. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  17. The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus on removal of U(VI) by illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus (P. catenlannulatus) on removal of U(VI) onto illite as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, and solution concentration was conducted by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics indicated that the removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be fitted by pseudo-second order kinetic model very well. The removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus increased with increasing pH from 1.0 to 7.0, whereas the decrease of U(VI) adsorption on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus was observed at pH > 7.5. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be simulated by the double diffuse model under various pH conditions. The ionic strength-dependent experiments showed that the removal of U(VI) on illite was outer-sphere surface complexation, whereas the inner-sphere surface complexation predominated the U(VI) adsorption onto illite coated P. catenlannulatus at pH 5.0–7.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus calculated from Langmuir model at pH 5.0 and T = 298 K was 46.729 and 54.347 mg/g, respectively, revealing enhanced adsorption of U(VI) on illite coated P. catenlannulatus. This paper highlights the effect of microorganism on the removal of radionuclides from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution management. - Highlights: • The removal of U(VI) by illite is strongly influenced by Paecilomyces catenlannulatus. • The removal of U(VI) by illite is an exothermic and spontaneous process. • The removal of U(VI) can be simulated by double diffuse model

  18. Towards a consistent geochemical model for prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by ferrihydrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: gustafjp@kth.se; Daessman, Ellinor [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Baeckstroem, Mattias [Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre, Orebro University, SE-701 82 Orebro (Sweden)

    2009-03-15

    Uranium(VI), which is often elevated in granitoidic groundwaters, is known to adsorb strongly to Fe (hydr)oxides under certain conditions. This process can be used in water treatment to remove U(VI). To develop a consistent geochemical model for U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite, batch experiments were performed and previous data sets reviewed to optimize a set of surface complexation constants using the 3-plane CD-MUSIC model. To consider the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on U(VI) speciation, new parameters for the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) were optimized using previously published data. The model, which was constrained from available X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy evidence, fitted the data well when the surface sites were divided into low- and high-affinity binding sites. Application of the model concept to other published data sets revealed differences in the reactivity of different ferrihydrites towards U(VI). Use of the optimized SHM parameters for U(VI)-DOM complexation showed that this process is important for U(VI) speciation at low pH. However in neutral to alkaline waters with substantial carbonate present, Ca-U-CO{sub 3} complexes predominate. The calibrated geochemical model was used to simulate U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite for a hypothetical groundwater in the presence of several competitive ions. The results showed that U(VI) adsorption was strong between pH 5 and 8. Also near the calcite saturation limit, where U(VI) adsorption was weakest according to the model, the adsorption percentage was predicted to be >80%. Hence U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite-containing sorbents may be used as a method to bring down U(VI) concentrations to acceptable levels in groundwater.

  19. Galsulfase (Naglazyme®) therapy in infants with mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    OpenAIRE

    Harmatz, Paul R.; Garcia, Paula; Guffon, Nathalie; Randolph, Linda M; Shediac, Renée; Braunlin, Elizabeth; Lachman, Ralph S.; Decker, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two dose levels of galsulfase (Naglazyme®) in infants with MPS VI. Study design This was a phase 4, multicenter, multinational, open-label, two-dose level study. Subjects were randomized 1:1 to receive weekly infusions of 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg of galsulfase for a minimum of 52 weeks. Progression of skeletal dysplasia was determined by monitoring physical appearance, radiographic changes, and growth. Urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels, gross and ...

  20. VI Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalle, J. B. G.; Villas da Rocha, J. F.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Wuensche de Souza, C. A.; da Silva, A. R.; Dottori, H. A.; Maia, M. A. G.; Poppe, P. C. R.; Martins, R. V.

    2004-04-01

    In this work we show the results of the VI Brazilian Olympiad of Astronomy, which took place on 17/05/2003 in all primary or secondary schools that previously registered. 76.445 students distributed over 1.565 schools from all Brazilian States took part in this event. A team of 5 students was selected to represent Brazil at the IX International Olympiad of Astronomy (IX IAO) in 2004. We participated of the VIII IAO that occurred in Stockholm, Sweden in 2003. Two of our students were awarded the bronze medal and silver medal in that event.

  1. The ENDF/B-VI photon interaction library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENDF/B-VI photon interaction library includes data to describe the interaction of photons with the elements Z = 1 to 100 over the energy range 10 eV to 100 MeV. This library has been designed to meet the traditional needs of users to model the interaction and transport of primary photons. However, this library contains additional information which used in a combination with our other data libraries can be used to perform much more detailed calculations, e.g., emission of secondary fluorescence photons. This paper describes both traditional and more detailed uses of this library

  2. Radiographically visualized skeletal changes associated with mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiographic skeletal form and structure of all cats with mucopolysaccharidosis VI is described. Common manifestations included epiphyseal dysplasia, generalized osteoporosis, abnormal nasal turbinate development, his subluxation, impaired development of skeletal growth, pectus excavatum, hyoid hypoplasia, aplasia, hypoplasia and fragmentation or abnormal ossification of the dens, and aplasia or hypoplasia of frontal and sphenoid sinuses. The skeletal measurements of two affected cats were compared with those of normal, sex-matched littermates, and the measurements of two affected female cats were compared with those of a normal male littermate

  3. Hvad skal vi med en hjerne?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Judy

    2009-01-01

      Debatten om Martin Lindstrøms Buyology har vist, at ikke alle sluger neuromarketing hypen råt. Brødrene Perrachione - den ene hjerneforsker og den anden marketingforsker - giver her deres bud på, hvor neurovidenskab og marketing har noget at sige hinanden. Hjernens fornemste opgave er, ifølge n...... bliver påvirket, ved vi ikke ret meget om - udover når det handler om effekten af rent kropslige stimuli som mad, rusmidler og sex. Lidt kan man dog sige om dem, som (udover mad, rusmidler og sex) er særdeles relevant for reklamefolk. Udgivelsesdato: Februar...

  4. A uranium (VI) complex: Synthesis, structural and thermal kinetic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Nidhi

    2016-08-01

    A new complex [UO2(2,6-DNP)2phen] (1) (2,6-DNP = 2,6-dinitrophenol, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) was synthesized, and identified by elemental analysis, IR, Powder XRD and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure provides the abundant information's about the bonding and geometry around the U(VI) metal center. The thermal decomposition was studied by TG-DSC, and the kinetics of thermolysis was investigated by applying model fitting as well as isoconversional methods. Explosion delay measurement (De) was also evaluated to determine the response of this complex under the condition of rapid heating.

  5. CFD Simulation of the NREL Phase VI Rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yang; Perot, J. Blair

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of the turbulent and potentially separating flow around a rotating, twisted, and tapered airfoil is a challenging task for CFD simulations. This paper describes CFD simulations of the NREL Phase VI turbine that was experimentally characterized in the 24.4m x 36.6m NREL/NASA Ames wind tunnel (Hand et al., 2001). All computations in this article are performed on the experimental base configuration of 0o yaw angle, 3o tip pitch angle, and a rotation rate of 72 rpm. The significanc...

  6. vi-Strauss, Caduveo Body Painting and the Readymade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiseman, Boris Nicholas Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore some convergences between aesthetics and the anthropology of art, two disciplines often thought of as incompatible or mutually exclusive. Its impetus is the conviction that we have much to gain by a more systematic and concerted attempt at constituting an ethno......-aesthetics, i.e. a decentred aesthetics enriched by the dynamic of cross-cultural comparison. I will take as my starting point Lévi-Strauss's classic studies of Caduveo body painting and try to show how, beyond the clichés often repeated about structuralism, they provide valuable insights for an understanding...

  7. In-orbit RF test of an Intelsat VI spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Gunnar E. G.; Teixeira, Basilio; Olimpiew, Alexandre; Petterson, Bengt A.; Sanders, Stewart B.

    An account is given of the RF in-orbit test (IOT) conducted to verify the performance of Intelsat VI's antennas and transponders, as well as its telemetry, command, and ranging subsystems. Attention is given to novel measurement methods developed and implemented at the Intelsat IOT station in Fucino, Italy; these encompass synthesized digital spectrum analyzers, fast frequency-switching synthesizers, and dual-pulse generator controls. The IOT measurements obtained for the Intelsat 602 spacecraft are found to be in good agreement with prelaunch data.

  8. Removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution using treated oil palm fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ibrahim, Naimah; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin; Sabiani, Nor Habsah Md; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar Lorestani; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2008-04-01

    This study proposed an oil palm by-product as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] from aqueous solution. Adsorption of Cr (VI) by sulphuric acid and heat-treated oil palm fibre was conducted using batch tests. The influence of pH, contact time, initial chromium concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal of Cr (VI) from the solutions was investigated. The optimum initial pH for maximum uptake of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution was found to be 1.5. The removal efficiency was found to correlate with the initial Cr (VI) concentration, adsorbent dosage as well as the contact time between Cr (VI) and the adsorbent. The adsorption kinetics tested with pseudo first order and pseudo second order models yielded high R(2) values from 0.9254 to 0.9870 and from 0.9936 to 0.9998, respectively. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant difference between the R(2) values of the two models at 99% confidence level. The Freundlich isotherm (R(2)=0.8778) described Cr (VI) adsorption slightly better than the Langmuir isotherm (R(2)=0.8715). Difficulty in desorption of Cr (VI) suggests the suitability of treated oil palm fibre as a single-use adsorbent for Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solution. PMID:17714862

  9. Biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_Arthrobacter species

    OpenAIRE

    Gelagutashvili, E.; Pataraia, E. Ginturi D.; Gurielidze, M.

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis and Arthrobacter oxidas) was studied simultaneous application dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. Also biosorption of Cr(VI) in the presence of Zn(II) during growth of Arthrobacter species and Cr(III) in the presence of Mn(II) were discussed. Comparative Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species shown, that Cr(III) was more effectively adsorbed by both bacterium than Cr(VI). The adsorption capacity is ...

  10. [Efficacy and side effects following immunization with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z G; Zhou, W Z; Shi, J

    1997-02-01

    Efficacy and side effects following the immunization with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Vi) were assessed. The diluted solution (DS) of Vi was used as placebo. A total number of 777 children and adults were observed for side effect response. Mild and moderate fever appeared 16.93% and 0.05% in Vi group, 15.01% and 0.03% in DS group, respectively (statistically significant). Two cases with mild local reaction were observed in Vi group. A total number of 81,506 vaccinees were investigated on the efficacy of Vi vaccine, using positive blood culture of Salmonolla typhi as a diagnostic criterion. The protective rate and index of vaccine were 71.35% and 3.49% respectively. If 2 cases of positive Widal's test were included in, the protective rate would come up to 78.17% with a protective index 4.85. Clinical data showed that fever seen in the cases in Vi group was much lower than that of DS group. The systematic and local reaction of Vi vaccine were mild. The vaccine is safe and has high protective rate. It can also decrease the degree of fever with only one single dose as primary immunization. We believe Vi vaccine may serve as a vaccine of new generation to be promoted.

  11. The distribution and kinematics of interstellar O~{\\small VI} in the Milky Way}

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Rathin; Murthy, Jayanta; Sarma, Jayanta K

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a survey of interstellar O~{\\small VI} absorption in the Milky Way (MW) towards {69} stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained with the \\textit{Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE)}. The integrated MW O~{\\small VI} column densities log N(O~{\\small VI}) are in the range from 13.68 to 14.73 with a mean of {14.26$_{-0.09}^{+0.07}$} atoms cm$^{-2}$. The O~{\\small VI} exponential scale height is found to be {2.28$\\pm$1.06} kpc. The O~{\\small VI} column density correlates with the Doppler parameter $\\it b$. The O~{\\small VI} velocity dispersion ranges from {14.0 to 91.6 with an average value of 62.7 km s$^{-1}$}. These high values of velocity dispersion reveal the effect of turbulence, multiple velocity components and collision on broad O~{\\small VI} profiles. There is a significant variation of O~{\\small VI} column density on all scales studied {(0.0025$\\degr$ - 6.35$\\degr$)}. The smallest scale for which O~{\\small VI} column density variations has been found is {$\\bigtr...

  12. Cr(VI) Adsorption on Red Mud Modified by Lanthanum: Performance, Kinetics and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, You-Wei; Li, Jie; Du, Zhao-Fu; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution caused by the highly toxic metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) creates significant human health and ecological risks. In this study, a novel adsorbent was used to treat Cr(VI)-containing wastewater; the adsorbent was prepared using red mud (RM) generated from the alumina production industry and the rare earth element lanthanum. This study explored adsorption performance, kinetics, and mechanisms. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics of the RM modified by lanthanum (La-RM), followed the pseudo-second-order model, with a rapid adsorption rate. Cr(VI) adsorption was positively associated with the absorbent dose, pH, temperature, and initial Cr(VI) concentration; coexisting anions had little impact. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity was 17.35 mg/g. Cr(VI) adsorption on La-RM was a mono-layer adsorption pattern, following the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters showed the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on La-RM occurred as a result of LaOCl formation on the RM surface, which in turn further reacted with Cr(VI) in the wastewater. This study highlighted a method for converting industrial waste into a valuable material for wastewater treatment. The novel absorbent could be used as a potential adsorbent for treating Cr(VI)-contaminating wastewater, due to its cost-effectiveness and high adsorption capability. PMID:27658113

  13. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in bothCol6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly,Bmal1(-/-)(also known asArntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis. PMID:26945058

  14. Synthesis of novel aminated cellulose microsphere adsorbent for efficient Cr(VI) removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianlin; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Min; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-08-01

    A novel aminated cellulose microsphere adsorbent (CVN) was successfully prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) onto cellulose microsphere (CMS), followed by amination. Micro-FTIR, XPS and SEM confirmed the structure of CVN. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) onto CVN from solution was well fitted by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The isothermal adsorption of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 4.68 with adsorption capacity of 129 mg/g in accordance with Langmuir thermal model, and the removal of Cr(VI) from solution could be 91% at a low amount (20 mg) of adsorbent. The best pH for adsorption of Cr(VI) was nearly 3.08, and with the increasing of temperature, the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) increased. XPS analysis confirmed the adsorption mechanism of Cr(VI) was ion-exchange mechanism, while common co-ions such as Na+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cl-, NO3- has no significant effect on the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI), and the Cr(VI) removal of 80% still could be obtained compared with that of fresh CVN adsorbent. Finally, spent CVN could be regenerated under 2 mol/L NaCl. The work indicated that aminated cellulose adsorbent could be prepared successfully by radiation-induced grafting and amination and CVN is a promising bio-adsorbent in the removing Cr(VI) from waste water.

  15. Myosin VI regulates actin structure specialization through conserved cargo-binding domain sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamiko Isaji

    Full Text Available Actin structures are often stable, remaining unchanged in organization for the lifetime of a differentiated cell. Little is known about stable actin structure formation, organization, or maintenance. During Drosophila spermatid individualization, long-lived actin cones mediate cellular remodeling. Myosin VI is necessary for building the dense meshwork at the cones' fronts. We test several ideas for myosin VI's mechanism of action using domain deletions or site-specific mutations of myosin VI. The head (motor and globular tail (cargo-binding domains were both needed for localization at the cone front and dense meshwork formation. Several conserved partner-binding sites in the globular tail previously identified in vertebrate myosin VI were critical for function in cones. Localization and promotion of proper actin organization were separable properties of myosin VI. A vertebrate myosin VI was able to localize and function, indicating that functional properties are conserved. Our data eliminate several models for myosin VI's mechanism of action and suggest its role is controlling organization and action of actin assembly regulators through interactions at conserved sites. The Drosophila orthologues of interaction partners previously identified for vertebrate myosin VI are likely not required, indicating novel partners mediate this effect. These data demonstrate that generating an organized and functional actin structure in this cell requires multiple activities coordinated by myosin VI.

  16. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  17. Quorum regulatory small RNAs repress type VI secretion in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-06-01

    Type VI secretion is critical for Vibrio cholerae to successfully combat phagocytic eukaryotes and to survive in the presence of competing bacterial species. V. cholerae type VI secretion system genes are encoded in one large and two small clusters. In V. cholerae, type VI secretion is controlled by quorum sensing, the cell-cell communication process that enables bacteria to orchestrate group behaviours. The quorum-sensing response regulator LuxO represses type VI secretion genes at low cell density and the quorum-sensing regulator HapR activates type VI secretion genes at high cell density. We demonstrate that the quorum regulatory small RNAs (Qrr sRNAs) that function between LuxO and HapR in the quorum-sensing cascade are required for these regulatory effects. The Qrr sRNAs control type VI secretion via two mechanisms: they repress expression of the large type VI secretion system cluster through base pairing and they repress HapR, the activator of the two small type VI secretion clusters. This regulatory arrangement ensures that the large cluster encoding many components of the secretory machine is expressed prior to the two small clusters that encode the secreted effectors. Qrr sRNA-dependent regulation of the type VI secretion system is conserved in pandemic and non-pandemic V. cholerae strains.

  18. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis.

  19. Mixtures of truncated basis functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre; Rumí, Rafael;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a framework, called mixtures of truncated basis functions (MoTBFs), for representing general hybrid Bayesian networks. The proposed framework generalizes both the mixture of truncated exponentials (MTEs) framework and the mixture of polynomials (MoPs) framework. Similar...... for efficiently approximating an arbitrary density function using the MoTBF framework. The transla- tion method is more flexible than existing MTE or MoP-based methods, and it supports an online/anytime tradeoff between the accuracy and the complexity of the approxima- tion. Experimental results show...

  20. Value basis for conservation policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiss, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a case study in attempting to apply a particular value (caring) to the domain of social policy, specifically resource conservation policy. The argument is that our consumer society erodes the social basis for the development by individuals of a sense of well-being and personal identity, and that a conservation ethic based on the concept of caring could provide a foundation in practical morality and public policy for a viable sense of well-being. Conservation, then, goes beyond eliminating wasteful consumption to encompass a public commitment that can further economic and social goals. 11 references.

  1. The physical basis of chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2000-01-01

    If the text you're using for general chemistry seems to lack sufficient mathematics and physics in its presentation of classical mechanics, molecular structure, and statistics, this complementary science series title may be just what you're looking for. Written for the advanced lower-division undergraduate chemistry course, The Physical Basis of Chemistry, Second Edition, offers students an opportunity to understand and enrich the understanding of physical chemistry with some quantum mechanics, the Boltzmann distribution, and spectroscopy. Posed and answered are questions concerning eve

  2. Study of molybdenum (VI) complexation and precipitation by zirconium (IV) in strongly acid medium. Application to nuclear spent fuel dissolution; Etude de la complexation et de la precipitation du molybdene (VI) par le zirconium (IV) en milieu tres acide. Application a la dissolution du combustible nucleaire irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbelin, E

    1999-07-01

    These last years the formation of solid deposits has been observed in the dissolution workshops of the La Hague plant. A sample of the solid was withdrawn for expertise: molybdenum and zirconium are the two major components of the solid, identified as zirconium molybdate. This thesis consisted in the approach of the mechanisms in solution liable to induce precipitate formation. After a bibliographical overview on the chemistry of Mo(VI) in highly acidic solution, this system was studied by absorption spectrophotometry in perchloric medium. The implication of two major forms of Mo(VI) in a dimerization equilibrium was confirmed by this way and by {sup 95}Mo NMR. The principal parameters governing this equilibrium were identified. It is thus shown that the molybdenum dimerization reaction is exothermic. Disturbance of the Mo(VI) system in highly acidic solution by Zr(IV) was also studied. In a restricted experimental field, for which 'conventional' exploitation methodologies had to be adapted to the system, a main complex of stoichiometry 1:1 between Mo(VI) and Zr(IV) was found. The precipitation study of Mo(VI) by Zr(IV) under conditions close to those of the dissolution medium of nuclear spent fuel was undertaken. The main parameters which control precipitation kinetics were identified. The results obtained reveal that precipitation is controlled by a single macroscopic process and therefore can be described by a single equation. The solid obtained is composed of only one phase presenting a Mo:Zr non-stoichiometry when compared to the theoretical formula ZrMo{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2},2H{sub 2}O. At last, on the basis of the research results, a descriptive mechanism of the system is proposed in which intervenes a 1:1 intermediate complex, much more soluble than a probable 2:1 precipitation precursor. (author)

  3. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  4. Recent Advances in Treatment Approaches of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliani, Roberto; Carvalho, Clarissa Gutiérrez; Herber, Silvani; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI is caused by accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan dermatan sulfate in all tissues due to decreased activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B. Patients exhibit multisystemic signs and symptoms in a chronic and progressive manner, especially with changes in the skeleton, cardiopulmonary system, cornea, skin, liver, spleen and meninges. Patients usually have normal intelligence. In the past, treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses was limited to palliative medical care. The outcome for affected patients improved with the introduction of new technologies as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relegated to specific situations after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) became available. The specific ERT for MPS VI, galsulfase (Naglazyme®, Biomarin Pharmaceutical) was approved in 2005 by FDA and in 2006 by EMEA, and three clinical studies including 56 patients have evaluated the efficacy and safety. Long-term follow up data with patients treated up to 5 years showed that ERT is well tolerated and associated with sustained improvements in the patients' clinical condition. Intrathecal ERT may be considered in situations of high neurosurgical risk but still it is experimental in humans, as is intra-articular ERT. It is possible that the full impact of this therapy will only be demonstrated when patients are identified and treated soon after birth, as it was shown that early introduction of ERT produced immune tolerance and improved enzyme effectiveness in the cat model. New insights on the pathophysiology of MPS disorders are leading to alternative therapeutic approaches, as gene therapy, inflammatory response modulators and substrate reduction therapy.

  5. Observations of O VI Emission from the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, R L; Murphy, E M; Andersson, B G; Blair, W P; Dixon, W V; Edelstein, J D; Fullerton, A W; Gry, C; Howk, J C; Jenkins, E B; Linsky, J L; Moos, H W; Oegerle, W R; Oey, M S; Roth, K C; Sahnow, D J; Sankrit, R; Savage, B D; Sembach, K R; Shull, J M; Siegmund, O H W; Vidal-Madjar, A; Welsh, B Y; York, D G

    2001-01-01

    We report the first Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) measurements of diffuse O VI (lambda,lambda 1032,1038) emission from the general diffuse interstellar medium outside of supernova remnants or superbubbles. We observed a 30arcsec x 30arcsec region of the sky centered at l = 315 and b = -41. From the observed intensities (2930+/-290(random)+/-410(systematic) and 1790+/-260(random)+/-250(systematic) photons/cm/cm/s/sr in the 1032 and 1038 Angstrom emission lines, respectively), derived equations, and assumptions about the source location, we calculate the intrinsic intensity, electron density, thermal pressure, and emitting depth. The intensities are too large for the emission to originate solely in the Local Bubble. Thus, we conclude that the Galactic thick disk and lower halo also contribute. High velocity clouds are ruled out because there are none near the pointing direction. The calculated emitting depth is small, indicating that the O VI-bearing gas fills a small volume. The observations ca...

  6. Correlations between O VI Absorbers and Galaxies at Low Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, Rajib; Fang, Taotao; Sembach, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between galaxies and metal-line absorption systems in a large-scale cosmological simulation with galaxy formation. Our detailed treatment of metal enrichment and non-equilibrium calculation of oxygen species allow us, for the first time, to carry out quantitative calculations of the cross-correlations between galaxies and O VI absorbers. We find the following: (1) The cross-correlation strength depends weakly on the absorption strength but strongly on the luminosity of the galaxy. (2) The correlation distance increases monotonically with luminosity from ~0.5-1h^-1 Mpc for 0.1L* galaxies to ~3-5h^-1 Mpc for L* galaxies. (3) The correlation distance has a complicated dependence on absorber strength, with a luminosity-dependent peak. (4) Only 15% of O VI absorbers lie near >=Lz* galaxies. The remaining 85%, then, must arise ``near'' lower-luminosity galaxies, though, the positions of those galaxies is not well-correlated with the absorbers. This may point to pollution of intergala...

  7. Treatment of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) in tanning effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common chemical used in chrome tanning is basic chromium sulphate (BCS). Manufacturing of BCS involves many steps producing liquid waste. Waste generated at every stage contains Cr (VI), which must be reduced to Cr (III) before being disposed to the environment. Different methods were studied for the reduction of toxic Cr (III). Pickle liquor (waste of electroplating industry) can also be used for the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr (vi) along with other reducing materials / chemicals. In an electroplating process metal is treated with HCl or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to remove scales and rust, the pickled items are then washed with water, washing contains FeCl/sub 2/ or fees/sub 4/ respectively called pickle liquor. During waste treatment pH adjustment to 6.0 - 9.0 and settling the sludge, is discharged to the lagoon. The sludge obtained is dried and disposed off in landfills. Other reducing agents like sodium bisulphite and sulfur dioxide were also studied, but pickle liquor was found to be more effective and economical. (author)

  8. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  9. PRoViScout: a planetary scouting rover demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paar, Gerhard; Woods, Mark; Gimkiewicz, Christiane; Labrosse, Frédéric; Medina, Alberto; Tyler, Laurence; Barnes, David P.; Fritz, Gerald; Kapellos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Mobile systems exploring Planetary surfaces in future will require more autonomy than today. The EU FP7-SPACE Project ProViScout (2010-2012) establishes the building blocks of such autonomous exploration systems in terms of robotics vision by a decision-based combination of navigation and scientific target selection, and integrates them into a framework ready for and exposed to field demonstration. The PRoViScout on-board system consists of mission management components such as an Executive, a Mars Mission On-Board Planner and Scheduler, a Science Assessment Module, and Navigation & Vision Processing modules. The platform hardware consists of the rover with the sensors and pointing devices. We report on the major building blocks and their functions & interfaces, emphasizing on the computer vision parts such as image acquisition (using a novel zoomed 3D-Time-of-Flight & RGB camera), mapping from 3D-TOF data, panoramic image & stereo reconstruction, hazard and slope maps, visual odometry and the recognition of potential scientifically interesting targets.

  10. Quadratic Hedging of Basis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Hulley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a simple basis risk model based on correlated geometric Brownian motions. We apply quadratic criteria to minimize basis risk and hedge in an optimal manner. Initially, we derive the Föllmer–Schweizer decomposition for a European claim. This allows pricing and hedging under the minimal martingale measure, corresponding to the local risk-minimizing strategy. Furthermore, since the mean-variance tradeoff process is deterministic in our setup, the minimal martingale- and variance-optimal martingale measures coincide. Consequently, the mean-variance optimal strategy is easily constructed. Simple pricing and hedging formulae for put and call options are derived in terms of the Black–Scholes formula. Due to market incompleteness, these formulae depend on the drift parameters of the processes. By making a further equilibrium assumption, we derive an approximate hedging formula, which does not require knowledge of these parameters. The hedging strategies are tested using Monte Carlo experiments, and are compared with results achieved using a utility maximization approach.

  11. Retention of U(VI) onto silica in presence of model organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.T.H.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Simoni, E. [Groupe de Radiochimie, IPNO, Universite Paris 11, Orsay, 91406 (France); Lambert, J. [LCPME, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, Villers-les-Nancy, 54600 (France)

    2008-07-01

    It is well-known that the organic matter influences the retention of ions onto mineral surfaces. However, the major part of concerned studies implies humic substances and complex solids. Another approach for identifying the sorption mechanisms is possible by studying simpler solids than those present in natural medium. So, silica is chosen as mineral surface because of its abundance in soils and of the presence of Si-O groups in clayey minerals. Uranium (VI) is selected as cation. Simple organic molecules like acetic (one carboxylic group) and oxalic (two carboxylic functions) acids are considered as models of the natural organic matter for understanding their role in the retention of U(VI) onto powders and slides of silica. Binary (organics/silica, U(VI)/silica) and ternary systems (organics/silica/U(VI)) are studied by complementary approaches. Sorption edges as function of pH are obtained by liquid scintillation methods and capillary electrophoresis. Different spectroscopic techniques are used to deduce the interactions between the organic matter and U(VI) sorbed onto the silica whose: Time-Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMA). The results of the effect of these model organic molecules onto the U(VI) retention showed a good agreement between the different techniques. Concerning the acetic acid, there are not differences in the sorption percentages of uranyl (see the figure). All these results indicate that the uranyl-acetate complexes stay in the aqueous solution rather than sorbing onto the silica. On the contrary, oxalic acid influences the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. The sorption percentage of U(VI) in the ternary system (oxalic acid/silica/U(VI)) is lower than the binary system (U(VI)/silica) (see the figure). So, the presence of oxalic acid decreases the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. (authors)

  12. Edaphic characteristics of Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arn. forests in the Višegrad area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Velibor D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of soil research in Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arn. forest communities in the Višegrad area, carried out to determine the basic soil characteristics and eco-production potential of forest habitats as an important basis and framework for the successful management of these forests on the principles of sustainable development. Austrian pine forests in this region are an important and ecologically valuable community. The complexity of the geological structure and relief dynamics are dominant environmental factors that condition the expressed variability of soils in the study area. Forest communities of Austrian pine are formed on the peridotites and serpentinites, eutric ranker (haplic leptosol, eutric cambisol (haplic cambisols and pseudogley (haplic planosol, dense granular and marl limestones calcomelanosol (mollic leptosol, rendzina (rendzic leptosol and calcocambisol (leptic cambisol. The productivity of these soils is highly correlated with depth and texture composition, and the impact of these factors is linked with soil type, climate and other site conditions. In the research area, soil types with low production potential such as rankers, rendzinas, limestone and dolomite calcomelanosol are dominant. Deeper variants of eutric cambisol, pseudogley and calcocambisol can be classified as soils with moderate to high production potential.

