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Sample records for basic ex-vivo investigation

  1. Ex-vivo investigations on endoluminal vein treatment procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, R.; Burgmeier, C.; Meissner, Oliver; Hunger, Katrin; Barbaryka, Gregor; Beyer, W.; Beck, T.; Steckmeier, B.; Schmedt, C.

    2007-02-01

    An ex-vivo model was developed for experimental evaluation of endoluminal thermal procedures for the occlusion of saphenous veins. The model consists of the subcutaneous foot vein from freshly slaughtered cows. Using this model primary and acute effects and initial mechanisms on vein vessel could be studied. In this study different energy sources (laser and radiofrequency generator), different energy application parameters (velocity, fluence, fluence rate, temperature) were compared. The dependency of using bare fibre and cylindrical diffusors could be investigated with respect to the induced effects on the vessels wall. Contraction of the vessels were measured and investigated macroscopically and microscopically as well as by means of optical coherence tomography. As a result an optimized treatment protocol could be developed and discussed with respect to the induced effects.

  2. Ex vivo sentinel lymph node investigation in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Hilário Alves Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Brazil, about 26,000 cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed per year. Pa- tients considered at the early stage of disease (without lymph node evolve with tumor relapse or recurrence in up to a quarter of cases, probably due to understaging. Objective: Research on ex vivo sentinel lymph node in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: We studied 37 patients who underwent curative surgical resection. The marker used to identify lymph nodes was patent blue dye injected into the peritu- moral submucosa of the open surgical specimen immediately after its removal from the abdominal cavity. Results: Ex vivo identification of sentinel lymph node with marker occurred in 13 (35.1% patients. The sensitivity was 40% and 60% false negative. The detailed histological examina- tion of sentinel lymph nodes with multilevel section and immunohistochemistry showed metastasis in one (4.3% individual, considered ultra-staging. Conclusion: The ex vivo identification of sentinel lymph node had questionable benefits, and worse results when include patients with rectal cancer. Restaging of one patient was possible after multilevel section and immunohistochemistry of the sentinel lymph node, but more research is needed to evaluate the role of micrometastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Resumo: Introdução: No Brasil, a cada ano são diagnosticados cerca de 26.000 casos de câncer colorre- tal. Pacientes com estadiamento considerado inicial, sem linfonodo metastático, evoluem com recorrência ou recidiva do tumor em até um quarto dos casos, por provável subesta- diamento. Objetivo: pesquisar sobre linfonodo-sentinela ex vivo em pacientes com adeno- carcinoma colorretal. Objetivo: Foram estudados 37 pacientes, submetidos à cirurgia oncológica com ressecção caráter curativo. O marcador de linfonodos utilizado foi o corante azul patente, injetado na submucosa peritumoral da peça cirúrgica aberta imediatamente

  3. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  4. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-01-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel

  5. Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Russell W; Aref, Amir R; Lizotte, Patrick H; Ivanova, Elena; Stinson, Susanna; Zhou, Chensheng W; Bowden, Michaela; Deng, Jiehui; Liu, Hongye; Miao, Diana; He, Meng Xiao; Walker, William; Zhang, Gao; Tian, Tian; Cheng, Chaoran; Wei, Zhi; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Bittinger, Mark; Vitzthum, Hans; Kim, Jong Wook; Merlino, Ashley; Quinn, Max; Venkataramani, Chandrasekar; Kaplan, Joshua A; Portell, Andrew; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Phillips, Bart; Smart, Alicia; Rotem, Asaf; Jones, Robert E; Keogh, Lauren; Anguiano, Maria; Stapleton, Lance; Jia, Zhiheng; Barzily-Rokni, Michal; Cañadas, Israel; Thai, Tran C; Hammond, Marc R; Vlahos, Raven; Wang, Eric S; Zhang, Hua; Li, Shuai; Hanna, Glenn J; Huang, Wei; Hoang, Mai P; Piris, Adriano; Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Cameron, Lisa; Su, Mei-Ju; Shah, Parin; Izar, Benjamin; Thakuria, Manisha; LeBoeuf, Nicole R; Rabinowits, Guilherme; Gunda, Viswanath; Parangi, Sareh; Cleary, James M; Miller, Brian C; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Thummalapalli, Rohit; Miao, Benchun; Barbie, Thanh U; Sivathanu, Vivek; Wong, Joshua; Richards, William G; Bueno, Raphael; Yoon, Charles H; Miret, Juan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Garraway, Levi A; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Freeman, Gordon J; Kirschmeier, Paul T; Lorch, Jochen H; Ott, Patrick A; Hodi, F Stephen; Flaherty, Keith T; Kamm, Roger D; Boland, Genevieve M; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Dornan, David; Paweletz, Cloud Peter; Barbie, David A

    2018-02-01

    Ex vivo systems that incorporate features of the tumor microenvironment and model the dynamic response to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) may facilitate efforts in precision immuno-oncology and the development of effective combination therapies. Here, we demonstrate the ability to interrogate ex vivo response to ICB using murine- and patient-derived organotypic tumor spheroids (MDOTS/PDOTS). MDOTS/PDOTS isolated from mouse and human tumors retain autologous lymphoid and myeloid cell populations and respond to ICB in short-term three-dimensional microfluidic culture. Response and resistance to ICB was recapitulated using MDOTS derived from established immunocompetent mouse tumor models. MDOTS profiling demonstrated that TBK1/IKKε inhibition enhanced response to PD-1 blockade, which effectively predicted tumor response in vivo Systematic profiling of secreted cytokines in PDOTS captured key features associated with response and resistance to PD-1 blockade. Thus, MDOTS/PDOTS profiling represents a novel platform to evaluate ICB using established murine models as well as clinically relevant patient specimens. Significance: Resistance to PD-1 blockade remains a challenge for many patients, and biomarkers to guide treatment are lacking. Here, we demonstrate feasibility of ex vivo profiling of PD-1 blockade to interrogate the tumor immune microenvironment, develop therapeutic combinations, and facilitate precision immuno-oncology efforts. Cancer Discov; 8(2); 196-215. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Balko and Sosman, p. 143 See related article by Deng et al., p. 216 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 127 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Saler, Marco; Pellegatta, Tommaso; Tresoldi, Marco Mario; Bonfanti, Viola; Malovini, Alberto; Faga, Angela; Riva, Federica

    2017-12-01

    Previous experiments by our group have indicated the regenerative effects of a spring water (Comano), which was possibly associated with the native non-pathogenic bacterial flora. The present study aimed to confirm these regenerative properties in a human ex vivo experimental model in the context of physiological wound healing. Human 6-mm punch skin biopsies harvested during plastic surgery sessions were injured in their central portion to induce skin loss and were cultured in either conventional medium (controls) or medium powder reconstituted with filtered Comano spring water (treated samples). At 24, 48 and 72 h the specimens were observed following staining with hematoxylin and eosin, Picrosirius Red, orcein and anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Compared with the controls, the treated samples exhibited reduced overall cell infiltration, evidence of fibroblasts, stimulation of cell proliferation and collagen and elastic fiber regeneration. In the spring water, in addition to 12 resident non-pathogenic bacterial strains exhibiting favorable metabolic activities, more unknown non-pathogenic species are being identified by genomic analysis. In the present study, the efficacy of this 'germ-free', filtered spring water in wound regeneration was indicated. Thus, the Comano spring water microbiota should be acknowledged for its regenerative properties.

  7. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Evaluation of carotenoids and reactive oxygen species in human skin after UV irradiation: a critical comparison between in vivo and ex vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C; Müller, Robert; Bechtel, Anne; Haag, Stefan F; Darvin, Maxim E; Lohan, Silke B; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    UV irradiation is one of the most harmful exogenous factors for the human skin. In addition to the development of erythema, free radicals, that is reactive oxygen species (ROS), are induced under its influence and promote the development of oxidative stress in the skin. Several techniques are available for determining the effect of UV irradiation. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measures the reduction of the carotenoid concentration, while electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy enables the analysis of the production of free radicals. Depending on the method, the skin parameters are analysed in vivo or ex vivo. This study provides a critical comparison between in vivo and ex vivo investigations on the ROS formation and carotenoid depletion caused by UV irradiation in human skin. The oxygen content of tissue was also determined. It was shown that the antioxidant status measured in the skin samples in vivo and ex vivo was different. The depletion in the carotenoid concentration in vivo exceeded the value determined ex vivo by a factor of about 1.5, and the radical formation after UV irradiation was significantly greater in vivo by a factor of 3.5 than that measured in excised human skin, which can be explained by the lack of oxygen ex vivo. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Response surface optimization, Ex vivo and In vivo investigation of nasal spanlastics for bioavailability enhancement and brain targeting of risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Fatma Elzahraa; Elsayed, Ibrahim; Gad, Mary Kamal; Elshafeey, Ahmed Hassen; Mohamed, Magdi Ibrahim

    2017-09-15

    Transnasal brain drug targeting could ensure better drug delivery to the brain through the olfactory pathway. Risperidone bioavailability is 66% in extensive metabolizers and 82% in slow metabolizers. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of the nanovesicular spanlastics to effectively deliver risperidone through the nasal route to the brain and increase its bioavailability. Spanlastics formulae, composed of span and polyvinyl alcohol, were designed based on central composite statistical design. The planned formulae were prepared using ethanol injection method. The prepared formulae were characterized by testing their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. The optimized formula having the lowest particle size, polydispersity index, the highest zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency was subjected to further investigations including characterization of its rheological properties, elasticity, transmission electron microscopy, in vitro diffusion, ex vivo permeation, histopathology and in vivo biodistribution. The optimized formula was composed of 5mg/mL span and 30mg/mL polyvinyl alcohol. It showed significantly higher transnasal permeation and better distribution to the brain, when compared to the used control regarding the brain targeting efficiency and the drug transport percentage (2.16 and 1.43 folds increase, respectively). The study introduced a successful and promising formula to directly and effectively carry the drug from nose to brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating different skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) pathologies ex vivo by autofluorescence spectroscopy and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Kuzmina, I.; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Genova, Ts.; Spigulis, J.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The skin neoplasias are on a second place in the world statistics of cancer incidence, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours are also in the "top ten" list. For the most of cutaneous and gastrointestinal tumours could be obtained better prognoses for patients, if an earlier and precise diagnostics procedure is applied. One of the most promising approaches for development of improved diagnostic techniques, is based on optical detection, and analysis of the signatures of biological tissues for detecting the presence of pathological alterations in the investigated objects. It is important to develop and combine novel diagnostic techniques for an accurate early stage diagnosis to improve the chances for skin and GIT tumours treatment. Optical techniques are very promising methods for such noninvasive diagnosis of skin and mucosa tumours, possessing the advantages of deep imaging depth, high resolution, fast imaging speed, and noninvasive character of detection. In this study we combine autofluorescence spectroscopy and optical imaging techniques to develop more precise evaluation of the tissue pathologies investigated. We obtain chromophore maps for GIT and cutaneous samples, with better visualization of the tumours borders and margins. In addition, fluorescence spectra give us information about the early changes in chromophores' contents into the tissues during neoplasia growth.

  11. Volumetric optoacoustic imaging feedback during endovenous laser therapy - an ex vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Endovenous laser therapy (ELT) was introduced in clinical practice for treating incompetent veins about fifteen years ago. Despite the considerable clinical evidence collected so far, no rigorous guidelines are yet available regarding the optimal energy deposition protocols while incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains variable among patients. Online monitoring and feedback-based control over the lesion progression may improve clinical outcomes. Yet the currently employed monitoring tools, such as Doppler ultrasound, often do not provide sufficient contrast as well as three-dimensional imaging capacity for accurate lesion assessment during thermal treatments. Here we investigate on the utility of volumetric optoacoustic tomography for real-time monitoring of the ELT procedures. Experiments performed in subcutaneous veins of an ox foot model revealed the accurate spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression and characteristics of the vessel wall. Optoacoustic images further correlated with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the coagulation spot and made it possible to track the position of the fiber tip during its pull back in real time and in all three dimensions. Overall, we showcase that volumetric optoacoustic tomography is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Comparing the speed of irrigation between pulsatile lavage versus gravity irrigation: an Ex-vivo experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Mundy, Lily R.; Gage, Mark J.; Yoon, Richard S.; Liporace, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The need for reoperation or wound infection treatments between pulsatile and gravity irrigation are statistically equivalent, however, it is unclear which method maximizes operative efficiency and expeditious irrigation. In this study we set out to determine the differences in irrigation rate between these various treatment methods. Methods This was an ex-vivo experimental laboratory study not involving human subjects. Irrigation rates were tested based on the time in seconds requi...

  13. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  14. The pathogenesis of Randall's plaque: a papilla cartography of Ca compounds through an ex vivo investigation based on XANES spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Xavier; Bazin, Dominique; Jungers, Paul; Reguer, Solenn; Thiaudière, Dominique; Daudon, Michel

    2010-05-01

    At the surface of attached kidney stones, a particular deposit termed Randall's plaque (RP) serves as a nucleus. This structural particularity as well as other major public health problems such as diabetes type-2 may explain the dramatic increase in urolithiasis now affecting up to 20% of the population in the industrialized countries. Regarding the chemical composition, even if other phosphate phases such as whitlockite or brushite can be found as minor components (less than 5%), calcium phosphate apatite as well as amorphous carbonated calcium phosphate (ACCP) are the major components of most RPs. Through X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at the Ca K-absorption edge, a technique specific to synchrotron radiation, the presence and crystallinity of the Ca phosphate phases present in RP were determined ex vivo. The sensitivity of the technique was used as well as the fact that the measurements can be performed directly on the papilla. The sample was stored in formol. Moreover, a first mapping of the chemical phase from the top of the papilla to the deep medulla is obtained. Direct structural evidence of the presence of ACCP as a major constituent is given for the first time. This set of data, coherent with previous studies, shows that this chemical phase can be considered as one precursor in the genesis of RP.

  15. Ex vivo investigations of laser auricular cartilage reshaping with carbon dioxide spray cooling in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Edward C; Sun, Victor; Manuel, Cyrus T; Protsenko, Dmitriy E; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J Stuart; Wong, Brian J F

    2013-11-01

    Laser cartilage reshaping (LCR) with cryogen spray cooling is a promising modality for producing cartilage shape change while reducing cutaneous thermal injury. However, LCR in thicker tissues, such as auricular cartilage, requires higher laser power, thus increasing cooling requirements. To eliminate the risks of freeze injury characteristic of high cryogen spray pulse rates, a carbon dioxide (CO2) spray, which evaporates rapidly from the skin, has been proposed as the cooling medium. This study aims to identify parameter sets which produce clinically significant reshaping while producing minimal skin thermal injury in LCR with CO2 spray cooling in ex vivo rabbit auricular cartilage. Excised whole rabbit ears were mechanically deformed around a cylindrical jig and irradiated with a 1.45-μm wavelength diode laser (fluence 12-14 J/cm(2) per pulse, four to six pulse cycles per irradiation site, five to six irradiation sites per row for four rows on each sample) with concomitant application of CO2 spray (pulse duration 33-85 ms) to the skin surface. Bend angle measurements were performed before and after irradiation, and the change quantified. Surface temperature distributions were measured during irradiation/cooling. Maximum skin surface temperature ranged between 49.0 to 97.6 °C following four heating/cooling cycles. Significant reshaping was achieved with all laser dosimetry values with a 50-70 °C difference noted between controls (no cooling) and irradiated ears. Increasing cooling pulse duration yielded progressively improved gross skin protection during irradiation. CO2 spray cooling may potentially serve as an alternative to traditional cryogen spray cooling in LCR and may be the preferred cooling medium for thicker tissues. Future studies evaluating preclinical efficacy in an in vivo rabbit model are in progress.

  16. Ex vivo investigations of laser auricular cartilage reshaping with carbon dioxide spray cooling in a rabbit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Edward C.; Sun, Victor; Manuel, Cyrus T.; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. Stuart; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Laser cartilage reshaping (LCR) with cryogen spray cooling is a promising modality for producing cartilage shape change while reducing cutaneous thermal injury. However, LCR in thicker tissues, such as auricular cartilage, requires higher laser power, thus increasing cooling requirements. To eliminate the risks of freeze injury characteristic of high cryogen spray pulse rates, a carbon dioxide (CO2) spray, which evaporates rapidly from the skin, has been proposed as the cooling medium. This study aims to identify parameter sets which produce clinically significant reshaping while producing minimal skin thermal injury in LCR with CO2 spray cooling in ex vivo rabbit auricular cartilage. Excised whole rabbit ears were mechanically deformed around a cylindrical jig and irradiated with a 1.45-μm wavelength diode laser (fluence 12–14 J/cm2 per pulse, four to six pulse cycles per irradiation site, five to six irradiation sites per row for four rows on each sample) with concomitant application of CO2 spray (pulse duration 33–85 ms) to the skin surface. Bend angle measurements were performed before and after irradiation, and the change quantified. Surface temperature distributions were measured during irradiation/cooling. Maximum skin surface temperature ranged between 49.0 to 97.6 °C following four heating/cooling cycles. Significant reshaping was achieved with all laser dosimetry values with a 50–70 °C difference noted between controls (no cooling) and irradiated ears. Increasing cooling pulse duration yielded progressively improved gross skin protection during irradiation. CO2 spray cooling may potentially serve as an alternative to traditional cryogen spray cooling in LCR and may be the preferred cooling medium for thicker tissues. Future studies evaluating preclinical efficacy in an in vivo rabbit model are in progress. PMID:23307439

  17. Ex vivo investigation of ocular tissue distribution following intravitreal administration of connexin43 mimetic peptide using the microdialysis technique and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Mandal, Abhirup; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Mitra, Ashim K

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate an ex vivo eye model for intravitreal drug sampling and tissue distribution of connexin43 mimetic peptide (Cx43MP) following intravitreal injection using the microdialysis technique and LC-MS/MS. An LC-MS/MS method was developed, validated, and applied for quantification of Cx43MP in ocular tissues. Microdialysis probes were calibrated for in vitro recovery studies. Bovine eyes were fixed in a customized eye holder and after intravitreal injection of Cx43MP, microdialysis probes were implanted in the vitreous body. Vitreous samples were collected at particular time intervals over 24 h. Moreover, 24 and 48 h after intravitreal injection ocular tissues were collected, processed, and analyzed for Cx43MP concentrations using LC-MS/MS. The LC-MS/MS method showed good linearity (r 2  = 0.9991). The mean percent recovery for lower (LQC), medium (MQC), and higher quality control (HQC) (0.244, 3.906, and 125 μg/mL) was found to be 83.83, 84.92, and 94.52, respectively, with accuracy ranges between 96 and 99 % and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.122 and 0.412 μg/mL. The in vitro recovery of the probes was found to be over 80 %. As per microdialysis sample analysis, the Cx43MP concentration was found to increase slowly in the vitreous body up to 16 h and thereafter declined. After 48 h, the Cx43MP concentration was higher in vitreous, cornea, and retina compared to lens, iris, and aqueous humor. This ex vivo model may therefore be a useful tool to investigate intravitreal kinetics and ocular disposition of therapeutic molecules after intravitreal injection.

  18. Comparison of In-Vitro and Ex-Vivo Wound Healing Assays for the Investigation of Diabetic Wound Healing and Demonstration of a Beneficial Effect of a Triterpene Extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ueck

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a frequent cause for chronic, difficult-to-treat wounds. New therapies for diabetic wounds are urgently needed and in-vitro or ex-vivo test systems are essential for the initial identification of new active molecules. The aim of this study is to compare in-vitro and ex-vivo test systems for their usability for early drug screening and to investigate the efficacy of a birch bark triterpene extract (TE that has been proven ex-vivo and clinically to accelerate non-diabetic wound healing (WH, in a diabetic context. We investigated in-vitro models for diabetic WH, i.e. scratch assays with human keratinocytes from diabetic donors or cultured under hyperglycaemic conditions and a newly developed porcine ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH model for their potential to mimic delayed diabetic WH and for the influence of TE in these test systems. We show that keratinocytes from diabetic donors often fail to exhibit significantly delayed WH. For cells under hyperglycaemic conditions significant decrease is observed but is influenced by choice of medium and presence of supplements. Also, donor age plays a role. Interestingly, hyperglycaemic effects are mainly hyperosmolaric effects in scratch assays. Ex-vivo models under hyperglycaemic conditions show a clear and substantial decrease of WH, and here both glucose and hyperosmolarity effects are involved. Finally, we provide evidence that TE is also beneficial for ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH, resulting in significantly increased length of regenerated epidermis to 188±16% and 183±11% (SEM; p<0.05 compared to controls when using two different TE formulations. In conclusion, our results suggest that microenvironmental influences are important in WH test systems and that therefore the more complex hyperglycaemic ex-vivo model is more suitable for early drug screening. Limitations of the in-vitro and ex-vivo models are discussed. Furthermore our data recommend TE as a promising candidate for in

  19. Investigation of skin permeation, ex vivo inhibition of venom-induced tissue destruction, and wound healing of African plants used against snakebites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marianne Molander; Stærk, Dan; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    . Materials and methods Extracts which had previously shown in vitro inhibitory activity against necrosis enzymes, were tested in an ex vivo air–liquid-interface model, and a wound healing scratch assay as well as for their ability to permeate the skin barrier and inhibit venom induced cell death. Results...... in its present form. None of the extracts were able to directly interact with the enzyme to lower the cell toxicity of the venom. Two extracts, Dichrostachys cinerea and Grewia mollis, were tested in the ex vivo model, but none of them inhibited the tissue destruction caused by venom. Conclusion...