  13. Spectroscopic properties and antimicrobial activity of dioxomolybdenum(VI complexes with heterocyclic S,S’-ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovilj Sofija P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Five new dioxomolybdenum(VI complexes of the general formula[MoO2(Rdtc2], 1-5, where Rdtc-refer to piperidine- (Pipdtc, 4-morpholine-(Morphdtc, 4-thiomorpholine-(Timdtc, piperazine- (Pzdtc or Nmethylpiperazine- (N-Mepzdtc dithiocarbamates, respectively, have been prepared. Elemental analysis, conductometric measurements, electronic, IR and NMR spectroscopy have been employed to characterize them. Complexes 1-5 contain a cis-MoO2 group and are of an octahedral geometry. Two dithiocarbamato ions join as bidentates with both the sulphur atoms to the molybdenum atom. The presence of different heteroatom in the piperidinо moiety influences the v(C----N and v(C----S vibrations, which decrease in the order of the complexes with: Pipdtc > N-Mepipdtc > Morphdtc > Pzdtc > Timdtc ligands. On the basis of spectral data, molecular structures of complexes 1-5 were optimized on semiempirical molecular-orbital level, and the geometries, as obtained from calculations, described. Antimicrobial activity was tested against nine different laboratory control strains of bacteria and two strains of yeast Candida albicans. All tested strains were sensitive. Complexes bearing heteroatom in position 4 of piperidine moiety are significantly more potent against bacteria tested comparing to corresponding ligands.

  14. Urinary pyridinoline cross-links in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, B.; Eyre, D.R.; Shao, P. [Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)]|[Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of connective tissue, affecting skin, ligaments, joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. The main general findings are hyperextensibility and bruisability of the skin, with abnormal scarring, and joint laxity. On the basis of clinical, genetic, and biochemical findings, EDS can be classified today into at least 10 different types. Among them, EDS type VI (MIM 225400) is characterized by marked muscular hypotonia from birth; kyphoscoliosis, often present at birth and progressing to a severe form; marfanoid habitus; eye involvement, often with microcornea and a tendency of the eyeballs to rupture after minor trauma; osteoporosis; and sometimes spontaneous rupture of arteries. The disorder is due to a deficiency of lysyl hydroxylase (E.C.1.14.11.4), inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Traditionally, the clinical diagnosis is confirmed by an insufficiency of hydroxylysine, on analysis of hydrolyzed dermis and/or reduced enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Synthesis of cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum. VI. Growth on citric acid-cycle intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GROMET-ELHANAN, Z; HESTRIN, S

    1963-02-01

    Gromet-Elhanan, Zippora (The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel) and Shlomo Hestrin. Synthesis of cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum. VI. Growth on citric acid-cycle intermediates. J. Bacteriol. 85:284-292. 1963.-Acetobacter xylinum could be made to grow on ethanol, acetate, succinate, or l-malate. The growth was accompanied by formation of opaque leathery pellicles on the surface of the growth medium. These pellicles were identified as cellulose on the basis of their chemical properties, solubility behavior, and infrared absorption spectra. Washed-cell suspensions prepared from cultures grown on ethanol or the organic acids, in contrast to washed sugar-grown cells, were able to transform citric-cycle intermediates into cellulose. The variations in the substrate spectrum of cellulose synthesis between sugar-grown cells and organic acids-grown cells were found to be correlated with differences in the oxidative capacity of the cells. The significance of the findings that A. xylinum could be made to grow on ethanol on complex as well as synthetic media is discussed from the viewpoint of the whole pattern of Acetobacter classification.

  16. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  17. A Salmonella Typhimurium-Typhi genomic chimera: a model to study Vi polysaccharide capsule function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Jansen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Vi capsular polysaccharide is a virulence-associated factor expressed by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi but absent from virtually all other Salmonella serotypes. In order to study this determinant in vivo, we characterised a Vi-positive S. Typhimurium (C5.507 Vi(+, harbouring the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-7, which encodes the Vi locus. S. Typhimurium C5.507 Vi(+ colonised and persisted in mice at similar levels compared to the parent strain, S. Typhimurium C5. However, the innate immune response to infection with C5.507 Vi(+ and SGB1, an isogenic derivative not expressing Vi, differed markedly. Infection with C5.507 Vi(+ resulted in a significant reduction in cellular trafficking of innate immune cells, including PMN and NK cells, compared to SGB1 Vi(- infected animals. C5.507 Vi(+ infection stimulated reduced numbers of TNF-α, MIP-2 and perforin producing cells compared to SGB1 Vi(-. The modulating effect associated with Vi was not observed in MyD88(-/- and was reduced in TLR4(-/- mice. The presence of the Vi capsule also correlated with induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in vivo, a factor that impacted on chemotaxis and the activation of immune cells in vitro.

  18. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs

  19. Chemical basis for minimal cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Ikegami, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a simple chemical system capable of self-movement in order to study the physicochemical origins of movement. We propose how this system may be useful in the study of minimal perception and cognition. The system consists simply of an oil droplet in an aqueous environment. A chemical reaction within the oil droplet induces an instability, the symmetry of the oil droplet breaks, and the droplet begins to move through the aqueous phase. The complement of physical phenomena that is then generated indicates the presence of feedback cycles that, as will be argued, form the basis for self-regulation, homeostasis, and perhaps an extended form of autopoiesis. We discuss the result that simple chemical systems are capable of sensory-motor coupling and possess a homeodynamic state from which cognitive processes may emerge. PMID:20586578

  20. The Genetic Basis of Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousi, Maria; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Studies of syndromic hydrocephalus have led to the identification of >100 causative genes. Even though this work has illuminated numerous pathways associated with hydrocephalus, it has also highlighted the fact that the genetics underlying this phenotype are more complex than anticipated originally. Mendelian forms of hydrocephalus account for a small fraction of the genetic burden, with clear evidence of background-dependent effects of alleles on penetrance and expressivity of driver mutations in key developmental and homeostatic pathways. Here, we synthesize the currently implicated genes and inheritance paradigms underlying hydrocephalus, grouping causal loci into functional modules that affect discrete, albeit partially overlapping, cellular processes. These in turn have the potential to both inform pathomechanism and assist in the rational molecular classification of a clinically heterogeneous phenotype. Finally, we discuss conceptual methods that can lead to enhanced gene identification and dissection of disease basis, knowledge that will potentially form a foundation for the design of future therapeutics. PMID:27145913

  1. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  2. Nanotechnological Basis for Advanced Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Popov, Cyril; Petkov, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    Bringing together experts from 15 countries, this book is based on the lectures and contributions of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on “Nanotechnological Basis for Advanced Sensors” held in Sozopol, Bulgaria, 30 May - 11 June, 2010. It gives a broad overview on this topic, and includes articles on: techniques for preparation and characterization of sensor materials; different types of nanoscaled materials for sensor applications, addressing both their structure (nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanostructured films, etc.) and chemical nature (carbon-based, oxides, glasses, etc.); and on advanced sensors that exploit nanoscience and nanotechnology. In addition, the volume represents an interdisciplinary approach with authors coming from diverse fields such as physics, chemistry, engineering, materials science and biology. A particular strength of the book is its combination of longer papers, introducing the basic knowledge on a certain topic, and brief contributions highlighting special types of sensors a...

  3. Pseudoglaucoma em mucopolissacaridose tipo VI: relato de caso Pseudo-glaucoma in type VI mucopolysaccharidosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gustavo Rosa da Rocha Canêdo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de mucopolissacaridose tipo VI em paciente de 19 anos, diagnosticada por meio de exame genético-clínico, demonstrando várias manifestações sistêmicas, incluindo alterações oftalmológicas como: opacidade corneal, aumento da pressão intra-ocular e aumento importante da espessura corneal. Discutem-se os achados característicos sindrômicos e a influência da espessura corneal na alteração da pressão intra-ocular podendo levar a tratamentos antiglaucomatosos desnecessários.The authors report a case of a 19-year-old patient presenting with type VI mucopolysaccharidosis, diagnosed by genetic-clinical examination, demonstrating several systemic manifestations, including ocular disorders such as: corneal opacity, elevated intra-ocular pressure and increase of corneal thickness. The authors discuss the characteristic syndromic findings and the influence of corneal thickness associated with an increase in intraocular pressure leading to unnecessary antiglaucomatous treatment.

  4. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  5. Use of spectroscopic technique to develop a reagent for Mo(VI) utilizing micellar effects on complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşcioğlu, Sülin; Kaki, E.; Taşcioğlu, Senay

    2012-09-01

    Ultraviolet and visible spectral properties of aqueous solutions of molybdenum(VI) (Mo), gallic acid (GA), Lalanine (Ala), and L-Phenylalanine (Phe), and of their binary and ternary solutions were investigated in the absence and presence of anionic, cationic, and nonionic surfactant micelles. Evaluation of the spectra in a comparative way revealed that both Ala and Phe form ternary complexes with Mo and GA. The formation of a quaternary complex between Mo, GA, Phe, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide at pH 4.5 provided a reagent system with a strikingly high sensitivity (1.2•106 l/(mol•cm)) for use in the spectrophotometric determination of Mo. A mechanism of micellar effects was discussed in terms of the substrate molecular charge and hydrophobicity, and rationalized on the basis of the spectral data obtained above and below the isoelectric pH of the amino acids.

  6. Synthesis and physico-chemical characteristics of some dioxouranium (VI) complexes of N-isonicotinamido-3-methoxy-4-hydroxy benzalaldimine and n-isonicotinamidocinnamalaldimine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 12 new complexes of dioxouranium (VI) with hydrazones of isonicotinic acid hydrazide, viz., N-isonicotinamido- cinnamalal-dimine (INH-CIN) and N-isonicotinamido-3-methoxy-4-hydroxy benazaldimine (INH-VAN) having the general composition UO2X2.nl (X=Br-,I-,CH3COOH-, NO3-,NCS-,n=2;X=ClO-4-,n=3;L=INH-VAN or INH-CIN) were prepared in non-aqueous media and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, electrical conductivity, magnetic moment and IR spectral studies. In all the complexes these ligands act as neutral bidentate (N,O) ligands. In all dioxouranium (VI) complexes, the υ1 and υ3 modes are assigned in the 845-825 cm1 and 930-910 cm1 resp. Wilson's G-F matrix method was used to determine the stretching and interaction force-constants from which the U-O bond distances were calculated using Badger's formula. The calculated data shows that U-O bond length decreases with increase in the value of symmetric stretching frequency (υ1). A plot of (υ1+υ3) vs. force constants gave a straight line. The calculated values of the U-O bond distances in the present complexes are close to 1.73-1.74 A. The probable coordination number U (VI) is 8 or 10, depending on the nature of anions. Thermal properties are also discussed. (author)

  7. Inhibition of corrosion of zinc by Cr(VI)and Cr(III) treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Bos, C. van den; Hovestad, A.; Terryn, H.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) treated zinc has been studied using scanning Kelvin probe (SKP), potentiodynamic polarization and elctrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The Volta potentials measured on the Cr(VI) or the CR(III)-A treated zinc area by SKP in a humid chamber are mor

  8. Photoreduction of chromium(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Lin [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang Hongli [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Deng Nansheng [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: nsdengwhu@163.com

    2006-11-16

    In this thesis, the photochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated under the irradiation of metal halide lamps ({lambda}=365nm, 250W). The affecting factors of photochemical reduction were studied in detail, such as exposure time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, initial algae concentration and pH. The rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction increased with algae concentration increasing, exposure time increasing, initial Cr(VI) concentration decreasing and the decrease of pH. When pH increased to 6, the rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction nearly vanished. When initial Cr(VI) concentration ranged from 0.4 to 1.0mgL{sup -1} and initial algae concentration ranged from ABS{sub algae} (the absorbency of algae)=0.025 to ABS{sub algae}=0.180, According to the results of kinetic analyses, the kinetic equation of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction in aqueous solution with algae under 250W metal halide lamps was V{sub 0}=kC{sub 0}{sup 0.1718}A{sub algae}{sup 0.5235} (C{sub 0} was initial concentration of Cr(VI); A{sub algae} was initial concentration of algae) under the condition of pH 4.

  9. Effectiveness of Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine among children: a cluster randomized trial in Karachi, Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.I.; Soofi, S.B.; Ochiai, R.L.; Habib, M.A.; Sahito, S.M.; Nizami, S.Q.; Acosta, C.J.; Clemens, J.D.; Bhutta, Z.A.; Group, D.T.K.V.E.S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typhoid fever is endemic in Karachi, with an incidence among children ranging from 170 to 450 per 100,000 child-years. Vaccination strategies are important for prevention, and the Vi capsular polysaccharide (ViCPS) vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of typhoid

  10. 7 CFR 42.112 - Defects of containers: Tables IV, V, VI, and VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Defects of containers: Tables IV, V, VI, and VII. 42... Sampling and Inspection § 42.112 Defects of containers: Tables IV, V, VI, and VII. Table IV—Metal... permitted. Table VII—Flexible Containers (Plastic, Cello, Paper, Textile, etc.) Defects Categories...

  11. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by chromium (VI) in anaerobic soil microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourtev, P. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-10-01

    Chromium (VI) is often found as a co-contaminant at sites polluted with organic compounds. We used microcosms amended with glucose or protein, nitrate and increasing concentrations of chromium to study nitrate reduction in Cr(VI) polluted soils. Organic carbon stimulated bacterial activity, but the addition of Cr(VI) caused a lag and then slower rates 5 of CO2 accumulation. Nitrate reduction only occurred after Cr(VI) had been reduced. Bacterial activity was again inhibited when Cr(VI) was added a second time; thus not all Cr-sensitive bacteria were removed in the first phase. Glucose and protein selected for relatively similar bacterial communities, as assayed by PCR-DGGE of the 16S rRNA gene; this selection was modified by the addition of 10 Cr(VI). Cr-resistant bacteria isolated from microcosms were closely related to members of Bacillus, Enterococcus and Propionibacterium sp. Our results indicate that carbon utilization and nitrate reduction in these soils in the presence of Cr(VI) are contingent upon the reduction of the added heavy metal by a limited subset of the bacterial community. The amount of Cr(VI) required to inhibit nitrate reduction was 10-fold less than for aerobic catabolism of the same 15 substrate. We hypothesize that the resistance level of a microbial process is directly related to the diversity of microbes capable of conducting it.

  12. Removal of Cr (VI) with wheat-residue derived black carbon: Reaction mechanism and adsorption performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solutions using black carbon (BC) isolated from the burning residues of wheat straw was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, reaction temperature, supporting electrolyte concentration and analytical initial Cr (VI) concentration in batch studies. The effect of surface properties on the adsorption behavior of Cr (VI) was investigated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The removal mechanism of Cr (VI) onto the BC was investigated and the result showed that the adsorption reaction consumed a large amount of protons along the reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III). The oxidation of the BC took place concurrently to the chromium reduction and led to the formation of hydroxyl and carboxyl functions. An initial solution pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr (VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order equation and Freundlich isotherm very well. The Cr (VI) adsorption was temperature-dependent and almost independent on the sodium chloride concentrations. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr (VI) was found at 21.34 mg/g in an acidic medium, which is comparable to other low-cost adsorbents.

  13. Forensic investigation of a chromium(VI) groundwater plume in Thiva, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotakis, I. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Dermatas, D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Vatseris, C. [Intergeo-Environmental Technology Ltd., Thessaloniki (Greece); Chrysochoou, M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Papassiopi, N. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Xenidis, A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Vaxevanidou, K. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece)

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a forensic investigation with the aim of decoupling the contribution of geogenic and anthropogenic Cr(VI) sources in the wider area of Thiva. Groundwater and topsoil samples were collected from two Cr(VI) groundwater plumes of 160 μg/L and 75 μg/L. A series of evidence support the view that the origin of Cr(VI) detected in groundwater is mainly geogenic. These are: (a) the presence of Cr in topsoil of the wider area, (b) the moderate Cr(VI) groundwater concentrations, (c) the high Ni levels within the Cr(VI) plumes, (d) the predominance of Mn(IV), which is a prerequisite for Cr(III) oxidation to Cr(VI), and (e) the absence of co-contaminants. This study also revealed that, although both Cr(VI) plumes are clearly of geogenic origin, the plume with the elevated Cr(VI) values, in the north of Thiva town, exhibits also an anthropogenic component, which can potentially be attributed to the alkaline environment associated with the old uncontrolled landfill of Thiva and the industrial cluster located in this area.

  14. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.28 - Hazard communication (See also § 1917.1(a)(2)(vi)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazard communication (See also § 1917.1(a)(2)(vi)). 1917.28 Section 1917.28 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... communication (See also § 1917.1(a)(2)(vi))....

  16. Amidoxime-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes by plasma techniques for efficient removal of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Amidoximated MWCNTs were synthesized by plasma techniques. • The surface modification remarkably enhanced U(VI) sorption capacity. • Process was endothermic, spontaneous, and pseudo-second-order chemisorption. • AO-g-MWCNTs showed more favorable selectivity to U(VI). • Mechanism of interaction between AO-g-MWCNTs and U(VI) was discussed and suggested. - Abstract: A novel solid-phase extractant, amidoxime-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (AO-g-MWCNTs), has been synthesized using plasma techniques to selectively separate uranium from nuclear industrial effluents. The adsorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), elemental analysis, Raman, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal gravity analysis (TGA). Sorption behaviors of uranium(VI) on AO-g-MWCNTs were investigated by varying pH, contact time, initial uranium concentration, and temperature. An optimum sorption capacity of 145 mg g−1 (0.61 mmol g−1) for U(VI) was obtained at pH 4.5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to explore the sorption mechanism of U(VI) on AO-g-MWCNTs. Furthermore, AO-g-MWCNTs could selectively adsorb U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cs+). This study shows that AO-g-MWCNTs are potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution

  17. [Safety and immunogenecity of a vaccine of polyssacharide Vi from Salmonella typhi in Cuban youths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azze, Rolando Felipe Ochoa; Suárez, Idalia Morelia Baró; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos Martínez; Sosa, Mayelin Mirabal; del Río, Marlene Isabel Armesto; Alvarez, Francisco Domínguez

    2003-01-01

    A randomized, controlled and double-blind study was conducted in young adults aged 18-20 aimed at evaluating the reactogenecity and immunogenecity of vaz-TyVi, a vaccine of polyssacharide Vi from Salmonella typhi. They were distributed into 3 groups: immunized with a dose of Vax-TyVi (Finlay Institute), TYPHIM Vi (Pasteur-Mérieux) or vax-TET (tetanic toxoid). Serum samples were taken before and 21 days after immunization. The immunogenecity was evaluated in 323 volunteers by an indirect ELISA. The seroconversion of those receiving vax-TyVi was 81.97% and 65.05 % for TYPHIM Vi. The postvaccine mean geometric titers were 7.41 U/mL (5.92-9.27 U/mL) and 5.41 U/mL (4.35-6.72 U/mL), respectively. The seroconversion with vax-TET was 0%. The reactogenecity of both polysaccharide vaccines was low. It was concluded that the immunogenecity of vax-TyVi was not lower than that of TYPHIM Vi and that its reactogenecity was similar.

  18. 46 CFR 251.11 - Applications under Title VI, Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications under Title VI, Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended. 251.11 Section 251.11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... AID § 251.11 Applications under Title VI, Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended. (a)...

  19. 78 FR 34575 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim VI, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule A. Regulatory History... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim VI, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... portion of Presque Isle bay during the Bay Swim VI swimming event. This temporary safety zone is...

  20. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  1. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work. PMID:26366503

  2. Phytoremediation of Cr(VI) by Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleiden employing reducing and chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Rajni; Thukral, Ashwani K

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation of Cr(VI) by Spirodela polyrrhiza in binary combinations with low molecular weight organic compounds (LMWOCs) with a reducing or chelating potential, viz., ascorbic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied in Cr(VI) containing hydroponic media. Significant increase in the relative dry weight of plants with respect to Cr(VI) treated controls was observed with ascorbic acid and glycerol. The uptake of chromium by S. polyrrhiza followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics of active ion uptake. Interaction between Cr and ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, and lactic acid decreased Cr uptake, whereas citric acid, glycerol, and tartaric acid increased it. Supplementation of LMWOCs to Cr(VI) containing media decreased the MDA content of the plants. Multiple regression models revealed that LMWOCs decrease lipid peroxidation independently, as well as that induced by Cr(VI). It was found that superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) activities were increased significantly in plants growing in media containing Cr(VI). The study established that lactic acid, citric acid, ascorbic acid, and glycerol were most effective in increasing the Cr(VI) phytoremediating potential of S. polyrrhiza and LMWOCs with reducing or chelating properties decrease Cr(VI) stress in S. polyrrhiza. PMID:21598777

  3. 77 FR 27081 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... was published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8281). The workers were engaged in... Employment and Training Administration II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg... former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg,...

  4. Hipparcos red stars in the HpV_{T2} and VI_C systems

    CERN Document Server

    Platais, I; Jorissen, A; Makarov, V V; Berdnikov, L N; Samus, N N; Evans, T L; Lebzelter, T; Sperauskas, J

    2003-01-01

    For Hipparcos M, S, and C spectral type stars, we provide calibrated instantaneous (epoch) Cousins $V-I$ color indices using newly derived $HpV_{T2}$ photometry. Three new sets of ground-based Cousins $VI$ data have been obtained for more than 170 carbon and red M giants. These datasets in combination with the published sources of $VI$ photometry served to obtain the calibration curves linking Hipparcos/Tycho $Hp-V_{T2}$ with the Cousins $V-I$ index. In total, 321 carbon stars and 4464 M- and S-type stars have new $V-I$ indices. The standard error of the mean $V-I$ is about 0.1 mag or better down to $Hp\\approx9$ although it deteriorates rapidly at fainter magnitudes. These $V-I$ indices can be used to verify the published Hipparcos $V-I$ color indices. Thus, we have identified a handful of new cases where, instead of the real target, a random field star has been observed. A considerable fraction of the DMSA/C and DMSA/V solutions for red stars appear not to be warranted. Most likely such spurious solutions ma...

  5. Supported liquid membrane system for Cr(III) separation from Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Religa, P; Rajewski, J; Gierycz, P; Swietlik, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analyses of the chromium(III) transport process from mixtures of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ions using supported liquid membranes (SLM), in which dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) were used as carriers. In both cases the membrane worked as a selective barrier for Cr(VI) ions. The increase in both the time of Cr(VI) ions-carrier interaction and the Cr(VI) concentration in the feed phase negatively influenced the Cr(III) separation. The polarizing layer consisting of Cr(VI) ions prevents the access of Cr(III) ions to the inter phase surface and leads to the deactivation of the carrier, which is the result of the strong oxidation properties of Cr(VI) ions. These factors meant that, in the case of the membrane with DNNSA, the membrane could not be used for the effective separation of Cr(III) from the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixture. On the other hand, the membrane with D2EHPA can be used for fast and efficient transport of Cr(III) ions, but only for strictly defined process parameters, i.e. where the level of chromium(VI) concentration is below 10(-3)M and with intensive feed phase mixing. PMID:24960010

  6. Synthesis and characterisation of molybdenum (V) and (VI) complexes of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol-bis[4-(X-phenyl) thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum (V) and (VI) complexes of novel ligand 2, 6-diformyl-p-cresol bis [4-(X-phenyl) thiosemicarbazone] (where X = -H, o-CH3, m-CH3, p-CH3, p-OCH3 and p-Cl) are synthesised and characterised on the basis of elemental analyses and magnetic, IR, UV, EPR, and NMR spectral studies. The complexes have the composition [MoO2LH] and [MoOClLH]. The Schiff bases behave as dibasic tetradentate SNON donor ligands. (author)

  7. Cis-Dioxido-molybdenum(VI) complexes of tridentate ONO hydrazone Schiff base: Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation and catalytic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Khabazadeh, , , Hojatollah; Castro, Jesús; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Crochet, Aurelien; Fromm, Katharina M.

    2015-01-01

    Two new cis-MoO₂ [MoO₂(L)(EtOH)] (1), [MoO₂(L)(Py)] (2) [L: (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato], complexes have been synthesized and fully characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, FT-IR, molar conductivity, ¹H NMR, ¹³C NMR and electronic spectra. The structure of complexes has been accomplished by single crystal X-ray diffraction. All experimental results confirmed that both complexes have an octahedral geometry around the Mo(VI) central atom, which is coordinated by the d...

  8. II-VI Materials-Based High Performance Intersubband Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Arvind Pawan

    Mid-infrared (mid-IR) light is of vital technological importance because of its application in trace-gas absorption spectroscopy, imaging, free-space communication or infrared countermeasures. Thus the ability to generate and detect mid-IR light at low cost and preferably, at room temperature is of utmost importance. High performance quantum cascade (QC) lasers - mid-IR light sources based on optical transitions in thin quantum wells, and intersubband infrared detectors - namely the quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) and quantum cascade detectors (QCDs), have rapidly advanced, due to excellent material quality of III-V materials. In spite of this tremendous success, there lie challenges such as lack of efficient short-wavelength emitters or broadband detectors - challenges that arise from intrinsic materials properties. As a central theme in this thesis, we look at a new class of materials, the II-VI based ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe system, to close technological gaps and develop high performance infrared light sources and detectors in the entire mid-IR regime. To that end, we first demonstrate the flexibility that the combination of II-VI materials and band structure engineering allows by developing various QWIPs, QCDs and QC emitters at different wavelengths, not easily achieved by other materials. The performance of these first-of-their-kind detectors is already comparable to existing commercial solutions. To fully realize the potential of this new material system, we also developed a room-temperature broadband infrared detector detecting between 3 and 6 mum with record responsivity. With this technology, it is now possible to monolithically integrate high performance mid-IR lasers and detectors for on-chip applications. One of the challenges with all intersubband detectors is that they do not absorb normally incident light, like most conventional detectors. In order to make intersubband detectors attractive to commercial exploration, we develop a novel method to

  9. Single-step synthesis of magnetic chitosan composites and application for chromate (Cr(VI)) removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卫春; 唐琼芝; 董舒宇; 柴立元; 王海鹰

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic chitosan composites (Fe3O4@chitosan) were synthesized in one single-step, characterized and applied in Cr(VI) removal from water. With the increase of loading proportion of chitosan, Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of Fe3O4@chitosan composites increased from 10.771 to 21.040 mg/g. The optimum adsorption capacities of Cr(VI) on Fe3O4@chitosan-3 were found in a pH range of 3.0−5.0. Kinetic study results show that the adsorption process follows pseudo-second-order model, indicating that the rate-limiting step in the adsorption of Cr(VI) involves chemisorptions. Moreover, FT-IR spectra analysis confirms that the amine and hydroxyl groups of chitosan are predominantly responsible for binding. Results from this work demonstrate that the prepared Fe3O4@chitosan composites possess great potential in Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water.

  10. Removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution using Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sethuraman,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the removal efficiency of Cr(VI by Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae from aqueous solution under different process conditions. Batch mode experiments were carried out as a function of solution pH, biosorbent dosage, Cr(VI concentration and contact time.The FT-IR spectra and SEM analysis of the biosorbent were recorded to analyse the number and position of the functional groups available for the binding of Cr(VI ions and to study the morphology of biosorbent. The batch isothermal equilibrium data were analyzed with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The kinetic models were examined with pseudo first order and pseudo second order kinetics. The results revealed that the Cr(VI is considerably adsorbed on bacterial biomass and it could be an economical method for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution.

  11. Chromium(VI) reduction by catechol(amine)s results in DNA cleavage in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Levina, A;

    2001-01-01

    Catechols are found extensively in nature both as essential biomolecules and as the byproducts of normal oxidative damage of amino acids and proteins. They are also present in cigarette smoke and other atmospheric pollutants. Here, the interactions of reactive species generated in Cr(VI)/catechol......(amine) mixtures with plasmid DNA have been investigated to model a potential route to Cr(VI)-induced genotoxicity. Reduction of Cr(VI) by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) (1), dopamine (2), or adrenaline (3) produces species that cause extensive DNA damage, but the products of similar reactions with catechol (4......) or 4-tert-butylcatechol (5) do not damage DNA. The Cr(VI)/catechol(amine) reactions have been studied at low added H(2)O(2) concentrations, which lead to enhanced DNA cleavage with 1 and induce DNA cleavage with 4. The Cr(V) and organic intermediates generated by the reactions of Cr(VI) with 1 or 4...

  12. Synthesis of Graphene Oxide by Oxidation of Graphite with Ferrate(VI) Compounds: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Bystroň, Tomáš; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-19

    It is well established that graphene oxide can be prepared by the oxidation of graphite using permanganate or chlorate in an acidic environment. Recently, however, the synthesis of graphene oxide using potassium ferrate(VI) ions has been reported. Herein, we critically replicate and evaluate this new ferrate(VI) oxidation method. In addition, we test the use of potassium ferrate(VI) for the synthesis of graphene oxide under various experimental routes. The synthesized materials are analyzed by a number of analytical methods in order to confirm or disprove the possibility of synthesizing graphene oxide by the ferrate(VI) oxidation route. Our results confirm the unsuitability of using ferrate(VI) for the oxidation of graphite on graphene oxide because of its high instability in an acidic environment and low oxidation power in neutral and alkaline environments.

  13. Regulation of a viral proteinase by a peptide and DNA in one-dimensional space: I. binding to DNA AND to hexon of the precursor to protein VI, pVI, of human adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Suomalainen, Maarit; Greber, Urs F; Freimuth, Paul; Blainey, Paul C; Luo, Guobin; Xie, X Sunney; Mangel, Walter F

    2013-01-18

    The precursor to adenovirus protein VI, pVI, is a multifunctional protein with different roles early and late in virus infection. Here, we focus on two roles late in infection, binding of pVI to DNA and to the major capsid protein hexon. pVI bound to DNA as a monomer independent of DNA sequence with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d)((app)), of 46 nm. Bound to double-stranded DNA, one molecule of pVI occluded 8 bp. Upon the binding of pVI to DNA, three sodium ions were displaced from the DNA. A ΔG(0)(0) of -4.54 kcal/mol for the nonelectrostatic free energy of binding indicated that a substantial component of the binding free energy resulted from nonspecific interactions between pVI and DNA. The proteolytically processed, mature form of pVI, protein VI, also bound to DNA; its K(d)((app)) was much higher, 307 nm. The binding assays were performed in 1 mm MgCl(2) because in the absence of magnesium, the binding to pVI or protein VI to DNA was too tight to determine a K(d)((app)). Three molecules of pVI bound to one molecule of the hexon trimer with an equilibrium dissociation constant K(d)((app)) of 1.1 nm.

  14. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix.

  15. Mechanism of Cr(VI) adsorption by coir pith studied by ESR and adsorption kinetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suksabye, Parinda [Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha-Utit Road, Bangmod, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Nakajima, Akira [Division of Chemistry, Department of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889 1692 (Japan); Thiravetyan, Paitip [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo.8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)], E-mail: paitip.thi@kmutt.ac.th; Baba, Yoshinari [Department of applied Chemistry, Faculty of Technology, University of Miyazaki, Gakuen-Kibabadai, Miyazaki 889 2192 (Japan); Nakbanpote, Woranan [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo.8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)

    2009-01-30

    The oxidation state of chromium in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). To elucidate the mechanism of chromium adsorption on coir pith, the adsorption studies of Cr(VI) onto lignin, {alpha}-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith were also studied. ESR signals of Cr(V) and Cr(III) were observed in coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI) at solution pH 2, while ESR spectra of lignin extracted from coir pith revealed only the Cr(III) signal. In addition, ESR signal of Cr(V) was observed in {alpha}-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI). These results confirmed that lignin in coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) while {alpha}-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(V). The Cr(V) signal exhibited in ESR of {alpha}-cellulose and holocellulose might be bound with glucose in cellulose part of coir pith. In addition, xylose which is main in pentosan part of coir pith, indicated that it is involved in form complex with Cr(V) on coir pith. The adsorption kinetic of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution on coir pith was also investigated and described well with pseudo second order model. ESR and desorption experiments confirmed that Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III), exist in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption. The desorption data indicated that the percentage of Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III) in coir pith were 15.63%, 12.89% and 71.48%, respectively.

  16. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-08-12

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

  17. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix. PMID:26900976

  18. Effect of Salicylic and Picolinic Acids on the Adsorption of U(VI) onto Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of organic acids on the adsorption of U(VI) onto oxide surfaces (TiO2(anatase), SiO2 (amorphous) and Al2O-3(amorphous)) has been investigated. Two different organic acids, salicylic and picolinic acids, were used. Changes of adsorption ratio of U(VI), which depend on the existence of organic acids in a sample, were measured as a function of pH. Quantities of adsorbed organic acids, which depend on the existence of U(VI) in a sample, were also measured as a function of pH. It is confirmed that the soluble complex formation of U(VI) with organic acids can deteriorate the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO2 surface. It is noteworthy that salicylic acid does not affect the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO2 surface, however, picolinic acid enhances the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO2 surface. The latter effect can be understood by considering the formation of a ternary surface complex on SiO2 surface, which was confirmed by the co-adsorption of picolinic acid with U(VI) and the change in a fluorescence spectra of U(VI) on surface, In the case of Al2O-3, organic acids themselves were largely adsorbed onto a surface without deteriorating the adsorption of U(VI). This would support the possibility of a ternary surface complex formation on the Al2O-3 surface, and an additional spectroscopic study is required.

  19. Insights into the extraction of U(VI) in Aliquat-336 ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the unique advantages, we exploited miscibility of Aliquat-336 based ionic liquid namely, tri-n-octylmethylammonium bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ((A336)+(DEHP)-) to modify the extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) in a PUREX solvent, namely 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD). The extraction behavior of U(VI) in 1.1 M TBP/n-DD was studied in the presence and absence of (A336)+(DEHP)-. The discrepancy in the extraction behavior observed in these systems was probed by measuring the distribution ratio of U(VI) as a function of various parameters. The extraction of U(VI) in (A336)+(DEHP)-/n-DD alone was studied to understand the role of ionic liquid in the PUREX solvent during extraction. The distribution ratio of U(VI) in (A336)+(DEHP)-/n-DD decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. Moreover, the extraction of U(VI) in (A336)+(DEHP)- medium was accompanied by the extraction of nitric acid leading to the formation of ionic liquid components namely (A336)+(NO3)- and HDEHP in organic phase. In view of this, the extraction of U(VI) in TBP/n-DD was also studied in the presence of these constituents. Extraction studies revealed that these constituents facilitated the extraction of U(VI) in organic phase. Synergic extraction of U(VI) was observed when HDEHP was employed in conjunction with (A336)+(NO3)- and TBP. The study also revealed that the distribution ratio of U(VI) and Pu(IV) obtained in ionic liquid medium was due to the synergic contributions of ionic liquid constituents as well as TBP. The details of our studies are reported in this paper

  20. VI International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Otero, Fernando; Masegosa, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Biological and other natural processes have always been a source of inspiration for computer science and information technology. Many emerging problem solving techniques integrate advanced evolution and cooperation strategies, encompassing a range of spatio-temporal scales for visionary conceptualization of evolutionary computation. This book is a collection of research works presented in the VI International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for Optimization (NICSO) held in Canterbury, UK. Previous editions of NICSO were held in Granada, Spain (2006 & 2010), Acireale, Italy (2007), Tenerife, Spain (2008), and Cluj-Napoca, Romania (2011). NICSO 2013 and this book provides a place where state-of-the-art research, latest ideas and emerging areas of nature inspired cooperative strategies for problem solving are vigorously discussed and exchanged among the scientific community. The breadth and variety of articles in this book report on nature inspired methods and applications such as Swarm In...

  1. vi-Strauss nos 90 voltas ao passado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévi-Strauss Claude

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo responde às críticas formuladas por Christian Delacampagne e Bernard Traimond em "A Polêmica Sartre/Lévi-Strauss Revisitada. Nas Raízes das Ciências Sociais de Hoje", publicado em Les Temps Modernes 596 (novembro-dezembro de 1997. Para fazê-lo, recorda inicialmente o caráter relativo da oposição entre "sociedades frias" e "sociedades quentes". Em seguida, refuta a tese de que Maurice Merleau-Ponty, sob a capa de um elogio, teria dirigido críticas veladas ao autor. Finalmente, reconhecendo o afastamento da antropologia de hoje em face das posições do autor, admite, sem se pronunciar sobre o valor desse movimento, que temas de ar sartriano ressurgem nos antropólogos contemporâneos.

  2. Pressure induced metallization of the Mott Insulator VI2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using diamond anvil cells, 129I Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) and resistivity measurements were carried out in the layered antiferromagnet VI2 at 0-45 GPa and 4-300 K. MS to 15 GPa revealed an impressive increase in Neel temperature and a slight increase in transferred hyperfine field. Pressure behavior of R(P,T), in particular near the metal-insulator pressure Pc=44 GPa, is described. Being the lightest transition metal (TM) in the isostructural (TM)I2 series, the V2+ (d3 configuration) represents a typical candidate for a pure Mott-Hubbard gap closure. Results are compared with the heavy TM diiodides such as NiI2 and CoI2, where it is expected that the charge transfer regime prevails. 3 figs, 10 refs

  3. CFD Simulation of the NREL Phase VI Rotor

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of the turbulent and potentially separating flow around a rotating, twisted, and tapered airfoil is a challenging task for CFD simulations. This paper describes CFD simulations of the NREL Phase VI turbine that was experimentally characterized in the 24.4m x 36.6m NREL/NASA Ames wind tunnel (Hand et al., 2001). All computations in this article are performed on the experimental base configuration of 0o yaw angle, 3o tip pitch angle, and a rotation rate of 72 rpm. The significance of specific mesh resolution regions to the accuracy of the CFD prediction is discussed. The ability of CFD to capture bulk quantities, such as the shaft torque, and the detailed flow characteristics, such as the surface pressure distributions, are explored for different inlet wind speeds. Finally, the significant three-dimensionality of the boundary layer flow is demonstrated.

  4. The ternary system U(VI) / humic acid / Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Claudia

    2013-07-23

    , where the geochemical interaction with uranium contaminated water plays a role. Concerning the suitability of Opalinus Clay as host rock for a nuclear waste repository, it can be concluded, that Opalinus Clay has a relatively high retardation potential for U(VI). In case of water ingress U(VI) as part of the nuclear waste is released into the clay formation. Under near-neutral pH conditions, it will be complexed by calcium and carbonate ions leached out from Opalinus Clay, whereby Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) is formed. This complex is only weakly retarded by sorption onto the clay, which can contribute to an enhanced mobility of U(VI) in the host rock. However, the U(VI) migration through the clay rock is governed by molecular diffusion. This decelerates the migration of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) through Opalinus Clay and thus it represents the decisive retardation process in the investigated system.

  5. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  6. Tank characterization technical sampling basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-04-28

    Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis (this document) is the first step of an in place working process to plan characterization activities in an optimal manner. This document will be used to develop the revision of the Waste Information Requirements Document (WIRD) (Winkelman et al. 1997) and ultimately, to create sampling schedules. The revised WIRD will define all Characterization Project activities over the course of subsequent fiscal years 1999 through 2002. This document establishes priorities for sampling and characterization activities conducted under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Characterization Project. The Tank Waste Characterization Project is designed to provide all TWRS programs with information describing the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the contents of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. These tanks contain radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons materials at the Hanford Site. The waste composition varies from tank to tank because of the large number of chemical processes that were used when producing nuclear weapons materials over the years and because the wastes were mixed during efforts to better use tank storage space. The Tank Waste Characterization Project mission is to provide information and waste sample material necessary for TWRS to define and maintain safe interim storage and to process waste fractions into stable forms for ultimate disposal. This document integrates the information needed to address safety issues, regulatory requirements, and retrieval, treatment, and immobilization requirements. Characterization sampling to support tank farm operational needs is also discussed.

  7. Community treatment orders: Bioethical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Bertolín Guillén

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Numerous opinions and medico-legal controversies have arisen up to the date from community treatment orders in Western countries, but underlying bioethical questions have not been specifically studied. The aim of this work is to contribute to further clarify the bioethical conflicts arising from community treatment orders. Methods: The bioethical deliberation of the author is principally based on what can be considered the deontologist-principlist dominant paradigm. These principles, as first described by Beauchamp and Childress in 1979, will be applied in this work to the actual situation of involuntary outpatient treatment. Results: The author's deliberation considers that community treatment orders are consistent first with the deontologist-principlist dominant paradigm of practical reason, respecting its four general categories of basic principles. It also respects the principles of the medical ethics of virtue, subsumed in the personalism of ontological matrix, in the same way as its ethos affects the intrinsic purpose which is the dignity of the person; and with the consequentialist utilitarianism because it seeks the proportionality of the common good. A community treatment order prescription must ultimately be based on a bioethical exercise of responsibility by the clinician, judiciously weighing up the classic principal prima facie duties which must necessarily be translated into a real duty referring to a specific patient and context. Conclusions: Community treatment orders are seen as a method of therapeutic intervention with a bioethical basis resistant to criticism.

  8. [Neural basis of procedural memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko

    2008-07-01

    Procedural memory is acquired by trial and error. Our daily life is supported by a number of procedural memories such as those for riding bicycle, typing, reading words, etc. Procedural memory is divided into 3 types; motor, perceptual, and cognitive. Here, the author reviews the cognitive and neural basis of procedural memory according to these 3 types. It is reported that the basal ganglia or cerebellum dysfunction causes deficits in procedural memory. Compared with age-matched healthy participants, patients with Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington disease (HD) or spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) show deterioration in improvements in motor-type procedural memory tasks. Previous neuroimaging studies have reported that motor-type procedural memory may be supported by multiple brain regions, including the frontal and parietal regions as well as the basal ganglia (cerebellum); this was found with a serial reaction time task (SRT task). Although 2 other types of procedural memory are also maintained by multiple brain regions, the related cerebral areas depend on the type of memory. For example, it was suggested that acquisition of the perceptual type of procedural memory (e.g., ability to read mirror images of words) might be maintained by the bilateral fusiform region, while the acquisition of cognitive procedural memory might be supported by the frontal, parietal, or cerebellar regions as well as the basal ganglia. In the future, we need to cleary understand the neural "network" related to the procedural memory. PMID:18646622

  9. Basis Document for Sludge Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Risenmay, H R

    2001-01-01

    DOE-RL recently issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER) amendments to the PFP Final Safety Analysis Report, HNF-SD-CP-SAR-021 Rev. 2. The Justification for Continued Operations for 2736-ZB and plutonium oxides in BTCs Safety Basis change (letter DOE-RL ABD-074) was approved by one of the SERs. Also approved by SER was the revised accident analysis for Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process (MHPP) gloveboxes HC-230C-3 and HC-230C-5 containing increased glovebox inventories and corresponding increases in seismic release consequence. Numerous implementing documents require revision and issuance to implement the SER approvals. The SER plutonium oxides into BTCs specifically limited the SER scope to ''pure or clean oxides, i.e., 85 wt% or grater Pu, in this feed change'' (SER Section 3.0 Base Information paragraph 4 [page 11]). Comprehensive USQ Evaluation PFP-2001-12 addressed the packaging of Pu alloy metals into BTCs, and the packaging of Pu alloy oxides (powders) into food pack cans and determined that the ac...

  10. Basis Document for Sludge Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE-RL recently issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER) amendments to the PFP Final Safety Analysis Report, HNF-SD-CP-SAR-021 Rev. 2. The Justification for Continued Operations for 2736-ZB and plutonium oxides in BTCs Safety Basis change (letter DOE-RL ABD-074) was approved by one of the SERs. Also approved by SER was the revised accident analysis for Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process (MHPP) gloveboxes HC-230C-3 and HC-230C-5 containing increased glovebox inventories and corresponding increases in seismic release consequence. Numerous implementing documents require revision and issuance to implement the SER approvals. The SER authorizing plutonium oxides into BTCs specifically limited the SER authorization scope to ''pure or clean oxides, i.e., 85 wt% or grater Pu, in this feed change'' (SER Section 3.0 Base Information paragraph 4 [page 11]). Comprehensive USQ Evaluation PFP-2001-12 addressed the packaging of Pu alloy metals into BTCs, and the packaging of Pu alloy oxides (powders) into food pack cans and determined that the activities did not represent an USQ. The same information used to make the PFP-2001-12 negative USQ determination is applicable to packaging Pu alloy powders (DOES NOT INCLUDE STABILIZED MHPP MATERIALS OR OXIDES OF MOLYBDATES) into BTCs. Information from USQ Evaluation PFP-2001-12 is included in this USQ Evaluation for packaging of relatively pure Pu oxides and Pu alloy oxides into BTCs

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  12. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  13. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  14. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp...

  15. Impact of the hurricanes Gustav and Ike in the karst areas of the Vi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfàn Gonzalez, H.; Corvea Porras, J. L.; Martinez Maquiera, Y.; Diaz Guanche, C.; Aldana Vilas, C.; de Bustamante, I.; Parise, M.

    2009-04-01

    Among the many natural hazards affecting the island of Cuba, the hydro-meteorological hazards include extreme rainstorms, tropical cyclones and hurricanes. At Cuba, as in the rest of the Caribbean Islands, the cyclonic period generally starts at the beginning of June and ends in late November; during this time period, hurricanes represent the most powerful expression of the tropical cyclones. As shown by historical data, the effects of hurricanes interest the whole island, with a particular focus at its western regions. Intensity of these events causes severe damage to the environment and the society. Hurricanes are classified into five categories according to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, essentially on the basis of the velocity reached by the winds. In this scale, category I is the less intense, and V the highest. In 2008, two strong hurricanes affected the province of Pinar del Rio, in western Cuba, during August and September, with a 10-days interval between the two events. Many effects were produced by the passage of the hurricanes, especially in the karst areas of the Viñales National Park. The first hurricane (named Gustavo) was registered on August 30, 2008. Classified as category IV, it hit the area with wind velocities over 250 km/h, gusts over 300 km/h, and a total rainfall of approximately 100 mm. The hurricane affected the southern slope of the area of mogotes, that is the isolated cone or tower left by intense development of karst processes in tropical climate conditions. The vegetation cover was strongly hit, and largely stripped away, thus exposing several situations of hazards in karst that were previously undetected. Local flooding was also recorded, generally in the lowest topographic areas, and with short duration, due to bedrock characteristics. Ten days after Gustavo, the second hurricane (named Ike) affected the whole Cuba on September 9, 2008. Even though classified as category I, it caused severe damage to the man-made environment

  16. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chulsung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2, illite (IMt-2, kaolinite (KGa-2, aluminum oxide (γ-Al2O3, titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase, and silica (SiO2. Based on their effects on Cr(VI reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i minerals catalyzing Cr(VI reduction – illite; (ii minerals with no effect – Al2O3; and (iii minerals inhibiting Cr(VI reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI. Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI, i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii, an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which

  17. Leerteoretiese basis van die andragogie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. A. Simpson

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning theory basis of andragogy. A cursory glance at andragogy creates the impression that humanistic learning theory plays an all encompassing role in the learner centered approach andragogy espouses. A closer look, however, reveals that Knowles (1973, after having made an intensive study of learning theory, created an extensive framework within which human resource development can take place. The fact that Knowles attracted critique from different areas, led to a need to ascertain the role different learning theories, if any, played in the emergence of andragogy. Having looked at the assumptions displayed by the andragogical approach, as well as a comparison of different learning theories and their connection with andragogy, it became clear that andragogy contains elements of various learning theories in an adapted way. These adaptations resulted in an approach to adult education in which learners are given the opportunity to be part of the learning process in such a way that they themselves contribute to the development which takes place. Opsomming Met 'n eerste oogopslag wil dit voorkom asof humanistiese leerteorie 'n oorheersende rol in die leerdergesentreerde benadering van andragogie speel. By nadere ondersoek blyk dit egter dat Knowles (1973, na 'n deeglike studie van verskillende leerteoretiese beginsels, 'n omvangryke raamwerk geskep het waarbinne, aan die hand van verskeie aangepaste leerteoretiese beginsels, menslike hulpbronontwikkeling kan plaasvind. As gevolg van die feit dat Knowles vanuit verskillende oorde kritiek op die lyf geloop het, is besluit om die rol wat verskillende leerteorieë in andragogie speel, te bestudeer. Dit blyk dat andragogie nie net elemente van verskillende leerteorieë bevat nie, maar dat toepaslike aspekte van die teoriee wat ondersoek is, benut en aangepas is om 'n geintegreerde benadering te bewerkstellig waarin veral volwassene-leerders by leergeleenthede en hulle selfontwikkeling betrek word.

  18. Multinary I-III-VI2 and I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductor Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulacio, Michelle D; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-15

    are the multinary chalcogenide semiconductors (MCSs), which include the ternary I-III-VI2 semiconductors (e.g., AgGaS2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) and the quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductors (e.g., Cu2ZnGeS4, Cu2ZnSnS4, and Ag2ZnSnS4). These inorganic compounds consist of environmentally benign elemental components, exhibit excellent light-harvesting properties, and possess band gap energies that are well-suited for solar photon absorption. Moreover, the band structures of these materials can be conveniently modified through alloying to boost their ability to harvest visible photons. In this Account, we provide a summary of recent research on the use of ternary I-III-VI2 and quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductor nanostructures for light-induced photocatalytic applications, with focus on hydrogen production and organic dye degradation. We include a review of the solution-based methods that have been employed to prepare multinary chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures of varying compositions, sizes, shapes, and crystal structures, which are factors that are known to have significant influence on the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. The enhancement of photocatalytic performance through creation of hybrid nanoscale architectures is also presented. Lastly, views on the current challenges and future directions are discussed in the concluding section. PMID:26864703

  19. Multinary I-III-VI2 and I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductor Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulacio, Michelle D; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-15

    are the multinary chalcogenide semiconductors (MCSs), which include the ternary I-III-VI2 semiconductors (e.g., AgGaS2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) and the quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductors (e.g., Cu2ZnGeS4, Cu2ZnSnS4, and Ag2ZnSnS4). These inorganic compounds consist of environmentally benign elemental components, exhibit excellent light-harvesting properties, and possess band gap energies that are well-suited for solar photon absorption. Moreover, the band structures of these materials can be conveniently modified through alloying to boost their ability to harvest visible photons. In this Account, we provide a summary of recent research on the use of ternary I-III-VI2 and quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductor nanostructures for light-induced photocatalytic applications, with focus on hydrogen production and organic dye degradation. We include a review of the solution-based methods that have been employed to prepare multinary chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures of varying compositions, sizes, shapes, and crystal structures, which are factors that are known to have significant influence on the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. The enhancement of photocatalytic performance through creation of hybrid nanoscale architectures is also presented. Lastly, views on the current challenges and future directions are discussed in the concluding section.

  20. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J K; Kostandarithes, H M; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Daly, M J

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO(2) and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH(2)DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml(-1)) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  1. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  2. [Reduction Kinetics of Cr (VI) in Chromium Contaminated Soil by Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron-copper Bimetallic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao-yun; Zhu, Fang; Shang, Zhi-feng

    2016-05-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron-copper bimetallic (nZVI/Cu) was produced by liquid-phase reduction and characterized by SEM and XRD. The remediation of Cr (VI) contaminated soil was conducted with nZVI/Cu, and the affecting factors and reduction kinetics were investigated. The results indicated that nZVI/Cu was effective in the degradation of Cr(VI) in soil at an initial pH of 7 at 30'C.After 10 min of reaction, Cr(VI) in the soil was completely degraded when the. concentration of nZVI/Cu was 2 g · L⁻' and the concentration of Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 88 mg · kg⁻¹. nZVI/Cu amount, pH value, reaction temperature, and the concentration of humic acid affected the degradation of Cr(VI). The removal efficiency of Cr(VI)--increased with increasing reaction temperature and decreased with increasing initial pH value. Humic acid had a certain impact on the degradation of Cr(W) in soil. The removal of Cr (VI) followed the pseudo first order reduction kinetics model, and the relationship between the reduction rate and the reaction temperature accorded with Arrhenius law, and the reaction activation energy (Ea) was 104.26 kJ · mol⁻¹. PMID:27506053

  3. Reduction and removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions using modified byproducts of beer production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haojie; Fu, Minglai; Yu, Shen; Wang, Ming Kuang

    2011-02-28

    Biosorption, as an effective and low-cost technology treating industrial wastewaters containing Cr(VI), has become a significant concern worldwide. In this work, acid-modified byproducts of beer production (BBP) were used to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Removal of Cr(VI) increases as the pH is decreased from 4.0 to 1.5, but the maximum of total Cr removal is obtained in a pH range from 2.0 to 2.5. Nearly 60% of the initial Cr(VI) (100 mg L(-1)) was adsorbed or reduced to Cr(III) within the first 10 min at pH 2.0. The Cr(VI) removal capability of acid-modified BBP materials was almost completely retained after regenerating with acid. FT-IR and XPS spectra revealed that carboxylate and carboxyl groups on the surface of modified BBP materials play a major role in Cr(VI) binding and reduction, whereas amide and other groups play a minor role in the Cr(VI) removal process.

  4. Localization and quantitation of cardiac annexins II, V, and VI in hypertensive guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, P; Legot, S; Bélikova, I; Marotte, F; Bénévolensky, D; Russo-Marie, F; Samuel, J L; Charlemagne, D

    1999-04-01

    Annexins are characterized by Ca2+-dependent binding to phospholipids. Annexin II mainly participates in cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction, whereas annexins V and VI also seem to regulate intracellular calcium cycling. Their abundance and localization were determined in left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) from hypertensive guinea pigs, during the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to heart failure. Immunoblot analysis of annexins II, V, and VI revealed an increased accumulation (2.6-, 1.45-, and 2.3-fold, respectively) in LV from hypertensive guinea pigs and no modification in RV. Immunofluorescent labeling of annexins II, V, and VI; of Na+-K+-ATPase; and of sarcomeric alpha-actinin showed that in control LV and RV, 1) annexin II is present in nonmuscle cells; 2) annexins V and VI are mainly observed in the sarcolemma and intercalated disks of myocytes; 3) annexins II, V, and VI strongly label endothelial cells and adventitia of coronary arteries; and 4) annexin VI is present in the media. At the onset of heart failure, the most striking changes are the increased protein accumulation in LV and the very strong labeling of annexins II, V, and VI in interstitial tissue, suggesting a role in fibrosis development and cardiac remodeling. PMID:10199838

  5. Moisture content-affected electrokinetic remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated clay by a hydrocalumite barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunfeng; Xu, Xiangjian; Hou, Hetian; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Dayi; Qian, Guangren

    2016-04-01

    An electrokinetic-permeable reaction barrier (EK-PRB) system was introduced in this study with hydrocalumite as the barrier material. The combined system effectively remediated the Cr(VI)-contaminated clay after a 72-h treatment, and the Cr(VI) removal efficiency increased with the initial soil moisture content. Further evidence was found that the changing soil pH value and current density were highly associated with the initial moisture content, showing its important roles in the Cr(VI) removal process. Additionally, the total Cr removal efficiency was much lower than that of Cr(VI) owing to the partial conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the electrokinetic remediation process. Under high soil moisture conditions (40%), the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and total Cr was 96.6 and 67.3%, respectively. Further analysis also revealed the new mineral phase, chromate hydrocalumite, for Cr fixation in the hydrocalumite barrier, which was significantly affected by the initial soil moisture content. Our results showed that the EK-PRB system with a hydrocalumite barrier is highly promising with great potential for the effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated clay and engineering implementation. PMID:26635219

  6. Chromium (VI removal from aqueous solutions by purolite base anion-exchange resins with gel structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balan Catalin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of Cr (VI from aqueous solution using two strong base anionic resins with gel structure, Purolite A-400 (styrene-divinylbenzene matrix and Purolite A-850 (acrylic matrix was investigated in batch technique. The sorption efficiency was determined as a function of phases contact time, solution pH, resin dose, temperature and initial Cr (VI concentration. The percentage of Cr (VI removed reaches maximum values (up to 99 % in the pH range 4 - 5.3 under a resin dose of 6 g/L and of Cr (VI concentration up to 100 mg/L. An increase in temperature has a positive effect on the Cr (VI sorption process. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted with the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models, using both linear and nonlinear regression method. The Langmuir model very well verifies the experimental data and gives the maximum sorption capacity of 120.55 mg Cr (VI/g and 95.82 mg Cr (VI/g for A-400 and A-850 resins, respectively. The thermodynamic study and mean free energy of sorption values calculated using Dubinin-Radushkevich equation indicated the sorption is a chemical endothermic process. The kinetic data were well described by pseudo-second order kinetic equation and the sorption process is controlled by external (film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion.