  20. Investigation of moxifloxacin loaded chitosan–dextran nanoparticles for topical instillation into eye: In-vitro and ex-vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskoos, Raad A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Management of ocular surface disease by conventional formulation is limited by poor residence of drug at cul-de-sac of eye. To overcome this limitation, prolonged released mucoadhesive chitosan (CS)–dextran sulfate (DS) nanoparticles (NPs) were investigated for the prolonged topical ophthalmic delivery of moxifloxacin (Mox). Methods: Formulation was optimized by 3-factors (CS, DS, and Mox concentration), 3-levels (−1, 0, +1) Box-Behnken design. Optimized formulation was characterized for various in-vitro attributes, including particles size, zeta potential, shape and morphology, in-vitro release profile, corneal permeation, corneal retention, ocular tolerance test as well as antimicrobial activity. Results: Average hydrodynamic particle size of statistically optimized formulation was found to be 279.18 ± 15.63 nm with good polydispersity index, 0.367 ± 0.016 and positive zeta potential, +31.23 ± 1.32. NPs showed entrapment efficiency, 72.82 ± 3.6% and transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed a spherical shape of particles. Formulation exhibited biphasic release profile with an initial fast release (≈25% in 1st h) followed by sustained release (≈95% in next 24 h) following Korsmeyer–Peppas model with a nonFickian diffusion process. Mox loaded CS-DS NPs exhibited a significantly higher (P < 0.01), approximately 1.8-fold transcorneal permeation as well as significantly higher corneal retention (P < 0.01), around 4-5-fold when compared to free solution. Developed formulation exhibited safety profile comparable to normal saline, which was revealed by ocular tolerance test (Hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane). Mox-CS-DS NPs exhibited significantly high (P < 0.01) antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: In-vitro and ex-vivo studies revealed that developed formulation could be a potential substitute for prolonged topical ocular delivery. PMID:25426437

  1. Early effects of the ex vivo evaluation system on graft function after swine lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Shinji; Oto, Takahiro; Kakishita, Tomokazu; Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Hori, Shiro; Yamane, Masaomi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-10-01

    Ex vivo lung evaluation (ex vivo) has been developed as a useful method by which to assess lungs from donation-after-cardiac death (DCD) donors prior to transplant. However, the safety of the ex vivo circulation itself with respect to grafts has not been fully investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the ex vivo circuit using a swine lung transplant model. Lungs with or without 2-h warm ischemia were used. To assess post-transplant graft function, the left lung was transplanted after 2-h ex vivo or cold preservation; blood gas analysis of the left pulmonary vein (partial pressure of oxygen, PO(2)) was performed during the 6-h post-transplant follow-up period. Data were compared between the ex vivo (+) and ex vivo (-) groups. Partial pressure of oxygen/ inspired oxygen fraction (PO(2)/FiO(2)) in the ex vivo (-) group was significantly greater than that in the ex vivo (+) group until 3h after transplant. The PO(2)/FiO(2) levels in both groups then increased and became similar at 6 h after transplant, regardless of whether ischemic or non-ischemic lungs (pex vivo system were limited and seen only in the immediate post-transplant period. Therefore, in DCD swine lung transplantation, the ex vivo system appears to be safe. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  3. Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy findings of cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Natsuko Yamazaki,1 Akira Kobayashi,1 Hideaki Yokogawa,1 Yasuhisa Ishibashi,2 Yosaburo Oikawa,3 Masaharu Tokoro,4 Kazuhisa Sugiyama11Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, East Washinomiya Hospital, Kuki, Japan; 3Department of Medical Zoology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku, Japan; 4Department of Parasitology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, JapanPurpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate ex vivo laser confocal microscopic findings of cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites obtained from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients.Methods: Eight cultured samples of Acanthamoeba trophozoites from eight eyes of seven patients (mean age, 26.9 years; age range, 18–52 years were used. Seven samples were from corneal scrapings of Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one sample was from the solution in a soft contact lens case. Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy was performed to qualitatively evaluate the shape and degree of light reflection of the living Acanthamoeba trophozoites.Results: Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy demonstrated highly reflective, high-contrast Acanthamoeba trophozoites with no walls (mean size, 25.4 µm; range, 17.1–58.5 µm. The shapes of the trophozoites were highly pleomorphic, and some showed characteristic acanthopodia by laser confocal microscopy.Conclusion: Ex vivo laser confocal microscopy was effective in demonstrating cultured Acanthamoeba trophozoites of various shapes and sizes. The observations of the current study may be helpful when similar structures are identified under in vivo conditions.Keywords: Acanthamoeba, trophozoite, laser confocal microscopy

  4. Evaluation of the in vivo and ex vivo optical properties in a mouse ear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomatina, E; Yaroslavsky, A N [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, 40 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)], E-mail: Yaroslav@helix.mgh.harvard.edu

    2008-06-07

    Determination of in vivo optical properties is a challenging problem. Absorption and scattering measured ex vivo are often used for in vivo applications. To investigate the validity of this approach, we have obtained and compared the optical properties of mouse ears in vivo and ex vivo in the spectral range from 370 to 1650 nm. Integrating sphere spectrophotometry in combination with the inverse Monte Carlo technique was employed to determine absorption coefficients, {mu}{sub a}, scattering coefficients, {mu}{sub s}, and anisotropy factors, g. Two groups of mice were used for the study. The first group was measured in vivo and ex vivo within 5-10 min post mortem. The second group was measured in vivo and ex vivo every 24 h for up to 72 h after sacrifice. Between the measurements the tissues were kept at 4 deg. C wrapped in a gauze moistened with saline solution. Then the specimens were frozen at -25 deg. C for 40 min, thawed and measured again. The results indicate that the absorption coefficients determined in vivo and ex vivo within 5-10 min post mortem differed considerably only in the spectral range dominated by hemoglobin. These changes can be attributed to rapid deoxygenation of tissue and blood post mortem. Absorption coefficients determined ex vivo up to 72 h post mortem decreased gradually with time in the spectral regions dominated by hemoglobin and water, which can be explained by the continuing loss of blood. Absorption properties of the frozen-thawed ex vivo tissues showed increase in oxygenation, which is likely caused by the release of hemoglobin from hemolyzed erythrocytes. Scattering of the ex vivo tissues decreased gradually with time in the entire spectral range due to the continuing loss of blood and partial cell damage. Anisotropy factors did not change considerably.

  5. Ex vivo investigations on the potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a diagnostic tool for reproductive medicine in a bovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Kölle, Sabine; Leeb, Regina; Doering, Daniel; Reese, Sven; Stief, Christian G; Dulohery, Kate; Leavy, Myles; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Sroka, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Routine infertility investigations in the male and female include imaging techniques such as ultrasonography and endoscopy (fertiloscopy). However, these techniques lack the resolution to localize vital sperm or to reveal detailed morphological analysis of the oviduct which is often the cause of infertility in females. Therefore we set out to evaluate the efficiency of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a diagnostic imaging tool for micron-scale visualization of the male and female genital tract. Using the bovine as a model, the optical features of the Telesto(TM) , Ganymede(TM) (both Thorlabs) and Niris(TM) (Imalux) OCT imaging systems were compared. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. In vivo and ex vivo confocal endomicroscopy of pancreatic cystic lesions: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Modi, Rohan M; Kamboj, Amrit K; Swanson, Benjamin J; Hart, Phil A; Dillhoff, Mary E; Manilchuk, Andrei; Schmidt, Carl R; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the reproducibility of the in vivo endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) - guided needle based confocal endomicroscopy (nCLE) image patterns in an ex vivo setting and compare these to surgical histopathology for characterizing pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). METHODS In a prospective study evaluating EUS-nCLE for evaluation of PCLs, 10 subjects underwent an in vivo nCLE (AQ-Flex nCLE miniprobe; Cellvizio, MaunaKea, Paris, France) during EUS and ex vivo probe based CLE (pCLE) of the PCL (Gastroflex ultrahigh definition probe, Cellvizio) after surgical resection. Biopsies were obtained from ex vivo CLE-imaged areas for comparative histopathology. All subjects received intravenous fluorescein prior to EUS and pancreatic surgery for in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging respectively. RESULTS A total of 10 subjects (mean age 53 ± 12 years; 5 female) with a mean PCL size of 34.8 ± 14.3 mm were enrolled. Surgical histopathology confirmed 2 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), 3 mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), 2 cystic neuroendocrine tumors (cystic-NETs), 1 serous cystadenoma (SCA), and 2 squamous lined PCLs. Characteristic in vivo nCLE image patterns included papillary projections for IPMNs, horizon-type epithelial bands for MCNs, nests and trabeculae of cells for cystic-NETs, and a “fern pattern” of vascularity for SCA. Identical image patterns were observed during ex vivo pCLE imaging of the surgically resected PCLs. Both in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging findings correlated with surgical histopathology. CONCLUSION In vivo nCLE patterns are reproducible in ex vivo pCLE for all major neoplastic PCLs. These findings add further support the application of EUS-nCLE as an imaging biomarker in the diagnosis of PCLs. PMID:28566895

  7. Comparison of ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Judith E; Boesten, Lianne S M; Ettema, Esmée M; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Franssen, Casper F M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Zittema, Debbie

    BACKGROUND: Copeptin, part of the vasopressin precursor, is increasingly used as marker for vasopressin and is claimed to have better ex vivo stability. However, no study has directly compared the ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin. METHODS: Blood of ten healthy volunteers was collected

  8. Ex vivo technical skills training transfers to the operating room and enhances cognitive learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, Vanessa N; Grantcharov, Teodor; Harvey, Adrian; Macrae, Helen M

    2011-05-01

    Surgical training in the operating room includes acquiring technical skills and cognitive knowledge. Technical skills training on simulated models has been shown to improve technical performance in the operating room, and may also enhance the acquisition of other skills by freeing cognitive capacity. This has yet to be investigated. We conducted a single-blinded randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of ex vivo technical skills training on cognitive learning in the operating room. Eighteen novice surgical residents were randomized to 2 groups. All participants were taught the basics of fascial closure and performed 1 closure on a low fidelity synthetic model. Residents in the intervention group practiced on the models until technical proficiency was reached. Residents in the control group had no further contact with the models. All residents then performed a fascial closure on a patient in the operating room while listening to a script that contained relevant clinical information. A validated evaluation tool was used to assess the technical merit of the closure. Finally, all participants completed a multiple-choice test designed to test the information retained from the script. The technical performance of the ex vivo trained group was significantly higher than that of the untrained group (P = 0.04). The ex vivo trained group also performed significantly better on the cognitive retention test (P = 0.03). Technical skills training using a low fidelity synthetic simulator resulted in improved technical performance in the operating room, and enhanced the ability of residents to attend to cognitive components of surgical expertise. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  9. Dual energy computed tomography thermometry during hepatic microwave ablation in an ex-vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J; Chacko, Annamma

    2015-11-01

    Microwave thermoablation (MTA) is a treatment method used to destroy hepatic tumors. To investigate temperature changes during MTA of ex-vivo porcine liver using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging. Three MTA experiments were performed using ex-vivo porcine liver (15 × 15 × 15 cm(3)) and DECT imaging with 80/Sn140 kVp spectral and 0.5-weighted reconstructions. Images were acquired from basic organ temperature to 100 °C with 10 °C difference during microwave heating and cooling phases. Three fluoro-optic thermometers were used for temperature measurements; two were placed at 1 cm and third one positioned at 2 cm distance from the applicator. Tissue temperature, ablation-region-conspicuity (ARC), ablation-region dimensions and image quality were determined. Regression analysis was performed determining thermal sensitivity during heating and cooling phases. Determined thermal sensitivities during heating phase were: -0.59 Hounsfield Unit/°C (80 kVp), -0.60HU/°C (0.5-weighted) and -0.59HU/°C (140 kVp); furthermore, during cooling: -0.56HU/°C (80 kVp), -0.55HU/°C (0.5-weighted) and -0.55HU/°C (140 kVp). ARC showed significantly higher (all P 0.05). Signal-to-noise ratios were higher for 0.5-weighted but ARC values were higher for 80 kVp images. Microwave thermal sensitivity on tissue was inversely linear with DECT image datasets. Heating phase showed higher influence of temperature on HU compared to cooling; ARC and ablation-region were increased with increase in temperature. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory symptoms and ex vivo cytokine release are associated in workers processing herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Thomassen, Mads; Viskum, Sven

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among workers processing herring and assess ex vivo cytokine release in response to agents at their workplace. METHODS: We applied a questionnaire, and performed skin prick testing and pulmonary investigations in 36 workers at two...

  11. Ischemic small intestine-in vivo versus ex vivo bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Amundsen, Runar J; Reims, Henrik M; Tronstad, Christian; Kalvøy, Håvard; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Høgetveit, Jan O; Ruud, Tom E; Tønnessen, Tor I

    2017-05-01

    Bioimpedance has been used to investigate changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The small intestine is a multi-layered structure, with several distinct tissue types, and ischemia related changes occur at different times in the different intestinal layers. When investigating how the electrical properties in the small intestine is affected by ischemia, some researchers have used ex vivo models while others have used in vivo models. In this study, we compare ischemic time development of electrical parameters in ischemic in vivo versus ex vivo small intestine. Measurements were performed using a two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. Electrodes were placed on the surface of ischemic pig jejunum, applying a voltage and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. In each pig, 4 segments of the jejunum were made ischemic by clamping the mesenteric arteries and veins, resulting in a 30 cm central zone of warm ischemia and edema. The in vivo part of the experiment lasted 10 h, after which 3 pieces of perfused small intestine were resected, stored in Ringer-acetat at 38 °C, and measured during a 10 h ex vivo experiment. Main results and significance: We found significant differences (p  vivo and ex vivo measurements as a function of ischemic time development. We also observed some similarities in the trends. In vivo, we measured an overall decrease in impedance during the duration of the experiment, probably as a result from the formation of edema. Ex vivo, the low frequency impedance increased initially for approximately 3 h before starting to decrease.

  12. Ex vivo study of dentate gyrus neurogenesis in human pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, M; Fernández, M; Del Vecchio, G; Lizzo, G; Marucci, G; Giulioni, M; Pozzati, E; Antonelli, T; Lanzoni, G; Bagnara, G P; Giardino, L; Calzà, L

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenesis in adult humans occurs in at least two areas of the brain, the subventricular zone of the telencephalon and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampal formation. We studied dentate gyrus subgranular layer neurogenesis in patients subjected to tailored antero-mesial temporal resection including amygdalohippocampectomy due to pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using the in vitro neurosphere assay. Sixteen patients were enrolled in the study; mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was present in eight patients. Neurogenesis was investigated by ex vivo neurosphere expansion in the presence of mitogens (epidermal growth factor + basic fibroblast growth factor) and spontaneous differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Growth factor synthesis was investigated by qRT-PCR in neurospheres. We demonstrate that in vitro proliferation of cells derived from dentate gyrus of TLE patients is dependent on disease duration. Moreover, the presence of MTS impairs proliferation. As long as in vitro proliferation occurs, neurogenesis is maintained, and cells expressing a mature neurone phenotype (TuJ1, MAP2, GAD) are spontaneously formed after mitogen withdrawal. Finally, formed neurospheres express mRNAs encoding for growth (vascular endothelial growth factor) as well as neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor). We demonstrated that residual neurogenesis in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in TLE is dependent on diseases duration and absent in MTS. © 2010 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2010 British Neuropathological Society.

  13. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D. [Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology, Sydney (Australia)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  15. In vitro and ex vivo correlation of drug release from ophthalmic ointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Quanying; Newman, Bryan; Wang, Yan; Choi, Stephanie; Burgess, Diane J

    2018-03-05

    In vitro drug release testing and ex vivo transcorneal drug permeation can provide valuable information on the performance of the Q1/Q2 equivalent ointments prior to any animal studies. Good correlation between in vitro and ex vivo drug release may be indicative of good in vitro and in vivo correlation. Accordingly, it is important to investigate in vitro as well as ex vivo drug release from Q1/Q2 equivalent ophthalmic ointments and evaluate whether a correlation between these release profiles can be established. Four Q1/Q2 equivalent loteprednol etabonate ointments were prepared using different processing methods and excipient sources. The rheological parameters (crossover modulus and K value) of the four formulations were determined. The in vitro drug release testing of the four ointment formulations were performed using three different apparati (Franz diffusion cells, USP apparatus 2 with enhancer cells and USP apparatus 4 with semisolid adapters). Three models (zero order, logarithmic and the Higuchi model) were used to study the release kinetics of the ointment formulations. The transcorneal (rabbit corneas) permeation studies were performed using spherical joint Franz diffusion cells. The USP apparatus 4 method demonstrated better discriminatory ability compared to the USP apparatus 2 and the Franz diffusion cell methods. The in vitro release profiles of the four Q1/Q2 equivalent ointments with manufacturing differences showed a better fit using the Higuchi model (R 2  > 0.98) for all three release testing methods, compared to the other two models. Ex vivo drug release through the rabbit corneas displayed zero order release kinetics. A logarithmic correlation between rheological parameters (crossover and K value) and transcorneal flux were established. In addition, a plot of the in vitro release rate against the ex vivo release flux of the four ointment formulations, yielded a straight line (R 2  > 0.98) for all three release methods. Accordingly, the

  16. Ex Vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Improve Engraftment in Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kap-Hyoun; Nordon, Robert; O'Brien, Tracey A; Symonds, Geoff; Dolnikov, Alla

    2017-01-01

    The efficient use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation is often limited by the relatively low numbers of HSC collected. The ex vivo expansion of HSC for clinical use is a potentially valuable and safe approach to increase HSC numbers thereby increasing engraftment and reducing the risk of morbidity from infection. Here, we describe a protocol for the robust ex vivo expansion of human CD34(+) HSC isolated from umbilical cord blood. The protocol described can efficiently generate large numbers of HSC. We also describe a flow cytometry-based method using high-resolution division tracking to characterize the kinetics of HSC growth and differentiation. Utilizing the guidelines discussed, it is possible for investigators to use this protocol as presented or to modify it for their specific needs.

  17. High-wavenumber FT-Raman spectroscopy for in vivo and ex vivo measurements of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Flores, A. F.; Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    -frequency Raman spectra of normal and cancer tissues. LDA results with the leave-one-out cross-validation option yielded a discrimination accuracy of 77.2, 83.3, and 100% for in vivo transcutaneous, in vivo skin-removed, and ex vivo biopsy HF Raman spectra. Despite the lower discrimination value for the in vivo...... 0.86, 0.94, and 1.0 for in vivo transcutaneous, in vivo skin-removed, and ex vivo biopsy measurements, respectively. The feasibility of using HF Raman spectroscopy as a clinical diagnostic tool for breast cancer detection and monitoring is due to no interfering contribution from the optical fiber......The identification of normal and cancer breast tissue of rats was investigated using high-frequency (HF) FT-Raman spectroscopy with a near-infrared excitation source on in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Significant differences in the Raman intensities of prominent Raman bands of lipids and proteins...

  18. In and ex vivo breast disease study by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Raman spectra in the 900-1,800 cm(-1) wavenumber region of in vivo and ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured. In the case of the in vivo tissues, the Raman spectra were collected for both transcutaneo...

  19. Antimicrobial Blue Light Therapy for Infectious Keratitis: Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Kochevar, Irene E; Behlau, Irmgard; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Fenghua; Wang, Yucheng; Sun, Xiaodong; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) as an alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. We developed an ex vivo rabbit model and an in vivo mouse model of infectious keratitis. A bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as the causative pathogen, allowing noninvasive monitoring of the extent of infection in real time via bioluminescence imaging. Quantitation of bacterial luminescence was correlated to colony-forming units (CFU). Using the ex vivo and in vivo models, the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) for the treatment of keratitis was evaluated as a function of radiant exposure when aBL was delivered at 6 or 24 hours after bacterial inoculation. The aBL exposures calculated to reach the retina were compared to the American National Standards Institute standards to estimate aBL retinal safety. Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis fully developed in both the ex vivo and in vivo models at 24 hours post inoculation. Bacterial luminescence in the infected corneas correlated linearly to CFU (R2 = 0.921). Bacterial burden in the infected corneas was rapidly and significantly reduced (>2-log10) both ex vivo and in vivo after a single exposure of aBL. Recurrence of infection was observed in the aBL-treated mice at 24 hours after aBL exposure. The aBL toxicity to the retina is largely dependent on the aBL transmission of the cornea. Antimicrobial blue light is a potential alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. Further studies of corneal and retinal safety using large animal models, in which the ocular anatomies are similar to that of humans, are warranted.

  20. Ex vivo efficacy of gemifloxacin in experimental keratitis induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Andreana; Blanco, Anna Rita; Ginestra, Giovanna; Nostro, Antonia; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains has been observed in ocular infections. Resistance of MRSA to second- and third-generation fluoroquinolones has increased interest in the fourth-generation fluoroquinolones. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gemifloxacin against MRSA ocular isolates in vitro and in a modified ex vivo rabbit keratitis model was investigated. In vitro susceptibility test results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of gemifloxacin were lower than the MICs of other fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin (MIC50 range, 0.016-0.032 µg/mL; MIC90 range, 0.047-0.094 µg/mL). Results from the ex vivo keratitis model showed a statistically significant decrease in MRSA counts (0.5-2 log10 CFU/g; P keratitis. In addition, this reproducible, ethical and economic ex vivo infection model can be used as a mechanistically-based alternative to in vivo animal testing, bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. Light Emission Requires Exposure to the Atmosphere in Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of organs bearing luciferase activity by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is often difficult, and ex vivo imaging of excised organs plays a complementary role. This study investigated the importance of exposure to the atmosphere in ex vivo BLI. Mice were inoculated with murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 transduced with firefly luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL. They were killed following in vivo BLI, and whole-body imaging was done after death and then after intraperitoneal air injection. In addition, the right knee was exposed and imaged before and after the adjacent bones were cut. Extensive light signals were seen on in vivo imaging. The luminescence disappeared after the animal was killed, and air injection restored the light emission from the abdomen only, suggesting a critical role of atmospheric oxygen in luminescence after death. Although no substantial light signal at the right knee was seen before bone cutting, light emission was evident after cutting. In conclusion, in ex vivo BLI, light emission requires exposure to the atmosphere. Bone destruction is required to demonstrate luciferase activity in the bone marrow after death.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cells: ex-vivo expansion and therapeutic potential for myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Lu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingwei Lu, Vincent J Pompili, Hiranmoy DasCardiovascular Stem Cell Research Laboratory, The Dorothy M Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAbstract: Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic heart disease remains the major cause of death in the United States and abroad. Cell-based therapy for degenerative diseases like myocardial ischemia using stem cells is currently under serious investigation. Various types of stem cells are being considered to be candidates for cell transplantation in cell-based therapy. Hematopoietic stem cells are one of the most promising cell types as several studies demonstrated their ability to improve ischemic cardiac functions by enhancing neovascularization and by reducing the total size of scar tissue. However, in order to procure sufficient numbers of functional stem cells, ex-vivo expansion technology became critically important. In this review, we focus on the state-of-the-art ex-vivo technology for the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, and the underlying mechanisms regulating stem cell self-renewal as well as differentiation.Keywords: ischemic heart disease, ex-vivo expansion, hematopoietic stem cells, cytokines, nanofibers

  3. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic cells in the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia. Feasibility Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry, D.; Bertho, J.M.; Chapel, A.; Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fountenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-05-01

    The lessons learnt from the treatment of previous radiation accidents using either bone marrow transplantation or growth factor therapy suggest that it is of importance to investigate new therapeutic regiments. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells, precursors and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with irradiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Ex vivo expanded maturing cells could be used to limit the early risks bound to aplasia (infections related to granulocytopaenia, bleedings associated with thrombocytopaenia), whereas expanded immature cells could hasten haematopoietic recovery. Indeed, it is possible to culture from the blood or bone marrow the cells able to proliferate and differentiate. A sufficient quantity of cells to cover the transfusion needs of a radiation victim through an aplasia episode can be produced, in presence of a specific growth factor combination. Qualitative studies shows that the expanded cells exhibit a close to normal functionality. Long-term culture techniques demonstrate the expansion of immature cells. We have set up a high dose total body irradiation non-human primate model in order to study the therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of autologous progenitors and differentiating cells. All the steps of the process (sampling, positive selection of the immature cells, ex vivo expansion, irradiation of the animals, reinjection of the cultured cells and study of the outcome) are established. In order to allow the long term follow up of the ex vivo expanded haematopoietic cells (homing to the bone marrow or localization to specific organs for example), a retroviral gene transfer technique for transduction of green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene toward the selected immature blood or bone marrow cells is under development in this model. Taken together these elements will allow establishing the feasibility of ex vivo expansion of

  4. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic cells in the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia. Feasibility Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.; Bertho, J.M.; Chapel, A.; Gourmelon, P.