  7. Cr(VI) reduction at rutile-catalyzed cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Yan, Yunhua; Wang, Changqiu; Zen, Cuiping; Wang, Xin [The Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin, Song [MWH Americas, 3665 JFK Parkway, Suite 206, Fort Collins, CO 80525 (United States); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Cathodic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and simultaneous power generation were successfully achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) containing a novel rutile-coated cathode. The selected rutile was previously characterized to be sensitive to visible light and capable of both non-photo- and photocatalysis. In the MFCs containing rutile-coated cathode, Cr(VI) was rapidly reduced in the cathode chamber in presence and absence of light irradiation; and the rate of Cr(VI) reduction under light irradiation was substantially higher than that in the dark. Under light irradiation, 97% of Cr(VI) (initial concentration 26 mg/L) was reduced within 26 h, which was 1.6 x faster than that in the dark controls in which only background non-photocatalysis occurred. The maximal potential generated under light irradiation was 0.80 vs. 0.55 V in the dark controls. These results indicate that photocatalysis at the rutile-coated cathode in the MFCs might have lowered the cathodic overpotential, and enhanced electron transfer from the cathode to Cr(VI) for its reduction. In addition, photoexcited electrons generated during the cathode photocatalysis might also have contributed to the higher Cr(VI) reduction rates when under light irradiation. This work assessed natural rutile as a novel cathodic catalyst for MFCs in power generation; particularly it extended the practical merits of conventional MFCs to cathodic reduction of environmental contaminants such as Cr(VI). (author)

  8. Adsorption of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions by Coffee Polyphenol-Formaldehyde/Acetaldehyde Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudbudin Mulani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium(VI from wastewater is essential as it is toxic. Thus, removal of chromium(VI was performed using coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins as adsorbents. Adsorbent resins were prepared by condensation of decaffeinated coffee powder with formaldehyde/acetaldehyde and used for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions. A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction procedure was applied for the determination of chromium at trace levels by spectroscopic method using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide reagent. The adsorption of Cr(VI on the coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins was monitored by FTIR and EDX analysis. The metal adsorption parameters such as contact time, pH, Cr(VI ion concentration, and adsorbent dose were investigated. For Cr(VI, the maximum adsorption capacity of coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde resins was 98% at pH 2. The experimental results showed that Cr(VI bound strongly with coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins and utilization of resins could be improved greatly by reuse.

  9. Ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI from contaminated mine water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRomero-Gonzalez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ex-situ bioremoval of U(VI from contaminated water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain 8455 and 13538 was studied under a range of pH and uranium concentrations. The effect of pH on the growth of bacteria was evaluated across the range 1.5 – 4.5 pH units. The respiration rate of At. ferrooxidans at different U(VI concentrations was quantified as a measure of the rate of metabolic activity over time using an oxygen electrode. The biosorption process was quantified using a uranyl nitrate solution, U-spiked growth media and U-contaminated mine water. The results showed that both strains of At. ferrooxidans are able to remove U(VI from solution at pH 2.5 – 4.5, exhibiting a buffering capacity at pH 3.5. The respiration rate of the micro-organism was affected at U(VI concentration of 30 mg L-1. The kinetics of the sorption fitted a pseudo-first order equation, and depended on the concentration of U(VI. The KD obtained from the biosorption experiments indicated that strain 8455 is more efficient for the removal of U(VI. A bioreactor designed to treat a solution of 100 mg U(VI L-1 removed at least 50% of the U(VI in water. The study demonstrated that At. ferrooxidans can be used for the ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI contaminated mine water.

  10. Assessment of Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using high content analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M Thompson

    Full Text Available Oral exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] induces intestinal redox changes, villus cytotoxicity, crypt hyperplasia, and intestinal tumors in mice. To assess the effects of Cr(VI in a cell model relevant to the intestine, undifferentiated (proliferating and differentiated (confluent Caco-2 cells were treated with Cr(VI, hydrogen peroxide or rotenone for 2-24 hours. DNA damage was then assessed by nuclear staining intensity of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and phosphorylated histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX measured by high content analysis methods. In undifferentiated Caco-2, all three chemicals increased 8-OHdG and γ-H2AX staining at cytotoxic concentrations, whereas only 8-OHdG was elevated at non-cytotoxic concentrations at 24 hr. Differentiated Caco-2 were more resistant to cytotoxicity and DNA damage than undifferentiated cells, and there were no changes in apoptotic markers p53 or annexin-V. However, Cr(VI induced a dose-dependent translocation of the unfolded protein response transcription factor ATF6 into the nucleus. Micronucleus (MN formation was assessed in CHO-K1 and A549 cell lines. Cr(VI increased MN frequency in CHO-K1 only at highly cytotoxic concentrations. Relative to the positive control Mitomycin-C, Cr(VI only slightly increased MN frequency in A549 at mildly cytotoxic concentrations. The results demonstrate that Cr(VI genotoxicity correlates with cytotoxic concentrations, and that H2AX phosphorylation occurs at higher concentrations than oxidative DNA damage in proliferating Caco-2 cells. The findings suggest that in vitro genotoxicity of Cr(VI is primarily oxidative in nature at low concentrations. Implications for in vivo intestinal toxicity of Cr(VI will be discussed.

  11. Treatment of selected pharmaceuticals by ferrate(VI): performance, kinetic studies and identification of oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-03-15

    The performance of ferrate(VI) in treating sulfamethoxazole (SMX), diclofenac (DCF), carbamazepine (CBZ) and bezafibrate (BZF) in test solutions containing the four compounds was investigated. A series of jar-test experiments was performed on a bench-scale at pH 6-9 and at a ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg Fe/L. The results suggested that ferrate(VI) can effectively remove SMX, DCF and CBZ from the test solutions, with greater than 80% removal under optimum conditions. However, the removal efficiency of BZF was very low, less than 25% under the studied conditions. Increasing the dose of ferrate(VI) improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH on ferrate(VI) performance varied among the different target compounds. Ferrate(VI) demonstrated the highest reactivity with SMX at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C), with apparent second-order rate constants of 360±17 M(-1) s(-1) and 1.26±0.02 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. However, BZF showed the lowest removal by ferrate(VI) with the smallest rate constants (less than 0.5 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, a number of oxidation products (OPs) of SMX, DCF and CBZ during ferrate(VI) oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and their degradation pathways were tentatively proposed. No OPs of BZF were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation. PMID:25063450

  12. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailides, Michail K. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G., E-mail: atekerle@upatras.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Akratos, Christos S.; Coles, Sandra [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Pavlou, Stavros [Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Vayenas, Dimitrios V. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-01-08

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m{sup 2} d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.

  13. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m2 d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem

  14. Cr(VI reduction by cell-free extract of thermophillic Bacillus fusiformis NTR9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Residual chromium compounds in discharged effluents is a serious problem, due to hexavalent chromium or chromate[Cr(VI] being extremely toxic and showing mutagenic and carcinogenic effects on biological systems. The bacterial enzymaticCr(VI reduction can occur and this could be an effective method of detoxifying Cr(VI polluted effluent. The present studycharacterized Cr(VI reductase activity of cell-free extracts (CFE of thermophilic chromate-reducing bacteria, Bacillusfusiformis NTR9. Results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for Cr(VI reductase activity of CFE was 80°C andpH 7, respectively. The reductase activity remained at 60.34% and 26.44% after 30 minutes of exposure to 70 and 90°C,respectively, suggesting a heat stable enzyme. Moreover, the enzyme was resistant under acidic and neutral condition but itsstability was decreased under alkaline condition. The Cr(VI reductase activity of CFE was enhanced when exposed in Cu2+and Fe3+ by 188.19% and 180.38%, respectively. The Cr(VI reductase activity could be reduced to 72.19% and 8.95% in thepresence of Mn2+ and Ag+, respectively. Mg2+, Zn2+, As3+ and electron acceptors like sulfate and nitrate had no affect on Cr(VIreductase activity. The external electron donors (glucose, glycerol, citrate, malate, succinate, and acetate, but not NADHwere essential to improve the chromate reductase activity of NTR9 strain. The chromate reductase was mainly associatedwith the soluble fraction in the cytoplasm of the bacterial cell. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 20 KDa. The resultsshowed that Cr(VI reductase could be a good candidate for detoxification of Cr(VI in industrial effluents.

  15. GWM-VI: groundwater management with parallel processing for multiple MODFLOW versions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater Management–Version Independent (GWM–VI) is a new version of the Groundwater Management Process of MODFLOW. The Groundwater Management Process couples groundwater-flow simulation with a capability to optimize stresses on the simulated aquifer based on an objective function and constraints imposed on stresses and aquifer state. GWM–VI extends prior versions of Groundwater Management in two significant ways—(1) it can be used with any version of MODFLOW that meets certain requirements on input and output, and (2) it is structured to allow parallel processing of the repeated runs of the MODFLOW model that are required to solve the optimization problem. GWM–VI uses the same input structure for files that describe the management problem as that used by prior versions of Groundwater Management. GWM–VI requires only minor changes to the input files used by the MODFLOW model. GWM–VI uses the Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability Application Programming Interface (JUPITER-API) to implement both version independence and parallel processing. GWM–VI communicates with the MODFLOW model by manipulating certain input files and interpreting results from the MODFLOW listing file and binary output files. Nearly all capabilities of prior versions of Groundwater Management are available in GWM–VI. GWM–VI has been tested with MODFLOW-2005, MODFLOW-NWT (a Newton formulation for MODFLOW-2005), MF2005-FMP2 (the Farm Process for MODFLOW-2005), SEAWAT, and CFP (Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005). This report provides sample problems that demonstrate a range of applications of GWM–VI and the directory structure and input information required to use the parallel-processing capability.

  16. Chromium(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate innate immune gene induction in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Zubritsky, Lindsey M.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for pathogenic metal signaling in airway injury or disease promotion are poorly understood. It is widely believed that one mechanism for pathogenic and possible carcinogenic effects of inhaled chromium (Cr(VI)) is inhibition of inducible gene transactivation. However, we recently reported that Cr(VI) inhibition of Sp1-dependent transactivation required signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-dependent expression of an inhibitory protein in airway epithelium. Thus, Cr(VI) exposures can induce genes and we hypothesized this induction resulted from Cr(VI) signaling through an innate immune-like STAT1-dependent pathway initiated by Fyn. Exposure of human airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells to Cr(VI) selectively transactivated STAT-responsive interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and induced ISRE-driven transactivation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), without affecting the gamma interferon-activated site (GAS)-driven IRF1 expression. Cr(VI)-induced IRF7 was absent or greatly reduced in cells that lacked STAT1, were treated with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2, or lacked Fyn. Expressing Fyn, but not Src, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells null for Src, Yes, and Fyn restored Cr(VI)-stimulated STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and IRF7 expression. Finally, shRNA knockdown of Fyn in BEAS-2B cells prevented Cr(VI)-activated STAT1 transactivation of IRF7. These data support a novel mechanism through which Cr(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate interferon-like signaling for STAT1-dependent gene transactivation. PMID:19994902

  17. The role of intracellular zinc in chromium(VI)-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav

    2006-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that zinc is required for the optimal functioning of the skin. Changes in intracellular zinc concentrations have been associated with both improved protection of skin cells against various noxious factors as well as with increased susceptibility to external stress. Still, little is known about the role of intracellular zinc in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced skin injury. To address this question, the effects of zinc deficiency or supplementation on Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA injury and cell death were investigated in human diploid dermal fibroblasts during 48 h. Zinc levels in fibroblasts were manipulated by pretreatment of cells with 100 microM ZnSO4 and 4 or 25 microM zinc chelator TPEN. Cr(VI) (50, 10 and 1 microM) was found to produce time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity resulting in oxidative stress, suppression of antioxidant systems and activation of p53-dependent apoptosis which is reported for the first time in this model in relation to environmental Cr(VI). Increased intracellular zinc partially attenuated Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis by enhancing cellular antioxidant systems while inhibiting Cr(VI)-dependent apoptosis by preventing the activation of caspase-3. Decreased intracellular zinc enhanced cytotoxic effects of all the tested Cr(VI) concentrations, leading to rapid loss of cell membrane integrity and nuclear dispersion--hallmarks of necrosis. These new findings suggest that Cr(VI) as a model environmental toxin may damage in deeper regions residing skin fibroblasts whose susceptibility to such toxin depends among others on their intracellular Zn levels. Further investigation of the impact of Zn status on skin cells as well as any other cell populations exposed to Cr(VI) or other heavy metals is warranted.

  18. Transferable basis sets of numerical atomic orbitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Louwerse; G. Rothenberg

    2012-01-01

    We show that numerical atomic orbital basis sets that are variationally optimized for specific compounds are biased and not fully transferable to other compounds. The situation improves when the basis sets are optimized for several compounds and a compromise is made. We demonstrate this for basis se

  19. Trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 (II = Ba, Sr and VI = S, Se) quaternary compounds for earth-abundant photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Lin, Wenjun; Meng, Weiwei; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-02-14

    We propose trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 (II = Ba, Sr and VI = S, Se) quaternary compounds for earth-abundant solar cell applications. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that these compounds exhibit similar electronic and optical properties to kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS): high optical absorption with band gaps suitable for efficient single-junction solar cell applications. However, the trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 compounds exhibit defect properties more suitable for photovoltaic applications than those of CZTS. In CZTS, the dominant defects are the deep acceptors, Cu substitutions on Zn sites, which cause non-radiative recombination and limit the open-circuit voltages of CZTS solar cells. On the contrary, the dominant defects in trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 are the shallow acceptors, Cu vacancies, similar to those in CuInSe2. Our results suggest that the trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 quaternary compounds could be promising candidates for efficient earth-abundant thin-film solar cell and photoeletrochemical water-splitting applications. PMID:26804024

  20. Oxo complexes of Mo(VI) and W(VI) with α-alkoxycarboxylate ligands: The role of counterions and water of crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Adelé; Dobrzańska, Liliana; Raubenheimer, Helgard G.; Luckay, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    Crystal structures of three oxo complexes of Mo(VI) and W(VI) with α-alkoxycarboxylate ligands were solved, namely [(CH3CH2)4N]2[Mo2O5(Hmal)2(H2O)2] (H3mal = malic acid) (1), Na6[Mo2O5(cit)2)]·10.5H2O (H4cit = citric acid) (2) and Na2[WO2(H2cit)2]·10H2O (3). In 1, dianionic malate ligands adopt a unique bidentate coordination mode via alkoxy and α-carboxylate groups in the oxo-bridged dinuclear anionic complex, in which two terminal oxo ligands and a water molecule complete the distorted octahedral geometry around the Mo(VI) centre. In compound 2, a similar oxo-bridged dinuclear core, [Mo2O5]2+, is present. However, the distorted octahedral geometry of each Mo(VI) is completed by oxygen atoms originating from a fully deprotonated citrate ligand, adopting a tridentate coordination mode. The mononuclear complex 3, with two terminal oxo ligands and four oxygen atoms originating from two dianionic, bidentately coordinated citrate ligands positioned in a distorted octahedral geometry around W(VI), shows the presence of unique icosameric water clusters trapped within the crystal lattice.

  1. Biosorption Potential of Trichoderma gamsii Biomass for Removal of Cr(VI) from Electroplating Industrial Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Haresh Keharia; Kavita, B.

    2012-01-01

    The potential use of acid-treated biomass of Trichoderma gamsii to remove hexavalent chromium ions from electroplating industrial effluent was evaluated. Electroplating industrial effluent contaminated with 5000 mg/L of Cr(VI) ions, collected from industrial estate of Gujarat, India, was mixed with acid-treated biomass of T. gamsii at biomass dose of 10 mg/mL. Effect of contact time and initial Cr(VI) ions was studied. The biosorption of Cr(VI) ions attained equilibrium at time interval of 24...

  2. Biosorption of Cr(VI) from AqueousSolution Using New Adsorbent: Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zainal, Israa G.

    2010-01-01

    Biosorption is one such emerging technology which utilized naturally occurring waste materials to sequester heavy metals from polluted water. In the present study cinnamon was utilized for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions.It was found that a time of two hours was sufficient for sorption to attain equilibrium. The optimum pH was 2 for Cr(VI) removal. Temprature has little influence on the biosorption process. The Cr(VI) removal decreased with increase in temperature. The biosorption data ...

  3. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  4. Role of collagen VI in peripheral nerves and wound-induced hair regrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule dynamically expressed in a variety of tissues, including peripheral nerves and skin. However, the role of collagen VI in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and hair follicle growth is yet unknown. The main focus of my PhD study was to investigate the role and the underlying mechanisms of collagen VI in peripheral nerve myelination and function, in PNS regeneration, as well as in wound-induced hair growth. During the first year of my P...

  5. Sorption of chromium (VI) by Mg/Fe hydrotalcite type compunds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Sosa, I., E-mail: irma.garcia@inin.gob.mx; Cabral-Prieto, A., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química (Mexico); Nava, N., E-mail: tnava@imp.mx; Navarrete, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Olguín, M. T., E-mail: teresa.olguin@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química (Mexico); Escobar, Luis, E-mail: luis.escobar@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Física (Mexico); López-Castañares, R., E-mail: rlc@anuies.mx; Olea-Cardoso, O., E-mail: olc@anuies.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Edo. de México, Facultad de Química (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    The synthesis by co-precipitation and characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopies of Mg-Fe-hydrotalcite compounds, and their sorption capacities for Cr(VI) in aqueous media were carried out. The average sorption capacity of Cr(VI) for the non-thermal treated samples was of 6.2 mg/g. The ferrihydrite was omnipresent in all prepared hydrotalcite samples. A brief discussion is made on the role of both the hydrotalcite and ferrihydrite for removing such amount of Cr(VI)

  6. Use of iron oxide magnetic nanosorbents for Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solutions: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala Ilankoon

    2014-01-01

    This review paper focuses on the use of iron oxide nanosorbents for the removal of hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)], from aqueous media. Cr(VI) is a well-known toxic heavy metal, which can cause severe damages to the human health even with the presence of trace levels. Chromium continuously enters into water streams from different sources. Several methods are available for Cr(VI) removal and some of them are well established in industrial scale whilst some are still in laboratory ...

  7. vi and Vim Editors Pocket Reference Support for every text editing task

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Many Unix, Linux, and Mac OS X geeks enjoy using the powerful, platform-agnostic text editors vi and Vim, but there are far too many commands for anyone to remember. Author Arnold Robbins has chosen the most valuable commands for vi, Vim, and vi's main clones-vile, elvis, and nvi-and packed them into this easy-to-browse pocket reference. You'll find commands for all kinds of editing tasks, such as programming, modifying system files, and writing and marking up articles. This second edition includes: Command-line optionsvi commands and set optionsInput mode shortcutsSubstitution and regular e

  8. Synthesis and crystal structure of 2-debenzoyl and 4-deacetyl 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai-Xia; Jiang, Yi-; Chen, Jian-Min; Chen, Jian-Kuan; Chen, Min-Qin

    2005-03-01

    Two novel 4-deacetyl and 2,4-deacyl 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives were prepared from 1-deoxybaccatin VI. Their structures were elucidated using extensive spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1HNMR, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and MS). In addition, the conformations for these compounds were obtained by X-ray diffraction methods. Comparisons to 1-deoxybaccatin VI and paclitaxel identify relative differences principally in the cyclohexenyl ring (A ring). Conformational analysis showed that removal of 4-acetyl or 2,4-diacyl moiety has a decisive influence on the conformation of the A ring.

  9. Chemical bath deposition of II-VI compound thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Isaiah Olatunde

    II-VI compounds are direct bandgap semiconductors with great potentials in optoelectronic applications. Solar cells, where these materials are in greater demand, require a low cost production technology that will make the final product more affordable. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) a low cost growth technique capable of producing good quality thin film semiconductors over large area and at low temperature then becomes a suitable technology of choice. Heterogeneous reaction in a basic aqueous solution that is responsible for the II-VI compound film growth in CBD requires a metal complex. We have identified the stability constant (k) of the metal complex compatible with CBD growth mechanism to be about 106.9. This value is low enough to ensure that the substrate adsorbed complex relax for subsequent reaction with the chalcogen precursor to take place. It is also high enough to minimize the metal ion concentration in the bath participating in the precipitation of the bulk compounds. Homogeneous reaction that leads to precipitation in the reaction bath takes place because the solubility products of bulk II-VI compounds are very low. This reaction quickly depletes the bath of reactants, limit the film thickness, and degrade the film quality. While ZnS thin films are still hard to grow by CBD because of lack of suitable complexing agent, the homogeneous reaction still limits quality and thickness of both US and ZnS thin films. In this study, the zinc tetraammine complex ([Zn(NH3) 4]2+) with k = 108.9 has been forced to acquire its unsaturated form [Zn(NH3)3]2+ with a moderate k = 106.6 using hydrazine and nitrilotriacetate ion as complementary complexing agents and we have successfully grown ZnS thin films. We have also, minimized or eliminated the homogeneous reaction by using ammonium salt as a buffer and chemical bath with low reactant concentrations. These have allowed us to increase the saturation thickness of ZnS thin film by about 400% and raise that of US film

  10. Vi capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugates for prevention of typhoid fever. Preparation, characterization, and immunogenicity in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, S C; Stone, A L; Robbins, J D; Schneerson, R; Robbins, J B

    1987-11-01

    The Vi has proven to be a protective antigen in two double masked, controlled clinical trials in areas with high rates of typhoid fever (approximately 1% per annum). In both studies the protective efficacy of the Vi was approximately 70%. Approximately 75% of subjects in these areas responded with a fourfold or greater rise of serum Vi antibodies. In contrast, the Vi elicited a fourfold or greater rise in 95-100% of young adults in France and the United States. Methods were devised, therefore, to synthesize Vi-protein conjugates in order to both enhance the antibody response and confer T-dependent properties to the Vi (and theoretically increase its protective action in populations at high risk for typhoid fever). We settled on a method that used the heterobifunctional crosslinking reagent, N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP), to bind thiol derivatives of the Vi to proteins. This synthetic scheme was reproducible, provided high yields of Vi-protein conjugates, and was applicable to several medically relevant proteins such as diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. The resultant conjugates were more immunogenic in mice and juvenile Rhesus monkeys than the Vi alone. In contrast to the T-independent properties of the Vi, conjugates of this polysaccharide with several medically relevant proteins induced booster responses in mice and in juvenile Rhesus monkeys. Clinical studies with Vi-protein conjugates are planned. This scheme is also applicable to synthesize protein conjugates with other polysaccharides that have carboxyl functions.

  11. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lulu [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Qiu, Guannan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang@ahau.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop.

  12. Thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, P.D., E-mail: pabloborges@ufv.br [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tec., Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Petersen, J.E.; Scolfaro, L. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Leite Alves, H.W. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, Caixa Postal 110, São João Del Rei 36300-000, MG (Brazil); Myers, T.H. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Doping in a manner that introduces anisotropy in order to reduce thermal conductivity is a significant focus in thermoelectric research today. By solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in the constant scattering time (τ) approximation, in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory, we compare the Seebeck coefficient (S) and figure of merit (ZT) of bulk PbTe to PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures and PbTe doping superlattices (SLs) with periodically doped planes. Bismuth and Thallium were used as the n- and p-type impurities, respectively. The effects of carrier concentration are considered via chemical potential variation in a rigid band approximation. The impurity bands near the Fermi level in the electronic structure of PbTe SLs are of Tl s- and Bi p-character, and this feature is independent of the doping concentration or the distance between impurity planes. We observe the impurity bands to have a metallic nature in the directions perpendicular to the doping planes, yet no improvement on the values of ZT is found when compared to bulk PbTe. For the PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures, the calculated S presents good agreement with recent experimental data, and an anisotropic behavior is observed for low carrier concentrations (n<10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}). A large value of ZT{sub ||} (parallel to the growth direction) of 3.0 is predicted for n=4.7×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and T=700 K, whereas ZT{sub p} (perpendicular to the growth direction) is found to peak at 1.5 for n=1.7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Both electrical conductivity enhancement and thermal conductivity reduction are analyzed. - Graphical abstract: Figure of merit for PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructure along the [0 0 1] direction, P.D. Borges, J.E. Petersen, L. Scolfaro, H.W. Leite Alves, T.H. Myers, Improved thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of IV–VI

  13. Constructing a quasi-Legendre basis based on the C-Bézier basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu; WANG Guozhao

    2005-01-01

    In the spaceГn = span{sint, cost, 1, t, t2, …, tn- 2[, a C-Bezier basis is constructed by an integral approach. However, the C-Bezier basis is not orthogonal. For some applications, we construct an orthogonal basis based on the C-Bezier basis, which has remarkable properties similar to that of the Legendre basis. Then we derive the transformation matrices that convert the C-Bezier basis and the orthogonal basis into each other. As an example of application, we apply this orthogonal basis to the degree reduction approximation of the C-Bezier curves.

  14. Análisis procedimental y documental de un nombramiento de mayordomo de propios durante el reinado de Fernando VI Procedural and documentary analysis of "mayordomo de propios" during the reign of Ferdinand VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Salamanca López

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Los mayordomos se encargaban de la gestión financiera del Concejo, llevando la contabilidad de los ingresos y gastos. Por lo que respecta a Madrid, tenemos noticias de su existencia en el capítulo CXIII del Fuero, aunque será en el siglo XV cuando se consolide como oficio de carácter unipersonal, nombrado de forma anual. En la segunda mitad del siglo XVI, el cargo se dividirá en dos, el mayordomo de los propios del Concejo y el mayordomo del pósito. Durante el reinado de Fernando VI, su designación se realizará conforme a la costumbre, si bien, en ocasiones, como es nuestro caso, se producían alteraciones en su génesis. En esa línea, analizaremos las vicisitudes acontecidas durante la elección de Antonio de Bengoa, traducidas en el análisis del procedimiento y documentación generada a lo largo de su tramitación.The "mayordomos" were responsible for the financial management of the Municipal Council, overseeing the accounting for income and expenditure. With regard to Madrid, we have news of your existence in the chapter CXXII of the "Fuero", although it will be in the 15th century, when it consolidated as office of unipersonal nature, appointed on an annual basis. In the second half of the 16th century, the office will be divided into two, the "mayordomo de los propios" of the Council and the "mayordomo del pósito". During the reign of Ferdinand VI, his nomination be made according to the custom, although, at times, as is our case, there were alterations in its genesis. In that line, we will analyze the vicissitudes occurred during the election of Antonio of Bengoa, translated into the analysis of the procedure and documentation generated during their processing.

  15. Estudio de inmunogenicidad de la vacuna antitifoídica cubana de polisacárido Vi vax-TyVi® en ratones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Ramírez

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi es un microorganismo que provoca más de 16 millones de casos de fiebre tifoidea con aproximadamente 600 000 muertes al año en todo el mundo. Dentro de las vacunas antitifoídicas la de polisacárido capsular Vi ha encontrado, gracias a sus incuestionables ventajas, una gran aceptación entre productores y consumidores. El presente trabajo aborda el estudio de inmunogenicidad de la vacuna antitifoídica cubana de polisacárido Vi vax-TyViâ en ratones. El estudio estuvo conformado por un grupo control no inoculado y un segundo grupo que recibió 0,05 mL de la vacuna por vía intramuscular. Se tomaron muestras de sangre a los -3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 y 84 días. La actividad de anticuerpos IgG antipolisacárido Vi de los sueros individuales fue determinada por ELISA. Los datos fueron analizados por grupo y por sexo y se calculó el porcentaje de seroconversión, considerándose respondedor aquel animal que al menos aumentara en cuatro veces su título inicial. La respuesta de anticuerpos inducida por la vacuna mostró un aumento notable de los títulos de IgG antipolisacárido Vi en el grupo vacunado (100% de seroconversión, mientras que el grupo control no incrementó sus niveles mínimos iniciales (0% de respondedores. Aunque más dispersa, la respuesta de anticuerpos antiVi fue significativamente mayor en las hembras que en los machos.

  16. Motion Object Detection Combined ViBe with Three-Frame Differential%结合三帧差分的ViBe运动检测算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严红亮; 王福龙; 刘志煌

    2014-01-01

    提出一种以ViBe算法为基础,结合三帧差分思想的运动目标检测算法。利用ViBe算法对每个像素点建模,当前帧和模型得到的差分图与前一帧得到的差分图再进行与运算,之后运用 ViBe 的思想对模型进行实时更新;同时在每一帧添加小波去噪处理,去除图像高频区域。本文算法有效地解决了光照变化对系统的影响,消除了影子问题,去除了闪烁背景点。实验结果表明,本文算法在多种环境下可以准确地提取运动目标,达到更好的鲁棒性。%Based on ViBe, this paper explores a new moving object detection algorithm combining with the three frame difference method. Firstly, we build model on every pixels of the background with the advantage of ViBe;then, do the logic AND operation between two differential images which have been subtracted from the current image and the previous image; lastly, update the model in real time with the idea of ViBe. Meanwhile, in order to remove the high frequency component of the image, we add wavelet denoising to every frame of the image. This algorithm effectively overcomes the effect of illumination change on the system and eliminates the ghost as well as the blinking background pixels. Experiments confirm that this algorithm can accurately extract moving objects in multiple environments and has higher robustness.

  17. Quantum chemistry study of uranium(VI), neptunium(V), and plutonium(IV,VI) complexes with preorganized tetradentate phenanthrolineamide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-10-20

    The preorganized tetradentate 2,9-diamido-1,10-phenanthroline ligand with hard-soft donors combined in the same molecule has been found to possess high selectivity toward actinides in an acidic aqueous solution. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) coupled with the quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotential method was used to investigate the structures, bonding nature, and thermodynamic behavior of uranium(VI), neptunium(V), and plutonium(IV,VI) with phenanthrolineamides. Theoretical optimization shows that Et-Tol-DAPhen and Et-Et-DAPhen ligands are both coordinated with actinides in a tetradentate chelating mode through two N donors of the phenanthroline moiety and two O donors of the amide moieties. It is found that [AnO2L(NO3)](n+) (An = U(VI), Np(V), Pu(VI); n = 0, 1) and PuL(NO3)4 are the main 1:1 complexes. With respect to 1:2 complexes, the reaction [Pu(H2O)9](4+)(aq) + 2L(org) + 2NO3(-)(aq) → [PuL2(NO3)2](2+)(org) + 9H2O(aq) might be another probable extraction mechanism for Pu(IV). From the viewpoint of energy, the phenanthrolineamides extract actinides in the order of Pu(IV) > U(VI) > Pu(VI) > Np(V), which agrees well with the experimental results. Additionally, all of the thermodynamic reactions are more energetically favorable for the Et-Tol-DAPhen ligand than the Et-Et-DAPhen ligand, indicating that substitution of one ethyl group with one tolyl group can enhance the complexation abilities toward actinide cations (anomalous aryl strengthening).

  18. Shape-selective synthesis of II-VI semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoli, A.; Colli, A.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J.; Ferrari, A.C. [Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    Polar II-VI semiconductors can nucleate in complex shapes ranging from nanowires to nanoribbons, nanosaws and multipods. Here we demonstrate the deterministic and fully reproducible shape-selective growth of several morphologies of CdSe and ZnTe nanocrystals by a steady-state vapour transport process. A simple pressure-based precursor-flow shutter excludes any effects of temperature ramping, ensuring reproducible shape selectivity for each set of deposition parameters. Once thermal gradients are eliminated, we show that the transition from one nanocrystal shape to another is controlled just by the interplay of precursor impinging on the substrate (ruled by the powder temperature T{sub P}) and sample surface kinetics (ruled by the sample temperature T{sub S}). Furthermore, a regime is found where seeded, epitaxial growth of CdSe nanorods becomes dominant over the conventional catalyst-assisted nucleation. This allows the fabrication of vertical nanorod arrays free of any metal contamination. Seeded growth of branched and tetrapod-like nanocrystals is also possible by further optimisation of the growth parameters. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Speedup and fracturing of George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Holt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available George VI Ice Shelf (GVIIS is located on the Antarctic Peninsula, a region where several ice shelves have undergone rapid breakup in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming. We use a combination of optical (Landsat, radar (ERS 1/2 SAR and laser altimetry (GLAS datasets to examine the response of GVIIS to environmental change and to offer an assessment on its future stability. The spatial and structural changes of GVIIS (ca. 1973 to ca. 2010 are mapped and surface velocities are calculated at different time periods (InSAR and optical feature tracking from 1989 to 2009 to document changes in the ice shelf's flow regime. Surface elevation changes are recorded between 2003 and 2008 using repeat track ICESat acquisitions. We note an increase in fracture extent and distribution at the south ice front, ice-shelf acceleration towards both the north and south ice fronts and spatially varied negative surface elevation change throughout, with greater variations observed towards the central and southern regions of the ice shelf. We propose that whilst GVIIS is in no imminent danger of collapse, it is vulnerable to ongoing atmospheric and oceanic warming and is more susceptible to breakup along its southern margin in ice preconditioned for further retreat.

  20. Mythos in Claude Lévi-Strauss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Uğurlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Humankind has been continuously trying to interpret the universe they live in and the existence they have since coming into being. How the sky, the earth, the seas and the mountains were created have an important place in this process of interpretation as something related to the creation of the universe. Humankind has also tried to understand the struggle between goodness and evil, and how humanity came into existence. In this process of interpretation, human efforts to understand these things were not much based on factual truth. Rather, in prehistoric times, the human struggle to understanding life and the universe was a struggle that used surreal symbols. For this reason, myths may be defined as sacred legends which both explain the existence of community of a certain region or of humankind. Thus, mythos should be considered as a system of thinking and discourse of the transition period from primitive life to culture. Archaic people expressed the form of rational thinking they experienced though nature with mythos fiction so that they could grasp society and what it was. Lévi Strauss has the idea that the logical structure of the modern world and the note system in music can help us to understand mythos. In light of this, it will be noticed that there has never been a great difference between primitive and modern men and finding out their similarity will help us to find answer questions about the vagueness of humankind.

  1. Recovery of U(Vi) with unexpanded perlite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlite is a glass volcanic rock that is hydrated by the addition of water during its formation. Is a natural material widely used in the chemical and construction industries, but recently beginning to be studied their adsorptive properties. In this paper the adsorption capacity of unexpanded perlite to remove U(Vi) in aqueous solution depending on the grain size of the material was investigated, as well as the contact time between the liquid and solid phases, ph of solution and initial concentration of uranium. The adsorption was dependent on the surface area of the material, recovering higher uranium percentage to smaller particle size. Meanwhile kinetics showed that the uranium adsorption is rapid, reaching equilibrium in 1 h. Adsorption to slightly acidic conditions was favored but dropped dramatically to ph highly acidic and basic; at a concentration of 1 x 10-3 M UO2+2 the maximum uranium recovery was 46% at ph 6. In dilute solutions (1 x 10-5 to 1 x 10-3 M) the adsorption percentage reached values between 34 and 42%, but was reduced to 1% at a concentration of 1 x 10-2 M. (Author)

  2. Close-spaced vapor transport of II-VI semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Gerard

    1991-12-01

    The close spaced vapor transport (CSVT) is an efficient and cost-effective technique that allows the growth of polycrystalline as well as epitaxial thin layers of semiconductors. It has been applied to II-VI materials, especially to zinc and cadmium chalcogenides. A summary table including the deposition parameters, i.e., the nature of the ambient gas, the temperature of the source, the temperature difference between source and substrate, and the values of the growth rates measured on various substrates is presented for ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe. Experimental results concerning the growth of ZnSe on GaAs substrates are also reported. The CSVT system uses an Ar atmosphere and the working temperature is ca. 825 degree(s)C. The temperatures of source and substrate are measured during deposition and growth rates of the ZnSe films are studied as a function of the reciprocal temperature of the substrate surface for GaAs and quartz (inert) substrates. The measured values of the growth rate are compared to the theoretical ones given by the reaction-limited model and the diffusion-limited model. The validity of the models is discussed in terms of the nature of the molecules participating in the transport.

  3. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Test VI-5, the fifth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus, was conducted in a flowing mixture of hydrogen and helium. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium which had been irradiated to a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg. Using a hot cell-mounted test apparatus, the fuel rod was heated in an induction furnace under simulated LWR accident conditions to two test temperatures, 2000 K for 20 min and then 2700 K for an additional 20 min. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains on components designed to measure fission product transport characteristics and facilitate sampling and analysis. The results from this test were compared with those obtained in previous tests in this series and with the CORSOR-M and ORNL diffusion release models for fission product release. 21 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. II-VI wide band gap semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, R.; Decoss, R.; Olguin, D.

    1993-08-01

    We set an analytical expression for the gap as a function of hydrostatic deformation, E(sub g)(epsilon), by diagonalizing in Gamma the corresponding empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian (ETBH). In the ETBH we use the well known d(exp -2) Harrison scaling law (HSL) to adjust the TB parameter (TBP) to the changes in interatomic distances. We do not consider cation-anion charge transfer. We calculate E(sub g)(epsilon) for wide band gap II-VI semiconductors with zincblende crystal structure for deformations under pressure up to -5 percent. Results are in good agreement with experiment for the compounds of lower ionicity but deviate as the ionicity of the compound increases. This is due to the neglect of charge transfer which should be included self-consistently. Within the approximation we always find a positive second derivative of E(sub g)(epsilon) with respect to epsilon, independent of the material. Furthermore, the inclusion of deviations from HSL appear to be unimportant to this problem.

  5. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  6. Uma visão do VI Congresso Brasileiro de Gerenciamento de Projetos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Aisenberg Ferenhof

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho relata uma visão do VI CONGRESSO BRASILEIRO DE GERENCIAMENTO DE PROJETOS & III FÓRUM INTERNACIONAL DE GOVERNO, destacando os pontos principais dos assuntos debatidos.

  7. Adsorption studies on fruits of Gular (Ficus glomerata): Removal of Cr(VI) from synthetic wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rifaqat A.K., E-mail: rakrao1@rediffmail.com [Environmental Research Laboratory, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India); Rehman, Fouzia [Environmental Research Laboratory, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-09-15

    The adsorption of Cr(VI) was studied in batch system using fruits of Ficus glomerata as adsorbent. The effect of temperature, pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration and time was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to investigate surface morphology and active functional groups present on the adsorbent surface. Thermodynamic parameters like free energy change ({Delta}G{sup 0}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup 0}) and entropy ({Delta}S{sup 0}) indicate the spontaneous, endothermic and increased randomness nature of Cr(VI) adsorption. Equilibrium data were fitted well with Langmuir isotherm at 50 deg. C. The magnitude of mean free energy indicates chemical nature of adsorption. The breakthrough and exhaustive capacities were found to be 5 and 23.1 mg g{sup -1} respectively. The applicability of the adsorbent has been demonstrated by removing Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater.

  8. Alkali-treated cellulose fibers for U(VI) separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present research work presents the study of cost effective cellulose fibers as sorbent for the U(VI) removal from nuclear wastewaters. Alkali-treated cellulose fibers (ATCFs) were extracted from alkaline peroxide mechanical pulp board by using CH3COOH and NaOH treatment. Sorption capability was ascertained by conducting batch experiments. The kinetic sorption of U(VI) on ATCFs could be described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation well. The results demonstrated that the sorption of U(VI) to ATCFs was strongly dependent of pH and weakly dependent of ionic strength. U(VI) sorption on ATCFs was mainly dominated by the outer-sphere complexation. (author)

  9. Derivative spectrophotometric determination of uranium (VI using diacetyl monoxime isonicotinoyl hydrazone (DMIH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChandraSekhar Reddy Gadikota

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Uranium (VI forms a yellow coloured water soluble complex with diacetyl monoxime isonicotinoyl hydrazone (DMIH reagent in acidic buffer of pH 3.25 with ?max at 364 nm. The molar absorptivity and sandell’s sensitivity are 1.63 X 10 4 L.mol -1.cm-1 and 0.00307692 µg/cm 2, respectively. The Beer’s law validity range is 1.19–14.28 µg/mL. Uranium (VI forms (M:L 1:1 complex with DMIH and stability constant of the complex is 4.928 X 106 .The derivative spectrophotometric determination of U (VI was carried out by measuring peak height method. The developed derivative spectrophotometric method was employed for the determination of uranium (VI in rock and synthetic samples. The effect of various diverse ions was also studied.

  10. Synthesis of polyamidoxime-functionalized nanoparticles for uranium(VI) removal from neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to separate uranium(VI) from water environment due to its high toxicity and radioactivity. A new kind of polystyrene nanoparticles with polyamidoxime is reported here for removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The obtained PSt nanoparticles have a tunable sorption capacity. The sorption process follows pseudo-second-order kinetics, and the equilibrium can be reached within 6 h. Furthermore, the optimal pH value of sorption process is 6.5, and the adsorbents can be recycled well for uranium(VI) sorption from aqueous solution. This work indicates that the polyamidoxime-functionalized PSt nanoparticles may be used as a good adsorbent for the removal of uranium(VI) from neutral aqueous solution. (author)

  11. Navarivanje pod prahom s višežičanom elektrodom

    OpenAIRE

    J. Tušek

    2002-01-01

    Navarivanje s višežičanom elektrodom pod prahom novi je postupak koji se, usprkos brojnim prednostima pred ostalim postupcima, još uvijek ne upotrebljava u praksi. Naprava za zavarivanje s višežičanom elektrodom suštinski se ne razlikuje od klasične naprave za zavarivanje sa samo jednom žicom. Razlika je samo da pri novoj napravi kroz kontaktnu mlaznicu istovremeno putuje više žica. Sve žice imaju istu brzinu, zajedničko podešavanje i samo jedan izvor električne struje. Pri zavarivanja sa viš...

  12. Deux disques sur les minorités du Viêt-Nam

    OpenAIRE

    Rappoport, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Depuis 1993, Patrick Kersalé se rend régulièrement au Viêt-nam : il a déjà réalisé dix disques sur les musiques traditionnelles du Viêt-nam, et un onzième — sur les musiques Joraï — sortira sous peu. La variété et la quantité de ces enregistrements font du catalogue de Kersalé l’un des plus riches concernant le Viêt-nam dans le domaine de l’édition discographique française. Le Viêt-nam ne constitue pourtant pas sa seule aire d’investigation puisque depuis six ans, il a déjà fait paraître 48 d...

  13. Asperosaponin VI promotes progesterone receptor expression in decidual cells via the notch signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhou, Chun; Li, Yadi; Gao, Feixia; Wu, Haiwang; Yang, Lilin; Qiu, Weiyu; Zhu, Lin; Du, Xin; Lin, Weixian; Huang, Dandan; Liu, Haibin; Liang, Chun; Luo, Songping

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a common clinical condition, but its reasons remain unknown in 37-79% of the affected women. The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is an integral mediator of early pregnancy events, exerting its effects via the progesterone receptor (PR). Dipsaci Radix (DR) has long been used for treating gynecological diseases in Chinese medicine, while its molecular mechanisms and active ingredients are still unclear. We report here the progesterone-like effects of the alcohol extraction and Asperosaponin VI from DR in primary decidual cells and HeLa cell line. We first determined the safe concentration of Asperosaponin VI in the cells with MTT assay and then found by using dual luciferase reporter and Western blotting that Asperosaponin VI significantly increased PR expression. Moreover, we explored the mechanisms of action of the DR extracts and Asperosaponin VI, and the results showed that they could activate Notch signaling, suggesting that they may function by promoting decidualization. PMID:27370099

  14. Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

    2004-03-29

    Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

  15. Removal of Cr(VI from Aqueous Environments Using Micelle-Clay Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Qurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques.

  16. Macroscopic and spectroscopic characterization of uranium(VI) sorption onto orthoclase and muscovite and the influence of competing Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Constanze; Müller, Katharina; Drobot, Björn; Steudtner, Robin; Großmann, Kay; Stockmann, Madlen; Brendler, Vinzenz

    2016-09-01

    The uranium(VI) sorption onto orthoclase and muscovite, representing the mineral groups of feldspars and micas as important components of the earth crust, was investigated in the presence and absence of Ca2+ under aerobic conditions. Batch experiments were accompanied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as well as in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that the U(VI) sorption is reduced by Ca2+ at pH ⩾ 8 up to 30% due to the formation of the neutral aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)3 (aq) complex. TRLFS measurements on the supernatant confirmed the predominance of this Ca2UO2(CO3)3 (aq) complex in accordance with thermodynamic calculations. Furthermore, TRLFS measurements on the mineral suspension as a function of pH (4-9) and Ca2+ revealed the existence of several species. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) indicated the formation of three surface species totally. In the absence of Ca2+, the tbnd XOsbnd UO2+ and tbnd XOsbnd UO2CO3- surface complexes were formed, whereas the presence of Ca2+ leads to the formation of tbnd XOsbnd UO2+ and tbnd XOsbnd UO2OH as the formation of the aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)3 (aq) complex reduces the free UO22+ concentration in the solution. In addition, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed an outer-sphere surface species in the absence of Ca2+. These experimental results were used for the assessment of surface complexation parameters to improve the basis for a mechanistic modeling of the sorption processes of U(VI) onto orthoclase and muscovite including the influence of Ca2+. Namely, logK tbnd XOsbnd UO2+ = 1.69 and logK tbnd XOsbnd UO2CO3- = 8.96 were determined for sorption onto orthoclase, whereas logK tbnd XOsbnd UO2+ = 0.41 and logK tbnd XOsbnd UO2CO3- = 8.71 best describe sorption onto muscovite in the absence of Ca2+.

  17. The influence of citric acid, EDTA, and fulvic acid on U(VI) sorption onto kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, Michelle, E-mail: Michelle.l.barger@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Koretsky, Carla M. [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Uranium(VI) sorption onto kaolinite was investigated as a function of pH (3-12), sorbate/sorbent ratio (1 x 10{sup -6}-1 x 10{sup -4} M U(VI) with 2 g/L kaolinite), ionic strength (0.001-0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}), and pCO{sub 2} (0-5%) in the presence or absence of 1 x 10{sup -2}-1 x 10{sup -4} M citric acid, 1 x 10{sup -2}-1 x 10{sup -4} M EDTA, and 10 or 20 mg/L fulvic acid. Control experiments without-solids, containing 1 x 10{sup -6}-1 x 10{sup -4} M U(VI) in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} were used to evaluate sorption to the container wall and precipitation of U phases as a function of pH. Control experiments demonstrate significant loss (up to 100%) of U from solution. Although some loss, particularly in 1 x 10{sup -5} and 1 x 10{sup -4} M U experiments, is expected due to precipitation of schoepite, adsorption on the container walls is significant, particularly in 1 x 10{sup -6} M U experiments. In the absence of ligands, U(VI) sorption on kaolinite increases from pH {approx}3 to 7 and decreases from pH {approx}7.5 to 12. Increasing ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.1 M produces only a slight decrease in U(VI) sorption at pH < 7, whereas 10% pCO{sub 2} greatly diminishes U(VI) sorption between pH {approx}5.5 and 11. Addition of fulvic acid produces a small increase in U(VI) sorption at pH < 5; in contrast, between pH 5 and 10 fulvic acid, citric acid, and EDTA all decrease U(VI) sorption. This suggests that fulvic acid enhances U(VI) sorption slightly via formation of ternary ligand bridges at low pH, whereas EDTA and citric acid do not form ternary surface complexes with the U(VI), and that all three ligands, as well as carbonate, form aqueous uranyl complexes that keep U(VI) in solution at higher pH.

  18. Dom João VI's death: convulsions and coma Morte de Dom João VI: convulsões e coma

    OpenAIRE

    Marleide da Mota Gomes; Rubens Reimão; Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2007-01-01

    Dom João VI's death occurred in adverse political conditions that led to the regicide hypothesis. The main aim of this paper is to mention life style and conditions of the death of the king by means of narrative review based on primary and secondary sources. Dom João VI died in the way of convulsions and gastrointestinal symptoms. This could be the result of the pathological chain of genetic determination, accentuated by the inappropriate life style, obesity and sedentary habits, and/or poiso...

  19. Syringomyelia in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome): imaging findings following bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hite, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Box 292, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krivit, W. [Department of Pediatrics and Institute for Human Genetics, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Haines, S.J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Whitley, C.B. [Department of Pediatrics and Institute for Human Genetics, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We present the imaging findings in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) who developed holocord syringomyelia. This represents the only reported case of syrinx formation in a child with MPS VI. Clinical, neurologic and spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented. The patient has maintained a stable clinical and neurologic course over the period following allogeneic bone marrow transplant. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  20. Syringomyelia in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome): imaging findings following bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the imaging findings in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) who developed holocord syringomyelia. This represents the only reported case of syrinx formation in a child with MPS VI. Clinical, neurologic and spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented. The patient has maintained a stable clinical and neurologic course over the period following allogeneic bone marrow transplant. (orig.). With 3 figs

  1. Functionalised MnVI-nanoparticles: an advanced high-valent magnetic catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Saikat Khamarui; Yasmin Saima; Laha, Radha M.; Subhadeep Ghosh; Dilip K. Maiti

    2015-01-01

    We discover MnVI-nanoparticles (NPs) bearing functional groups, high oxidation state, strong electron affinity, unique redox and paramagnetic nature, which opens up a new avenue to catalysis, magnetism and material application. However, its synthesis is challenging and remains unexplored because of associated serious difficulties. A simple benign synthetic strategy is devised to fabricate the high-valent NPs using mild reducing agent bromide, which transformed MnVII to valuable MnVI-species. ...

  2. ViZPar: A GUI for ZPar with Manual Feature Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Isabel; Ballesteros Martínez, Miguel; Zhang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Phrase-structure and dependency parsers are used massively in the Natural Language Processing community. ZPar implements fast and accurate versions of shift-reduce dependency and phrase-structure parsing algorithms. We present ViZPar, a tool that enhances the usability of ZPar, including parameter selection and output visualization. Moreover, ViZPar allows manual feature selection which makes the tool very useful for people interested in obtaining the best parser through feature engineering, ...

  3. Applications of Ferrate(VI) to Wastewater Reclamation and Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Choi, H.; Lee, K.; Nam, J.; Kim, I.

    2010-12-01

    The estimated amount of water resources is about 63 billion cubic meters in Korea. However, due to the lack of precipitation during the dry season, natural flows are not enough for the water supply. In addition, since the lack of water affects water quality, environmental problems are occurred in natural and social systems. In this study, we investigated the application feasibility of ferrate(VI) systems to water and wastewater treatment. And we'd like to suggest an alternative solution for conservation and efficient reuse of the limited water resources. In the research area of environmental applications, a primary interest has been focused to the power of ferrate(VI) systems in the decomposition of pollutants in wastewater and industrial effluents due to its potential use as a strong, relatively non-toxic, and oxidizing agent for diverse environmental contaminants. Also ferrate(VI) has additional advantages as a very efficient coagulant and a sorbent of pollutants. We have analysed and compared several ferrate(VI) manufacturing processes, especially focused on the electro chemical methods(Fig. 1). And we have investigated the applications of the manufactured ferrate(VI) in our own laboratory and the commercial ferrate(VI) to decomposition of persistent organic pollutants in water. Under optimal conditions, the removal efficiencies of 2-chlorophenol and benzothiophene were above 90%(Fig. 2). The ferrate system(VI) is promising and can be one of the most efficient alternatives among the advanced oxidation processes(AOPs) for degradation of persistent organic pollutants, and is an innovative technology for the wastewater reclamation, water reusing systems, and water treatment systems. Fig 1. Comparison of Electro-Chemical Ferrate(VI) manufacturing Processes Fig 2. Degradation of 2-Chlorophenol and Bezothiophene by Ferrate. (Experimental Conditions : 2-CP = 3ppm, BT = 5ppm, NaClO4 = 0.05M)

  4. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We...... leather and metal articles. The spot test has the potential to become a valuable screening tool....

  5. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  6. Humic substances extraction, characterization and interaction with U(VI) at Ruprechtov site (CZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervinka, R.; Havlova, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) plc, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic). Waste Disposal Dept.; Stamberg, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering; Noseck, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The extent of complexation between natural humic acid (HA) and uranium(VI) has been investigated at the Ruprechtov natural analogue site, Czech Republic. Natural HA was extracted from the clay sediments enriched by organic matter and then characterized for their elemental composition, UV/Vis and infrared spectroscopic properties, exchange capacity and protonation constants. Moreover, the reference sample HA-leonardite was selected and studied for comparison. Complexation between natural HA and U(VI) was studied using the cation exchange technique at pH 5-6. The experimental work was focused on study dependence of U(VI) complexation with HA: (i) on the concentration of HA 1-40 mg/l, and (ii) on the concentration of U(VI) 1 x 10{sup -5}-1 x 10{sup -7} M. The charge neutralization model (CNM) was used for evaluation of the experimental data, modified in a way, that the total charge was divided among the individual U(VI) species in solution under given conditions. The stability constant value was determined to be log {beta} = 4.32 {+-} 0.50, LC=50-60%, being independent on the HA concentration at U(VI) concentrations of 1 x 10{sup -4} M. On the other hand, a dependence on the stability constant for the different U(VI) concentrations was observed. At close to real conditions of the site (U(VI) = 1 x 10{sup -7} M and mHA = 5 mg/l) the stability constant log {beta}=6.16, LC=50.3-52.7%. (orig.)

  7. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  8. CHROMIUM (VI ADSORPTION ONTO ACTIVATED KRAFT LIGNIN PRODUCED FROM ALFA GRASS (STIPA TENACISSIMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassima Tazrouti

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Activated lignin having a surface area of 1023 m2 g-1 has been prepared from sulfate lignin that was treated by 30% H2O2 and carbonized at 300 °C in order to test the chromium (VI adsorption from aqueous solution. The influence of contact time, pH, initial concentrations of adsorbent and adsorbate, and temperature on the adsorption capacity were investi-gated. The maximum removal of Cr(VI was found to be 92.36 % at pH=2 and a contact time of 80 min. Optimal concentration of lignin and Cr(VI were found to be 3.8 g L-1 and 180 mg L-1, respectively. The adsorption kinetics data fitted well with a pseudo-second-order equation, and the rate of removal of chromium was found to speed up with increasing temperature. Activation energy for the adsorption process was found to be 18.19 kJ mol-1. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the isotherm and isotherm constants for the adsorption of Cr (VI on lignin. These constants and correlation coefficients of the isotherm models were calculated and compared. Results indicated that Cr (VI uptake could be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm of Cr (VI on lignin was 75.75 mg g-1 at 40°C. The dimensionless equilibrium parameter (RL signified a favorable adsorption of Cr (VI on lignin and was found to be between 0.0601 and 0.818 (0VI from waste water.

  9. Localization and mobility of synaptic vesicles in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kisiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ, synaptic vesicles are mobile; however, the mechanisms that regulate vesicle traffic at the nerve terminal are not fully understood. Myosin VI has been shown to be important for proper synaptic physiology and morphology at the NMJ, likely by functioning as a vesicle tether. Here we investigate vesicle dynamics in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila. RESULTS: In Drosophila, Myosin VI is encoded by the gene, jaguar (jar. To visualize active vesicle cycling we used FM dye loading and compared loss of function alleles of jar with controls. These studies revealed a differential distribution of vesicles at the jar mutant nerve terminal, with the newly endocytosed vesicles observed throughout the mutant boutons in contrast to the peripheral localization visualized at control NMJs. This finding is consistent with a role for Myosin VI in restraining vesicle mobility at the synapse to ensure proper localization. To further investigate regulation of vesicle dynamics by Myosin VI, FRAP analysis was used to analyze movement of GFP-labeled synaptic vesicles within individual boutons. FRAP revealed that synaptic vesicles are moving more freely in the jar mutant boutons, indicated by changes in initial bleach depth and rapid recovery of fluorescence following photobleaching. CONCLUSION: This data provides insights into the role for Myosin VI in mediating synaptic vesicle dynamics at the nerve terminal. We observed mislocalization of actively cycling vesicles and an apparent increase in vesicle mobility when Myosin VI levels are reduced. These observations support the notion that a major function of Myosin VI in the nerve terminal is tethering synaptic vesicles to proper sub-cellular location within the bouton.

  10. Synthesis and application of magnetic hydrogel for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Samuel C N

    2010-11-01

    Many magnetic adsorbents reported in the literature, such as iron oxides, for Cr(VI) removal have been found effective only in low pH environments. Moreover, the application of polymeric hydrogels on heavy metal removal has been hindered by difficulties in separation by filtration. In this study, a magnetic cationic hydrogel was synthesized for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water, making use of the advantages of magnetic adsorbents and polymeric hydrogels. The magnetic hydrogel was produced by imbedding 10-nm γ-Fe2O 3 nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix via radical polymerization. Characterization of the hydrogel was undertaken with Fourier transform infrared and vibrating sample magnetometer; swelling properties were tested and anionic adsorption capacity was evaluated. The magnetic hydrogel showed a superior Cr(VI) removal capacity compared to commercial products such as MIEX®. Cr(VI) removal was independent of solution pH. Results show that Cr(VI) removal kinetics was improved drastically by grinding the bulk hydrogel into powder form. At relevant concentrations, common water anions (e.g., Cl-, SO4 2-, PO4 3-) and natural organic matter did not exhibit significant inhibition of Cr(VI) adsorption onto the hydrogel. Results of vibrating sample magnetometer indicate that the magnetic hydrogel can be easily separated from treatment systems. Regeneration of the magnetic hydrogel can be easily achieved by washing the Cr(VI)-loaded hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl solution, with a recovery rate of about 90% of Cr(VI). © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2010.