    2000-01-01

    The lessons learnt from the treatment of previous radiation accidents using either bone marrow transplantation or growth factor therapy suggest that it is of importance to investigate new therapeutic regiments. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells, precursors and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with irradiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Ex vivo expanded maturing cells could be used to limit the early risks bound to aplasia (infections related to granulocytopaenia, bleedings associated with thrombocytopaenia), whereas expanded immature cells could hasten haematopoietic recovery. Indeed, it is possible to culture from the blood or bone marrow the cells able to proliferate and differentiate. A sufficient quantity of cells to cover the transfusion needs of a radiation victim through an aplasia episode can be produced, in presence of a specific growth factor combination. Qualitative studies shows that the expanded cells exhibit a close to normal functionality. Long-term culture techniques demonstrate the expansion of immature cells. We have set up a high dose total body irradiation non-human primate model in order to study the therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of autologous progenitors and differentiating cells. All the steps of the process (sampling, positive selection of the immature cells, ex vivo expansion, irradiation of the animals, reinjection of the cultured cells and study of the outcome) are established. In order to allow the long term follow up of the ex vivo expanded haematopoietic cells (homing to the bone marrow or localization to specific organs for example), a retroviral gene transfer technique for transduction of green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene toward the selected immature blood or bone marrow cells is under development in this model. Taken together these elements will allow establishing the feasibility of ex vivo expansion of

  5. Ex vivo permeation characteristics of venlafaxine through sheep nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pund, Swati; Rasve, Ganesh; Borade, Ganesh

    2013-01-23

    Venlafaxine, a dual acting antidepressant is a new therapeutic option for chronic depression. Depression is a common mental disorder associated with the abnormalities in neuronal transport in the brain. Since the nose-to-brain pathway has been indicated for delivering drugs to the brain, we analyzed the transport of venlafaxine through sheep nasal mucosa. Transmucosal permeation kinetics of venlafaxine were examined using sheep nasal mucosa mounted onto static vertical Franz diffusion cells. Nasal mucosa was treated with venlafaxine in situ gel (100 μl; 1% w/v) for 7h. Amount of venlafaxine diffused through mucosa was measured using validated RP-HPLC method. After the completion of the study histopathological investigation of mucosa was carried out. Ex vivo studies through sheep nasal mucosa showed sustained diffusion of venlafaxine with 66.5% permeation in 7h. Transnasal transport of venlafaxine followed a non-Fickian diffusion process. Permeability coefficient and steady state flux were found to be 21.11×10(-3) cmh(-1) and 21.118 μg cm(-2)h(-1) respectively. Cumulative amount permeated through mucosa at 7h was found to be 664.8 μg through an area of 3.14 cm(2). Total recovery of venlafaxine at the end of the permeation study was 87.3% of initial dose distributed (i) at the mucosal surface (208.4 μg; 20.8%) and (ii) through mucosa (664.8 μg; 66.5%). Histopathological examinations showed no significant adverse effects confirming that the barrier function of nasal mucosa remains unaffected even after treatment with venlafaxine in situ gel. Permeation through sheep nasal mucosa using in situ gel demonstrated a harmless nasal delivery of venlafaxine, providing new dimension to the treatment of chronic depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A.; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  7. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal

  8. Mechanical Properties of Healthy and ex vivo Onychomycosis Nails and the Influence of a Porphyrin-propylene Glycol Antifungal Formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hosseinzoi (Amu); F. Galli (Federica); L. Incrocci (Luca); T. Smijs (Threes)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAims: To investigate nail penetration enhancing effectiveness of a novel drug formulation and ingredients, 40% propylene glycol (PG) and 40 μM multifunctional photosensitizer (MFPS). Proposed formulation was proven effective in photodynamic treatment (PDT) of ex vivo fungal infections

  9. Ex vivo fracture resistance of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without posts on maxillary premolars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Bell, A.M. Le; Kreulen, C.M.; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ex vivo the fracture resistance and failure mode of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without various root canal posts made on maxillary premolars. METHODOLOGY: The clinical crowns of 40 human extracted single-rooted maxillary premolars were sectioned at the

  10. Sorbitol increases muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and inhibits intestinal glucose absorption ex vivo and in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sorbitol, a known polyol sweetener, possesses glycemic control potentials. However, the effect of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake still remains elusive. The present study investigated the effects of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake as possible anti-hyperglycemic or glycemic control potentials using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. Sorbitol (2.5% to 20%) inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejuna (IC 50 = 14.6% ± 4.6%) and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle with (GU 50 = 3.5% ± 1.6%) or without insulin (GU 50 = 7.0% ± 0.5%) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sorbitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, accelerated digesta transit, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption, and reduced blood glucose increase in both normoglycemic and type 2 diabetic rats after 1 h of coingestion with glucose. Data of this study suggest that sorbitol exhibited anti-hyperglycemic potentials, possibly via increasing muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and reducing intestinal glucose absorption in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Hence, sorbitol may be further investigated as a possible anti-hyperglycemic sweetener.

  11. Ex vivo culture of patient tissue & examination of gene delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial.

  12. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coagulation Management in Jersey Calves: An ex vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Sabine; Maas, Judith; van Geul, Svenja; Rossaint, Rolf; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Grottke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Jersey calves are frequently used as an experimental animal model for in vivo testing of cardiac assist devices or orthopedic implants. In this ex vivo study, we analyzed the coagulation system of the Jersey calves and the potential of human-based coagulation management to circumvent perioperative bleeding complications during surgery. Experimental Procedure: Blood from 7 Jersey calves was subjected to standard laboratory tests and thromboelastometry analysis. An ex vivo model of dilutional coagulopathy was used to study the effects of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate supplementation. Fibrinolysis was induced with tissue plasminogen activator to identify potential therapeutic strategies involving tranexamic acid or aprotinin. Furthermore, anticoagulation strategies were evaluated by incubating the blood samples with dabigatran or rivaroxaban. Baseline values for thromboelastometry and standard laboratory parameters, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin III, and D-dimers, were established. Fifty percent diluted blood showed a statistically significant impairment of hemostasis. The parameters significantly improved after the administration of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate. Tranexamic acid and aprotinin ameliorated tissue plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. Both dabigatran and rivaroxaban significantly prolonged the coagulation parameters. In this ex vivo study, coagulation factors, factor concentrate, antifibrinolytic reagents, and anticoagulants regularly used in the clinic positively impacted coagulation parameters in Jersey calf blood. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  15. Aflatoxin B1 binding by a mixture of Lactobacillus and Propionibacterium: in vitro versus ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, S; Mykkänen, H; El-Nezami, H

    2005-11-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB) is a well-known carcinogen and reducing its bioavailability is of great interest for human and animal health. Several probiotic bacteria are able to bind AFB1 in vitro, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC-705 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS. A mixture of these two probiotics is used by the food and feed industry as biopreservative (Bioprofit), making it a promising candidate for future applications. Consequently, this study aims to investigate the in vitro and ex vivo ability of this probiotic mixture to bind AFB1. For in vitro experiments, probiotic mixture was suspended in an AFB1 solution (5 microM), incubated for 1 to 30 min, centrifuged, and AFB1 residues were quantitated in supernatant and pellet. For ex vivo experiments, duodenal loops of chicks were ligated and injected with either AFB1 solution alone or probiotic mixture suspension and AFB1 solution. Lumen content was centrifuged and AFB1 was quantitated in supernatant and pellet. Additionally, AFB1 was extracted from duodenal tissue to calculate tissue uptake. In vitro, 57 to 66% of AFB1 was removed from the solution by the probiotic mixture, but only 38 to 47% could be extracted from the bacterial surface. In ex vivo experiments, only up to 25% of AFB1 was bound by bacteria, and tissue uptake of AFB1 was significantly reduced when probiotic bacteria were present in the duodenal loop. Furthermore, the effect of intestinal mucus on the bacterial binding ability was investigated in vitro and was found to significantly reduce AFB1 binding by the probiotic mixture. However, probiotic mixture could only retard but not prevent AFB1 absorption in duodenal loops. Further work needs to assess the potential of probiotics in different experimental setups.

  16. Development of a novel ex vivo equine corneal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlo, Todd L; Giuliano, Elizabeth A; Sharma, Ajay; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2017-07-01

    To develop an ex vivo equine corneal organ culture model. Specifically, to assess the equine cornea's extracellular matrix and cellularity after 7 days using two different culture techniques: either (i) immersion system or (ii) air/liquid interface system, to determine the best ex vivo equine corneal model. Fourteen healthy equine corneas of various breeds. Equine corneas with 2 mm of perilimbal sclera were freshly harvested from 7 horses undergoing humane euthanasia. One corneal-scleral ring (CSR) from each horse was randomly placed in the (i) immersion condition organ culture system (IC), with the contralateral CSR being placed in the (ii) air/liquid interface organ culture system (ALC) for 7 days. All corneas were evaluated using serial daily gross photography, histology, qPCR, and TUNEL assay. corneal-scleral rings placed in the IC (i) had complete loss of corneal transparency on gross photography by 7 days, showed a significant level of corneal stromal disorganization, significantly increased α-SMA levels on qPCR, and apoptosis on TUNEL assay compared to controls. The ALC (ii) had weak stromal disorganization on histopathologic examination and was not significantly different from normal equine corneal controls on all other evaluated parameters. The air-liquid interface organ culture system maintains the equine cornea's extracellular matrix and preserves corneal transparency, while the immersion condition results in near complete degradation of normal equine corneal architecture after 7 days in culture. The air-liquid organ culture is a viable option to maintain a healthy equine cornea in an ex vivo setting for wound healing studies. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  17. Ex Vivo Model of Human Penile Transplantation and Rejection: Implications for Erectile Tissue Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Nikolai A; Matsui, Hotaka; Lough, Denver M; Miller, Devin; Harris, Kelly; Kates, Max; Liu, Xiaopu; Billups, Kevin; Redett, Richard; Burnett, Arthur L; Brandacher, Gerald; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2017-04-01

    Penile transplantation is a potential treatment option for severe penile tissue loss. Models of human penile rejection are lacking. Evaluate effects of rejection and immunosuppression on cavernous tissue using a novel ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) model. Cavernous tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 patients undergoing penile prosthesis operations and PBMCs from a healthy volunteer were obtained. Ex vivo MLRs were prepared by culturing cavernous tissue for 48h in media alone, in media with autologous PBMCs, or in media with allogenic PBMCs to simulate control, autotransplant, and allogenic transplant conditions with or without 1μM cyclosporine A (CsA) or 20nM tacrolimus (FK506) treatment. Rejection was characterized by PBMC flow cytometry and gene expression transplant array. Cavernous tissues were evaluated by histomorphology and myography to assess contraction and relaxation. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and unpaired Student t test. Flow cytometry and tissue array demonstrated allogenic PBMC activation consistent with rejection. Rejection impaired cavernous tissue physiology and was associated with cellular infiltration and apoptosis. CsA prevented rejection but did not improve tissue relaxation. CsA treatment impaired relaxation in tissues cultured without PBMCs compared with media and FK506. Study limitations included the use of penile tissue with erectile dysfunction and lack of cross-matching data. This model could be used to investigate the effects of penile rejection and immunosuppression. Additional studies are needed to optimize immunosuppression to prevent rejection and maximize corporal tissue physiology. This report describes a novel ex vivo model of human penile transplantation rejection. Tissue rejection impaired erectile tissue physiology. This report suggests that cyclosporin A might hinder corporal physiology and that other immunosuppressant agents, such as FK506, might be better suited

  18. Ex vivo MRI of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, Alain; Pigneur, Frederic; Ghozali, Faridah; Dao, Thu-Ha; Cunin, Patrick; Meyblum, Evelyne; De Baecque-Fontaine, Cecile; Alamdari, Ali; Maison, Patrick; Deux, Jean Francois; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Lantieri, Laurent; Rahmouni, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a strategy for precise co-localization of lymph nodes on axillary lymph-node dissection (ALND) specimens both on pathology and MR. To identify nodal features suggestive of metastatic involvement on a node-to-node basis. Materials and methods: National Institutional review-board approved this prospective study of 18 patients with breast cancer referred for ALND. Ex vivo T1 and inversion recovery (IR) T2 WI of ALND specimens tightly positioned within scaled plastic cranes was performed immediately after surgery. The correspondence of MR-based or pathologically based nodes location was assessed. The MR size and morphological presentation of metastatic and normal nodes were compared (Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney test). Quantitative variables were compared using Pearson coefficient. Results: 207 nodes were retrieved on pathology and 165 on MR. MR-pathological correlation of nodes location was high regarding MR-identified nodes (r = 0.755). An MR short axis threshold of 4 mm yielded the best predictive value for metastatic nodal involvement (Se = 78.6%; Sp = 62.3%). Irregular contours (Se = 35.7%; Sp = 96.7%), central nodal hyper-intensity on IR T2 WI (Se = 57.1%; Sp = 91.4%), and a cortical thickness above 3 mm (Se = 63.6%; Sp = 83.2%) were significantly associated with metastatic involvement. Conclusion: Ex vivo MR allows node-to-node correlation with pathology. Morphological MR criteria can suggest metastatic involvement

  19. Ex-vivo training model for laparoendoscopic single-site surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kommu Sashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS has recently been applied successfully in the performance of a host of surgical procedures. Preliminary consensus from the experts is that this mode of surgery is technically challenging and requires expertise. The transition from trainee to practicing surgeon, especially in complex procedures with challenging learning curves, takes time and mentor-guided nurturing. However, the trainee needs to use platforms of training to gain the skills that are deemed necessary for undertaking the live human case. Objective: This article aims to demonstrate a step-by-step means of how to acquire the necessary instrumentation and build a training model for practicing steeplechase exercises in LESS for urological surgeons and trainees. The tool built as a result of this could set the platform for performance of basic and advanced skills uptake using conventional, bent and articulated instruments. A preliminary construct validity of the platform was conducted. Materials and Methods: A box model was fitted with an R-Port™ and camera. Articulated and conventional instruments were used to demonstrate basic exercises (e.g. glove pattern cutting, loop stacking and suturing and advanced exercises (e.g. pyeloplasty. The validation included medical students (M, final year laparoscopic fellows (F and experienced consultant laparoscopic surgeons (C with at least 50 LESS cases experience in total, were tested on eight basic skill tasks (S including manipulation of the flexible cystoscope (S1, hand eye coordination (S2, cutting with flexible scissors (S3, grasping with flexible needle holders (S4, two-handed maneuvers (S5, object translocation (S6, cross hand suturing with flexible instruments (S7 and conduction of an ex-vivo pyeloplasty. Results: The successful application of the box model was demonstrated by trainee based exercises. The cost of the kit with circulated materials was less than £150 (Pounds Sterling

  20. An ex vivo model to quantitatively analyze cell migration in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Conor J; Weston, Mikail; McDermott, Kieran W

    2018-01-01

    Within the developing central nervous system, the ability of cells to migrate throughout the tissue parenchyma to reach their target destination and undergo terminal differentiation is vital to normal central nervous system (CNS) development. To develop novel therapies to treat the injured CNS, it is essential that the migratory behavior of cell populations is understood. Many studies have examined the ability of individual neurons to migrate through the developing CNS, describing specific modes of migration including locomotion and somal translocation. Few studies have investigated the mass migration of large populations of neural progenitors, particularly in the developing the spinal cord. Here, we describe a method to robustly analyze large numbers of migrating cells using a co-culture assay. The ex vivo tissue model promotes the survival and differentiation of co-cultured progenitor cells. Using this assay, we demonstrate that migrating neuroepithelial progenitor cells display region specific migration patterns within the dorsal and ventral spinal cord at defined developmental time points. The technique described here is a viable ex vivo model to quantitatively analyze cell migration and differentiation. We demonstrate the ability to detect changes in cell migration within distinct tissue region across tissue samples using the technique described here. Developmental Dynamics 247:201-211, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ex vivo infection of human embryonic spinal cord neurons prior to transplantation into adult mouse cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Ádám

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically modified pseudorabies virus (Prv proved suitable for the delivery of foreign genes to rodent embryonic neurons ex vivo and maintaining foreign gene expression after transplantation into spinal cord in our earlier study. The question arose of whether human embryonic neurons, which are known to be more resistant to Prv, could also be infected with a mutant Prv. Specifically, we investigated whether a mutant Prv with deleted ribonucleotide reductase and early protein 0 genes has the potential to deliver marker genes (gfp and β-gal into human embryonic spinal cord neurons and whether the infected neurons maintain expression after transplantation into adult mouse cord. Results The results revealed that the mutant Prv effectively infected human embryonic spinal cord neurons ex vivo and the grafted cells exhibited reporter gene expression for several weeks. Grafting of infected human embryonic cells into the spinal cord of immunodeficient (rnu-/rnu- mice resulted in the infection of some of the host neurons. Discussion These results suggest that Prv is suitable for the delivery of foreign genes into transplantable human cells. This delivery method may offer a new approach to use genetically modified cells for grafting in animal models where spinal cord neuronal loss or axon degeneration occurs.

  3. A novel ex vivo method for measuring whole brain metabolism in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Kathryn E; Bosse, Timothy L; Klekos, Mia; Mills, John F; Weicksel, Steven E; Waters, James S; Tipping, Marla

    2018-02-15

    Many neuronal and glial diseases have been associated with changes in metabolism. Therefore, metabolic reprogramming has become an important area of research to better understand disease at the cellular level, as well as to identify targets for treatment. Model systems are ideal for interrogating metabolic questions in a tissue dependent context. However, while new tools have been developed to study metabolism in cultured cells there has been less progress towards studies in vivo and ex vivo. We have developed a method using newly designed tissue restraints to adapt the Agilent XFe96 metabolic analyzer for whole brain analysis. These restraints create a chamber for Drosophila brains and other small model system tissues to reside undisrupted, while still remaining in the zone for measurements by sensor probes. This method generates reproducible oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification rate data for Drosophila larval and adult brains. Single brains are effectively treated with inhibitors and expected metabolic readings are observed. Measuring metabolic changes, such as glycolytic rate, in transgenic larval brains demonstrates the potential for studying how genotype affects metabolism. Current methodology either utilizes whole animal chambers to measure respiration, not allowing for targeted tissue analysis, or uses technically challenging MRI technology for in vivo analysis that is not suitable for smaller model systems. This new method allows for novel metabolic investigation of intact brains and other tissues ex vivo in a quick, and simplistic way with the potential for large-scale studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman’s colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4’-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26330885

  5. Adrenergic Effect on Cytokine Release After Ex Vivo Healthy Volunteers' Whole Blood LPS Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandreou, Vasiliki; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Venetsanou, Kyriaki; Baltopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    Catecholamines are molecules with immunomodulatory properties in health and disease. Several studies showed the effect of catecholamines when administered to restore hemodynamic stability in septic patients. This study investigates the effect of norepinephrine and dobutamine on whole blood cytokine release after ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Whole blood collected from healthy individuals was stimulated with LPS, in the presence of norepinephrine or dobutamine at different concentrations, with or without metoprolol, a β1 receptor antagonist. Cytokine measurement was performed in isolated cell culture supernatants with ELISA. Results are expressed as mean ± SEM and compared with Mann-Whitney rank-sum test. Both norepinephrine and dobutamine significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-6 production after ex vivo LPS stimulation of whole blood in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was partially reversed by the presence of metoprolol. Norepinephrine and dobutamine reduce the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus possibly contributing to altered balance between the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses, which are vital for a successful host response to severe disease, shock, and sepsis.

  6. In vitro and ex vivo effect of hyaluronic acid on erythrocyte flow properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palatnik S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyaluronic acid (HA is present in many tissues; its presence in serum may be related to certain inflammatory conditions, tissue damage, sepsis, liver malfunction and some malignancies. In the present work, our goal was to investigate the significance of hyaluronic acid effect on erythrocyte flow properties. Therefore we performed in vitro experiments incubating red blood cells (RBCs with several HA concentrations. Afterwards, in order to corroborate the pathophysiological significance of the results obtained, we replicated the in vitro experiment with ex vivo RBCs from diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, a serum HA-increasing pathology. Methods Erythrocyte deformability (by filtration through nucleopore membranes and erythrocyte aggregability (EA were tested on blood from healthy donors additioned with purified HA. EA was measured by transmitted light and analyzed with a mathematical model yielding two parameters, the aggregation rate and the size of the aggregates. Conformational changes of cytoskeleton proteins were estimated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR. Results In vitro, erythrocytes treated with HA showed increased rigidity index (RI and reduced aggregability, situation strongly related to the rigidization of the membrane cytoskeleton triggered by HA, as shown by EPR results. Also, a significant correlation (r: 0.77, p Conclusions Our results lead us to postulate the hypothesis that HA interacts with the erythrocyte surface leading to modifications in erythrocyte rheological and flow properties, both ex vivo and in vitro.

  7. Ex vivo expansion with stem cell factor and interleukin-11 augments both short-term recovery posttransplant and the ability to serially transplant marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoake, T L; Freshney, M G; McNair, L; Parker, A N; McKay, P J; Steward, W P; Fitzsimons, E; Graham, G J; Pragnell, I B

    1996-06-01

    The characterization of many cytokines involved in the control of hematopoiesis has led to intense investigation into their potential use in ex vivo culture to expand progenitor numbers. We have established the optimum ex vivo culture conditions that allow substantial amplification of transient engrafting murine stem cells and which, simultaneously, augment the ability to sustain serial bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Short-term incubation of unfractionated BM cells in liquid culture with stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin-11 (IL-11) produced a 50-fold amplification of clonogenic multipotential progenitors (CFU-A). Following such ex vivo expansion, substantially fewer cells were required to rescue lethally irradiated mice. When transplanted in cell doses above threshold for engraftment, BM cells expanded ex vivo resulted in significantly more rapid hematopoietic recovery. In a serial transplantation model, unmanipulated BM was only able to consistently sustain secondary BMT recipients, but BM expanded ex vivo has sustained quaternary BMT recipients that remain alive and well more than 140 days after 4th degree BMT. These results show augmentation of both short-term recovery posttransplant and the ability to serially transplant marrow by preincubation in culture with SCF and IL-11.

  8. Human skin in vivo has a higher skin barrier function than porcine skin ex vivo - comprehensive Raman microscopic study of the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2018-02-20

    Porcine skin is widely used as a human skin model in dermatology. For both, porcine stratum corneum (SC) ex vivo and human SC in vivo, the hydrogen bonding states of water, the secondary and tertiary structures of keratin, the natural moisturizing factor (NMF) concentrations and the intercellular lipids' (ICL) lateral organization are investigated depth-dependently using confocal Raman microscopy. The SC depth profiles show that porcine SC ex vivo is characterized by lower hydrogen bonding states of water (10-30% SC depth), lower NMF concentration in the whole SC, more β-sheet form of keratin (10-90% SC depth), more folded tertiary keratin structures (30-70% SC depth) and higher hexagonal lateral packing order of ICL (10-50% SC depth) compared to human SC in vivo. The results clearly show a higher value of skin barrier function of human SC in vivo than of porcine SC ex vivo. Thus, the human SC in vivo is less permeable for lipophilic and hydrophilic substances than porcine SC ex vivo. Considering the porcine SC as an ex vivo model of human SC in vivo, these findings should be taken into consideration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling placental transport: correlation of in vitro BeWo cell permeability and ex vivo human placental perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina

    2009-01-01

    . Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, Part A 71, 984-991]. In this work, the transport of these same three compounds, plus the reference compound antipyrine, was investigated using BeWo (b30) cell monolayers. Transport......The placental passage of three compounds with different physicochemical properties was recently investigated in ex vivo human placental perfusion experiments (caffeine, benzoic acid, and glyphosate) [Mose, T., Kjaerstad, M.B., Mathiesen, L., Nielsen, J.B., Edelfors, S., Knudsen, L.E., 2008...... across the BeWo cells was observed in the rank order of caffeine>antipyrine>benzoic acid>glyphosate in terms of both the apparent permeability coefficient and the initial slope, defined as the linear rate of substance transferred to the fetal compartment as percent per time, a parameter used to compare...

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion in clinical lung transplantation--state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Anders S I; Dark, John H; Fisher, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a new technique for assessing and potentially reconditioning human donor lungs previously unacceptable for clinical transplantation with the potential to dramatically push the limits of organ acceptability. With the recent introduction of portable EVLP, a new era in lung preservation may be upon us with the opportunity to also limit organ ischaemic times and potentially improve the outcome of donor lungs already deemed acceptable for transplantation. It took over half a century for the technique to evolve from basic theory to semi-automated circuits fit for clinical use that are now rapidly being adopted in transplant centres across the globe. With this field in constant evolution and many unanswered questions remaining, our review serves as an update on the state of the art of EVLP in clinical lung transplantation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Valproic acid modulates platelet and coagulation function ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E; Halaweish, Ihab

    2017-01-01

    of coagulopathy, it remains unknown whether this is a direct effect of the drug, or the establishment of an overall prosurvival phenotype. We thus conducted an ex-vivo experiment to determine if VPA has an effect on coagulation and platelet function. Ten swine were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI......) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). Blood samples were drawn prior to TBI+HS insult (Healthy group) and 2 h following TBI+HS (Shock group). Samples were incubated with VPA or vehicle controls for 1 h. Platelet aggregation was analyzed via impedance aggregometry and coagulation was measured using thromboelastography....... Addition of VPA to the healthy blood did not affect platelet aggregation or coagulation parameters. In shock blood, incubation with VPA significantly reduced collagen-(P = 0.050), arachidonic acid-(P = 0.005), and adenosine diphosphate-(P = 0.023) induced platelet aggregation. VPA also significantly...

  12. Assessment of donor heart viability during ex vivo heart perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher W; Ambrose, Emma; Müller, Alison; Li, Yun; Le, Hoa; Hiebert, Brett; Arora, Rakesh; Lee, Trevor W; Dixon, Ian; Tian, Ganghong; Nagendran, Jayan; Hryshko, Larry; Freed, Darren

    2015-10-01

    Ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP) may facilitate resuscitation of discarded donor hearts and expand the donor pool; however, a reliable means of demonstrating organ viability prior to transplantation is required. Therefore, we sought to identify metabolic and functional parameters that predict myocardial performance during EVHP. To evaluate the parameters over a broad spectrum of organ function, we obtained hearts from 9 normal pigs and 37 donation after circulatory death pigs and perfused them ex vivo. Functional parameters obtained from a left ventricular conductance catheter, oxygen consumption, coronary vascular resistance, and lactate concentration were measured, and linear regression analyses were performed to identify which parameters best correlated with myocardial performance (cardiac index: mL·min(-1)·g(-1)). Functional parameters exhibited excellent correlation with myocardial performance and demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for identifying hearts at risk of poor post-transplant function (ejection fraction: R(2) = 0.80, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.85; stroke work: R(2) = 0.76, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.77; minimum dP/dt: R(2) = 0.74, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.54; tau: R(2) = 0.51, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.92), whereas metabolic parameters were limited in their ability to predict myocardial performance (oxygen consumption: R(2) = 0.28; coronary vascular resistance: R(2) = 0.20; lactate concentration: R(2) = 0.02). We concluded that evaluation of functional parameters provides the best assessment of myocardial performance during EVHP, which highlights the need for an EVHP device capable of assessing the donor heart in a physiologic working mode.

  13. Effect of laser generated shockwaves 1 on ex-vivo pigskin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, Vidyunmala; Navarro, Artemio; Patel, Shahzad; Patel, Vikash; Nowroozi, Bryan N; Taylor, Zach D; Yong, William; Gupta, Vijay; Grundfest, Warren S

    2014-10-01

    Persistent bacterial infection prolongs hospitalizations, leading to increased healthcare costs. Treatment of these infections costs several billion dollars annually. Biofilm production is one mechanism by which bacteria become resistant. With the help of biofilms, bacteria withstand the host immune response and are much less susceptible to antibiotics. Currently, there is interest in the use of laser-generated shockwaves (LGS) to delaminate biofilm from infected wound surfaces; however, the safety of such an approach has not yet been established. Of particular concern are the thermal and mechanical effects of the shockwave treatment on the epidermis and the underlying collagen structure of the dermis. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the effect of LGS on freshly harvested ex vivo porcine skin tissue samples. Tissue samples for investigation were harvested immediately post-mortem and treated with LGS within 30 minutes. Previous studies have shown that laser fluences between 100 and 500 mJ/pulse are capable of delaminating biofilms off a variety of surfaces, thus our preliminary investigation focused on this range of laser energy. For each sample, LGS were produced via laser irradiation of a thin layer (0.5 µm) of titanium sandwiched between a 50 and 100 µm thick layer of water glass and a 0.1 mm thick sheet of Mylar. The rapid thermal expansion of the irradiated titanium film generates a transient compressive wave that is coupled through a liquid layer to the surface of the ex vivo pigskin sample. Shocked samples were immediately fixed in formalin and prepared for histological analysis. A blinded pathologist evaluated and scored each section on the basis of its overall appearance (O) and presence of linear/slit-like spaces roughly parallel to the surface of the skin (S). The scores were given on a scale of 0-3. The present investigation revealed no visible difference between the tissue sections of the control sample and those that

  14. Optimized isolation enables Ex vivo analysis of microglia from various central nervous system regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Alexander H.; Boddeke, Hendricus W. G. M.; Brouwer, Nieske; Biber, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo analysis is an accurate and convenient way to study in vivo microglia phenotype and function. However, current microglia isolation protocols for ex vivo analysis show many differences in isolation steps (perfusion, removal of meninges and blood vessels, mechanical dissociation, enzymatic

  15. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...

  16. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yichen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications.

  17. The protective effect of dexmedetomidine in a rat ex vivo lung model of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Xinqiao; Zhou, Wenjuan; Pang, Qingfeng; Wang, Zhiping

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of dexmedetomidine (Dex) in a rat ex vivo lung model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. An IL-2 ex vivo lung perfusion system was used to establish a rat ex vivo lung model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Drugs were added to the perfusion solution for reperfusion. Lung injury was assessed by histopathological changes, airway pressure (Res), lung compliance (Compl), perfusion flow (Flow), pulmonary venous oxygen partial pressure (PaO2), and lung wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) were measured, respectively. The introduction of Dex attenuated the post-ischemia-reperfusion lung damage and MDA level, improved lung histology, W/D ratio, lung injury scores and SOD activity. Decreased mRNA and protein levels of GRP78 and CHOP compared with the IR group were observed after Dex treatment. The effect of Dex was dosage-dependence and a high dose of Dex (10 nM) was shown to confer the strongest protective effect against lung damage (Pex vivo lungs.

  18. Ex-vivo response to blood products and haemostatic agents after paediatric cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Andreasen, Jo B; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    . The aims of the present study were to investigate changes in coagulation profiles after paediatric cardiac surgery and the effect after ex-vivo addition of blood products and haemostatic agents. Coagulation profiles were evaluated by thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in 54 children before and immediately after...... cardiac surgery. The haemostatic potential of various factor concentrates (fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant factor VIIa and factor XIII), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), pooled platelets and tranexamic acid was investigated. After surgery, the coagulation profiles revealed significantly prolonged clotting......Bleeding complications after cardiac surgery are of particular importance in children because they are more prone to volume overload. To optimize haemostatic intervention, the coagulopathy has to be characterized, and knowledge about the effect of blood products and haemostatic agents is needed...

  19. In vitro and ex vivo evaluations on transdermal delivery of the HIV inhibitor IQP-0410.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S Ham

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and in vitro/ex vivo characteristics of the pyrmidinedione IQP-0410 formulated into transdermal films. IQP-0410 is a potent therapeutic anti-HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that would be subjected to extensive first pass metabolism, through conventional oral administration. Therefore, IQP-0410 was formulated into ethyl cellulose/HPMC-based transdermal films via solvent casting. In mano evaluations were performed to evaluate gross physical characteristics. In vitro release studies were performed in both Franz cells and USP-4 dissolution vessels. Ex vivo release and permeability assays were performed on human epidermal tissue models, and the permeated IQP-0410 was collected for in vitro HIV-1 efficacy assays in CEM-SS cells and PBMCs. Film formulation D3 resulted in pliable, strong transdermal films that were loaded with 2% (w/w IQP-0410. Composed of 60% (w/w ethyl cellulose and 20% (w/w HPMC, the films contained < 1.2% (w/w of water and were hygroscopic resulting in significant swelling under humid conditions. The water permeable nature of the film resulted in complete in vitro dissolution and drug release in 26 hours. When applied to ex vivo epidermal tissues, the films were non-toxic to the tissue and also were non-toxic to HIV target cells used in the in vitro efficacy assays. Over a 3 day application, the films delivered IQP-0410 through the skin tissue at a zero-order rate of 0.94 ± 0.06 µg/cm(2/hr with 134 ± 14.7 µM collected in the basal media. The delivered IQP-0410 resulted in in vitro EC50 values against HIV-1 of 2.56 ± 0.40 nM (CEM-SS and 0.58 ± 0.03 nM (PBMC. The film formulation demonstrated no significant deviation from target values when packaged in foil pouches under standard and accelerated environmental conditions. It was concluded that the transdermal film formulation was a potentially viable method of administering IQP-0410 that warrants

  20. Fusing in vivo and ex vivo NMR sources of information for brain tumor classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitor-Sava, A R; Laudadio, T; Sima, D M; Van Huffel, S; Martinez-Bisbal, M C; Celda, B; Piquer, J; Heerschap, A

    2011-01-01

    In this study we classify short echo-time brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data by applying a model-based canonical correlation analyses algorithm and by using, as prior knowledge, multimodal sources of information coming from high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS), MRSI and magnetic resonance imaging. The potential and limitations of fusing in vivo and ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance sources to detect brain tumors is investigated. We present various modalities for multimodal data fusion, study the effect and the impact of using multimodal information for classifying MRSI brain glial tumors data and analyze which parameters influence the classification results by means of extensive simulation and in vivo studies. Special attention is drawn to the possibility of considering HR-MAS data as a complementary dataset when dealing with a lack of MRSI data needed to build a classifier. Results show that HR-MAS information can have added value in the process of classifying MRSI data

  1. Effects of Ex Vivo y-Tocopherol on Airway Macrophage ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated inflammation and altered immune responses are features found in atopic asthmatic airways. Recent studies indicate y-tocopherol (GT) supplementation can suppress airway inflammation in allergic asthma. We studied the effects of in vitro GT supplementation on receptor-mediated phagocytosis and expression of cell surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity on sputum-derived macrophages. Cells from nonsmoking healthy (n = 6)and mild house dust mite-sensitive allergic asthmatics (n =6) were treated ex vivo with GT (300 uM) or saline (control). Phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan A bioparticles (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and expression of surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity were assessed using flow cytometry. GT caused significantly decreased (p innate and adaptive immune response elements, and atopic status appears to be an important factor. Recent studies on the effects of the fat-soluble steriod hormone vitamins D and E suggest that dietary suplementation with these vitamins may be helpful for the prevention or in the treatment of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases, including atopic asthma.

  2. New 'ex vivo' radioisotopic method of quantitation of platelet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badimon, L.; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Unit, Barcelona; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Fuster, V.; Chesebro, J.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive and quantitative method of 'ex vivo' evaluation of platelet deposition on collagen strips, from rabbit Achilles tendon, superfused by flowing blood and applied it to four animal species, cat, rabbit, dog and pig. Autologous platelets were labeled with indium-111-tropolone, injected to the animal 24 hr before the superfusion and the number of deposited platelets was quantitated from the tendon gamma-radiation and the blood platelet count. We detected some platelet consumption with superfusion time when blood was reinfused entering the contralateral jugular vein after collagen contact but not if blood was discarded after the contact. Therefore, in order to have a more physiological animal model we decided to discard blood after superfusion of the tendon. In all species except for the cat there was a linear relationship between increase of platelet on the tendon and time of exposure to blood superfusion. The highest number of platelets deposited on the collagen was found in cats, the lowest in dogs. Ultrastructural analysis showed the platelets were deposited as aggregates after only 5 min of superfusion. (orig.)

  3. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Experiments were conducted on 40 porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), balanced salt solution, Optisol, 15% dextran). The epithelium was removed, and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. Although in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hr: at 5-min intervals for the first 30 min and then 15-min intervals for the remaining 90 min. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters, and Young modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. Balanced salt solution, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. Fifteen percent dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. Fifteen percent dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol.

  4. Photoacoustic tomography of pathological tissue in ex vivo mouse hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holotta, Markus; Grossauer, Harald; Kremser, Christian; Torbica, Pavle; Völkl, Jakob; Degenhart, Gerald; Esterhammer, Regina; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Jaschke, Werner

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the applicability of ex-vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in organs of small animals. We used photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to visualize infarcted areas within mouse hearts and compared it to other imaging techniques (MRI and μCT). In order to induce ischemia an in-vivo ligation of the Ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA, left anterior descending, LAD) was performed on nine wild type C41 mice. After varying survival periods the mice were sacrificed. The hearts were excised and immediately transferred into a formaldehyde solution for conservation. Various wavelengths in the visible and near infrared region (500 nm - 1000 nm) had been tested to find the best representation of the ischemic regions. Samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser pulses delivered by an Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator. Ultrasound detection was achieved by an optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer working as an integrating line detector. For acoustic coupling the samples were located inside a water tank. The voxel data are computed from the measurement data by a Fourier-domain based reconstruction algorithm, followed by a sequence of inverse Radon transforms. Results clearly show the capability of PAI to detect pathological tissue and the possibility to produce three-dimensional images with resolutions well below 100 μm. Different wavelengths allow the representation of structure inside an organ or on the surface even without contrast enhancing tracers.

  5. Ex vivo testing of immune responses in precision-cut lung slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henjakovic, M.; Sewald, K.; Switalla, S.; Kaiser, D.; Mueller, M.; Veres, T.Z.; Martin, C.; Uhlig, S.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was the establishment of precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) as a suitable ex vivo alternative approach to animal experiments for investigation of immunomodulatory effects. For this purpose we characterized the changes of cytokine production and the expression of cell surface markers after incubation of PCLS with immunoactive substances lipopolysaccharide (LPS), macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2), interferon γ (IFNγ), and dexamethasone. Viability of PCLS from wild-type and CD11c-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (CD11-EYFP)-transgenic mice was controlled by measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme activity and live/dead fluorescence staining using confocal microscopy. Cytokines and chemokines were detected with Luminex technology and ELISA. Antigen presenting cell (APC) markers were investigated in living mouse PCLS in situ using confocal microscopy. LPS triggered profound pro-inflammatory effects in PCLS. Dexamethasone prevented LPS-induced production of cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin (IL)-5, IL-1α, TNFα, IL-12(p40), and RANTES in PCLS. Surface expression of MHC class II, CD40, and CD11c, but not CD86 was present in APCs of naive PCLS. Incubation with LPS enhanced specifically the expression of MHC class II on diverse cells. MALP-2 only failed to alter cytokine or chemokine levels, but was highly effective in combination with IFNγ resulting in increased levels of TNFα, IL-12(p40), RANTES, and IL-1α. PCLS showed characteristic responses to typical pro-inflammatory stimuli and may thus provide a suitable ex vivo technique to predict the immunomodulatory potency of inhaled substances

  6. Development of domperidone bilayered matrix type transdermal patches: physicochemical, in vitro and ex vivo characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K Madishetti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Domperidone (DOM is a dopamine- receptor (D2 antagonist, which is widely used in the treatment of motion-sickness. The pharmacokinetic parameters make DOM a suitable candidate for transdermal delivery. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop transdermal delivery systems for DOM and to evaluate their physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release an ex vivo permeation through rat abdominal skin and their mechanical properties. "nMethods: Bilayered matrix type transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS of DOM were prepared by film casting technique using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose as primary and Eudragit RL 100 as secondary layers. Brij-35 was incorporated as a solubilizer, d-limonene and propylene glycol were employed as permeation enhancer and plasticizer respectively. The prepared TDDS were extensively evaluated for in vitro release, moisture absorption, moisture content, water vapor transmission, ex vivo permeation through rat abdominal skin, mechanical properties and stability studies. The physicochemical interaction between DOM and polymers were investigated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. "nResults: All the formulations exhibited satisfactory physicochemical and mechanical characteristics. The optimized formulation F6 showed maximum cumulative percentage of drug release (90.7%, permeation (6806.64 μg in 24 hrs, flux (86.02 μg /hr/cm2 and permeation coefficient of 0.86x10-2 cm/hr. Values of tensile strength (4.34 kg/mm2 and elastic modulus (5.89 kg/cm2 revealed that formulation F6 was strong but not brittle. DSC and FTIR studies showed no evidence of interaction between the drug and polymers. A shelf life of 2 years is predicted for the TDDS. Conclusions: Domperidone bilayered matrix type transdermal therapeutic systems could be prepared with the required flux and suitable mechanical properties.

  7. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  8. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given...... with a focus on an ex vivo application of OCT. Image and video examples of freshly obtained murine lungs are included. The main advantage of OCT for ex vivo analysis is the non-contact, non-invasive, and non-destructive fast acquisition of a three-dimensional data set with micrometer-resolution....

  9. DNA damage in Human Limbal Epithelial Cells expanded ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Lorenzo Corrales

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limbal stem cell deficiency, secondary to insults and diseases, may be treated by transplantation of ex vivo engineered epithelial grafts. We here present preliminary data on levels of cellular DNA damage in grafts produced in two different types of culture medium. Cultures were initiated using corneo-limbal donor tissue after removal of the central area for transplant purposes. Explants (approx. 2x2 mm were positioned epithelial side down on tissue culture treated polyester membranes and expanded for four weeks in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium F12 Nutrient Mixture (Ham [DMEM/F12 (1:1] with either (1 H. medium; 10% human serum or (2 COM; 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, insulin-transferrin-sodiumselenzine (ITS , cholera toxin-A, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and hydrocortisone. Cells were dissociated using Trypsin-EDTA (0.05% for 30 min., the enzyme activity was inhibited by medium and serum. The cell suspension was transferred to tubes on ice and processed using the Comet Assay. Duplicate samples from each culture were analyzed in each assay by visual scoring. Using a fluorescence microscope, 100 comets (50 from each gel were classified into five categories, 0-4, representing increasing relative tail intensities. Summing the scores (0-4 of 100 comets therefore gives an overall score of between 0 and 400 arbitrary units. Preliminary data show some levels of DNA damage in cells dissociated from the grafts regardless of the type of culture medium used. Anyway more experiments with other donors have to be done to have some conclusions. Recent studies have shown that medium with human serum equally support production of grafts containing differentiated as well as undifferentiated cells suitable for clinical transplantation. Preliminary data from our experiments indicate that levels of molecular damage to the DNA do not increase in cells cultured in H. medium despite its lacks of complexity.

  10. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  11. Ex vivo pathomechanics of the canine Pond-Nuki model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transection of the canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL is a well-established osteoarthritis (OA model. The effect of CCL loss on contact pressure and joint alignment has not been quantified for stifle loading in standing. The purposes of the study were to measure femorotibial contact areas and stresses and joint alignment following transection of the CCL in an ex vivo model. We hypothesized that transection of the CCL would lead to abnormal kinematics, as well as alterations in contact mechanics of the femorotibial joint. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight canine hindlimbs were tested in a servo-hydraulic materials testing machine using a custom made femoral jig. Contact area and pressure measurements, and femorotibial rotations and translations were measured in the normal and the CCL-deficient stifle in both standing and deep flexion angles. We found that at standing angle, transection of the CCL caused cranial translation and internal rotation of the tibia with a concurrent caudal shift of the contact area, an increase in peak pressure and a decrease in contact area. These changes were not noted in deep flexion. At standing, loss of CCL caused a redistribution of the joint pressure, with the caudal region of the compartment being overloaded and the rest of the joint being underloaded. CONCLUSION: In the Pond-Nuki model alterations in joint alignment are correlated with shifting of the contact points to infrequently loaded areas of the tibial plateau. The results of this study suggest that this cadaveric Pond-Nuki model simulates the biomechanical changes previously reported in the in-vivo Pond-Nuki model.

  12. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Tingart, Markus; Pufe, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane; Jahr, Holger; Truhn, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration.