  11. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  12. SPESIASI Cr(III) DAN Cr(VI) PADA LIMBAH CAIR INDUSTRI ELEKTROPLATING

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Windy Dwiasi; Dwi Kartika

    2008-01-01

    Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in wastewater have been widely investigated. The species of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in wastewater samples were determined by UV – Vis Spectrometry and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). The method described is based upon the spectrophotometric determination of the magenta chromagen (λmax = 545 nm) formed when 1,5-diphenylcarbazide reacts with hexavalent chromium in sulphuric acid solution. Hexavalent chromium are determined by a calibration curve technique. The ...

  13. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  14. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2015-01-28

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  15. Prevention of chromium(VI) formation by improving the tannery processes

    OpenAIRE

    Font Vallès, Joaquim; Rius Carrasco, Antoni; Marsal Monge, Agustín; Hauber, Christiane; Tommaselli, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This work has been funded by the European Commission through the Chrom6less Project (CRAFT -1999-71638). The objectives of the project were: - Establishment of the analytical methodology which provided reproducible results that may be free of interferences. - Identification of the factors that facilitated or impeded the transformation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). - Establishment of the best conditions that allowed the production of chromium(VI) free leather, even during the l...

  16. Tuegræs - så slap vi af med det

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl

    2010-01-01

    Som så mange andre golfklubber kæmper vi på Hornbæk golfbane også med tuegræs-områder der kraftigt forstyrrer golfspillet. Sidste år valgte vi at gå drastisk til værks i et forsøg på at løse problemet....

  17. Vi ved for lidt om danske børn, der er opvokset med specifikke sprogforstyrrelser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen de Lopez, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    Et barn, der lider af sprogforstyrrelser, føler sig ofte svigtet af omverdenen. I Danmark har vi hidtil ikke haft mulighed for at hjælpe, men nu er basale redskaber under udvikling......Et barn, der lider af sprogforstyrrelser, føler sig ofte svigtet af omverdenen. I Danmark har vi hidtil ikke haft mulighed for at hjælpe, men nu er basale redskaber under udvikling...

  18. New low cost sorbents for Cr(VI – batch and column experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šillerová H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of agricultural byproducts and industrial biowaste materials has been shown to be an attractive technique for removing Cr(VI from contaminated waste waters. In this study, used brewers draff, peat moss, sawdust, grape stalks and husks were investigated as novel biosorbents for Cr(VI. The material was tested in two different modifications. The material was dried, cut and sieved and part of it was subjected to acid (2 M H2SO4 and alkali (0.5 M NaOH pre-treatments to remove starch, proteins and sugars. Fourier transform infrared rays analysis on solid phase (FTIR-ATR was used to determine the main functional groups that might control the metal uptake. Batch experiments were performed at different pH values (3, 4.5, 6 and at various initial concentration of Cr(VI (25–2012;250 mg L−1. Two equilibrium empirical models, Langmuir and Freundlich, were used to describe Cr(VI adsorption. In order to identify possible reduction processes, ion exchange separation on the AG1-X8 resin was used to separate the anionic Cr(VI and the reduced cationic Cr(III from the aqueous phase after biosorption. As expected, Cr(VI removal was pH-dependent and fitted well both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The ion exchange separation showed that Cr(VI reduction had occurred in the solution during biosorption. The efficiency of draff as a biosorbent was comparable (or even higher to highly organic materials (e.g., composted peat showing its potential application for Cr(VI decontamination.

  19. Reversion Of Disused Fishpond Lease Agreement Areas To Mangrove Forests In Region VI, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Alice Joan G. Ferrer; Jinky C. Hopanda; Michael Q. Orquejo; Alan Dino E. Moscoso; Resurreccion B. Sadaba

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on evaluating the reversion of disused Fishpond Lease Agreement areas in Region VI (Western Visayas), Philippines to mangrove forests. The rehabilitation and restoration of mangrove areas are important given the substantial decline of mangrove forests in the country, particularly in Region VI. The study used a two-stage and five-step evaluation process. The first stage assessed the processes of Fishpond Lease Agreement (FLA) cancellation and reversion of jurisdiction over d...

  20. Genesis of Cr(VI) in Sri Lankan soils and its adsorptive removal by calcined gibbsite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, A. U.; Wijesundara, D. M.; Vithanage, M. S.; Ok, Y. S.

    2012-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium is highly toxic to biota and considered as a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. In addition, weathering of ultramafic rocks rich in chromium, such as serpentine, is known to Cr(VI) sources into natural water. The Cr(III) is the most stable in the environment, however, conversion of Cr(III) into Cr(VI) occurs in soil due to presence of naturally occurring minerals such as manganese dioxides. We investigated the amount of Cr(VI) recorded from the soils from anthropogenically and naturally contaminated soils (serpentine soils) in Sri Lanka and the removal efficacy of Cr(VI) by calcined gibbsite (Al oxides). The effect of pH on Cr(VI) adsorption was determined by adjusting the pH in the range of 4-10. In the experiments, the adsorbent concentration was kept at 1 g/l of solution containing 10 mg/l Cr(VI) at 25 0C. Total chromium recorded were around 11,000 mg kg-1 and 6,000 mg kg-1 for serpentine soil and tannery waste-contaminated soil, respectively. Although total Cr was high in the contaminated soils, Cr(VI) concentration was only about 28 mg kg-1 and 210 mg kg-1 in the serpentine and tannery soils, respectively. The calcined gibbsite has maximum adsorption of 85 % around pH 4 and adsorption generally decreased with increase of pH.

  1. Formation of stable uranium(VI) colloidal nanoparticles in conditions relevant to radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Pieter; Morris, Katherine; Hibberd, Rosemary; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Brown, Andy P; Doutch, James; Smith, Andrew J; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    The favored pathway for disposal of higher activity radioactive wastes is via deep geological disposal. Many geological disposal facility designs include cement in their engineering design. Over the long term, interaction of groundwater with the cement and waste will form a plume of a hyperalkaline leachate (pH 10-13), and the behavior of radionuclides needs to be constrained under these extreme conditions to minimize the environmental hazard from the wastes. For uranium, a key component of many radioactive wastes, thermodynamic modeling predicts that, at high pH, U(VI) solubility will be very low (nM or lower) and controlled by equilibrium with solid phase alkali and alkaline-earth uranates. However, the formation of U(VI) colloids could potentially enhance the mobility of U(VI) under these conditions, and characterizing the potential for formation and medium-term stability of U(VI) colloids is important in underpinning our understanding of U behavior in waste disposal. Reflecting this, we applied conventional geochemical and microscopy techniques combined with synchrotron based in situ and ex situ X-ray techniques (small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS)) to characterize colloidal U(VI) nanoparticles in a synthetic cement leachate (pH > 13) containing 4.2-252 μM U(VI). The results show that in cement leachates with 42 μM U(VI), colloids formed within hours and remained stable for several years. The colloids consisted of 1.5-1.8 nm nanoparticles with a proportion forming 20-60 nm aggregates. Using XAS and electron microscopy, we were able to determine that the colloidal nanoparticles had a clarkeite (sodium-uranate)-type crystallographic structure. The presented results have clear and hitherto unrecognized implications for the mobility of U(VI) in cementitious environments, in particular those associated with the geological disposal of nuclear waste.

  2. Elemental sulfur amendment decreases bio-available Cr-VI in soils impacted by leather tanneries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingjing; Chen, Hualin; Arocena, Joselito M; Whitcombe, Todd; Thring, Ronald W; Memiaghe, Jeff Nze

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the potential use of elemental S (S(0)) to convert Cr-VI to Cr-III which should decrease the bio-availability hence, toxicity of Cr-VI in soils. The bio-available fraction of Cr in soil was measured by phosphate buffer extraction (PBE) and the results showed that the fraction is about 10% of the total Cr-VI and varied from 12.8 to 42.5 mg kg(-1). The addition of 4.0 mg g(-1) S(0) decreased PBE Cr-VI to <0.4 mg kg(-1) limit established for Cr-VI toxicity in soils. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and micro-XRD revealed that Cr-III was the dominant species (99% of total Cr) and Cr was retained by hematite and goethite in soil. Fe-containing minerals may have provided sufficient protection to render the dominant Cr-III species biochemically inert to redox processes in soils. It is concluded that S(0)amendment is a promising approach to remediate Cr-VI contaminated soils. PMID:26840517

  3. Foundry sands as low-cost adsorbent material for Cr (VI) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I; Alvarez, J A; Villar, P; Pascual, A; Herrero, L

    2013-01-01

    The potential of foundry sands, industrial waste from the iron foundry industry, was evaluated for the removal of Cr (VI) using discontinuous assays. Chemical foundry sands are composed of fine silica sand, furanic resins as binder, chemical catalyst and residual iron particles. The influence ofpH, agitation rate and metal concentration on the removal process was investigated. Kinetic and equilibrium tests were conducted to determine Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solutions at a temperature range of 25-55 degrees C. Cr (VI) removal of 40-100% for a range of pH 6-1.6 was obtained. This removal was attributed to the presence of a large number of protonated silanol and aluminol groups. Cr (VI) adsorption in foundry sands follows a pseudo-second-order kinetic reaction (Ho model, r2 > 0.999) reaching kinetic constants of 0.341, 0.551, 0.775 and 0.920 g/mg h at 25, 35, 45 and 55 degrees C, respectively. The adsorption data were fitted to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (r > 0.99) obtaining adsorption capacities (q(max)) of 1.99, 2.40, 2.50, and 3.14 mg Cr (VI)/g sand at 25, 35, 45 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Calculated Gibbs free energy change (deltaG0), adsorption energy (E) and activation energy (E(a)) values indicate that a physisorption mechanism governs Cr (VI) adsorption process in foundry sands. PMID:24191460

  4. One-step fabrication of amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for uranium(VI) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Wang, Xianbiao; Chen, Changlun

    2016-06-15

    Amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite (AMGO), a good sorbent for U(VI), was fabricated and characterized. The AMGO was applied as a magnetic sorbent for the U(VI) removal from aqueous solutions. The AMGO can be easily recovered from the solution with the magnetic separation within one minute. The kinetic data were well-described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The Langmuir model fitted the sorption isotherm data better than the Freundlich model. The maximum sorption capacity of the AMGO for U(VI) was 141.2mg/g, displaying a high efficiency for the removal of U(VI). It was found that the U(VI) sorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange. The thermodynamic parameters illustrated that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. In addition, the excellent reproducibility indicate that the AMGO can be used as a potential sorbent for removal of U(VI) from large volumes of aqueous solution. PMID:27016915

  5. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engeneering; Roden, E.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2007-07-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  6. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  7. Biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_Arthrobacter species

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, E; Gurielidze, M

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis and Arthrobacter oxidas) was studied simultaneous application dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. Also biosorption of Cr(VI) in the presence of Zn(II) during growth of Arthrobacter species and Cr(III) in the presence of Mn(II) were discussed. Comparative Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species shown, that Cr(III) was more effectively adsorbed by both bacterium than Cr(VI). The adsorption capacity is the same for both the Chromium-Arthrobacter systems. The biosorption constants for Cr(III) is higher than for Cr(VI) 5.7-5.9- fold for both species. Comparative Freundlich biosorption characteristics Cr(VI) Arthrobacter species of living and dry cells shown, that capacity(n) is in both cases the same(1.25,1.35). Dry cells have larger biosorption constant for both species, than living cells. Biosorption characteristics (K) and (n) for A. oxidas are without Mn(II) and in the presence of Mn(II) 2.6 x 10-4 (K), 1.37 (n) and 2...

  8. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of imidazole-modified silica for chromium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhike, E-mail: wzk@htu.cn; Ye, Cunling; Wang, Xueyuan; Li, Juan

    2013-12-15

    Imidazole-modified silica adsorbent with chloride as counter ion (SilprIm-Cl) was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscope, infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and BET analysis. The adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions onto the SilprIm-Cl was investigated at varying pH, contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent amount and temperature. The experimental results showed that the modification of silica with imidazole enhanced significantly the adsorption capacity for Cr(VI). The SilprIm-Cl was of primary anion-exchange adsorption nature, pH and excess Cl{sup −} ions in solutions affected significantly the adsorption of chromium(VI). The adsorption isotherms would be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) of 47.79 mg g{sup −1} with an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 150 mg L{sup −1} was achieved at pH of 2.0. The adsorption–desorption experiments of the SilprIm-Cl exhibited that the adsorbent could be regenerated and reused eight times at least by simple washings with NaCl and water in turn.

  9. Speciation of Cr(VI) in environmental samples in the vicinity of the ferrochrome smelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedumedi, Hilda N; Mandiwana, Khakhathi L; Ngobeni, Prince; Panichev, Nikolay

    2009-12-30

    The impact of ferrochrome smelter on the contamination of its environment with toxic hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), was assessed by analyzing smelter dusts, soil, grass and tree barks. For the separation of Cr(VI) from Cr(III), solid samples were treated with 0.1M Na(2)CO(3) and filtered through hydrophilic PDVF 0.45 microm filter prior to the determination of Cr(VI) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Ferrochrome smelter dust was found to contain significant levels of Cr(VI), viz. 43.5 microg g(-1) (cyclone dust), 2710 microg g(-1) (fine dust), and 7800 microg g(-1) (slimes dust) which exceeded the maximum acceptable risk concentration (20 microg g(-1)). The concentration of Cr(VI) in environmental samples of grass (3.4+/-0.2), soil (7.7+/-0.2), and tree bark (11.8+/-1.2) collected in the vicinity of the chrome smelter were higher as compared with the same kind of samples collected from uncontaminated area. The results of the investigation show that ferrochrome smelter is a source of environmental pollution with contamination factors of Cr(VI) ranging between 10 and 50.

  10. Speciation of Cr(VI) in environmental samples in the vicinity of the ferrochrome smelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedumedi, Hilda N. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa); Mandiwana, Khakhathi L., E-mail: MandiwanaKL@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa); Ngobeni, Prince; Panichev, Nikolay [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2009-12-30

    The impact of ferrochrome smelter on the contamination of its environment with toxic hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), was assessed by analyzing smelter dusts, soil, grass and tree barks. For the separation of Cr(VI) from Cr(III), solid samples were treated with 0.1 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and filtered through hydrophilic PDVF 0.45 {mu}m filter prior to the determination of Cr(VI) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Ferrochrome smelter dust was found to contain significant levels of Cr(VI), viz. 43.5 {mu}g g{sup -1} (cyclone dust), 2710 {mu}g g{sup -1} (fine dust), and 7800 {mu}g g{sup -1} (slimes dust) which exceeded the maximum acceptable risk concentration (20 {mu}g g{sup -1}). The concentration of Cr(VI) in environmental samples of grass (3.4 {+-} 0.2), soil (7.7 {+-} 0.2), and tree bark (11.8 {+-} 1.2) collected in the vicinity of the chrome smelter were higher as compared with the same kind of samples collected from uncontaminated area. The results of the investigation show that ferrochrome smelter is a source of environmental pollution with contamination factors of Cr(VI) ranging between 10 and 50.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Guha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae, commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05 potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+ and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05 positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cell damage.

  12. Inhibition of bone resorption by Tanshinone VI isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Nicolin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, a more detailed knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in osteoclastogenesis has driven research efforts in the development and screening of compound libraries of several small molecules that specifically inhibit the pathway involved in the commitment of the osteoclast precursor cells. Natural compounds that suppress osteoclast differentiation may have therapeutic value in treating osteoporosis and other bone erosive diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or metastasis associated with bone loss. In ongoing investigation into anti-osteoporotic compounds from natural products we have analyzed the effect of Tanshinone VI on osteoclasts differentiation, using a physiologic three-dimensional osteoblast/bone marrow model of cell co-culture. Tanshinone VI is an abietane diterpene extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Labiatae, a Chinese traditional crude drug, ‘’Tan-Shen’’. Tashinone has been widely used in clinical practice for the prevention of cardiac diseases, arthritis and other inflammation-related disorders based on its pharmacological actions in multiple tissues. Although Tanshinone VI A has been used as a medicinal agent in the treatment of many diseases, its role in osteoclast-related bone diseases remains unknown. We showed previously that Tanshinone VI greatly inhibits osteoclast differentiation and suppresses bone resorption through disruption of the actin ring; subsequently, we intended to examine the precise inhibitory mechanism of Tanshinone VI on osteoclast differentiating factor. This study shows, for the first time, that Tanshinone VI prevents osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting RANKL expression and NFkB induction.

  13. "Involvement of metabolic reactive intermediate Cr (IV in Chromium (VI cytotoxic effects "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourahmad J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Addition of Cr VI (dichromate to isolated rat hepatocytes results in rapid glutathione oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and lysosomal membrane rupture before hepatocyte lysis occurred. Cytotoxicity was prevented by ROS scavengers, antioxidants, and glutamine (ATP generator. Hepatocyte dichlorofluorescin oxidation to dichlorofluorescein (DCF to determine ROS formation was inhibited by mannitol (a hydroxyl radical scavenger or butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene (antioxidants. The Cr VI reductive mechanism required for toxicity is not known. Cytochrome P450 inhibitors, Particularly CYP 2E1 inhibitors, but not inhibitors of DT diaphorase or glutathione reductase also prevented cytotoxicity. This suggests that P450 reductase and/or reduced cytochrome P450 contributes to Cr VI reduction to Cr IV. Glutathione depleted hepatocytes were resistant to Cr (VI toxicity and much less dichlorofluorescin oxidation occurred. Reduction of dichromate by glutathione or cysteine in vitro was also accompanied by oxygen uptake and was inhibited by Mn II (a Cr IV reductant. Cr VI induced cytotoxicity and ROS formation was also inhibited by Mn II, which suggests that, Cr IV and Cr IV GSH mediate "ROS" formation in isolated hepatocytes. In conclusion Cr VI cytotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial/lysosomal toxicity by the metabolic reactive intermediate Cr IV and “ROS”.

  14. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  15. Characteristics of Amine Surfactant Modified Peanut Shell and Its Sorption Property for Cr(VI)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳敏; 张猛; 刘斌; 许醒; 李小明; 岳钦艳; 马春元

    2013-01-01

    Modified peanut shell (MPS) was prepared by amination reaction with peanut shell (PS) as the starting material. The sorption of Cr(VI) oxyanions on MPS in static and column tests were investigated. In addition, the sorption isotherm and kinetic models were applied to confirm the sorption capacity and the sorption mechanisms. BET surface area analysis showed the physicochemical characteristics of the samples. The results of zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectra analysis illustrated that chemical adsorption and ion ex-change are the potential sorption mechanism. The static sorption test showed that the maximum sorption capacity (qmax) of MPS for Cr(VI) increased with temperature, which indicated that the Cr(VI) sorption process was endo-thermic. The saturated sorption capacity of Cr(VI) in the column sorption test was 138.34 mg·g-1, which accounted for 93.9%of the qmax at 25 °C. The regeneration capacity of MPS was evaluated using HCl solution as an eluent. The high regeneration efficiency (82.6%) validated the dominance of the ion exchange mechanism in the Cr(VI) sorption process with Cl-ions displacing Cr(VI) oxyanion on MPS. The Langmuir isotherm model showed a higher correlation coefficient than the other adsorption isotherm models. And in the kinetic study, a pseudo-second-order model fit the data best.

  16. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Alok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter. Materials and Methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI were considered as Cr resistant. Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30oC. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei. Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI.

  17. Molybdenum(VI) removal by using constructed wetlands with different filter media and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, J J; Xu, S G; Zhang, Y M; Han, C W

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and capacity of vertical-flow wetland filters on molybdenum (Mo) removal from wastewater was examined, employing reed (Phragmites australis) and cattail (Typha latifolia) as well as different adsorption granular media. Humus, cinder, modified cinder, as well as pyrite were used as filter media. A synthetic effluent with different concentrations of Mo(VI) at different hydraulic retention times was used for simulating Mo leached mine wastewater. Laboratory experiments showed that the equilibrium adsorption data were in agreement with the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum Mo(VI) adsorption capacities of modified cinder and pyrite were 10.01 and 6.25 mg/g, respectively. Mo(VI) removal in F5 (combination substrates of pyrite and cinder) was found to be more stable and effective than that of F1 (conventional gravel and soil filter media) during the 14-week experiment. Most of the Mo(VI) was retained in the 10-20 cm of the substrate, and adsorbed by the modified cinder and pyrite. The largest fraction of Mo(VI) retained was the water-soluble fraction on the surface of the pyrite. Cattail was more suitable for Mo(VI) absorption than reed, but the bioaccumulation accounted for a very small portion of the total removal.

  18. Phylogeny of mycoplasmalike organisms (phytoplasmas): a basis for their classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, D E; Lee, I M; Rehner, S A; Davis, R E; Kingsbury, D T

    1994-09-01

    A global phylogenetic analysis using parsimony of 16S rRNA gene sequences from 46 mollicutes, 19 mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) (new trivial name, phytoplasmas), and several related bacteria placed the MLOs definitively among the members of the class Mollicutes and revealed that MLOs form a large discrete monophyletic clade, paraphyletic to the Acholeplasma species, within the Anaeroplasma clade. Within the MLO clade resolved in the global mollicutes phylogeny and a comprehensive MLO phylogeny derived by parsimony analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences from 30 diverse MLOs representative of nearly all known distinct MLO groups, five major phylogenetic groups with a total of 11 distinct subclades (monophyletic groups or taxa) could be recognized. These MLO subclades (roman numerals) and designated type strains were as follows: i, Maryland aster yellows AY1; ii, apple proliferation AP-A; iii, peanut witches'-broom PnWB; iv, Canada peach X CX; v, rice yellow dwarf RYD; vi, pigeon pea witches'-broom PPWB; vii, palm lethal yellowing LY; viii, ash yellows AshY; ix, clover proliferation CP; x, elm yellows EY; and xi, loofah witches'-broom LfWB. The designations of subclades and their phylogenetic positions within the MLO clade were supported by a congruent phylogeny derived by parsimony analyses of ribosomal protein L22 gene sequences from most representative MLOs. On the basis of the phylogenies inferred in the present study, we propose that MLOs should be represented taxonomically at the minimal level of genus and that each phylogenetically distinct MLO subclade identified should represent at least a distinct species under this new genus. PMID:8071198

  19. Natural hazards in the karst areas of the Viñales National Park, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govea Blanco, Darlenys; Farfan Gonzalez, Hermes; Dias Guanche, Carlos; Parise, Mario; Ramirez, Robert

    2010-05-01

    discharges have been mapped on the basis of the outcomes from inquiries carried out in the villages of the area, and of the documentation recorded in the Viñales National Park archives since the time of its foundation in year 2000. Slope movements in karst are quite difficult to map and survey, given the wilderness of the area. Thus, different methodologies were applied at this aim. Mass movements were mapped by using the PNUMA-FAO method, that allows to map the erosional features based upon a matrix analysis, and the results were checked in the field, and processed by means of GIS. As before mentioned, natural hazards from meteorological events are the most dangerous, even because of the peculiar characters of karst landforms, and the hydrologic recharge of karst territories. For instance, arrival of waters from allochtonous, non karst, territories has a great influence on the overall amount of water that is present in karst, both at the surface and underground, and the discharge from karst springs or rivers is strongly dependant upon such waters. Many caves are also conditioned by the presence of water, and periodically may become flooded, especially when located at the mountain or mogote foothills, well within the areas morelikely to be inundated. At the same time, flood occurrence greatly affects the anthropogenic activities, and is often at the origin of the main damage recorded to man and the human society. The other cited natural hazards are by far less disruptive to man, and cause minor damage when compared to floods. This because the great majority of mass movements and erosional phenomena have to be registered in sectors where the presence of man and his activities is much lower, so that economic activities are less affected; lightnings, on the other hand, are at the origin of wildfires generally limited to the highest peaks and mogotes (residual hills and ridges in Cuban tropical karst), once again rarely affecting man's activities.

  20. Recovery of U(Vi) with unexpanded perlite; Recuperacion de U(VI) con perlita no expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas J, A.K.; Davila R, J. I.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: cuja2105@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Perlite is a glass volcanic rock that is hydrated by the addition of water during its formation. Is a natural material widely used in the chemical and construction industries, but recently beginning to be studied their adsorptive properties. In this paper the adsorption capacity of unexpanded perlite to remove U(Vi) in aqueous solution depending on the grain size of the material was investigated, as well as the contact time between the liquid and solid phases, ph of solution and initial concentration of uranium. The adsorption was dependent on the surface area of the material, recovering higher uranium percentage to smaller particle size. Meanwhile kinetics showed that the uranium adsorption is rapid, reaching equilibrium in 1 h. Adsorption to slightly acidic conditions was favored but dropped dramatically to ph highly acidic and basic; at a concentration of 1 x 10{sup -3} M UO{sub 2}{sup +2} the maximum uranium recovery was 46% at ph 6. In dilute solutions (1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} M) the adsorption percentage reached values between 34 and 42%, but was reduced to 1% at a concentration of 1 x 10{sup -2} M. (Author)

  1. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H2O2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO3]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H2O2]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H2O2]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO3] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  2. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir, E-mail: amir.karton@uwa.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L{sup α} two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}.

  3. ASA conference on radiation and health, Coolfont VI: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1986 ASA Conference on Radiation and Health (Coolfont VI) continued the procedure established in 1981 of holding forenoon and evening sessions, leaving afternoons free for discussion and relaxation. One exception was made this year in that Michael and Marie Stoline were invited to discuss the Chernobyl Disaster on Monday afternoon. The program consisted of the following topics: a general overview of radiation and health problems; cytogenetics and radiation (human and animal studies and statistical analysis of dose-response curves); uranium and health effects, including continuing emphasis on radon, which has attracted considerable national interest lately; epidemiologic studies of workers at nuclear power plants and an uranium processing plant; the latest assessment of atomic bomb dosimetry. These Coolfont Conferences provide an excellent environment for an interchange of ideas and information in an assemblage of scientists from a variety of disciplines. Unfortunately there is one important factor which limits this interchange: language. In order to overcome the difficulty of statisticians understanding nuclear scientists and nuclear scientists understanding statisticians, I suggested one of two procedures: each group prepare a set of commonly used terms with definitions which would be understood by the other group(s); have an introductory session in which each group attempts to explain its language to the other group(s). This problem of communication is even more serious when scientists attempt to explain their research efforts to the general public. The Coolfont Conferences on Radiation and Health should be ideal forums for development of a language which could be understood by the general public as well as different scientific groups. This document contains the abstracts of 12 presented papers

  4. ViSUS: Visualization Streams for Ultimate Scalability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, V

    2005-02-14

    In this project we developed a suite of progressive visualization algorithms and a data-streaming infrastructure that enable interactive exploration of scientific datasets of unprecedented size. The methodology aims to globally optimize the data flow in a pipeline of processing modules. Each module reads a multi-resolution representation of the input while producing a multi-resolution representation of the output. The use of multi-resolution representations provides the necessary flexibility to trade speed for accuracy in the visualization process. Maximum coherency and minimum delay in the data-flow is achieved by extensive use of progressive algorithms that continuously map local geometric updates of the input stream into immediate updates of the output stream. We implemented a prototype software infrastructure that demonstrated the flexibility and scalability of this approach by allowing large data visualization on single desktop computers, on PC clusters, and on heterogeneous computing resources distributed over a wide area network. When processing terabytes of scientific data, we have achieved an effective increase in visualization performance of several orders of magnitude in two major settings: (i) interactive visualization on desktop workstations of large datasets that cannot be stored locally; (ii) real-time monitoring of a large scientific simulation with negligible impact on the computing resources available. The ViSUS streaming infrastructure enabled the real-time execution and visualization of the two LLNL simulation codes (Miranda and Raptor) run at Supercomputing 2004 on Blue Gene/L at its presentation as the fastest supercomputer in the world. In addition to SC04, we have run live demonstrations at the IEEE VIS conference and at invited talks at the DOE MICS office, DOE computer graphics forum, UC Riverside, and the University of Maryland. In all cases we have shown the capability to stream and visualize interactively data stored remotely at the San

  5. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VI. Project Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report VI presents a comprehensive plan for the management of the Breckinridge Project. For the purpose of this report, the project work is divided into five major project phases: Development, Engineering, Procurement, Construction, and Operations. The results of the Development Phase (Initial Effort) of the project are discussed in Section 1.0. This phase of the project was performed under a Cooperative Agreement with US Department of Energy and has produced 43 volumes of documentation. Fifteen volumes contain information of proprietary nature for patented processes and are therefore classified as Limited Access; however, twenty-eight volumes are not classified and are suitable for public dissemination. This Project Management Plan is a volume of the unclassified documentation. The other twenty-seven volumes contain comprehensive data on technical, financial, and environmental aspects of the project. Each of the four remaining project phases is presented starting with the extensive planning that will be performed and continuing through to the execution and completion of each phase. The major roles of the Operator, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI), and the Managing Contractor are defined. Although a contract has not yet been executed with a Managing Contractor, the procedures, controls, organization and management philosophy of Bechtel Petroleum, Inc., are presented in this report as being representative of those used by contractors in the business of performing the engineering, procurement, and construction of projects of this size and complexity. The organizational structures of the Operator and the Managing Contractor are described, with designation of key project team personnel by job description and organization charts. Provisions for cost, schedule, and material control are described.