  13. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  14. Cysteinyl leukotrienes mediate histamine hypersensitivity ex vivo by increasing histamine receptor numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pynaert, G.; Grooten, J.; van Deventer, S. J.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Hyperresponsiveness to histamine is a key feature of a variety of pathological conditions, including bronchial asthma, food allergy, colitis ulcerosa, and topical allergic disorders. Cells isolated from hyperresponsive individuals do not display exaggerated histamine responses ex vivo and thus the

  15. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy using a novel perfused ex vivo simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Ruben; Achurra, Pablo; Tejos, Rodrigo; Varas, Julian; Solovera, María; Salas, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Simulation may provide a solution to acquire advanced skills in thoracic surgery, however to date there are no reports in the English literature about a perfused ex vivo model. We developed a low cost and hi fidelity model using an ex vivo in bloc heart and lung specimen from a swine. The swine was previously used in a non-thoracic experiment, so we extracted the lung and heart for this ex vivo based model to reduce animal use. The cost of the whole model is 70 USD and it can be reused many times changing the ex vivo tissue, so this model may help reduce the costs and animal use associated to this high complexity surgery.

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans ex vivo capsule size is associated with intracranial pressure and host immune response in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Emma J; Najjuka, Grace; Rolfes, Melissa A; Akampurira, Andrew; Jain, Neena; Anantharanjit, Janani; von Hohenberg, Maximilian; Tassieri, Manlio; Carlsson, Allan; Meya, David B; Harrison, Thomas S; Fries, Bettina C; Boulware, David R; Bicanic, Tihana

    2014-01-01

    The Cryptococcus neoformans polysaccharide capsule is a well-characterized virulence factor with immunomodulatory properties. The organism and/or shed capsule is postulated to raise intracranial pressure (ICP) in cryptococcal meningitis (CM) by mechanical obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. Little is known regarding capsule phenotype in human cryptococcosis. We investigated the relationship of ex vivo CSF capsular phenotype with ICP and CSF immune response, as well as in vitro phenotype. In total, 134 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Ugandan adults with CM had serial lumbar punctures with measurement of CSF opening pressures, quantitative cultures, ex vivo capsule size and shedding, viscosity, and CSF cytokines; 108 had complete data. Induced capsular size and shedding were measured in vitro for 48 C. neoformans isolates. Cryptococcal strains producing larger ex vivo capsules in the baseline (pretreatment) CSF correlated with higher ICP (P = .02), slower rate of fungal clearance (P = .02), and paucity of CSF inflammation, including decreased CSF white blood cell (WBC) count (P Cryptococcal capsule size ex vivo is an important contributor to virulence in human cryptococcal meningitis.

  17. Formulation and ex vivo-in vivo evaluation of pH-triggered brimonidine tartrate in situ gel for the glaucoma treatment using application of 32factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barse, Rohan K; Tagalpallewar, Amol A; Kokare, Chandrakant R; Sharma, Jaya P; Sharma, Pankaj K

    2018-05-01

    Short residence time, poor bioavailability and poor permeability are the major problems for conventional eye drops treatment. The aim of this article is to develop, optimize and ex vivo-in vivo investigation of brimonidine tartrate in situ gel as compared to marketed eye drops for the treatment of glaucoma. The effect of independent variables, namely concentrations of polymers, on various dependent variables like viscosity at physiological pH and in vitro drug release were studied by using 3 2 factorial design. Further the optimized formulation was characterized for ex vivo and in vivo study. Experimental data demonstrated that optimized in situ gel formulation (F8) showed in vitro-ex vivo sustained release profile with polymer composites carbopol 974P and HPMC K4M. After 5 h of ex vivo transcorneal permeation study, the amount recovered from the corneal surface on the donor chamber 12.40% (124 ug) and the amount collected from the receptor chamber 76.8% (760 ug) of the initial dose 1 mg. The total amount recovered from the permeation experiment was 89.2%. Bioadhesive carbopol 974P and viscosity HPMC K4M composites optimized formulation (F 8) produce greater influence on the duration of drug action and improved intraocular pressure reduction activity as compared to marketed eye drop solution in in vivo study. The developed in situ gelling system as a promising ophthalmic formulation to prolong the drug lowering effect on the intraocular pressure.

  18. Ex Vivo ERG analysis of photoreceptors using an In Vivo ERG system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Frans; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    The Function of the retina and effects of drugs on it can be assessed by recording transretinal voltage across isolated retina that is perfused with physiological medium. However, building ex vivo ERG apparatus requires substantial amount of time, resources and expertise. Here we adapted a commercial in vivo ERG system for transretinal ERG recordings from rod and cone photoreceptors and compared rod and cone signalling between ex vivo and in vivo environments. We found that the rod and cone a- and b-waves recorded with the transretinal ERG adapter and a standard in vivo ERG system are comparable to those obtained from live anesthetized animals. However, ex vivo responses are somewhat slower and their oscillatory potentials are suppressed as compared to those recorded in vivo. We found that rod amplification constant (A) was comparable between ex vivo and in vivo conditions, ∼10 - 30 s-2 depending on the choice of response normalization. We estimate that the A in cones is between 3 and 6 s-2 in ex vivo conditions and by assuming equal A in vivo we arrive to light funnelling factor of 3 for cones in the mouse retina. The ex vivo ERG adapter provides a simple and affordable alternative to designing a custom-built transretinal recordings setup for the study of photoreceptors. Our results provide a roadmap to the rigorous quantitative analysis of rod and cone responses made possible with such a system. PMID:24959652

  19. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  20. Cellular and molecular characterization of gametogenic progression in ex vivo cultured prepuberal mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoler-Alcaraz, J; Fernández-Pérez, D; Larriba, E; Del Mazo, J

    2017-10-18

    Recently, an effective testis culture method using a gas-liquid interphase, capable of differentiate male germ cells from neonatal spermatogonia to spermatozoa has been developed. Nevertheless, this methodology needs deep analyses that allow future experimental approaches in basic, pathologic and/or reprotoxicologic studies. Because of this, we characterized at cellular and molecular levels the entire in vitro spermatogenic progression, in order to understand and evaluate the characteristics that define the spermatogenic process in ex vivo cultured testes compared to the in vivo development. Testicular explants of CD1 mice aged 6 and 10 days post-partum were respectively cultured during 55 and 89 days. Cytological and molecular approaches were performed, analyzing germ cell proportion at different time culture points, meiotic markers immunodetecting synaptonemal complex protein SYCP3 by immunocytochemistry and the relative expression of different marker genes along the differentiation process by Reverse Transcription - quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. In addition, microRNA and piwi-interactingRNA profiles were also evaluated by Next Generation Sequencing and bioinformatic approaches. The method promoted and maintained the spermatogenic process during 89 days. At a cytological level we detected spermatogenic development delays of cultured explants compared to the natural in vivo process. The expression of different spermatogenic stages gene markers correlated with the proportion of different cell types detected in the cytological preparations. In vitro progression analysis of the different spermatogenic cell types, from both 6.5 dpp and 10.5 dpp testes explants, has revealed a relative delay in relation to in vivo process. The expression of the genes studied as biomarkers correlates with the cytologically and functional detected progression and differential expression identified in vivo. After a first analysis of deep sequencing data it has been observed

  1. Protocol for ex vivo incubation of Drosophila primary post-embryonic haemocytes for real-time analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Christopher J; Williams, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The cellular branch of the Drosophila larval innate immune system consists of three immunosurveillance (haemocyte) cell types: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. In order to examine haemocyte cytoskeletal dynamics or migration, most researchers use embryos or in vitro cell culture systems, but very little is known about the behaviour of post-embryonic haemocytes. The current method employs an ex vivo system, in which post-embryonic haemocytes are isolated for short-term analysis, in order to investigate various aspects of their behaviour during events requiring cytoskeleton dynamics and Rho GTPase signalling.

  2. Reduced ex Vivo Interleukin-6 Production by Dietary Fish Oil Is Not Modified by Linoleic Acid Intake in Healthy Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C. T.; Lauritzen, L.; Calder, P. C.

    2009-01-01

    production from cultures of whole blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and monocytes in healthy men. The study was a double-blinded, controlled, 2 X 2 factorial 8-wk intervention. Sixty-four healthy men were randomized to 5 mL/d FO or olive oil (00) provided in capsules and to spreads and oils......Fish oil (FO) is considered antiinflammatory, but evidence regarding its effect on human cytokine production is conflicting. High linoleic acid (LA) intake may impair any effects of FO. The aim of this study was to investigate how FO combined with high or low LA intake affected ex vivo cytokine...

  3. Direct Ex Vivo Analysis of Activated, Fas-sensitive Autoreactive T Cells in Human Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowska, Katarzyna D.; Ausubel, Lara J.; Modabber, Yalda; Slovik, Elissa; Messersmith, Wells; Hafler, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of clonally expanded and persistent T cells recognizing the immunodominant autoantigenic peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP)p85-99 was directly measured ex vivo in subjects with typical relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). T cells expressing mRNA transcripts encoding T cell receptor (TCR)-α and -β chains found in T cell clones previously isolated from these subjects recognizing the MBPp85-99 epitope were examined. In contrast to frequencies of 1 in 105–106 as measured by limiting dilution analysis, estimates of the T cell frequencies expressing MBPp85-99–associated TCR chain transcripts were as high as 1 in 300. These high frequencies were confirmed by performing PCR on single T cells isolated by flow cytometry. MBPp85-99 TCR transcripts were present in IL-2 receptor α–positive T cells which were induced to undergo Fas-mediated cell death upon antigen stimulation. These data demonstrate that at least a subpopulation of patients with MS can have a very high frequency of activated autoreactive T cells. PMID:9151896

  4. Reactivation capacity by latency-reversing agents ex vivo correlates with the size of the HIV-1 reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcis, Gilles; Bouchat, Sophie; Kula, Anna; Van Driessche, Benoit; Delacourt, Nadège; Vanhulle, Caroline; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; De Wit, Stéphane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-14

    HIV-1 reservoirs are the major hurdle to virus clearance in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated patients. An approach to eradicating HIV-1 involves reversing latency in cART-treated patients to make latent cells visible to the host immune system. Stimulation of patient cell cultures with latency-reversing agents (LRAs) ex vivo results in heterogeneous responses among HIV-infected patients. Determinants of this heterogeneity are unknown and consequently important to determine. Here, we grouped and retrospectively analyzed the data from our two recent HIV-1 reactivation studies to investigate the role of the HIV-1 reservoir size in the reactivation capacity by LRAs in ex vivo cultures of CD8-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from 54 cART-treated patients and of resting CD4 T cells isolated from 30 cART-treated patients. Our results established a statistically relevant positive correlation between the HIV-1 reservoir size measured by total cell-associated HIV-1 DNA and the frequency of positive HIV-1 recovery measurements in response to various LRAs in ex vivo cultures of cells isolated from cART-treated HIV aviremic patients. HIV-1 reservoir size also correlated with the extracellular HIV-1 RNA median level measured in supernatants of cell cultures following LRA treatments. However, we identified HIV patients whose positive measurements frequency and median level of extracellular HIV-1 RNA deviated from linearity relative to their corresponding HIV reservoir size. We demonstrated that the reservoir size is one predictive marker of LRA effectiveness but this parameter alone is not sufficient. The identification of other predictive markers is necessary to predict the success of HIV anti-latency approaches.

  5. Effect of Ex Vivo Ionizing Radiation on Static and Fatigue Properties of Mouse Vertebral Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerzian, Shannon R.; Pendleton, Megan M.; Li, Alfred; Liu, Jennifer W.; Alwood, Joshua S.; O’Connell, Grace D.; Keaveny, Tony M.

    2018-01-01

    For a variety of medical and scientific reasons, human bones can be exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation levels. In vivo radiation therapy (0.05 kGy) is used in cancer treatment, and ex vivo irradiation (25-35 kGy) is used to sterilize bone allografts. Ionizing radiation in these applications has been shown to increase risk of fracture, decrease bone quality and degrade collagen integrity. Past studies have investigated the deleterious effects of radiation on cortical or trabecular bone specimens individually, but to date no studies have examined whole bones containing both cortical and trabecular tissue. Furthermore, a clear relationship between the dose and the mechanical and biochemical response of bone's extracellular matrix has yet to be established for doses ranging from cancer therapy to allograft sterilization (0.05-35 kGy). To gain insight into these issues, we conducted an ex vivo radiation study to investigate non-cellular (i.e. matrix) effects of ionizing radiation dose on vertebral whole bone mechanical properties, over a range of radiation doses (0.05-35 kGy), with a focus on any radiation-induced changes in collagen. With underlying mechanisms of action in mind, we hypothesized that any induced reductions in mechanical properties would be associated with changes in collagen integrity. METHODS: 20-week old female mice were euthanized and the lumbar spine was dissected using IACUC approved protocols. The lumbar vertebrae (L1- S1) were extracted from the spine via cuts through adjacent intervertebral discs, and the endplates, posterior processes, surrounding musculature, and soft tissues were removed (approx. 1.5mm diameter, approx. 2mm height). Specimens were randomly assigned to one of five groups for ex vivo radiation exposure: x-ray irradiation at 0.05, 1, 17, or 35 kGy, or a 0 kGy control. Following irradiation, the vertebrae were imaged using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and then subjected to either monotonic compressive loading to

  6. A marginal anticancer effect of regorafenib on pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Barbara; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Bauer, Nathalie; Liu, Li; Zhu, Yifan; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2017-11-01

    Activation of receptor tyrosine kinases is recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR are the prominent players in the induction of tumor neoangiogenesis. Strategies to inhibit VEGF and VEGFR are under intensive investigation in preclinical and clinical settings. Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor targeting some VEGFR and other receptor kinases. Preclinical results led to the FDA approval of regorafenib for treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Effects of this drug in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have not been investigated yet. Gene expression was assessed with real-time PCR analysis. In vitro cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, migration, and invasion of the PDAC cells were assessed after regorafenib treatment. Ex vivo anti-tumor effects of regorafenib were investigated in a spheroid model of PDAC. In vivo anti-tumor effects of the drug were evaluated in a fertilized chicken egg model. In this work, we have demonstrated only a marginal anticancer effect of regorafenib in PDAC in vitro and ex vivo. However, in the egg model of PDAC, this drug reduced tumor volume. Besides, regorafenib is capable of modulating the expression of cancer stem cell (CSC) markers and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers on PDAC cells. We found out that effects of regorafenib on the expression of CSC and EMT markers are very heterogeneous and depend obviously on original expression of these markers. We concluded that regorafenib might be a potential drug for PDAC and it should be investigated in future clinical trials.

  7. Monitoring UV-induced signalling pathways in an ex vivo skin organ culture model using phospho-antibody array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenain, Christelle; Gamboa, Bastien; Perrin, Agnes; Séraïdaris, Alexia; Bertino, Béatrice; Rival, Yves; Bernardi, Mathieu; Piwnica, David; Méhul, Bruno

    2017-09-08

    We investigated UV-induced signalling in an ex vivo skin organ culture model using phospho-antibody array. Phosphorylation modulations were analysed in time-course experiments following exposure to solar-simulated UV and validated by Western blot analyses. We found that UV induced P-p38 and its substrates, P-ERK1/2 and P-AKT, which were previously shown to be upregulated by UV in cultured keratinocytes and in vivo human skin. This indicates that phospho-antibody array applied to ex vivo skin organ culture is a relevant experimental system to investigate signalling events following perturbations. As the identified proteins are components of pathways implicated in skin tumorigenesis, UV-exposed skin organ culture model could be used to investigate the effect on these pathways of NMSC cancer drug candidates. In addition, we found that phospho-HCK is induced upon UV exposure, producing a new candidate for future studies investigating its role in the skin response to UV and UV-induced carcinogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. In vivo and ex vivo methods of growing a liver bud through tissue connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Yusuke; Nakayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Enosawa, Shin; Tamura, Tadashi; Yoshimaru, Koichiro; Matsuura, Toshiharu; Hayashida, Makoto; Kohashi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2017-10-26

    Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. The novel transplantation of an in vitro-generated liver bud might have therapeutic potential. In vivo and ex vivo methods for growing a liver bud are essential for paving the way for the clinical translation of liver bud transplantation. We herein report a novel transplantation method for liver buds that are grown in vivo involving orthotopic transplantation on the transected parenchyma of the liver, which showed long engraftment and marked growth in comparison to heterotopic transplantation. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a method for rapidly fabricating scalable liver-like tissue by fusing hundreds of liver bud-like spheroids using a 3D bioprinter. Its system to fix the shape of the 3D tissue with the needle-array system enabled the fabrication of elaborate geometry and the immediate execution of culture circulation after 3D printing-thereby avoiding an ischemic environment ex vivo. The ex vivo-fabricated human liver-like tissue exhibited self-tissue organization ex vivo and engraftment on the liver of nude rats. These achievements conclusively show both in vivo and ex vivo methods for growing in vitro-generated liver buds. These methods provide a new approach for in vitro-generated liver organoids transplantation.

  9. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  10. Effect of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) on ex vivo dental plaque vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, A; Auschill, T M; Donos, N; Brecx, M; Arweiler, N B

    2001-11-01

    A common clinical observation following surgical periodontal therapy with an enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) is the improved healing of the soft tissues and the limited inflammation of the operated areas. These clinical observations are empirical and difficult to explain. One of the factors influencing the early wound healing might be a potential antimicrobial effect of Emdogain. To investigate the effect of Emdogain on the vitality of ex vivo supragingival dental plaque and to compare this effect to that of a standard 0.2% chlorhexidine solution. 24 patients suffering from adult periodontitis were included in the study. At the beginning of the experiment, all participants were given a professional tooth cleaning. For the following 4 days, they had to refrain from any kind of oral hygiene measures. At day 5, from each of the volunteers, a voluminous plaque biofilm sample was taken with a sterile curette from the vestibular surfaces of the 1st lower molars and divided into 5 equal parts. Each part was mounted with 5 microl of the following solutions: (1) NaCl, (2) enamel matrix derivative dissolved in water (EMD), (3) enamel matrix derivative dissolved in the vehicle (Emdogain), (4) vehicle (propylene glycol alginate, PGA), (5) 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX). After a reaction time of 2 min the test solutions were sucked off, and subsequently the biofilm was stained with a fluorescence dye. The vitality of the plaque flora after the treatments was evaluated under the fluorescence microscope (VF%). Plaque samples treated with NaCl showed a mean vitality of 76.8+/-8%. The EMD, Emdogain, PGA and CHX showed VF values of 54.4+/-9.2, 21.4+/-10.6%, 19.6+/-11.6% and 32.3+/-11.8%, respectively. Emdogain, PGA and CHX showed statistically highly significant reductions (pEmdogain and PGA were found to be statistically significantly different compared to CHX (pEmdogain might have an antibacterial effect on the vitality of the ex vivo supragingival dental plaque flora.

  11. Standard donor lung procurement with normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Alexis; Schillab, Lukas; Barta, Maximilian; Benedek, Aris; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Taghavi, Shahrokh; Lang, Gyoergy; Matilla, Jose; Ankersmit, Hendrik; Hager, Helmut; Roth, Georg; Klepetko, Walter; Aigner, Clemens

    2017-07-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) was primarily developed for evaluation of impaired donor lungs. The good clinical results raise the question for its possible impact on lungs meeting standard criteria. Before application of EVLP on such lungs enters routine clinical practice, it must be demonstrated whether EVLP would affect or improve outcome when used in standard donor lungs. We performed a prospective randomized trial to investigate the role of EVLP in standard lung transplantation (Tx). This prospective randomized clinical trial compared patients who underwent Tx with ex vivo evaluated donor lungs with an equivalent patient population without previous EVLP. From October 2013 to May 2015, 193 lung Tx were performed at the Medical University of Vienna. During this period, 80 recipient/donor pairs that met the inclusion criteria were included in this trial, 41 pairs in the control group, and 39 in the EVLP group. In the EVLP group, 4 lungs (10.2%) ultimately did not qualify for Tx and were rejected for lung Tx owing to technical reasons (n = 2) and quality criteria (n = 2). Donor and recipient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Total cold ischemic time in the EVLP group was significantly longer for both implanted lungs (first side, 372 minutes vs 291 minutes, p 1 was lower in the EVLP group at all time points compared with the control group (24 hours, 5.7% vs 19.5%, p = 0.10), and need for post-operative prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was lower in the EVLP group (5.7% vs 12.2%, p = 0.44). Short-term clinical outcomes did not differ between recipients in the 2 groups. Patients remained intubated (1.6 days vs 1.6 days, p = 0.67), in the intensive care unit (6 days vs 6 days, p = 0.76), and in the hospital (23 days vs 19 days, p = 0.42) for a comparable period of time. The 30-day survival was 97.1% vs 100% (p = 0.46). This study provides evidence that EVLP can safely be used in standard donor lungs. Functional results and perioperative

  12. The Role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in Maintenance of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0–1000 ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P < 0.05) of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1+ cells (HSCs) at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1) expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P < 0.05) the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs. PMID:25405216

  13. The role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of ex vivo murine bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Wak Harto, Muhd Khairul Akmal; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0-1000 ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P < 0.05) of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1(+) cells (HSCs) at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1) expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P < 0.05) the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs.

  14. Ex vivo skin delivery of diclofenac by transcutol containing liposomes and suggested mechanism of vesicle-skin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Maria; Caddeo, Carla; Sinico, Chiara; Valenti, Donatella; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Biggio, Giovanni; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2011-05-01

    Recently, we described a novel family of liposomes, the Penetration Enhancer-containing Vesicles (PEVs), as carriers for enhanced (trans)dermal drug delivery. In this study, to go deeply into the potential of these new vesicles and suggest the possible mechanism of vesicle-skin interaction, we investigated transcutol containing PEVs as carriers for diclofenac, in the form of either acid or sodium salt. PEVs, prepared with soy phosphatidylcholine and aqueous solutions containing different concentrations of transcutol, were characterized by size distribution, zeta potential, incorporation efficiency, thermotropic behavior, and stability. (Trans)dermal diclofenac delivery from PEVs was investigated ex vivo through new born pig skin using conventional liposomes and a commercial gel as controls. The mode of action of the vesicles was also studied by performing a pre-treatment test and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analyses. Results of the all skin permeation experiments showed an improved diclofenac (both acid and sodium salt) delivery to and through the skin when PEVs were used (especially in comparison with the commercial gel) thus suggesting intact PEVs' penetration through the pig skin. Images of the qualitative CLSM analyses support this conclusion. Thus, this work shows the superior ability of the PEVs to enhance ex vivo drug transport of both hydrophilic and lipophilic diclofenac forms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle in Maintenance of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zariyantey Abdul Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs- based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0–1000 ng/mL for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione (GSH level, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P<0.05 of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1+ cells (HSCs at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1 expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P<0.05 the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs.

  16. Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentiviral Mediated Gene Transfer Into Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Jalali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Introduction of therapeutic genes into the injured site of nervous system can be achieved using transplantation of cellular vehicles containing desired gene. To transfer exogenous genes into the cellular vehicles, lentiviral vectors are one of interested vectors because of advantages such high transduction efficiency of dividing and non-dividing cells. Unrestricted somatic stem cells are subclasses of umbilical cord blood derived stem cells which are appreciate candidates to use as cellular vehicles for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system. Objectives In current study we investigated the effect of lentiviral vector transduction on the neuronal related features of unrestricted somatic stem cells to indicate the probable and unwanted changes related to transduction procedure. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lentiviral vector containing green fluorescent protein (GFP were transduced into unrestricted somatic stem cells and its effect was investigated with using MTT assay, qPCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. For statistical comparison of real time PCR results, REST software (2009, Qiagen was used. Results Obtained results showed lentiviral vector transduction did not have cytotoxic effects on unrestricted somatic stem cells and did not change neuronal differentiation capacity of them as well the expression of some neuronal related genes and preserved them in multilineage situation. Conclusions In conclusion, we suggested that lentiviral vectors could be proper vectors to transfer therapeutic gene into unrestricted somatic stem cells to provide a cellular vehicle for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system disorders.

  17. Effectiveness of hand washing on the removal of iron oxide nanoparticles from human skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Nastassja A; Berthet, Aurélie; Maurizi, Lionel; Eisenbeis, Antoine; Hopf, Nancy B

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of washing with soap and water in removing nanoparticles from exposed skin was investigated. Dry, nanoscale hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) or maghemite (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) powder, with primary particle diameters between 20-30 nm, were applied to two samples each of fresh and frozen ex vivo human skin in two independent experiments. The permeation of nanoparticles through skin, and the removal of nanoparticles after washing with soap and water were investigated. Bare iron oxide nanoparticles remained primarily on the surface of the skin, without penetrating beyond the stratum corneum. Skin exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles for 1 and 20 hr resulted in removal of 85% and 90%, respectively, of the original dose after washing. In the event of dermal exposure to chemicals, removal is essential to avoid potential local irritation or permeation across skin. Although manufactured at an industrial scale and used extensively in laboratory experiments, limited data are available on the removal of engineered nanoparticles after skin contact. Our finding raises questions about the potential consequences of nanoparticles remaining on the skin and whether alternative washing methods should be proposed. Further studies on skin decontamination beyond use of soap and water are needed to improve the understanding of the potential health consequences of dermal exposure to nanoparticles.

  18. Ex vivo skin absorption of terpenes from Vicks VapoRub ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sopala, Monika

    2008-08-01

    The pharmaceutical market offers a wide range of inhalant drug products applied on the skin that contain essential oils and/or their isolated compounds, i.e. terpenes. Because there are few data concerning the skin penetration of terpenes, especially from complex carriers, the goal of this study was to determine the ex vivo skin absorption kinetics of chosen terpenes, namely eucalyptol, menthol, camphor, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene, from the product Vicks VapoRub. Human cadaver skin was placed in a flow-through diffusion chamber and the product was applied for 15, 30, and 60 min. After the application time the skin was separated into layers using a tape-stripping technique: three fractions of stratum corneum and epidermis with dermis, and terpenes amounts in the samples were determined by gas-chromatography. The investigated terpenes showed different absorption characteristics related to their physicochemical properties and did not permeate through the skin into the acceptor fluid. Eucalyptol had the largest total accumulation in the stratum corneum and in the epidermis with dermis, while alpha-pinene penetrated into the skin in the smallest amount. The short time in which saturation of the stratum corneum with the terpenes occurred and the high accumulation of most of the investigated terpenes in the skin layers proved that these compounds easily penetrate and permeate the stratum corneum and that in vivo they may easily penetrate into the blood circulation.

  19. Ex-vivo assessment and non-invasive in vivo imaging of internal hemorrhages in Aga2/+ mutant mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolayev, Vladimir [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Cohrs, Christian M. [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Hrabé de Angelis, Martin [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ntziachristos, Vasilis, E-mail: v.ntziachristos@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Aga2/+ mice, model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, have type I collagen mutation. ► Aga2/+ mice display both moderate and severe phenotypes lethal 6–11th postnatal. ► Internal hemorrhages studied in Aga2/+ vs. control mice at 6 and 9 days postnatal. ► Anatomical and functional findings in-vivo contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance. -- Abstract: Mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1/2) typically lead to Osteogenesis imperfecta, the most common heritable cause of skeletal fractures and bone deformation in humans. Heterozygous Col1a1{sup Aga2/+}, animals with a dominant mutation in the terminal C-propeptide domain of type I collagen develop typical skeletal hallmarks and internal hemorrhages starting from 6 day after birth. The disease progression for Aga2/+ mice, however, is not uniform differing between severe phenotype lethal at the 6–11th day of life, and moderate-to-severe one with survival to adulthood. Herein we investigated whether a new modality that combines X-ray computer tomography with fluorescence tomography in one hybrid system can be employed to study internal bleedings in relation to bone fractures and obtain insights into disease progression. The disease phenotype was characterized on Aga2/+ vs. wild type mice between 6 and 9 days postnatal. Anatomical and functional findings obtained in-vivo were contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance of the same tissues under cryo-slicing.

  20. Formulation Optimization and Ex Vivo and In Vivo Evaluation of Celecoxib Microemulsion-Based Gel for Transdermal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mengyuan; Ren, Lili; Chen, Guoguang

    2017-08-01

    Celecoxib (CXB) is a poorly aqueous solubility sulfonamide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Hence, the formulation of CXB was selected for solubilization and bioavailability. To find out suitable formulation for microemulsion, the solubility of CXB in triacetin (oil phase), Tween 80 (surfactant), and Transcutol-P (co-surfactant) was screened respectively and optimized by using orthogonal experimental design. The Km value and concentration of oil, S mix , and water were confirmed by pseudo-ternary phase diagram studies and central composite design. One percent carbopol 934 was added to form CXB microemulsion-based gel. The final formulation was evaluated for its appearance, pH, viscosity, stability, drug content determination, globule size, and zeta potential. Its ex vivo drug permeation and the in vivo pharmacokinetic was investigated. Further research was performed to ensure the safety and validity by skin irritation study and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity study. Ex vivo permeation study in mice was designed to compare permeation and transdermal ability between microemulsion formulation and conventional gel. The results revealed that optimized microemulsion-based gel gained higher permeation based on smaller globule size and high drug loading of microemulsion. Transdermal ability was also greatly improved. Bioavailability was compared to market Celebrex® by the in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rabbits. The results indicated that CXB microemulsion-based gel had better bioavailability than Celebrex®.

  1. Application of an ex vivo cellular model of circadian variation for bipolar disorder research: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamne, Mikhil N; Ponder, Christine A; Wood, Joel A; Mansour, Hader; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Young, Michael W; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2013-09-01

    Disruption of circadian function has been observed in several human disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD). Research into these disorders can be facilitated by human cellular models that evaluate external factors (zeitgebers) that impact circadian pacemaker activity. Incorporating a firefly luciferase reporter system into human fibroblasts provides a facile, bioluminescent readout that estimates circadian phase, while leaving the cells intact. We evaluated whether this system can be adapted to clinical BD research and whether it can incorporate zeitgeber challenge paradigms. Fibroblasts from patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) (n = 13) and controls (n = 12) were infected ex vivo with a lentiviral reporter incorporating the promoter sequences for Bmal1, a circadian gene to drive expression of the firefly luciferase gene. Following synchronization, the bioluminescence was used to estimate period length. Phase response curves (PRCs) were also generated following forskolin challenge and the phase response patterns were characterized. Period length and PRCs could be estimated reliably from the constructs. There were no significant case-control differences in period length, with a nonsignificant trend for differences in PRCs following the phase-setting experiments. An ex vivo cellular fibroblast-based model can be used to investigate circadian function in BD-I. It can be generated from specific individuals and this could usefully complement ongoing circadian clinical research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Solubility and Bioavailability Enhancement of Poorly Aqueous Soluble Atorvastatin: In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S. Rodde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to improve the solubility of the poorly water soluble drug atorvastatin (ATR, using solid dispersion (SD techniques, with Neem Gum (NG as a hydrophilic carrier. The effects of the polymer concentration and method of preparation on the solubility and dissolution rate were studied. The results showed that the solubility of ATR increases with increasing NG concentration. However, dissolution rate of ATR from its SD was dependent on the method used to prepare SD. An in vitro drug release study revealed that the solvent evaporation technique is a more convenient and effective method of preparing SD than kneading method. The SD was characterized using DSC, SEM, and XRD study. An in vivo study was performed in which the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibition activity was measured. A significant reduction in HMG CoA reductase activity was observed with SD of ATR compared with the plain drug. An ex vivo absorption study was carried out using modified apparatus developed in our laboratory. The in vitro drug release and in vivo and ex vivo studies clearly demonstrated the potential of hydrophilic NG in enhancing the solubility, dissolution rate, and bioavailability of ATR.

  3. Formulation, functional evaluation and ex vivo performance of thermoresponsive soluble gels - A platform for therapeutic delivery to mucosal sinus tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Cabot, Peter J; Wallwork, Benjamin; Panizza, Benedict J; Parekh, Harendra S

    2017-01-01

    Mucoadhesive in situ gelling systems (soluble gels) have received considerable attention recently as effective stimuli-transforming vectors for a range of drug delivery applications. Considering this fact, the present work involves systematic formulation development, optimization, functional evaluation and ex vivo performance of thermosensitive soluble gels containing dexamethasone 21-phosphate disodium salt (DXN) as the model therapeutic. A series of in situ gel-forming systems comprising the thermoreversible polymer poloxamer-407 (P407), along with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and chitosan were first formulated. The optimized soluble gels were evaluated for their potential to promote greater retention at the mucosal surface, for improved therapeutic efficacy, compared to existing solution/suspension-based steroid formulations used clinically. Optimized soluble gels demonstrated a desirable gelation temperature with Newtonian fluid behaviour observed under storage conditions (4-8°C), and pseudoplastic fluid behaviour recorded at nasal cavity/sinus temperature (≈34°C). The in vitro characterization of formulations including rheological evaluation, textural analysis and mucoadhesion studies of the gel form were investigated. Considerable improvement in mechanical properties and mucoadhesion was observed with incorporation of HPMC and chitosan into the gelling systems. The lead poloxamer-based soluble gels, PGHC4 and PGHC7, which were carried through to ex vivo permeation studies displayed extended drug release profiles in conditions mimicking the human nasal cavity, which indicates their suitability for treating a range of conditions affecting the nasal cavity/sinuses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ex vivo generation of dendritic cells from cryopreserved, post-induction chemotherapy, mobilized leukapheresis from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Smita K; Driscoll, Timothy; Boczkowski, David; Schmittling, Robert; Reynolds, Renee; Johnson, Laura A; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H; Gururangan, Sridharan; Mitchell, Duane A

    2015-10-01

    Generation of patient-derived, autologous dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical component of cancer immunotherapy with ex vivo-generated, tumor antigen-loaded DCs. An important factor in the ability to generate DCs is the potential impact of prior therapies on DC phenotype and function. We investigated the ability to generate DCs using cells harvested from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma for potential evaluation of DC-RNA based vaccination approach in this patient population. Cells harvested from medulloblastoma patient leukapheresis following induction chemotherapy and granulocyte colony stimulating factor mobilization were cryopreserved prior to use in DC generation. DCs were generated from the adherent CD14+ monocytes using standard procedures and analyzed for cell recovery, phenotype and function. To summarize, 4 out of 5 patients (80%) had sufficient monocyte recovery to permit DC generation, and we were able to generate DCs from 3 out of these 4 patient samples (75%). Overall, we successfully generated DCs that met phenotypic requisites for DC-based cancer therapy from 3 out of 5 (60%) patient samples and met both phenotypic and functional requisites from 2 out of 5 (40%) patient samples. This study highlights the potential to generate functional DCs for further clinical treatments from refractory patients that have been heavily pretreated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate the utility of evaluating the effect of the currently employed standard-of-care therapies on the ex vivo generation of DCs for DC-based clinical studies in cancer patients.

  5. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L; Wong, Terence T W; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Photoreactivity of tiaprofenic acid and suprofen using pig skin as an ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia, Z; Hernández, D; Castell, J V; van Henegouwen, G M

    2000-10-01

    The skin is repeatedly exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation. Photoreaction of drugs in the body may result in phototoxic or photoallergic side effects. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as tiaprofenic acid (TPA) and the closely related isomer suprofen (SUP) are frequently associated with photosensitive disorders; they may mediate photosensitised damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Using ex vivo pig skin as a model, we investigated the photodegradation of TPA and SUP, and photobinding of these drugs to protein by means of HPLC analysis and drug-directed antibodies. Both with keratinocytes, which were first isolated from the pig skin and thereafter exposed to UVA and with keratinocytes which were isolated from pig skin after the skin was UVA exposed, time-dependent photodegradation of TPA and SUP was found, beside photoadduct formation to protein. The results of this work show that: (a) TPA and SUP were photodecomposed with similar efficiency; major photoproducts detected were decarboxytiaprofenic acid (DTPA) and decarboxysuprofen (DSUP), respectively. (b) Both drugs form photoadducts, as concluded from recognition by drug-specific antibodies. Pig skin appears to be a good model for studying the skin photosensitising potential of drugs.

  7. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Kaluzny

    Full Text Available We investigated the autofluorescence (AF signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD using 488 nm excitation.The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496-610 nm, 6 nm resolution. The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch's Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered.Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch's Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02.The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo.

  8. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Nelson Jr. [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Manns, Fabrice [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Milne, Peter J [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1638 NW 10th Ave, McKnight Bldg, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Denham, David B [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1638 NW 10th Ave, McKnight Bldg, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Minhaj, Ahmed M [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Parel, Jean-Marie [Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, PO Box 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Robinson, David S [Center for Breast Care, St Luke' s Hospital of Kansas City, 4400 Broadway, Suite 509, Kansas City, MO 64111 (United States)

    2004-05-07

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 deg. C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 x 10{sup 3} mm{sup 3}) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  9. Flagellin Induces β-Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Ex vivo Infection with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Steven B; Prior, Alison; Ellis, Samuel J; Cook, Vivienne; Chan, Simon S M; Gelson, William; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen in the developed world and can cause life-threatening disease particularly in children. EHEC persists in the human gut by adhering intimately to colonic epithelium and forming characteristic attaching/effacing lesions. In this study, we investigated the innate immune response to EHEC infection with particular focus on antimicrobial peptide and protein expression by colonic epithelium. Using a novel human colonic biopsy model and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells, we found that EHEC infection induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), whereas hBD1, hBD3, LL-37, and lysozyme remained unchanged. Infection with specific EHEC deletion mutants demonstrated that this was dependent on flagellin, and apical exposure to purified flagellin was sufficient to stimulate hBD2 and also interleukin (IL)-8 expression ex vivo and in vitro. Flagellin-mediated hBD2 induction was significantly reduced by inhibitors of NF-κB, MAP kinase p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, IL-8 secretion by polarized T84 cells was vectorial depending on the side of stimulation, and apical exposure to EHEC or flagellin resulted in apical IL-8 release. Our results demonstrate that EHEC only induces a modest immune response in human colonic epithelium characterized by flagellin-dependent induction of hBD2 and low levels of IL-8.

  10. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  11. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques.

  12. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Nelson Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J; Denham, David B; Minhaj, Ahmed M; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S

    2004-01-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T 3 mm 3 ) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization

  13. Impact of post-dialysis calcium level on ex vivo rat aortic wall calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiazu, Daniel; González-Parra, Emilio; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent complication in chronic haemodialysis patients and is associated with adverse outcomes. Serum calcium and phosphate levels and imbalances in calcification regulators are thought to contribute to the process. In this regard, the dialysate calcium concentration is a modifiable tool for modulating the risk of vascular calcification. We explored pre- and post-dialysis phosphate and calcium concentrations in stable chronic haemodialysis patients treated by dialysis with the KDIGO-suggested 1.5 mmol/L calcium dialysate to investigate the effects on ex vivo calcification of rat aortic rings. At the end of haemodialysis, mean serum calcium levels were increased in 88% of paired pre-/post-dialysis samples, while mean serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone levels were decreased. Rat aortic ring cultures grown at the same calcium and phosphate concentrations revealed that pre- and post-dialysis resulted in a similar degree of calcification. By contrast, haemodialysis with unchanged serum calcium resulted in a 5-fold reduction in calcium deposition. Dialysis with the widely prescribed 1.5 mmol/L calcium dose results in persistent high serum calcification potential in a sizable proportion of patients, driven by increased post-dialysis calcium concentration. This could potentially be mitigated by individualising dialysate calcium dosage based on pre-dialysis serum calcium levels.

  14. Retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection by an angiotensin II blocker in an ex vivo retinal explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew J R; Heller, Janosch P; Leung, Johahn; Tassoni, Alessia; Martin, Keith R

    2015-12-01

    An ex vivo organotypic retinal explant model was developed to examine retinal survival mechanisms relevant to glaucoma mediated by the renin angiotensin system in the rodent eye. Eyes from adult Sprague Dawley rats were enucleated immediately post-mortem and used to make four retinal explants per eye. Explants were treated either with irbesartan (10 µM), vehicle or angiotensin II (2 μM) for four days. Retinal ganglion cell density was estimated by βIII tubulin immunohistochemistry. Live imaging of superoxide formation with dihydroethidium (DHE) was performed. Protein expression was determined by Western blotting, and mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. Irbesartan (10 µM) almost doubled ganglion cell survival after four days. Angiotensin II (2 µM) reduced cell survival by 40%. Sholl analysis suggested that irbesartan improved ganglion cell dendritic arborisation compared to control and angiotensin II reduced it. Angiotensin-treated explants showed an intense DHE fluorescence not seen in irbesartan-treated explants. Analysis of protein and mRNA expression determined that the angiotensin II receptor At1R was implicated in modulation of the NADPH-dependent pathway of superoxide generation. Angiotensin II blockers protect retinal ganglion cells in this model and may be worth further investigation as a neuroprotective treatment in models of eye disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Ex vivo micro-CT imaging of murine brain models using non-ionic iodinated contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Bautista, N.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, J.; Franco-Pérez, J.; Calvillo-Velasco, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical investigation of brain tumors is frequently carried out by means of intracranial implantation of brain tumor xenografts or allografts, with subsequent analysis of tumor growth using conventional histopathology. However, very little has been reported on the use contrast-enhanced techniques in micro-CT imaging for the study of malignant brain tumors in small animal models. The aim of this study has been to test a protocol for ex vivo imaging of murine brain models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after treatment with non-ionic iodinated solution, using an in-house developed laboratory micro-CT. We have found that the best compromise between acquisition time and image quality is obtained using a 50 kVp, 0.5 mAs, 1° angular step on a 360 degree orbit acquisition protocol, with 70 μm reconstructed voxel size using the Feldkamp algorithm. With this parameters up to 4 murine brains can be scanned in tandem in less than 15 minutes. Image segmentation and analysis of three sample brains allowed identifying tumor volumes as small as 0.4 mm3.

  16. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  17. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo viscoelastic behavior of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramo, Nicole L; Shetye, Snehal S; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Troyer, Kevin L; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2018-03-01

    Despite efforts to simulate the in vivo environment, post-mortem degradation and lack of blood perfusion complicate the use of ex vivo derived material models in computational studies of spinal cord injury. In order to quantify the mechanical changes that manifest ex vivo, the viscoelastic behavior of in vivo and ex vivo porcine spinal cord samples were compared. Stress-relaxation data from each condition were fit to a non-linear viscoelastic model using a novel characterization technique called the direct fit method. To validate the presented material models, the parameters obtained for each condition were used to predict the respective dynamic cyclic response. Both ex vivo and in vivo samples displayed non-linear viscoelastic behavior with a significant increase in relaxation with applied strain. However, at all three strain magnitudes compared, ex vivo samples experienced a higher stress and greater relaxation than in vivo samples. Significant differences between model parameters also showed distinct relaxation behaviors, especially in non-linear relaxation modulus components associated with the short-term response (0.1-1 s). The results of this study underscore the necessity of utilizing material models developed from in vivo experimental data for studies of spinal cord injury, where the time-dependent properties are critical. The ability of each material model to accurately predict the dynamic cyclic response validates the presented methodology and supports the use of the in vivo model in future high-resolution finite element modeling efforts. Neural tissues (such as the brain and spinal cord) display time-dependent, or viscoelastic, mechanical behavior making it difficult to model how they respond to various loading conditions, including injury. Methods that aim to characterize the behavior of the spinal cord almost exclusively use ex vivo cadaveric or animal samples, despite evidence that time after death affects the behavior compared to that in a living

  18. Analyses d'images de tomographie X chez le petit animal : applications aux études de phénotypage ex vivo et in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Marchadier, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Small animal imaging is highly necessary for the development of biomedical research and pharmaceuticalapplications. Amongst various available imaging methods, X-Ray tomography is now considered as a goldstandard for anatomical and phenotypical analysis in mice. CT imaging allows non invasive longitudinal studiesin vivo and high resolution analysis ex vivo. The 3D image analysis requires the development of specific toolsdepending on the biomedical problematics.In this context, we have investig...

  19. Recovery following Thyroxine Treatment Withdrawal, but Not Propylthiouracil, Averts In Vivo and Ex Vivo Thyroxine-Provoked Cardiac Complications in Adult FVB/N Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent cardiovascular pathology has been described in hyperthyroid patients even with effective antithyroid treatment. Here, we studied the effect of a well-known antithyroid drug, propylthiouracil (PTU; 20 mg/kg/day, on thyroxine (T4; 500 µg/kg/day-induced increase in blood pressure (BP, cardiac hypertrophy, and altered responses of the contractile myocardium both in vivo and ex vivo after 2 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, the potential recovery through 2 weeks of T4 treatment discontinuation was also investigated. PTU and T4 recovery partially reduced the T4-prompted increase in BP. Alternatively, PTU significantly improved the in vivo left ventricular (LV function with no considerable effects on cardiac hypertrophy or ex vivo right ventricular (RV contractile alterations subsequent to T4 treatment. Conversely, T4 recovery considerably enhanced the T4-provoked cardiac changes both in vivo and ex vivo. Altogether, our data is in agreement with the proposal that hyperthyroidism-induced cardiovascular pathology could persevere even with antithyroid treatments, such as PTU. However, this cannot be generalized and further investigation with different antithyroid treatments should be executed. Moreover, we reveal that recovery following experimental hyperthyroidism could potentially ameliorate cardiac function and decrease the risk for additional cardiac complications, yet, this appears to be model-dependent and should be cautiously construed.