  6. Cr(VI) retention and transport through Fe(III)-coated natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Breakthrough curves of Cr(VI) from columns packed with raw zeolite (a) and Fe(III)-zeolite (b). The solid line in (b) is the HYDRUS-1D fit to the observed data with adsorption term only, while the dashed line in (b) includes a reduction term in the HYDRUS-1D fit. Highlights: ► Zeolite modified with Fe(III) could be used for adsorption and retention of Cr(VI). ► The Fe present on zeolite was in an amorphous Fe(OH)3 form. ► A Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of 82 mg/kg was found on Fe(III)-zeolite. ► A Cr(VI) retardation factor of 3 or 5 was determined from column and batch studies. - Abstract: Cr(VI) is a group A chemical based on the weight of evidence of carcinogenicity. Its transport and retention in soils and groundwater have been studied extensively. Zeolite is a major component in deposits originated from volcanic ash and tuff after alteration. In this study, zeolite aggregates with the particle size of 1.4–2.4 mm were preloaded with Fe(III). The influence of present Fe(III) on Cr(VI) retention by and transport through zeolite was studied under batch and column experiments. The added Fe(III) resulted in an enhanced Cr(VI) retention by the zeolite with a capacity of 82 mg/kg. The Cr(VI) adsorption on Fe(III)-zeolite followed a pseudo-second order kinetically and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm thermodynamically. Fitting the column experimental data to HYDRUS-1D resulted in a retardation factor of 3 in comparison to 5 calculated from batch tests at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg/L. The results from this study showed that enhanced adsorption and retention of Cr(VI) may happen in soils derived from volcanic ash and tuff that contains significant amounts of zeolite with extensive Fe(III) coating.

  7. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  8. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation

  9. Determination of Design Basis Earthquake ground motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Muneaki [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes principle of determining of Design Basis Earthquake following the Examination Guide, some examples on actual sites including earthquake sources to be considered, earthquake response spectrum and simulated seismic waves. In sppendix of this paper, furthermore, seismic safety review for N.P.P designed before publication of the Examination Guide was summarized with Check Basis Earthquake. (J.P.N.)

  10. 14 CFR 1203.100 - Legal basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...”), and the standards for such classification, are established by the “the Order” (E.O. 12958, 3 CFR, 1996... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Legal basis. 1203.100 Section 1203.100....100 Legal basis. (a) Executive Order 12958 (hereinafter referred to as “the Order”)....

  11. Remoción de Cromo (VI por una Cepa de Paecilomyces sp Resistente a Cromato Removal of Chromium (VI in a Chromate-Resistant Strain of Paecilomyces sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Cárdenas-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó la capacidad de remoción de Cr(VI de una cepa de Paecilomyces sp. Cuando el hongo se incubó en medio mínimo con glucosa y otras fuentes de carbono comerciales y de bajo costo, como azúcar moscabada y piloncillo ó glicerol, en presencia de 50 mg/L de Cr(VI, removió totalmente el Cr(VI. La reducción a Cr(III ocurre en el medio de cultivo después de 7 días de incubación a 28°C, pH 4.0, y un inoculo de 38 mg. El hongo también redujo eficientemente la concentración de Cr(VI a partir de tierra contaminada. Los resultados indican que la cepa de Paecilomyces sp tiene la capacidad de reducir Cr(VI a Cr(III, y por lo tanto puede utilizarse para eliminar la contaminación por Cr(VI.The ability to reduce chromium (VI by a fungal strain of Paecilomyces sp was studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose and other inexpensive commercial carbon sources such as unrefined and brown sugar or glycerol, in the presence of 50 mg/L of Cr(VI, the strain caused complete removal of Cr(VI. The reduction to Cr (III occurs in the growth medium after 7 days of incubation, at 28°C, pH 4.0, and inoculum of 38 mg. Also, the fungi efficiently reduced the concentration of Cr(VI from contaminated soil wastes. The results indicate that the fungal strain of Paecilomyces sp has the capacity of reducing Cr(VI to Cr(III, and therefore it could be useful for the removal of Cr(VI pollution.

  12. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) in sediments of different lithologies collected from Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • U(VI)(aq) mobility can be controlled by stimulating biogeochemical interactions. • Indigenous microbes in varied sediments reduced U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). • Sediment cell numbers and amount of bioavailable Fe(III) could limit this process. - Abstract: The presence of uranium in groundwater at nuclear sites can be controlled by microbial processes. Here we describe the results from stimulating microbial reduction of U(VI) in sediment samples obtained from a nuclear-licensed site in the UK. A variety of different lithology sediments were selected to represent the heterogeneity of the subsurface at a site underlain by glacial outwash deposits and sandstone. The natural sediment microbial communities were stimulated via the addition of an acetate/lactate electron donor mix and were monitored for changes in geochemistry and molecular ecology. Most sediments facilitated the removal of 12 ppm U(VI) during the onset of Fe(III)-reducing conditions; this was reflected by an increase in the proportion of known Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducing species. However U(VI) remained in solution in two sediments and Fe(III)-reducing conditions did not develop. Sequential extractions, addition of an Fe(III)-enrichment culture and most probable number enumerations revealed that a lack of bioavailable iron or low cell numbers of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria may be responsible. These results highlight the potential for stimulation of microbial U(VI)-reduction to be used as a bioremediation strategy at UK nuclear sites, and they emphasise the importance of both site-specific and borehole-specific investigations to be completed prior to implementation

  13. Extraction and transport of uranium (VI) by polymer inclusion membranes incorporating Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) is a commonly used extraction reagent for the separation of uranium from aqueous solutions. Previous work showed the suitability of a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) based on D2EHPA and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) for the extraction and transport of uranium (VI) from sulfate solutions. This study investigates the influence of the main system parameters (i.e. stirring rate, percentage of D2EHPA in the membrane, initial U(VI) concentration, membrane thickness, and concentration of sulfuric acid) on the extraction process. A comprehensive mathematical model, describing the extraction of U(VI), was developed, numerically solved and fitted to the experimental extraction data to determine the values of the extraction constant and the diffusion coefficient of the U(VI)-D2EHPA complex in the membrane. The transport properties of the PVC/D2EHPA PIM have been further improved by adding o-nitrophenyloctyl ether as plasticizer. Fluxes of U(VI) as high as 1.5 x 10-6 mol m-2 S-1 were recorded using a membrane composed of 35% D2EHPA, 10% o-nitrophenyloctyl ether and 55% PVC (m/m) from a solution containing 100 mg L-1 U(VI) in 0.1 mol L-1 H2SO4 into a solution containing 6 mol L-1H2SO4. The effect of the counter-ion on the extraction and back extraction of uranium was also investigated and the membranes were tested for durability over repeated cycles of extraction and back-extraction. It was demonstrated that a 45% D2EHPA and 55% PVC PIM (m/m) allowed U(VI) to be completely separated thermodynamically from a range of common metal cations and kinetically from iron (III). (author)

  14. Collagens VI and XII form complexes mediating osteoblast interactions during osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izu, Yayoi; Ezura, Yoichi; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E; Noda, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Bone formation is precisely regulated by cell-cell communication in osteoblasts. We have previously demonstrated that genetic deletion of Col6a1 or Col12a1 impairs osteoblast connections and/or communication in mice, resulting in bone mass reduction and bone fragility. Mutations of the genes encoding collagen VI cause Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM), which have overlapping phenotypes involving connective tissue and muscle. Recent studies have identified COL12A1 gene mutations in patients with UCMD- and BM-like disorders harboring no COL6 mutations, indicating the shared functions of these collagens in connective tissue homeostasis. The purpose of this investigation has been to test the hypothesis that collagens VI and XII have coordinate regulatory role(s) during bone formation. We analyzed the localization of collagens VI and XII relative to primary osteoblasts during osteogenesis. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that collagens VI and XII colocalized in matrix bridges between adjacent cells during periods when osteoblasts were establishing cell-cell connections. Quantification of cells harboring collagen bridges demonstrated that matrix bridges were composed of collagens VI and XII but not collagen I. Interestingly, matrix bridge formation was impaired in osteoblasts deficient in either Col6a1 or Col12a1, suggesting that both collagens were indispensable for matrix bridge formation. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a functional relationship between collagens VI and XII during osteogenesis and indicate that a complex containing collagens VI and XII is essential for the formation of a communicating cellular network during bone formation. PMID:26753503

  15. Cr(VI) adsorption and reduction by humic acid coated on magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenjun; Cai, Quan; Xu, Wei; Yang, Mingwei; Cai, Yong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; O'Shea, Kevin E

    2014-07-15

    Easily separable humic acid coated magnetite (HA-Fe3O4) nanoparticles are employed for effective adsorption and reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) is effective under acidic, neutral, and basic pH conditions. The chromium adsorption nicely fits the Langmuir isotherm model, and the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous media by HA-Fe3O4 particles follows pseudo-second-order kinetics. Characterization of the Cr-loaded HA-Fe3O4 materials by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) indicates Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) while the valence state of the iron core is unchanged. Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray diffraction measurements also indicate no detectable transformation of the Fe3O4 core occurs during Cr(VI) adsorption and reduction. Thus, suggesting HA on the surface of HA-Fe3O4 is responsible for the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The functional groups associated with HA act as ligands leading to the Cr(III) complex via a coupled reduction-complexation mechanism. Cr K-edge EXAFS demonstrates the Cr(III) in the Cr-loaded HA-Fe3O4 materials has six neighboring oxygen atoms likely in an octahedral geometry with average bond lengths of 1.98 Å. These results demonstrate that easily separable HA-Fe3O4 particles have promising potential for removal and detoxification of Cr(VI) in aqueous media.

  16. Removal of Cr(VI from Aqueous Solution Using Modified Pomegranate Peel : Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. Najim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the utilization of modified pomegrenate peel (MPGP and formaldehyde modified pomegrenate peel (FMPGP as adsorbents for the removal of chromium Cr(VI from aqueous solution. A series of experiments were conducted in a batch system to evaluate the effect of system variables. The effect of pH, initial Cr(VI concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage and temperature were considered. The optimal pH values of Cr(VI removal by MPGP and FMPGP were 2.0 and 3.0 respectively. The time required for equilibrium was found to be about 100 minutes. The initial Cr(VI concentration and adsorbent dosage was found to have large effect on the adsorption of Cr(VI. The maximum uptake capacities were 13.01 and 22.28 mg of Cr(VI per gram of MPGP and FMPGP respectively. Adsorption kinetic data were tested using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption followed a pseudo second order reaction due to the high correlation coefficient and the agreement between the experimental and calculated values of qe.The adsorption may follow intraparticle diffusion as well, due to the highest values of rate constants for the surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models, the higher values of rate constants are related to an improved bonding between Cr(VI ions and adsorbent particle.The Dubinin-radushkevich, Freundlich and Tempkin models were the closest fit for the equilibrium data of MPGP and FMPGP.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety

  18. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngji [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Hyunku [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Her, Namguk [Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, 135-1 Changhari, Kokyungmeon, Young-cheon, Gyeongbuk 770-849 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeomin [University of South Carolina, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Sohn, Jinsik [Kookmin University, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungpyo [Korea University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jaekyung, E-mail: jyoon@kier.re.kr [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO{sub 2} NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO{sub 2} and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO{sub 2} nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  19. As(V)/Cr(VI) pollution control in soils, hemp waste, and other by-products: competitive sorption trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintáns-Fondo, Ana; Ferreira-Coelho, Gustavo; Paradelo-Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2016-10-01

    We study As(V)/Cr(VI) competitive sorption on a forest soil, a vineyard soil, pyritic material, mussel shell, pine bark, oak ash, and hemp waste, adding variable As(V) and Cr(VI) concentrations or displacing each pollutant with the same concentration of the other. When using variable concentrations, As(V) showed more affinity than Cr(VI) for sorption sites on most materials (sorption up to >84 % on oak ash and pyritic material). The only exception was pine bark, with clearly higher Cr(VI) sorption (>90 %) for any Cr(VI)/As(V) concentration added. Regarding the displacement experiments, when As(V) was added and reached sorption equilibrium, the subsequent addition of equal Cr(VI) concentration did not cause relevant As displacement from oak ash and pyritic material, indicating strong As bindings, and/or low competitive effects. When Cr(VI) was added and reached sorption equilibrium, the subsequent addition of equal As(V) concentration caused Cr(VI) displacement from all materials except pine bark, indicating weak Cr bindings. In view of these results, oak ash and the pyritic material could be used to remove As(V) in concentrations as high as 6 mmol L(-1), even in the presence of a wide range of Cr(VI) concentrations, whereas pine bark could be used to remove Cr(VI) concentrations as high as 6 mmol L(-1). The other materials assayed (including hemp waste, studied for the first time as As(V) and Cr(VI) bio-sorbent) cannot be considered appropriate to remove As(V) and/or Cr(VI) from polluted media.

  20. Highly efficient detoxification of Cr(VI) by chitosan–Fe(III) complex: Process and mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cr(VI) detoxification by chitosan–Fe(III) complex was in high efficiency. ► XAFS and XPS were used to decipher the mechanism of Cr(VI) detoxification. ► The -OH on C-6 of chitosan served as an electron donor during Cr(VI) reduction. ► The geometrical arrangement of adsorbed Cr(VI) was similar as Cr(III). ► Mechanism for detoxification of Cr(VI) by chitosan–Fe(III) complex was elucidated. -- Abstract: Metal–biopolymer complexes has recently gained significant attention as an effective adsorbent used for the removal of Cr(VI) from water. Unfortunately, despite increasing research efforts in the field of removal efficiency, whether this kind of complex can reduce Cr(VI) to less-toxic Cr(III) and what are the mechanisms of detoxification processes are still unknown. In this study, despite the highly adsorption efficiency (maximum adsorption capacity of 173.1 mg/g in 10 min), the significant improvement of Cr(VI) reduction by chitosan–Fe(III) complex compared with normal crosslinked chitoan has been demonstrated. In addition, the structure of chitosan–Fe(III) complex and its functional groups concerned with Cr(VI) detoxification have been characterized by the powerful spectroscopic techniques X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS spectra indicated that the primary alcoholic function on C-6 served as an electron donor during Cr(VI) reduction and was oxidized to a carbonyl group. The X-ray adsorption near edge spectra (XANES) of the Cr(VI)-treated chitosan–Fe(III) complex revealed the similar geometrical arrangement of Cr species as that in Cr(III)-bound chitosan–Fe(III). Overall, a possible process and mechanism for highly efficient detoxification of Cr(VI) by chitosan–Fe(III) complex has been elucidate

  1. Surface Reactions Limiting Chromium(VI) Generation from Naturally Derived Chromium(III) Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, D.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium(III)-bearing minerals, commonly found in serpentinite and ultramaphic rocks, are ubiquitous in California soils and along convergent plate boundaries worldwide. Elevated concentrations of carcinogenic Cr(VI) have been measured in groundwater throughout the state, even in aquifers untouched by anthropogenic contamination. In most natural systems, manganese oxides are the only known, kinetically viable, oxidant of Cr(III). Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated a finite capacity of Mn-oxides to generate Cr(VI) before surface alterations inhibit further Cr-oxidation. The extent to which these processes dictate the inhibition, and subsequent regeneration, of Mn-oxidation capacity within structured soils and sediments is not well understood. Here we use artificial soil aggregates made of Fe(III),Cr(III)-hydroxide-coated quartz sand and surrounded by aerated solute flow (pH 8, 30mM HEPES, 10mM HCO3-) to investigate C(VI) generation within ultramafic rock derived sediment and processes inhibiting manganese reactivity. We found that while Cr(VI)-production scaled with Cr-mineral solubility; Cr(VI) effluent concentrations from aggregates of both lower and higher solubility Cr(III)-minerals peaked very soon after reaction with birnessite (within 2 days and 4 days, respectively). Once Cr(VI) production plateaued (t=22 days) aggregate influent was acidified (pH 5, 30mM C2H3O2-). Despite increasing Cr(III) solubility at lower pH, aqueous Cr(VI) production further decreased. A secondary pulse of Cr(VI) generation was seen only after the surrounding solute returned to initial conditions (pH 8). As with the initial pulse, Cr(VI) concentration scaled with mineral solubility. Collectively, our results demonstrate the extent that natural fluctuations in groundwater composition, both as a result of irrigation or precipitation events, have the potential to both regenerate and inhibit Mn-oxide surfaces. These synthetic soil aggregates provide insight into how fluctuating

  2. Biochemical study on the protective role of folic acid in rabbits treated with chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Yousef, Mokhtar I; Elaswad, Fathia A M

    2006-01-01

    Deleterious effects of chromium (VI) compounds are diversified affecting almost all the organ systems in a wide variety of animals. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of folic acid (FA) in alleviating the toxicity of chromium (VI) on certain biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, and enzyme activities of male New Zealand white rabbits. Six rabbits per group were assigned to one of four treatment groups: 0 mg FA and 0 mg Cr(VI)/kg BW (control); 8.3 microg FA/kg BW; 5 mg Cr(VI)/kg BW; 5 mg Cr(VI) plus 8.3 microg FA/kg BW, respectively. Rabbits were orally administered their respective doses every day for 10 weeks. Results obtained showed that Cr(VI) significantly (P content of sulfhydryl groups (SH groups) in liver, testes, brain, kidney, and lung. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AlP), acid phosphatase (AcP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly decreased in liver and testes due to Cr(VI) administration. Also, AlP and AcP activities were significantly decreased in kidney and lung. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was significantly decreased in brain and plasma. Contrariwise, the activities of AST and ALT were significantly increased in plasma, while AlP and AcP decreased. Chromium (VI) treatment caused a significant decrease in plasma total protein (TP) and globulin, and increased total lipids (TL), cholesterol, glucose, urea, creatinine, and bilirubin concentrations. Folic acid alone significantly decreased the levels of free radicals in liver, brain, and kidney, and increased the content of SH-group. The activities of AST, ALT, and LDH in liver; AST, ALT, AlP, AcP, and LDH in testes; AcP in kidney; AlP and AcP in lung, and LDH in brain were significantly increased. Plasma TP and albumin were increased, while urea and creatinine were decreased. The presence of FA with Cr(VI) restored the changes in enzyme activities and

  3. BIOSORPTION OF Cr(VI) FROM SYNTHETIC WASTEWATER USING THE FRUIT SHELL OF GULMOHAR (Delonix regia): APPLICATION TO ELECTROPLATING WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    Attimodde Girirajanna Devi Prasad; Mohammed Abdulsalam Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI) from synthetic solutions and electroplating wastewater using the fruit shell of gulmohar has been investigated in a batch system. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) on the biosorption process were studied. The complete removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH < 3.0. Studies indicated that both biosorption and bioreduction were involved in the removal of Cr(VI). The sorption equilibrium exhibit...

  4. Studies on Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions by nanotitania under visible light and dark conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madona Lien Paul; Jastin Samuel; Rajdeep Roy; Natarajan Chandrasekaran; Amitava Mukherjee

    2015-04-01

    The current study deals with Cr(VI) removal by nanotitania under fluorescent light and dark conditions. The equilibrium removal capacities, 85.85 and 59.4 mg of Cr(VI)g−1 of nanoparticle were noted for nanotitania interacted under light and dark conditions, respectively, at optimized conditions (pH: 7.0, contact time: 30 min, initial Cr(VI) concentration: 20 mg l−1, nanoparticle dosage: 0.1 g l−1). Under both the conditions, the equilibrium removal data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The nanotitania followed a second-order kinetics under light condition whereas a pseudo-second-order kinetics was observed under dark condition. The surface characterization of nanotitania was carried out by zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) studies carried out under light and dark conditions indicate the interaction of surface functional groups to Cr(VI). Cr(VI) removal study carried out in the Cr(VI)–Cr(III) mixture showed a decrease in Cr(VI) removal capacity with increase in Cr(III) concentration. A 92% regeneration of nanoparticle was observed indicating efficient reusability of the system. The applicability of the nanotitania in Cr(VI) contaminated water was studied by spiking Cr(VI) in natural water matrices like ground water and lake water.

  5. Chromium isotope variation along a contaminated groundwater plume: a coupled Cr(VI)- reduction, advective mixing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.; Izbicki, J.

    2007-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a common contaminant in groundwater, used in electroplating, leather tanning, wood preservation, and as an anti-corrosion agent. Cr occurs in two oxidation states in groundwater: Cr(VI) is highly soluble and mobile, and is a carcinogen; Cr(III) is generally insoluble, immobile and less toxic than Cr(VI). Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is thus a central issue in approaches to Cr(VI) contaminant remediation in aquifers. Aqueous Cr(VI) occurs mainly as the chromate (CrO22-) and bichromate (HCrO2-) oxyanions, while Cr(III) is mainly "hexaquo" Cr(H2O)63+. Cr has four naturally-occurring stable isotopes: 50Cr, 52Cr, 53Cr and 54Cr. When Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), the strong Cr-O bond must be broken, resulting in isotopic selection. Ellis et al. (2002) demonstrated that for reduction of Cr(VI) on magnetite and in natural sediment slurries, the change of isotopic composition of the remnant Cr(VI) pool was described by a Rayleigh fractionation model having fractionation factor ɛCr(VI)-Cr(III) = 3.4‰. We attempted to use Cr isotopes as a monitor of Cr(VI) reduction at a field site in Hinkley, California (USA) where groundwater contaminated with Cr(VI) has been under assessment for remediation. Groundwater containing up to 5 ppm Cr(VI) has migrated down-gradient from the contamination source through the fluvial to alluvial sediments to form a well-defined plume. Uncontaminated groundwater in the aquifer immediately adjacent to the plume has naturally-occurring Cr(VI) of 4 ppb or less (CH2M-Hill). In early 2006, colleagues from CH2M-Hill collected 17 samples of groundwater from within and adjacent to the plume. On a plot of δ53Cr vs. log Cr(VI), the data array is strikingly linear and differs markedly from the trend predicted for reduction of Cr(VI) in the contaminated water. There appear to be two groups of data: four samples with δ53Cr >+2‰ and Cr(VI) 15 ppb. Simple mixing lines between the groundwater samples having <4 ppb Cr(VI), taken to be

  6. Nanostructure, thermoelectric properties, and transport theory of V{sub 2}VI{sub 3} and V{sub 2}VI{sub 3}/IV-VI based superlattices and nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dankwort, Torben; Schuermann, Ulrich; Kienle, Lorenz [Institute for Materials Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel (Germany); Hansen, Anna-Lena; Bensch, Wolfgang [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Christian Albrechts University Kiel (Germany); Winkler, Markus; Koenig, Jan D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Physical Measurement Techniques IPM, Freiburg (Germany); Johnson, David C. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Institute, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Hinsche, Nicki F. [Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle/Saale (Germany); Zahn, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Mertig, Ingrid [Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle/Saale (Germany); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The scope of this work is to review the thermoelectric properties, the microstructures, and their correlation with theoretical calculations and predictions for recent chalcogenide based materials. The main focus is put on thin multilayered Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, and bulk V{sub 2}VI{sub 3}/IV-VI mixed systems. For all films a systematic characterization of the thermoelectric properties as well as the micro- and nanostructure was performed. The degree of crystallinity of the multilayered films varied from epitaxial systems to polycrystalline films. Other multilayered thin films revealed promising thermoelectric properties. (SnSe){sub 1.2}TiSe{sub 2} thin films with rotational disorder yielded the highest Seebeck coefficient published to date for analogous materials. For bulk V{sub 2}VI{sub 3}/IV-VI mixed systems insides are given into a complete ''material to module'' process resulting in a high performance thermoelectric generator using (1-x)(GeTe) x(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 0.2}Te{sub 2.8}) (x = 0.038). Cyclic heating of this system with x = 0.063 resulted in a drastic change of the micro- and nanostructure observed by ex situ and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Consequently a degradation of ZT at 450 C from ∝2.0 to ∝1.0 was observed, while samples with x = 0.038 showed a stable ZT of 1.5. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. In vivo regulation of the Vi antigen in Salmonella and induction of immune responses with an in vivo-inducible promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Carole; Grant, Andrew J; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Morgan, Fiona J E; John, Victoria F; Houghton, Jenny; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the agent of typhoid fever in humans, expresses the surface Vi polysaccharide antigen that contributes to virulence. However, Vi expression can also be detrimental to some key steps of S. Typhi infectivity, for example, invasion, and Vi is the target of protective immune responses. We used a strain of S. Typhimurium carrying the whole Salmonella pathogenicity island 7 (SPI-7) to monitor in vivo Vi expression within phagocytic cells of mice at different times after systemic infection. We also tested whether it is possible to modulate Vi expression via the use of in vivo-inducible promoters and whether this would trigger anti-Vi antibodies through the use of Vi-expressing live bacteria. Our results show that Vi expression in the liver and spleen is downregulated with the progression of infection and that the Vi-negative population of bacteria becomes prevalent by day 4 postinfection. Furthermore, we showed that replacing the natural tviA promoter with the promoter of the SPI-2 gene ssaG resulted in sustained Vi expression in the tissues. Intravenous or oral infection of mice with a strain of S. Typhimurium expressing Vi under the control of the ssaG promoter triggered detectable levels of all IgG subclasses specific for Vi. Our work highlights that Vi is downregulated in vivo and provides proof of principle that it is possible to generate a live attenuated vaccine that induces Vi-specific antibodies after single oral administration.

  8. Relative integral basis for algebraic number fields

    OpenAIRE

    Mohmood Haghighi

    1986-01-01

    At first conditions are given for existence of a relative integral basis for OK≅Okn−1⊕I with [K;k]=n. Then the constrtiction of the ideal I in OK≅Okn−1⊕I is given for proof of existence of a relative integral basis for OK4(m1,m2)/Ok(​m3). Finally existence and construction of the relative integral basis for OK6(n3,−3)/Ok3(n3),OK6(n3,−3)/Ok2(−3) for some values of n are given.

  9. The Pattern Basis Approach to Circuit Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Bruce K.

    2016-01-01

    We describe and motivate a proposed new approach to lowerbounding the circuit complexity of boolean functions, based on a new formalization of "patterns" as elements of a special basis of the vector space of all truth table properties. We prove that a "pattern basis" with certain properties would lead to a useful complexity formula of a specific form, and speculate on how to find such a basis. This formula might take as long to compute on arbitrary functions as a brute-force search among circ...

  10. Pericellular colocalisation and interactive properties of type VI collagen and perlecan in the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A J; Shu, C C; Lord, M S; Little, C B; Whitelock, J M; Melrose, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to immunolocalise type VI collagen and perlecan and determine their interactive properties in the intervertebral disc (IVD). Confocal laser scanning microscopy co-localised perlecan with type VI collagen as pericellular components of IVD cells and translamellar cross-bridges in ovine and murine IVDs. These cross-bridges were significantly less abundant in the heparin sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse IVD than in wild type. This association of type VI collagen with elastic components provides clues as to its roles in conveying elastic recoil properties to annular tissues. Perlecan and type VI collagen were highly interactive in plasmon resonance studies. Pericellular colocalisation of perlecan and type VI collagen provides matrix stabilisation and cell-matrix communication which allows IVD cells to perceive and respond to perturbations in their biomechanical microenvironment. Perlecan, at the cell surface, provides an adhesive interface between the cell and its surrounding extracellular matrix. Elastic microfibrillar structures regulate tensional connective tissue development and function. The 2010 Global Burden of Disease study examined 291 disorders and identified disc degeneration and associated low back pain as the leading global musculoskeletal disorder emphasising its massive socioeconomic impact and the need for more effective treatment strategies. A greater understanding of how the IVD achieves its unique biomechanical functional properties is of great importance in the development of such therapeutic measures. PMID:27377666

  11. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the biosorption of Cr(VI) by Pinus sylvestris Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of chromium(VI) ions onto cone biomass were studied in a batch system with respect to temperature and initial metal ion concentration. The biosorption efficiency of chromium ions to the cone biomass decreased as the initial concentration of metal ions was increased. But cone biomass of Pinus sylvestris Linn. exhibited the highest Cr(VI) uptake capacity at 45 oC. The biosorption efficiency increased from 67% to 84% with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 deg. C at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 300 mg/L. The Langmuir isotherm model was applied to experimental equilibrium data of Cr(VI) biosorption depending on temperature. According to Langmuir isotherm, the monolayer saturation capacity (Qmax) is 238.10 mg/g. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data for initial Cr(VI). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The activation energy of biosorption (Ea) was determined as 41.74 kJ/mol using the Arrhenius equation. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients obtained at different temperatures, the thermodynamic constants of biosorption (ΔGo, ΔHo and ΔSo) were also evaluated

  12. Mechanism of oxidation of cysteine and methionine by ferrate(VI): Mössbauer investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Siskova, K.; Machala, L.; Zboril, R.