  20. 3D morphological analysis of the mouse cerebral vasculature: Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Steinman

    Full Text Available Ex vivo 2-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM with optical clearing enables vascular imaging deep into tissue. However, optical clearing may also produce spherical aberrations if the objective lens is not index-matched to the clearing material, while the perfusion, clearing, and fixation procedure may alter vascular morphology. We compared in vivo and ex vivo 2PFM in mice, focusing on apparent differences in microvascular signal and morphology. Following in vivo imaging, the mice (four total were perfused with a fluorescent gel and their brains fructose-cleared. The brain regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented in both images using an automated tracing algorithm that accounts for the spatially varying PSF in the ex vivo images. This spatial variance is induced by spherical aberrations caused by imaging fructose-cleared tissue with a water-immersion objective. Alignment of the ex vivo image to the in vivo image through a non-linear warping algorithm enabled comparison of apparent vessel diameter, as well as differences in signal. Shrinkage varied as a function of diameter, with capillaries rendered smaller ex vivo by 13%, while penetrating vessels shrunk by 34%. The pial vasculature attenuated in vivo microvascular signal by 40% 300 μm below the tissue surface, but this effect was absent ex vivo. On the whole, ex vivo imaging was found to be valuable for studying deep cortical vasculature.

  1. Preparation, characterization and ex vivo evaluation of an orally disintegrating film formulation containing pyrazinamide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adeleke, Oluwatoyin A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to prepare, characterize as well as assess the ex vivo buccal drug delivery and cytotoxicity of an orally disintegrating film (ODF) loaded with pyrazinamide. Pyrazinamide (solubility = 15 mg/mL at 25°C; log P = -1...

  2. Ex-vivo evaluation of crab shell chitosan as absorption enhancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at evaluating crab shell chitosan as absorption enhancer in ciprofloxacin tablet formulation using the ex-vivo model. Six batches of ciprofloxacin tablets containing varying concentrations of crab shell-derived chitosan ranging from 0 to 5% w/w at 1% w/w intervals were produced. Batch CTS-0 ...

  3. Validation of myocardial perfusion quantification by dynamic CT in an ex-vivo porcine heart model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Assen, Marly; Prinzen, Frits W; Stijnen, Marco; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2017-01-01

    To test the accuracy of quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using computed tomography (CT) in ex-vivo porcine models. Five isolated porcine hearts were perfused according to Langendorff. Hearts were perfused using retrograde flow through the aorta and blood flow, blood pressure and

  4. Generation of regulatory gut-homing human T lymphocytes using ex vivo interleukin 10 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfrans, Catherine; Hooijberg, Erik; Rodriguez Pena, Maria Sol; de Jong, Esther C.; Spits, Hergen; te Velde, Anje A.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Background & Aims: Systemic treatment of Crohn's disease patients using recombinant interleukin (rIL)-10 has not resulted in significant therapeutic benefit presumably because of limited bioavailability and unexpected proinflammatory effects of high-dose rIL-10. Ex vivo gene transfer of the

  5. Dataset on force measurements of needle insertions into two ex-vivo human livers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, T.L.; Dankelman, J.; van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A needle-tissue interaction experiment has been carried out, by inserting the inner needle of a trocar needle into two ex-vivo human livers. The dataset contains the forces that act on the needle during insertion and retraction into the livers. In addition, a MATLAB code file is included that

  6. Quantification of fibronectin as a method to assess ex vivo extracellular matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Cecilie Liv; Gudmann, N.; Willumsen, N.

    2016-01-01

    -terminus of fibronectin was developed (FBN-C). The assay was evaluated in relation to specificity, technical performance and as a marker for quantification of fibronectin in cartilage and cancer ex vivo models. The ELISA was specific and technically stable. Cleavage of tumor tissue with MMP-2 released significantly...

  7. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory

  8. Mechanical properties of porcine brain tissue in vivo and ex vivo estimated by MR elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertler, Charlotte A; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Badachhape, Andrew A; Johnson, Curtis L; Bayly, Philip V

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of brain tissue in vivo determine the response of the brain to rapid skull acceleration. These properties are thus of great interest to the developers of mathematical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) or neurosurgical simulations. Animal models provide valuable insight that can improve TBI modeling. In this study we compare estimates of mechanical properties of the Yucatan mini-pig brain in vivo and ex vivo using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at multiple frequencies. MRE allows estimations of properties in soft tissue, either in vivo or ex vivo, by imaging harmonic shear wave propagation. Most direct measurements of brain mechanical properties have been performed using samples of brain tissue ex vivo. It has been observed that direct estimates of brain mechanical properties depend on the frequency and amplitude of loading, as well as the time post-mortem and condition of the sample. Using MRE in the same animals at overlapping frequencies, we observe that porcine brain tissue in vivo appears stiffer than porcine brain tissue samples ex vivo at frequencies of 100 Hz and 125 Hz, but measurements show closer agreement at lower frequencies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ex vivo changes in blood glucose levels seldom change blood glucose control algorithm recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groene, L.; Harmsen, R. E.; Binnekade, J. M.; Spronk, P. E.; Schultz, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Hyperglycemia and glycemic variabilities are associated with adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. Blood glucose control with insulin mandates an adequate and precise assessment of blood glucose levels. Blood glucose levels, however, can change ex vivo after sampling. The aim of

  10. Particle Bombardment of Ex Vivo Skin to Deliver DNA and Express Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokol, Ena; Nijenhuis, Miranda; Sjollema, Klaas A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pas, Hendri H; Giepmans, Ben N G; Clausen, Björn E.; Laman, Jon D.

    2017-01-01

    Particle bombardment of gold microparticles coated with plasmids, which are accelerated to high velocity, is used for transfection of cells within tissue. Using this method, cDNA encoding proteins of interest introduced into ex vivo living human skin enables studying of proteins of interest in real

  11. Ex vivo trypanostatic effect of stem-bark extracts of Securidaca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is aimed at evaluating ex vivo anti-trypanosomal effect of stem-bark extracts of S. longipedunculata against T. brucei brucei. ... and tannins. However, aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions were devoid of flavonoids. The crude methanol immobilized the parasites within 75 min, while ethyl acetate and aqueous ...

  12. HBV-Derived Synthetic Long Peptide Can Boost CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Chronic HBV Patients Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yingying; van Montfoort, Nadine; van den Bosch, Aniek; de Man, Robert A; Zom, Gijs G; Krebber, Willem-Jan; Melief, Cornelis J M; Buschow, Sonja I; Woltman, Andrea M

    2018-02-14

    Vaccination with synthetic long peptides (SLP) is a promising new treatment strategy for chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB). SLP can induce broad T-cell responses for all HLA types. Here we investigated the ability of a prototype HBV-core (HBc)-sequence-derived SLP to boost HBV-specific T cells in CHB patients ex vivo. HBc-SLP was used to assess cross-presentation by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) and BDCA1+ blood myeloid DC (mDC) to engineered HBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Autologous SLP-loaded and toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated DC were used to activate patient HBc-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. HBV-SLP was cross-presented by moDC, which was further enhanced by adjuvants. Patient-derived SLP-loaded moDC significantly increased autologous HBcAg18-27-specific CD8+ T cells and CD4+ T cells ex vivo. HBV-specific T cells were functional as they synthesized tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma. In 6/7 of patients blockade of PD-L1 further increased SLP effects. Also, importantly, patient-derived BDCA1+ mDC cross-presented and activated autologous T-cell responses ex vivo. As a proof of concept, we showed a prototype HBc-SLP can boost T-cell responses in patients ex vivo. These results pave the way for the development of a therapeutic SLP-based vaccine to induce effective HBV-specific adaptive immune responses in CHB patients. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. Gravitational physiology of human immune cells: a review of in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the function of immune cells in microgravity has been studied for more than 20 years in several laboratories. It is clear today that the immune system is depressed in more than 50% of the astronauts during and after space flight and that the activation of T lymphocytes by mitogens in vitro changes dramatically. This article gives an overview of the gravitational studies conducted by our laboratory in Spacelab, in MIR station, in sounding rockets and on the ground in the clinostat and the centrifuge. Three experimental approaches are followed in our work: (i) Ex vivo studies are performed with blood samples drawn from astronauts; (ii) in vivo studies are based on the application of seven antigens to the skin of the astronauts; (iii) in vitro studies are carried out with immune cells purified from the blood of healthy donors (not astronauts). The data from our in vivo and ex vivo studies are in agreement with those of other laboratories and show that the immunological function is depressed in the majority of astronauts as a consequence of the stress of space flight rather than by a direct influence of gravity on the cell. Immune depression may become a critical hazard on long duration flights on space stations or to other planets. In vitro experiments show that cultures of free-floating lymphocytes and monocytes undergo a dramatic depression of activation by the mitogen concanavalin A, while activation is more than doubled when the cells are attached to microcarrier beads. Such effects may be attributed to both direct and indirect effects of gravitational unloading on basic biological mechanisms of the cell. While the in vitro data are very important to clarify certain aspects of the biological mechanism of T cells activation, they are not descriptive of the changes of the immunological function of the astronauts.

  14. Celiac Disease–Specific TG2-Targeted Autoantibodies Inhibit Angiogenesis Ex Vivo and In Vivo in Mice by Interfering with Endothelial Cell Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Suvi; Sulic, Ana-Marija; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R.; Szondy, Zsuzsa; Frias, Rafael; Perez, Mileidys Alea; Martucciello, Stefania; Roivainen, Anne; Pelliniemi, Lauri J.; Esposito, Carla; Griffin, Martin; Sblattero, Daniele; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri; Lindfors, Katri; Caja, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A characteristic feature of celiac disease is the presence of circulating autoantibodies targeted against transglutaminase 2 (TG2), reputed to have a function in angiogenesis. In this study we investigated whether TG2-specific autoantibodies derived from celiac patients inhibit angiogenesis in both ex vivo and in vivo models and sought to clarify the mechanism behind this phenomenon. We used the ex vivo murine aorta-ring and the in vivo mouse matrigel-plug assays to address aforementioned issues. We found angiogenesis to be impaired as a result of celiac disease antibody supplementation in both systems. Our results also showed the dynamics of endothelial cells was affected in the presence of celiac antibodies. In the in vivo angiogenesis assays, the vessels formed were able to transport blood despite impairment of functionality after treatment with celiac autoantibodies, as revealed by positron emission tomography. We conclude that celiac autoantibodies inhibit angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo and impair vascular functionality. Our data suggest that the anti-angiogenic mechanism of the celiac disease-specific autoantibodies involves extracellular TG2 and inhibited endothelial cell mobility. PMID:23824706

  15. Bioprocessing of wheat bran in whole wheat bread increases the bioavailability of phenolic acids in men and exerts antiinflammatory effects ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo Anson, Nuria; Aura, Anna-Marja; Selinheimo, Emilia; Mattila, Ismo; Poutanen, Kaisa; van den Berg, Robin; Havenaar, Robert; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2011-01-01

    Whole grain consumption has been linked to a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, which is normally associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation. The benefits of whole grain are in part related to the inclusion of the bran, rich in phenolic acids and fiber. However, the phenols are poorly bioaccessible from the cereal matrix. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bioprocessing of the bran in whole wheat bread on the bioavailability of phenolic acids, the postprandial plasma antioxidant capacity, and ex vivo antiinflammatory properties. After consumption of a low phenolic acid diet for 3 d and overnight fasting, 8 healthy men consumed 300 g of whole wheat bread containing native bran (control bread) or bioprocessed bran (bioprocessed bread) in a cross-over design. Urine and blood samples were collected for 24 h to analyze the phenolic acids and metabolites. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity was measured in plasma. Cytokines were measured in blood after ex vivo stimulation with LPS. The bioavailabilities of ferulic acid, vanillic acid, sinapic acid, and 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid from the bioprocessed bread were 2- to 3-fold those from the control bread. Phenylpropionic acid and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid were the main colonic metabolites of the nonbioaccessible phenols. The ratios of pro-:antiinflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in LPS-stimulated blood after the consumption of the bioprocessed bread. In conclusion, bioprocessing can remarkably increase the bioavailability of phenolic acids and their circulating metabolites, compounds which have immunomodulatory effects ex vivo.

  16. Cellulose filtration of blood from malaria patients for improving ex vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Minja, Daniel T R; Jespersen, Jakob S; Alifrangis, Michael; Kavishe, Reginald A; Mwakalinga, Steven B; Lusingu, John P; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas; Wang, Christian W

    2017-02-10

    Establishing in vitro Plasmodium falciparum culture lines from patient parasite isolates can offer deeper understanding of geographic variations of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of malaria pathogenesis and immunity. Cellulose column filtration of blood is an inexpensive, rapid and effective method for the removal of host factors, such as leucocytes and platelets, significantly improving the purification of parasite DNA in a blood sample. In this study, the effect of cellulose column filtration of venous blood on the initial in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasite isolates from Tanzanian children admitted to hospital was tested. The parasites were allowed to expand in culture without subcultivation until 5 days after admission or the appearance of dead parasites and parasitaemia was determined daily. To investigate whether the filtration had an effect on clonality, P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 genotyping was performed using nested PCR on extracted genomic DNA, and the var gene transcript levels were investigated, using quantitative PCR on extracted RNA, at admission and 4 days of culture. The cellulose-filtered parasites grew to higher parasitaemia faster than non-filtered parasites seemingly due to a higher development ratio of ring stage parasites progressing into the late stages. Cellulose filtration had no apparent effect on clonality or var gene expression; however, evident differences were observed after only 4 days of culture in both the number of clones and transcript levels of var genes compared to the time of admission. Cellulose column filtration of parasitized blood is a cheap, applicable method for improving cultivation of P. falciparum field isolates for ex vivo based assays; however, when assessing phenotype and genotype of cultured parasites, in general, assumed to represent the in vivo infection, caution is advised.

  17. Exploring Optical Contrast in Ex-Vivo Breast Tissue Using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy and Tissue Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephanie Ann

    In this research, ex-vivo breast tissue is evaluated to determine which sources of optical contrast have the potential to detect malignancy at the margins in women of differing breast composition. Then, H&E images of ex-vivo breast tissue sites are quantified to further deconstruct the relationship between optical scattering and the underlying tissue morphology. H&E images were taken of the malignant and benign sites and quantified to describe the % adipose, % collagen and % glands. Adipose sites, images at 10x, were predominantly fatty and quantified according to adipocyte morphology. H&E-stained adipose tissue sections were analyzed with an automated image processing algorithm to extract average cell area and cell density. Non-adipose sites were imaged with a 2.5x objective. Grids of 200µm boxes corresponding to the 3mm x 2mm area were overlaid on each non-adipose image. The non-adipose images were classified as the following: adipose and collagen (fibroadipose); collagen and glands (fibroglandular); adipose, collagen and glands (mixed); and malignant sites. Correlations between and % collagen in were determined in benign sites. Age, BMI, and MBD were then correlated to in the adipose and non-adipose sites. Variability in was determined to be related to collagen and not adipose content. In order to further investigate this relationship, the importance of age, BMI and MBD was analyzed after adjusting for the % collagen. Lastly, the relationship between % collagen and % glands was analyzed to determine the relative contributions of % collagen and % glands . Statistics were calculated using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, Pearson correlation coefficients and linear fits in R. Further deconstructing the relationship between optical scattering and tissue morphology resulted in a positive relationship between and % collagen. Increased variability was observed in sites with a higher percentage of collagen. In adipose tissues MBD was negatively correlated with age, BMI and

  18. In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo Determination of Thyroid Hormone Modulating Activity of Benzothiazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Michael W; Kosian, Patricia A; Haselman, Jonathan T; Korte, Joseph J; Challis, Katie; Macherla, Chitralekha; Nevalainen, Erica; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2015-08-01

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of 6 benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone synthesis inhibition were assessed using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays. Inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) derived from pig thyroid glands was determined for benzothiazole (BTZ), 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (CMBT), 2-aminobenzothiazole (ABT), 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (HBT), and 2-methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT). Their rank order potency for TPO inhibition was MBT=CMBT>ABT>BTZ, whereas HBT and MTBT exhibited no inhibitory activity. The benzothiazoles were tested further in a Xenopus laevis thyroid gland explant culture assay in which inhibition of thyroxine (T4) release was the measured endpoint. In this assay all 6 benzothiazoles inhibited T4 release. The activity of the benzothiazoles for disrupting thyroid hormone activity was verified in vivo using X. laevis tadpoles in a 7-day assay. The 2 most potent chemicals for TPO inhibition, MBT and CMBT, produced responses in vivo indicative of T4 synthesis inhibition including induction of sodium iodide symporter mRNA and decreases in glandular and circulating thyroid hormones. The capability to measure thyroid hormone levels in the glands and blood by ultrahigh performance LC-MS/MS methods optimized for small tissue samples was critical for effects interpretation. These results indicate that inhibition of TPO activity in vitro was a good indicator of a chemical's potential for thyroid hormone disruption in vivo and may be useful for prioritizing chemicals for further investigation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Enterococcus faecalis demonstrates pathogenicity through increased attachment in an ex vivo polymicrobial pulpal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio Ayre, Wayne; Melling, Genevieve; Cuveillier, Camille; Natarajan, Madhan; Roberts, Jessica L; Marsh, Lucy L; Lynch, Christopher D; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Denyer, Stephen P; Sloan, Alastair J

    2018-02-26

    This study investigated the host response to a polymicrobial pulpal infection consisting of Streptococcus anginosus and Enterococcus faecalis , bacteria commonly implicated in dental abscesses and endodontic failure, using a validated ex vivo rat tooth model. Tooth slices were inoculated with planktonic cultures of S. anginosus or E. faecalis alone or in co-culture at ratios of 50:50 and 90:10 S. anginosus to E. faecalis Attachment was semi-quantified by measuring area covered by fluorescently labelled bacteria. Host response was established by viable histological cell counts and inflammatory response using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. A significant reduction in cell viability was observed for single and polymicrobial infections, with no significant differences between infection types (≈2000cells/mm 2 for infected pulps compared to ≈4000cells/mm 2 for uninfected pulps). E. faecalis demonstrated significantly higher levels of attachment (6.5%) compared to S. anginosus alone (2.3%) and mixed species infections (3.4% for 50:50 and 2.3% for 90:10), with a remarkable affinity to the pulpal vasculature. Infections with E. faecalis demonstrated the greatest increase in TNF-α (47.1 fold for E. faecalis , 14.6 fold for S. anginosus , 60.1 fold for 50:50 and 25.0 fold for 90:10) and IL-1β expression (54.8 fold for E. faecalis , 8.8 fold for S. anginosus , 54.5 fold for 50:50 and 39.9 fold for 90:10) when compared to uninfected samples. Immunohistochemistry confirmed this with the majority of inflammation localised to the pulpal vasculature and odontoblast regions. Interestingly, E. faecalis supernatant and heat killed E. faecalis treatment was unable to induce the same inflammatory response, suggesting E. faecalis pathogenicity in pulpitis is linked to its greater ability to attach to the pulpal vasculature. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Antiandrogenic actions of medroxyprogesterone acetate on epithelial cells within normal human breast tissues cultured ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Moore, Nicole L; Jankovic-Karasoulos, Tanja; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Ryan, Natalie K; Thomas, Mervyn R; Birrell, Stephen N; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D; Hickey, Theresa E

    2014-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), a component of combined estrogen-progestin therapy (EPT), has been associated with increased breast cancer risk in EPT users. MPA can bind to the androgen receptor (AR), and AR signaling inhibits cell growth in breast tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of MPA to disrupt AR signaling in an ex vivo culture model of normal human breast tissue. Histologically normal breast tissues from women undergoing breast surgical operation were cultured in the presence or in the absence of the native AR ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), MPA, or the AR antagonist bicalutamide. Ki67, bromodeoxyuridine, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), AR, estrogen receptor α, and progesterone receptor were detected by immunohistochemistry. DHT inhibited the proliferation of breast epithelial cells in an AR-dependent manner within tissues from postmenopausal women, and MPA significantly antagonized this androgenic effect. These hormonal responses were not commonly observed in cultured tissues from premenopausal women. In tissues from postmenopausal women, DHT either induced or repressed BCL2 expression, and the antiandrogenic effect of MPA on BCL2 was variable. MPA significantly opposed the positive effect of DHT on AR stabilization, but these hormones had no significant effect on estrogen receptor α or progesterone receptor levels. In a subset of postmenopausal women, MPA exerts an antiandrogenic effect on breast epithelial cells that is associated with increased proliferation and destabilization of AR protein. This activity may contribute mechanistically to the increased risk of breast cancer in women taking MPA-containing EPT.

  1. Aloin delivery on buccal mucosa: ex vivo studies and design of a new locoregional dosing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Viviana; Scaturro, Anna Lisa; Di Prima, Giulia; Avellone, Giuseppe; Sutera, Flavia Maria; Di Fede, Olga; Campisi, Giuseppina; Giannola, Libero Italo

    2015-01-01

    Chemoprevention of potential malignant disorders or cancerous lesions that affect oral mucosae requires extended duration of treatment. Locoregional delivery of natural products could represent a promising strategy for this purpose. To investigate the aptitude of aloin to permeate through, or accumulate in, the buccal mucosa and to develop a new prolonged oro-mucosal drug delivery system. Permeation/accumulation of aloin from Curacao Aloe (containing 50% barbaloin) was evaluated ex vivo, using porcine buccal mucosa as the most useful model to simulate human epithelium. Oro-mucosal matrix tablets were prepared by dispersing aloin (10% w/w) in Eudragit® RS 100 as, biocompatible, low permeable, pH-independent, and non-swelling polymer. The prepared tablets were evaluated for drug-polymer compatibility, weight variation, drug uniformity content, diameter, thickness, hardness, friability, swelling, mucoadhesive strength, and drug release. Aloin has low tendency to cross buccal mucosa, permeation is marginal, and high drug amounts remain entrapped into the epithelium. Matrix tablets characteristics were in agreement with pharmacopoeial requirements. Drug release showed highly reproducible Higuchian profile. Delivery through matrix tablets promoted drug accumulation in the mucosal tissue. Following application of matrix tablets on porcine buccal mucosa, the amount of discharged drug recovered in the tissue should be sufficient to produce the desired effects, providing therapeutic drug levels directly at the site of action. Aloin-loaded tablets are valid candidates for prevention/treatment of potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer and could potentially lead to clinically relevant drug delivery system as coadjuvant of conventional chemotherapy/radiation therapy.