    2012-10-01

    Oxidation of organosulfur compounds (S) by ferrate(VI) (FeVIO42-,Fe(VI)) proceeds by the transfer of oxygen atom to S. A vast amount of literature proposed oxygen atom transfer (OAT) via 2-e- transfer process in which Fe(IV) acts as an intermediate, and Fe(II) was also proposed to be an intermediate or final reduced iron species of Fe(VI)(FeVI→FeIV→FeII). In this paper, Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to explore intermediate iron species in the oxidation of cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met) by Fe(VI). In the oxidation of Cys, both Fe(II) and Fe(III) were observed while only Fe(III) was seen in the oxidation of Met by Fe(VI). These results support that no Fe(II) species was formed in the oxidation of Met before forming Fe(III). These results are in consistency with the possibility of initial 1-e- transfer with the formation of Fe(V) species and subsequent 2-e- transfer to yield Fe(III)(FeVI→FeV→FeIII).

  13. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Matilde; Chen, Peiwen; Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1-/-) mice. Col6a1-/- neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1-/-mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  14. A spectrophotometric study of cerium IV and chromium VI species in nuclear fuel reprocessing process streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickson, I. D.; Boxall, C.; Jackson, A.; Whillock, G. O. H.

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing schemes such as PUREX and UREX utilise HNO3 media. An understanding of the corrosion of process engineering materials such as stainless steel in such media is a major concern for the nuclear industry. Two key species are cerium and chromium which, as Ce(IV), Cr(VI), may act as corrosion accelerants. An on-line analytical technique for these quantities would be useful for determining the relationship between corrosion rate and [Ce(IV)] and [Cr(VI)]. Consequently, a strategy for simultaneous quantification of Ce(IV), Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in the presence of other ions found in average burn-up Magnox / PWR fuel reprocessing stream (Fe, Mg, Nd, Al) is being developed. This involves simultaneous UV-vis absorbance measurement at 620, 540, 450 nm, wavelengths where Ce and Cr absorb but other ions do not. Mixed solutions of Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) are found to present higher absorbance values at 540 nm than those predicted from absorbances recorded from single component solutions of those ions. This is attributed to the formation of a 3:1 Cr(VI)-Ce(IV) complex and we report on the complexation and UV-visible spectrophotometric characteristics of this species. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental study of this complex in aqueous nitric acid solution systems.

  15. Cr(VI) reduction in wastewater using a bimetallic galvanic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical reduction of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) in wastewater by iron and copper-iron bimetallic plates was evaluated and optimized. Iron has been used as a reducing agent, but in this work a copper-iron galvanic system in the form of bimetallic plates is applied to reducing hexavalent chromium. The optimal pH (2) and ratio of copper to iron surface areas (3.5:1) were determined in batch studies, achieving a 100% reduction in about 25 min. The Cr(VI) reduction kinetics for the bimetallic system fit a first order mechanism with a correlation of 0.9935. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the Cr(VI) reduction is possible at any pH value. However, at pH values above 3.0 for iron and 5.5 for chromium insoluble species appear, indicating that the reaction will be hindered. Continuous column studies indicate that the bimetallic copper-iron galvanic system has a reduction capacity of 9.5890 mg Cr(VI) cm-2 iron, whereas iron alone only has a capacity of 0.1269 mg Cr(VI) cm-2. The bimetallic copper-iron galvanic system is much more effective in reducing hexavalent chromium than iron alone. The exhausted plates were analyzed by SEM, EDS, and XRD to determine the mechanism and the surface effects, especially surface fouling.

  16. Biotreatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters by sulphate reducing bacteria fed with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnanelli, F., E-mail: francesca.pagnanelli@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Cruz Viggi, C., E-mail: carolina.cruzviggi@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Cibati, A., E-mail: alessio.cibati@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Uccelletti, D., E-mail: daniela.uccelletti@uniroma1.it [Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Toro, L., E-mail: luigi.toro@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Palleschi, C., E-mail: claudio.palleschi@uniroma1.it [Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of ethanol as electron donor for sulphate-reducing bacteria for the treatment of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of contribution in Cr removal (adsorption vs. bioprecipitation). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioassessment of the process effectiveness by ecotoxicological in vivo tests using C. elegans. - Abstract: Biological treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters was performed in fixed bed reactors inoculated with SRB (sulphate-reducing bacteria) growing on ethanol. Treatment efficiency was evaluated by checking chemical abatement of Cr(VI) and by ecotoxicological tests using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A preliminary comparison between ethanol and lactate was performed, denoting that using ethanol, the same values of final sulphate abatement were obtained. In addition ethanol showed to be a substrate more competitive than lactate in kinetic terms. Fixed bed column reactors were continuously fed with a solution containing sulphates (3 g L{sup -1}), ethanol (1.5 g L{sup -1}) and Cr(VI) (50 mg L{sup -1}). At steady state the column inoculated with SRB removed 65 {+-} 5% of sulphate and 95 {+-} 5% of chromium. Bioactive removal mechanisms predominated over biosorption. Diminution of Cr(VI) toxicity was assessed by using the nematode C. elegans as a test organism showing that the survival of nematodes was 20% in the presence of the untreated influent and raised up to 53% when the nematodes were exposed to the treated effluent.

  17. Recycling MgOH2 nanoadsorbent during treating the low concentration of CrVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhen; Huang, Feng; Wang, Yongjing; Zou, Ting; Zheng, Jinsheng; Lin, Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Investigations about how to recycle the deactivated nanomaterials are well-needed. This work was designed to explore the recycling strategy of Mg(OH)(2) nanoadsorbent during treating low concentration of Cr(VI) solution as an example. It was demonstrated that a reversible route between Cr-adsorbed nano-Mg(OH)(2) and Cr-desorbed bulk-MgCO(3) · 3H(2)O can be established by using CO(2) as a phase transformation medium. In each adsorption-desorption cycle, Cr(VI) solution with initial concentration of 10 mg · L(-1) could be enriched over 40 times. An aggregation-induced rapid phase transformation mechanism from nano-Mg(OH)(2) to bulk-MgCO(3) · 3H(2)O was discovered, which was one of the critical factors to ensure the disposing efficiency of this environmental-friendly Cr(VI) disposal system. A pilot-scale experiment was conducted with this strategy to deal with 50 L Cr(VI)-containing simulated industrial wastewater. The enrichment of Cr(VI) and the recycle of nano-Mg(OH)(2) can be successfully achieved simultaneously. PMID:21291274

  18. Improving Memory Subsystem Performance Using ViVA: Virtual Vector Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebis, Joseph; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Williams, Samuel; Yelick, Katherine

    2009-01-12

    The disparity between microprocessor clock frequencies and memory latency is a primary reason why many demanding applications run well below peak achievable performance. Software controlled scratchpad memories, such as the Cell local store, attempt to ameliorate this discrepancy by enabling precise control over memory movement; however, scratchpad technology confronts the programmer and compiler with an unfamiliar and difficult programming model. In this work, we present the Virtual Vector Architecture (ViVA), which combines the memory semantics of vector computers with a software-controlled scratchpad memory in order to provide a more effective and practical approach to latency hiding. ViVA requires minimal changes to the core design and could thus be easily integrated with conventional processor cores. To validate our approach, we implemented ViVA on the Mambo cycle-accurate full system simulator, which was carefully calibrated to match the performance on our underlying PowerPC Apple G5 architecture. Results show that ViVA is able to deliver significant performance benefits over scalar techniques for a variety of memory access patterns as well as two important memory-bound compact kernels, corner turn and sparse matrix-vector multiplication -- achieving 2x-13x improvement compared the scalar version. Overall, our preliminary ViVA exploration points to a promising approach for improving application performance on leading microprocessors with minimal design and complexity costs, in a power efficient manner.

  19. Magnetic ferrous-doped graphene for improving Cr(VI) removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ting; Kong, Lingyu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Feng; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2016-04-01

    A highly reductive and magnetic graphene/Fe3O4 composite (abbreviated as HR-M-GO/Fe3O4) was synthesized via graphene oxide (GO) oxidizing FeCl2 in situ. This superparamagnetic composite could be used for the highly efficient removal of Cr(VI) from waste water conveniently by applying an external magnet. The maximum adsorption capacity of the HR-M-GO/Fe3O4 for Cr(VI) reaches 31.8 mg g‑1, which is greater than the graphene/γ-Fe2O3 composite. According to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the possible mechanism of HR-M-GO/Fe3O4 removing Cr(VI) effectively was that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) by ferrous hydroxide moieties in the graphene structure and the resulting Cr(III) ions were easily captured by the negatively charged HR-M-GO/Fe3O4. In addition, such HR-M-GO/Fe3O4 with large surface area, negative charge and superior magnetism could be applied to remove Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) with an efficiency of almost 100%. This composite could therefore be used to remove trace Cr(VI), Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from water for super purification.

  20. Clinical characteristics of patients with Rutherford category IV, compared with V and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketsugu Tsuchiya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients categorized Rutherford category IV might have different characteristics compared with Rutherford category V and VI. Our study aims were to estimate the clinical differences between Rutherford category IV and Rutherford category V and VI, for those underwent endovascular therapy for isolated infrapopliteal disease, and also to find risk factors for endovascular therapy in Rutherford category IV. Methods: Based on the Japanese multi-center registry data, 1091 patients with 1332 limbs (Rutherford category IV: 226 patients with 315 limbs, Rutherford category V and VI: 865 patients with 1017 limbs were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Patients’ backgrounds and lesions’ characteristics had significant differences. Both freedom rate from major adverse limb event with perioperative death and amputation-free survival rate at 1 year were better in Rutherford category IV than Rutherford category V and VI (93.6% vs 78.3%, 87.7% vs 66.7% and those maintained to 3 years (p  3.0 mg/dL, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary artery disease in Rutherford category IV. Conclusion: From the present results, Rutherford category IV should be recognized to have quite different backgrounds and better outcome from Rutherford category V and VI.

  1. Facile synthesis of boehmite/PVA composite membrane with enhanced adsorption performance towards Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Cai, Weiquan; Zhou, Jiabin; Li, Yuanzhi

    2016-11-15

    A novel boehmite/PVA composite membrane (BPCM) with remarkably enhanced adsorption performance towards Cr(VI) was successfully synthesized from Al(NO3)3·9H2O using HAc as the peptizing agent via a facile sol-gel method. The physicochemical properties of the BPCM, the boehmite powder (BP) without PVA and a commercial boehmite powder (CBP) were comparatively characterized by XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and XPS. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption performance of the BPCM is much better than those of BP and CBP. Its adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and its equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherm well with a maximum adsorption capacity of 36.41mgg(-1). Its interference adsorption experiment in presence of coexisting anions showed that SO4(2-) and HPO4(2-) have greater effect than those of the Cl(-), F(-), C2O4(2-) and HCO3(-). A three step action mechanism including adsorption of Cr(VI) anions, complexation between Cr(VI) anions and the functional groups on the surface of BPCM, and the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was proposed to illustrate the adsorption process. This efficient film could be easily separated after adsorption, exhibiting great potential for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution, and other fields of environmental remediation. PMID:27450337

  2. Surface complexation modeling of Cr(VI) adsorption at the goethite-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinyu; Gu, Xueyuan; Tong, Fei; Zhao, Yanping; Tan, Yinyue

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a charge distribution multisite surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC) for adsorption of chromate onto goethite was carefully developed. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on goethite was firstly investigated as a function of pH, ionic strength and Cr(VI) concentration. Results showed that an inner-sphere complexation mechanism was involved because the retention of Cr(VI) was little influenced by ionic strength. Then two surface species: a bidentate complex (≡Fe2O2CrOOH) and a monodentate complex (≡FeOCrO3(-3/2)), which is constrained by prior spectroscopic evidence were proposed to fit the macroscopic adsorption data. Modeling results showed that the bidentate complex was found to be the dominant species at low pH, whereas, with increasing pH, monodentate species became more pronounced. The model was then verified by prediction of competitive adsorption of chromate and phosphate at various ratios and ionic strengths. The model successfully predicted the inhibition of chromate with the presence of phosphate, suggesting phosphate has higher affinity to goethite surface than Cr(VI). Results showed that the model developed in this study for Cr(VI) onto goethite was applicable for various conditions. It is a useful supplement for the surface complexation model database for oxyanions onto goethite surfaces. PMID:26057103

  3. Screen-printed sensor for batch and flow injection potentiometric chromium(VI) monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Moreno, Raul A.; Gismera, M.J.; Sevilla, M.T.; Procopio, Jesus R. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Analisis Instrumental, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    A disposable screen-printed electrode was designed and evaluated for direct detection of chromium(VI) in batch and flow analysis. The carbon screen-printed electrode was modified with a graphite-epoxy composite. The optimal graphite-epoxy matrix contains 37.5% graphite powder, 12.5% diphenylcarbohydrazide, a selective compound for chromium(VI), and 50% epoxy resin. The principal analytical parameters of the potentiometric response in batch and flow analysis were optimized and calculated. The screen-printed sensor exhibits a response time of 20 {+-} 1 s. In flow analysis, the analytical frequency of sampling is 70 injections per hour using 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution at pH 3 as the carrier, a flow rate of 2.5 mL.min{sup -1}, and an injection sample volume of 0.50 mL. The sensor shows potentiometric responses that are very selective for chromium(VI) ions and optimal detection limits in both static mode (2.1 x 10{sup -7} M) and online analysis (9.4 x 10{sup -7} M). The disposable potentiometric sensor was employed to determine toxicity levels of chromium(VI) in mineral, tap, and river waters by flow-injection potentiometry and batch potentiometry. Chromium(VI) determination was also carried out with successful results in leachates from municipal solid waste landfills. (orig.)

  4. 基于改进 ViBe 的多行人检测方法%Multi-pedestrian Detection Approach Based on Improved ViBe Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴春赫; 潘怡霖; 赵海; 朱宏博

    2016-01-01

    The moving object detection of multi-pedestrian scenario was conducted by using the improved ViBe algorithm and the template matching method.The original ViBe algorithm was combined with the frame difference method to improve the performance of moving object detection,which can more rapidly eliminate the ghosts in the result binary image than the original ViBe algorithm.According to the treated foreground result around the treating pixel,the dynamic model parameters were used to estimate the foreground for improving the accuracy of the foreground object detection.The HOG algorithm was used to detect the pedestrians in the moving objects.The results showed that the method does not reduce the real-time performance of moving object detection,and significantly improve the accuracy of the detection algorithm.%利用改进的 ViBe 算法及模板匹配方法对多行人场景进行了目标检测。为了提高运动目标检测性能,提出将原 ViBe 算法与帧间差分相结合的方法,该方法使二值图像中的鬼影比原 ViBe 算法消除更为迅速。根据待处理像素点周围已完成的前背景分离结果,利用动态计算模型参数估计前背景,以提高前景目标提取的准确度。基于 HOG 算法识别运动目标中的行人目标。实验结果表明,该方法在没有降低运动物体检测实时性的同时,明显提高了算法检测的准确度。

  5. Generalized multiscale radial basis function networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Stephen A; Wei, Hua-Liang; Balikhin, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    A novel modelling framework is proposed for constructing parsimonious and flexible multiscale radial basis function networks (RBF). Unlike a conventional standard single scale RBF network, where all the basis functions have a common kernel width, the new network structure adopts multiscale Gaussian functions as the bases, where each selected centre has multiple kernel widths, to provide more flexible representations with better generalization properties for general nonlinear dynamical systems. As a direct extension of the traditional single scale Gaussian networks, the new multiscale network is easy to implement and is quick to learn using standard learning algorithms. A k-means clustering algorithm and an improved orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm are used to determine the unknown parameters in the network model including the centres and widths of the basis functions, and the weights between the basis functions. It is demonstrated that the new network can lead to a parsimonious model with much better generalization property compared with the traditional single width RBF networks.

  6. The Teleological Resocialization: theoretical-praxeological basis

    OpenAIRE

    Sławomir Sobczak

    2011-01-01

    Resocialization and Social Prevention is a theoretical and a praxeological subject, thus teleology of resocialization as its building block should relate both to its theoretical and practical aspects, i.e. to goals and postulates formed on the basis of paradigms and diagnosis. In the article are pointed out the reasons for forming teleology of resocialization due to the foundation of fundamental thinking, i.e. monistic basis (idealism, materialism) and pluralism (realism) and also the outcome...

  7. Benchmark analysis of MCNP{trademark} ENDF/B-VI iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets.

  8. Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by adsorption onto activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, K; Pattabhi, S; Kadirvelu, K

    2001-10-01

    Activated carbon (AC) prepared from coconut tree sawdust was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Batch mode adsorption studies were carried out by varying agitation time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, carbon concentration and pH. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to model the adsorption data. Adsorption capacity was calculated from the Langmuir isotherm and was 3.46 mg/g at an initial pH of 3.0 for the particle size 125-250 microm. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was pH dependent and maximum removal was observed in the acidic pH range. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.01-1 M NaOH solutions.

  9. Production of Nanocrystalline Magnetite for Adsorption of Cr(VI) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, N.; Raygan, Sh.; Seyyed Ebrahimi, S. A.

    Higher environmental standards have made the removal of toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium from wastewater; an important problem for environmental protection. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting adsorbent to be considered for this application. In this study, a new method combining adsorption and magnetic separation was developed to remove Cr(VI) from wastewater. The nanocrystalline magnetite as adsorbent was produced via thermo- mechanical reduction of hematite. Various parameters which affect the adsorption of Cr(VI) such as time, pH, temperature and initial concentration were investigated using thermo-gravimeters (TG), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. The maximum adsorption was occurred at pH 2. The adsorption data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption of Cr(VI) increased significantly with increasing of temperature and time.

  10. Nano Structured Potentiometric Sensors Based on Polyaniline Conducting Polymer for Determination of Cr (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad-khah, Ali; Ansari, Reza; Delavar, Ali Fallah; Mosayebzadeh, Zahra [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    In this paper, a potentiometric sensor based on polyaniline conducting polymer for potentiometric determination of Cr (VI) ions is reported. Polyaniline was synthesized electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry method) onto a micro pencil graphite electrode (0.7 mm diameter) in the presence of HCl and diphenylcarbazide (termed as (PGE/PAni/DPC). Some initial experiments were performed in order to find out the optimized conditions for preparation of the introduced Cr (VI) sensor electrode. The plot of E vs. log [Cr (VI)], showed a linear response in the range from 1.0 x 10{sup -6} to 1.0 x 10{sup -1} M. High repeatability with the detection limit of 8.0 x 10{sup -7} M was obtained

  11. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide VI on the structure of multilamellar lipid membranes at water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural changes in the multilamellar lipid membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide VI binary systems during hydration and dehydration have been studied by neutron diffraction. The effect of cholesterol and ceramide on the kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membranes is characterized. Compared to pure DPPC, membranes of binary systems swell faster during hydration (with a characteristic time of ∼30 min). Both compounds, ceramide VI and cholesterol, similarly affect the hydration of DPPC membranes, increasing the repeat distance due to the bilayer growth. However, in contrast to cholesterol, ceramide significantly reduces the thickness of the membrane water layer. The introduction of cholesterol into a DPPC membrane slows down the change in the parameters of the bilayer internal structure during dehydration. In the DPPC/ceramide VI/cholesterol ternary system (with a molar cholesterol concentration of 40%), cholesterol is partially released from the lamellar membrane structure into the crystalline phase.

  12. Can iron oxides remove Cr(VI) from drinking water at sub-ppb levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprara, Efthymia; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Samaras, Petros; Zouboulis, Anastasios; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2013-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has long been recognized as a potential carcinogen via inhalation, in contrast to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] which is 100 times less toxic and also a necessary nutrient, essential to human glucidic metabolism. Nowadays there is an increasing concern that Cr(VI) is also carcinogenic by the oral route of exposure, while an increased number of publications indicate that Cr(VI) is a common natural pollutant. Hexavalent chromium formation is attributed to natural oxidation of Cr(III) in ultramafic derived soils and ophiolithic rocks. To verify this theory, drinking water samples were collected from targeted areas of Greece e.g. areas in which the geological background is predominated by ultramafic minerals and the water supply depends mainly on groundwater resources. Valuable guide for the samples collection was the geological map of Greece and emphasis was given to regions where the natural occurrence of Cr(VI) is thought to be more possible. A wide range of Cr concentrations (2-100 μg/L) were detected in the areas studied, with most of them ranging below the current limit of 50 μg/L, and the Cr(VI) concentration being more than 90% of the total. Since the Cr(VI) affects significant part of population worldwide, a debate was established concerning the enforcement of stringent regulation, which also demands the drinking water treatment processes re-evaluation in view of Cr(VI) removal at sub-ppb level. In this regard, adsorption has evolved as the front line of defense for chromium removal. The motivation of this work was to investigate the efficiency of iron oxides for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from drinking water and its removal at sub-ppb levels. The adsorbents examined included iron oxy-hydroxides and magnetite prepared using common low cost iron salts. Their effectiveness as Cr(VI) adsorbents was evaluated through the decrease of a Cr(VI) concentration of 100μg/L prepared in NSF water at pH 7. Preliminary batch experiments did not

  13. The Biosorption of Cr (VI From Aqueous SolutionUsing Date Palm Fibers (Leef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas A. Abdulgafoor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Cr (VI removal from aqueous solution using date palm fibers (leef was investigated .The effects of pH, contact time, sorbets concentration and initial metal ions concentration on the biosorption were investigated.The residual concentration of Cr (VI in solution was determined colorimetrically using spectrophotometer at wave length 540 nm .The biosorption was pH-dependent, the optimum pH was 7 and adsorption isotherms obtained fitted well with Langmuir isotherms .The Langmuir equation obtained was Ce/Cs = 79.99 Ce-77.39, the correlation factor was 0.908.These results indicate that date palm fibers (leef has a potential effect for the uptake of Cr (VI from industrial waste water.

  14. Typhim Vi vaccine against typhoid fever: a clinical trial in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, N B; Wamola, I A; Estambale, B A; Mbithi, E; Poillet, M

    1995-03-01

    Safety, tolerance and immunogenicity of the purified Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi) against typhoid fever was evaluated in primary school children aged 5-15 years. A total of 435 children were vaccinated, each with a single intramuscular injection in the left deltoid muscle. One hundred and ten children were randomly selected for blood samples on day 0 (pre vaccination) and day 30 (post vaccination). Vi antibodies studied by Radio immuno assay (RIA) on 97(88%) paired sera showed a seroconversion rate of 76.2% and seroprotection rate after vaccination was 74.2%, while 6.2% of children already had protective immunity before vaccination. The vaccine was well tolerated. Most commonly reported reactions were mild pain at site of injection (83%), and a few complained of mild swelling (4.6%), induration (1.1%), itching (1.1%) and headaches (1.4%). All reactions were of mild severity and disappeared within 24 to 48 hours.

  15. Generation of a murine monoclonal antibody to capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Reyes-López

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional hybridoma technology has enabled the development of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs against many antigens. Mabs have several applications in the field of basic research, diagnosis, immunotherapy and vaccine manufacturing processes. Mabs-producing hybridomas against the capsular polysaccharide from Salmonella Typhi were obtained, after intraperitoneal immunization of BALB/c mice with 10 µg of capsular polysaccharide Vi conjugated to diphtheria toxoid, and subsequent fusion of lymphocytes isolated of the spleen and myeloma cells SP2/O. A Mab was selected, partially characterized, and named as 4G3E11. The isotype of this Mab was IgG1. It was proved by means of a sandwich ELISA that the 4G3E11 Mab reacts with different concentrations of polysaccharide in samples of the vax-TyVi® vaccine. The Mab obtained in this research could be useful as reagent for the detection and quantitation of polysaccharide Vi in typhoid vaccines.

  16. A review of chemical, electrochemical and biological methods for aqueous Cr(VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Díaz, Carlos E; Lugo-Lugo, Violeta; Bilyeu, Bryan

    2012-07-15

    Hexavalent chromium is of particular environmental concern due to its toxicity and mobility and is challenging to remove from industrial wastewater. It is a strong oxidizing agent that is carcinogenic and mutagenic and diffuses quickly through soil and aquatic environments. It does not form insoluble compounds in aqueous solutions, so separation by precipitation is not feasible. While Cr(VI) oxyanions are very mobile and toxic in the environment, Cr(III) cations are not. Like many metal cations, Cr(III) forms insoluble precipitates. Thus, reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III) simplifies its removal from effluent and also reduces its toxicity and mobility. In this review, we describe the environmental implications of Cr(VI) presence in aqueous solutions, the chemical species that could be present and then we describe the technologies available to efficiently reduce hexavalent chromium. PMID:22608208

  17. Characterizations and Cr (VI) adsorption properties of polyaniline/filter-paper composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Wanwan; Li, Mengjuan;

    2014-01-01

    Polyaniline/filter-paper (PANI/FP) composite was prepared by in situ polymerization of polyaniline onto FP and subsequently evaluated for the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared were used to investigate the morphology and physicoch......Polyaniline/filter-paper (PANI/FP) composite was prepared by in situ polymerization of polyaniline onto FP and subsequently evaluated for the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared were used to investigate the morphology...... coefficients (about R-2 = 0.9383). Although the removal capability was still limited, the PANI/FP composite showed the great potential that can be used as an effective adsorbent for removing Cr (VI) from industrial waste-water. POLYM. COMPOS., 35:993-998, 2014. (c) 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers...

  18. Removal of GaAs growth substrates from II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, S.; Hartmann, P. R.; Kießling, T.; Rüth, M.; Schumacher, C.; Gould, C.; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a process that enables the removal of II-VI semiconductor epilayers from their GaAs growth substrate and their subsequent transfer to arbitrary host environments. The technique combines mechanical lapping and layer selective chemical wet etching and is generally applicable to any II-VI layer stack. We demonstrate the non-invasiveness of the method by transferring an all-II-VI magnetic resonant tunneling diode. High resolution x-ray diffraction proves that the crystal integrity of the heterostructure is preserved. Transport characterization confirms that the functionality of the device is maintained and even improved, which is ascribed to completely elastic strain relaxation of the tunnel barrier layer.

  19. Classification of mood disorders in DSM-V and DSM-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    For any diagnostic system to be clinically useful, and go beyond description, it must provide an understanding that informs about aetiology and/or outcome. DSM-III and DSM-IV have provided reliability; the challenge for DSM-V and DSM-VI will be to provide validity. For DSM-V this will not be achieved. Believers in DSM-III and DSM-IV have impeded progress towards a valid classification system, so DSM-V needs to retain continuity with its predecessors to retain reliability and enhance research, but position itself to inform a valid diagnostic system by DSM-VI. This review examines the features of a diagnostic system and summarizes what is really known about mood disorders. The review also questions whether what are called mood disorders are primarily disorders of mood. Finally, it provides suggestions for DSM-VI.

  20. Samskipti barna við foreldra og vini : tungumálið á heimilinu

    OpenAIRE

    Ester Ösp Sigurðardóttir 1987

    2013-01-01

    Rannsóknir hafa sýnt að félagsleg og efnahagsleg staða barna og unglinga af erlendum uppruna er oft verri en innfæddra jafnaldra þeirra. Tilgangur rannsóknarinnar var að skoða samskipti barna við foreldra sína og bestu vini út frá hvort íslenska væri það tungumál sem oftast væri talað á heimilinu eða ekki. Við rannsóknina var notast við gögn frá 2010 úr rannsókninni „Heilsa og lífskjör skólanema“ (HBSC- Health Behaviour in School-aged Children). Þáttakendur voru 3731 nemendur í 6.bekk en spur...