  2. Isolation and characterization of ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells obtained from a surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Sha, Huifan; Wang, Guan; Bao, Guoliang; Lu, Shun; Luo, Qingquan; Tan, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics and pluripotent differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Bone marrow cells were isolated from a rib fragment of an adult surgical patient, hBMMSCs were isolated based on plastic adherence and expanded ex vivo and phenotyping was performed. Pluripotent differentiation assays for adipogenesis, myogenesis and osteogenesis were conducted. Hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated nude mice was performed by infusion of hBMMSCs. The gene expression profiles of early and late hBMMSCs were examined. The rate of CD31‑positive cells was 31.1% in passage (P)4 hBMMSCs and 18.6% in P10 hBMMSCs. CD105 and CD106 were expressed in 99 and 95% of P25 hBMMSCs, respectively. Lipid droplets appeared at day 18 post induction. For osteogenesis, palpable masses were grossly observed from day 35 post inoculation of hBMMSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining further revealed chondrocytes and bone tissues. For myogenesis, at day six post subcutaneous inoculation, hBMMSCs differentiated into myocytes and were positive for myoglobin and MyoD1. In irradiated nude mice reconstituted by hBMMSCs, the white blood cell count briefly decreased following irradiation; however, it gradually recovered. In the irradiated nude mice reconstituted with hBMMSCs, CD45‑ and CD34‑positive cells were detected 72 h post induction. Gene microarray analysis of P7 and P57 hBMMSCs demonstrated that 20 genes were upregulated >2 fold and 40 genes were downregulated >2 fold in P57 hBMMSCs. In conclusion, the isolated HBMMSCs possessed pluripotent differentiation potential and it was feasible and safe to use hBMMSCs within 30 passages.

  3. EX VIVO STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND PARAMETERS IN FATTY RABBIT LIVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Kemmerer, Jeremy P.; Miller, Rita J.; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects more than 30% of Americans, and with increasing problems of obesity in the United States, NAFLD is poised to become an even more serious medical concern. At present, accurate classification of steatosis (fatty liver) represents a significant challenge. In this study, the use of high-frequency (8 to 25 MHz) quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging to quantify fatty liver was explored. QUS is an imaging technique that can be used to quantify properties of tissue giving rise to scattered ultrasound. The changes in the ultrasound properties of livers in rabbits undergoing atherogenic diets of varying durations were investigated using QUS. Rabbits were placed on a special fatty diet for 0, 3, or 6 weeks. The fattiness of the livers was quantified by estimating the total lipid content of the livers. Ultrasonic properties, such as speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter coefficients, were estimated in ex vivo rabbit liver samples from animals that had been on the diet for varying periods. Two QUS parameters were estimated based on the backscatter coefficient: effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC), using a spherical Gaussian scattering model. Two parameters were estimated based on the backscattered envelope statistics (the k parameter and the μ parameter) according to the homodyned K distribution. The speed of sound decreased from 1574 to 1565 m/s and the attenuation coefficient increased from 0.71 to 1.27 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, with increasing fat content in the liver. The ESD decreased from 31 to 17 μm and the EAC increased from 38 to 63 dB/cm3 with increasing fat content in the liver. A significant increase in the μ parameter from 0.18 to 0.93 scatterers/mm3 was observed with increasing fat content in the liver samples. The results of this study indicate that QUS parameters are sensitive to fat content in the liver. PMID:23062376

  4. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rupf

    Full Text Available The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra: 1.96 µm were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each. Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates. Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h to 91 µm (72 h covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  5. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  6. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle-cell interactions itself.

  7. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Inflammatory Markers of Common Metabolic Phenotypes in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Frøkiær, Hanne; Stenbæk, Marie Grøntved; Nielsen, Camilla Betak; Lind, Mads V; Lundtoft, Christian; Bohr, Marietta Boje; Ibrügger, Sabine; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Vestergaard, Henrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2018-02-01

    Low-grade systemic inflammation (LGSI) is often characterized by elevated levels of interleukin (IL)6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Other serum proteins, ex vivo-stimulated cytokine production, and leukocyte count have, however, also been suggested LGSI-markers, but their associations with the metabolic syndrome (MS) are less clear. We aimed to evaluate mutual relationships between in vivo and ex vivo inflammatory markers and their association with MS and its subcomponents. A cross-sectional study of 118 overweight adults with one or several features of MS. Inflammatory markers included fasting serum levels of IL6, TNFα, CRP, and pentraxin-3 (PTX3), IL1-receptors, leukocytes, and whole-blood ex vivo-produced IL1β, IL6, TNFα, and IL8 after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. All classical serum LGSI-markers correlated with each other, and IL6 and CRP were also correlated with leukocyte count. Ex vivo-produced cytokines were intercorrelated and correlated with leukocyte count, but did not correlate with the serum immune markers. MS score, body mass index, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were associated with 8%-16% higher inflammatory score per standard deviation increment (P = 0.030, 0.001, and 0.034, respectively), primarily driven by higher serum IL6. Serum PTX3 was only significantly associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.19[1.04; 1.37], P = 0.013). HbA1c was inversely associated with surface expression of IL1R1 on monocytes and IL1R2 on granulocytes (P vivo production of cytokines when adjusting for leukocyte count, as were plasma triacylglycerol (9%-10% lower IL1β and IL6). Leukocyte count was most consistently associated with MS and its subcomponents, although not with HbA1. The classical fasting serum markers of LGSI and leukocyte counts associated best with measures of MS-associated LGSI, whereas ex vivo cytokine production was only associated with prevailing glycemia and dyslipidemia. Taken together

  8. Micro-endoscopy of the human vas deferens: a feasibility study of a novel device in several ex vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottmann, M; Sroka, R; Braun, C; Liedl, B; Schaaf, H; Graw, M; Becker, A J; Stief, C G; Khoder, W Y

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show limitation as well as potential of micro-endoscopy techniques as an innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approach in andrology. Two kinds of custom-made micro-endoscopes (ME) were tested in ex vivo vas deferens specimen and in post-mortem whole body. The semi-rigid ME included a micro-optic (0.9 mm outer diameter [OD], 10.000 pixels, 120° vision angle [VE], 3-20 mm field depth [FD]) and an integrated fibre-optic light source. The flexible ME was composed of a micro-optic (OD = 0.6 mm, 6.000 pixels, 120° VE, 3-20 mm FD). The ex vivo study included retrograde investigation of the vas deferens (surgical specimen n = 9, radical prostatectomy n = 3). The post-mortem investigation (n = 4) included the inspection of the vas deferens via both approaches. The results showed that antegrade and retrograde rigid endoscopy of the vas deferens were achieved as a diagnostic tool. The working channel enabled therapeutic use including biopsies or baskets. Using the flexible ME, the orifices of the ejaculatory ducts were identified. In vivo cadaveric retrograde cannulation of the orifices was successful. Post-mortem changes of verumontanum hindered the examinations beyond. Orifices were identified shaded behind a thin transparent membrane. Antegrade vasoscopy using flexible ME was possible up to the internal inguinal ring. Further advancement was impossible because of anatomical angle and lack adequate vision guidance. The vas deferens interior was clearly visible and was documented by pictures and movies. Altogether, the described ME techniques were feasible and effective, offering the potential of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for use in the genital tract. Several innovative indications could be expected. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. Despite the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage, HLA-DR+ cells from ex vivo UVB-exposed human skin are able to migrate and show no impaired allostimulatory capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, I. B.; Sylva-Steenland, R. M.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of ultraviolet B radiation on human Langerhans cell function. Normal human skin was irradiated ex vivo with single doses of ultraviolet B. For assessment of T-cell stimulatory function, cells that spontaneously migrated from epidermal sheets were used,

  10. Correlation of In Vivo and Ex Vivo ADC and T2 of In Situ and Invasive Murine Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaobing; Macleod, Kay; Mustafi, Devkumar; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Markiewicz, Erica; Zamora, Marta; Vosicky, James; Mueller, Jeffrey; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo MRI may aid in the evaluation of surgical specimens, and provide valuable information regarding the micro-anatomy of mammary/breast cancer. The use of ex vivo MRI to study mouse mammary cancer would be enhanced if there is a strong correlation between parameters derived from in vivo and ex vivo scans. Here, we report the correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2 values measured in vivo and ex vivo in mouse mammary glands with in situ cancers (mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN)) and invasive cancers (those which spread outside the ducts into surrounding tissue). MRI experiments were performed on the Polyoma middle T oncoprotein breast cancer mouse model (n = 15) in a 9.4T scanner. For in vivo experiments, T2-weighted (T2W) images were acquired to identify abnormal regions, then ADC and T2 values were measured for nine selected slices. For ex vivo experiments, a midline incision was made along the spine, and then skin, glands, and tumors were gently peeled from the body. Tissue was fixed in formalin, placed around a mouse-sized sponge, and sutured together mimicking the geometry of the gland when attached to the mouse. The same pulse sequences used for in vivo experiments were repeated for ex vivo scans at room temperature. Regions of interest were manually traced on T2W images defining features that could be identified on in vivo and ex vivo images. The results demonstrate a strong positive correlations between in vivo and ex vivo invasive cancers for ADC (r = 0.89, p vivo and ex vivo in situ cancers for ADC (r = 0.61, p vivo ADC value was about 54% of the in vivo value; and the average ex vivo T2 was similar to the in vivo value for cancers. Although motion, fixation, and temperature differences affect ADC and T2, these results show a reliable relationship between ADC and T2 in vivo and ex vivo. As a result ex vivo images can provide valuable information with clinical and research applications. PMID:26208092

  11. Ex vivo brain tumor analysis using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    A big challenge during neurosurgeries is to distinguish between healthy tissue and cancerous tissue, but currently a suitable non-invasive real time imaging modality is not available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a potential technique for such a modality. OCT has a penetration depth of 1-2 mm and a resolution of 1-15 μm which is sufficient to illustrate structural differences between healthy tissue and brain tumor. Therefore, we investigated gray and white matter of healthy central nervous system and meningioma samples with a Spectral Domain OCT System (Thorlabs Callisto). Additional OCT images were generated after paraffin embedding and after the samples were cut into 10 μm thin slices for histological investigation with a bright field microscope. All samples were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. In all cases B-scans and 3D images were made. Furthermore, a camera image of the investigated area was made by the built-in video camera of our OCT system. For orientation, the backsides of all samples were marked with blue ink. The structural differences between healthy tissue and meningioma samples were most pronounced directly after removal. After paraffin embedding these differences diminished. A correlation between OCT en face images and microscopy images can be seen. In order to increase contrast, post processing algorithms were applied. Hence we employed Spectroscopic OCT, pattern recognition algorithms and machine learning algorithms such as k-means Clustering and Principal Component Analysis.

  12. 1,8-Cineol Reduces Mucus-Production in a Novel Human Ex Vivo Model of Late Rhinosinusitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Sudhoff

    Full Text Available Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as rhinosinusitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or bronchial asthma are strongly associated with overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus lining the epithelial airway surface. 1,8-cineol, the active ingredient of the pharmaceutical drug Soledum, is commonly applied for treating such inflammatory airway diseases. However, its potential effects on mucus overproduction still remain unclear.In the present study, we successfully established ex vivo cultures of human nasal turbinate slices to investigate the effects of 1,8-cineol on mucus hypersecretion in experimentally induced rhinosinusitis. The presence of acetyl-α-tubulin-positive cilia confirmed the integrity of the ex vivo cultured epithelium. Mucin-filled goblet cells were also detectable in nasal slice cultures, as revealed by Alcian Blue and Periodic acid-Schiff stainings. Treatment of nasal slice cultures with lipopolysaccharides mimicking bacterial infection as observed during late rhinosinusitis led to a significantly increased number of mucin-filled goblet cells. Notably, the number of mucin-filled goblet cells was found to be significantly decreased after co-treatment with 1,8-cineol. On a molecular level, real time PCR-analysis further showed 1,8-cineol to significantly reduce the expression levels of the mucin genes MUC2 and MUC19 in close association with significantly attenuated NF-κB-activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time a 1,8-cineol-dependent reduction of mucin-filled goblet cells and MUC2-gene expression associated with an attenuated NF-κB-activity in human nasal slice cultures. Our findings suggest that these effects partially account for the clinical benefits of 1,8-cineol-based therapy during rhinosinusitis. Therefore, topical application of 1,8-cineol may offer a novel therapeutic approach to reduce bacteria-induced mucus hypersecretion.

  13. 1,8-Cineol Reduces Mucus-Production in a Novel Human Ex Vivo Model of Late Rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhoff, Holger; Klenke, Christin; Greiner, Johannes F W; Müller, Janine; Brotzmann, Viktoria; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as rhinosinusitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or bronchial asthma are strongly associated with overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus lining the epithelial airway surface. 1,8-cineol, the active ingredient of the pharmaceutical drug Soledum, is commonly applied for treating such inflammatory airway diseases. However, its potential effects on mucus overproduction still remain unclear.In the present study, we successfully established ex vivo cultures of human nasal turbinate slices to investigate the effects of 1,8-cineol on mucus hypersecretion in experimentally induced rhinosinusitis. The presence of acetyl-α-tubulin-positive cilia confirmed the integrity of the ex vivo cultured epithelium. Mucin-filled goblet cells were also detectable in nasal slice cultures, as revealed by Alcian Blue and Periodic acid-Schiff stainings. Treatment of nasal slice cultures with lipopolysaccharides mimicking bacterial infection as observed during late rhinosinusitis led to a significantly increased number of mucin-filled goblet cells. Notably, the number of mucin-filled goblet cells was found to be significantly decreased after co-treatment with 1,8-cineol. On a molecular level, real time PCR-analysis further showed 1,8-cineol to significantly reduce the expression levels of the mucin genes MUC2 and MUC19 in close association with significantly attenuated NF-κB-activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time a 1,8-cineol-dependent reduction of mucin-filled goblet cells and MUC2-gene expression associated with an attenuated NF-κB-activity in human nasal slice cultures. Our findings suggest that these effects partially account for the clinical benefits of 1,8-cineol-based therapy during rhinosinusitis. Therefore, topical application of 1,8-cineol may offer a novel therapeutic approach to reduce bacteria-induced mucus hypersecretion.

  14. Calcium Dynamics of Ex Vivo Long-Term Cultured CD8+ T Cells Are Regulated by Changes in Redox Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Rivet

    Full Text Available T cells reach a state of replicative senescence characterized by a decreased ability to proliferate and respond to foreign antigens. Calcium release associated with TCR engagement is widely used as a surrogate measure of T cell response. Using an ex vivo culture model that partially replicates features of organismal aging, we observe that while the amplitude of Ca2+ signaling does not change with time in culture, older T cells exhibit faster Ca2+ rise and a faster decay. Gene expression analysis of Ca2+ channels and pumps expressed in T cells by RT-qPCR identified overexpression of the plasma membrane CRAC channel subunit ORAI1 and PMCA in older T cells. To test whether overexpression of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel is sufficient to explain the kinetic information, we adapted a previously published computational model by Maurya and Subramaniam to include additional details on the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE process to recapitulate Ca2+ dynamics after T cell receptor stimulation. Simulations demonstrated that upregulation of ORAI1 and PMCA channels is not sufficient to explain the observed alterations in Ca2+ signaling. Instead, modeling analysis identified kinetic parameters associated with the IP3R and STIM1 channels as potential causes for alterations in Ca2+ dynamics associated with the long term ex vivo culturing protocol. Due to these proteins having known cysteine residues susceptible to oxidation, we subsequently investigated and observed transcriptional remodeling of metabolic enzymes, a shift to more oxidized redox couples, and post-translational thiol oxidation of STIM1. The model-directed findings from this study highlight changes in the cellular redox environment that may ultimately lead to altered T cell calcium dynamics during immunosenescence or organismal aging.

  15. Gene transfer to human trabecular meshwork cells in vitro and ex vivo using HIV-based lentivirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate whether the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP reporter gene could be transferred into human trabecular meshwork (HTM cells by a HIV-based lentivirus both in vitro and ex vivo.METHODS:The HIV-based lentivirus that contains an EF1-α promoter driving EGFP expression cassette was constructed following the standard molecular cloning methods. The cultured HTM cells were transduced at a range of multiplicity of infection (MOI with HIV-based lentivirus. EGFP positive cell populations were detected by flow cytometry. Human anterior eye segments were cultured with perfusion culture system and transfected by HIV-based lentivirus with a 1×108 transducing unit (TU virus in perfusion liquid. The intraocular pressure was recorded every 8h for 21d. The expression of EGFP in the anterior segment of the human eye was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the distribution of EGFP expression was confirmed by anti-EGFP immunohistochemical staining.RESULTS:The HIV-based lentivirus which contains an EF1-α promoter driving EGFP expression cassette was constructed successfully. After HTM cells were transduced with HIV-based lentivirus containing EGFP in vitro, the ratio of EGFP positive cells to the total cell number reached 92.3%, with the MOI of 15. After the lentivirus containing EGFP were used to transduce human anterior eye segments, the EGFP could be directly detected by fluorescence microscopy in vivo. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed that 88.19% EGFP-positive trabecular meshwork (TM cells were observed in the human anterior segment. Nevertheless, the intraocular pressure in the lentivirus-transduced group kept constant when compared with control group (P>0.05.CONCLUSION:EGFP gene could be efficiently transferred into HTM cells both in vitro and ex vivo by using HIV-based lentivirus.

  16. Calcium Dynamics of Ex Vivo Long-Term Cultured CD8+ T Cells Are Regulated by Changes in Redox Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Catherine A; Kniss-James, Ariel S; Gran, Margaret A; Potnis, Anish; Hill, Abby; Lu, Hang; Kemp, Melissa L

    2016-01-01

    T cells reach a state of replicative senescence characterized by a decreased ability to proliferate and respond to foreign antigens. Calcium release associated with TCR engagement is widely used as a surrogate measure of T cell response. Using an ex vivo culture model that partially replicates features of organismal aging, we observe that while the amplitude of Ca2+ signaling does not change with time in culture, older T cells exhibit faster Ca2+ rise and a faster decay. Gene expression analysis of Ca2+ channels and pumps expressed in T cells by RT-qPCR identified overexpression of the plasma membrane CRAC channel subunit ORAI1 and PMCA in older T cells. To test whether overexpression of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel is sufficient to explain the kinetic information, we adapted a previously published computational model by Maurya and Subramaniam to include additional details on the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) process to recapitulate Ca2+ dynamics after T cell receptor stimulation. Simulations demonstrated that upregulation of ORAI1 and PMCA channels is not sufficient to explain the observed alterations in Ca2+ signaling. Instead, modeling analysis identified kinetic parameters associated with the IP3R and STIM1 channels as potential causes for alterations in Ca2+ dynamics associated with the long term ex vivo culturing protocol. Due to these proteins having known cysteine residues susceptible to oxidation, we subsequently investigated and observed transcriptional remodeling of metabolic enzymes, a shift to more oxidized redox couples, and post-translational thiol oxidation of STIM1. The model-directed findings from this study highlight changes in the cellular redox environment that may ultimately lead to altered T cell calcium dynamics during immunosenescence or organismal aging.

  17. Measurement of histamine release from human lung tissue ex vivo by microdialysis technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Dan; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Nolte, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Currently no method is available for measurement of mediator release from intact human lung. In this study, a microdialysis technique was used to measure histamine release from mast cells in human lung tissue ex vivo. MATERIAL: Microdialysis fibers of 216 microm were inserted...... responses were observed but data could be reproduced within individual donors. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a potent basophil secretagogue, did not induce histamine release in lung tissue which indicated mast cells to be the histamine source. Substance P did not release histamine in the lung tissue....... CONCLUSIONS: The microdialysis technique allowed measurements of histamine release from mast cells in intact lung ex vivo. The method may prove useful since a number of experiments can be performed in a few hours in intact lung tissue without any dispersion or enzymatic treatment....

  18. Ex Vivo Methods for Informing Computational Models of the Mitral Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodworth, Charles H.; Pierce, Eric L.; Easley, Thomas F.; Drach, Andrew; Khalighi, Amir H.; Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten O.; Sacks, Michael S.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of the mitral valve (MV) has potential applications for determining optimal MV repair techniques and risk of recurrent mitral regurgitation. Two key concerns for informing these models are (1) sensitivity of model performance to the accuracy of the input geometry, and, (2) acquisition of comprehensive data sets against which the simulation can be validated across clinically relevant geometries. Addressing the first concern, ex vivo micro-computed tomography (microCT) wa...

  19. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  20. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  1. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  2. Robust methods to create ex vivo minimum deformation atlases for brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Andrew L; Ullmann, Jeremy F P

    2015-02-01

    Highly detailed ex vivo 3D atlases of average structure are of critical importance to neuroscience and its current push to understanding the global microstructure of the brain. Multiple single slice histology sections can no longer provide sufficient detail of inter-slice microstructure and lack out of plane resolution. Two ex vivo methods have emerged that can create such detailed models. High-field micro MRI with the addition of contrast media has allowed intact whole brain microstructure imaging with an isotropic resolution of 15 μm in mouse. Blockface imaging has similarly evolved to a point where it is now possible to image an entire brain in a rigorous fashion with an out of plane resolution of 10 μm. Despite the destruction of the tissue as part of this process it allows a reconstructed model that is free from cutting artifacts. Both of these methods have been utilised to create minimum deformation atlases that are representative of the respective populations. The MDA atlases allow us unprecedented insight into the commonality and differences in microstructure in cortical structures in specific taxa. In this paper we provide an overview of how to create such MDA models from ex vivo data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasticity of Cells and Ex Vivo Production of Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hiroyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The supply of transfusable red blood cells (RBCs is not sufficient in many countries. If transfusable RBCs could be produced abundantly from certain resources, it would be very useful. Our group has developed a method to produce enucleated RBCs efficiently from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells present in umbilical cord blood. More recently, it was reported that enucleated RBCs could be abundantly produced from human embryonic stem (ES cells. The common obstacle for application of these methods is that they require very high cost to produce sufficient number of RBCs that are applicable in the clinic. If erythroid cell lines (immortalized cell lines able to produce transfusable RBCs ex vivo were established, they would be valuable resources. Our group developed a robust method to obtain immortalized erythroid cell lines able to produce mature RBCs. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first paper to show the feasibility of establishing immortalized erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce enucleated RBCs ex vivo. This result strongly suggests that immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce mature RBCs ex vivo can also be established.

  4. Microwave ablation of primary and secondary liver tumours: ex vivo, in vivo, and clinical characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Claudio; Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Meloni, Maria Franca; Solbiati, Marco; Cassarino, Simone; Tosoratti, Nevio; Nissenbaum, Yitzhak; Ierace, Tiziana; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a microwave ablation (MWA) apparatus in preclinical and clinical settings. The same commercial 2.45 GHz MWA apparatus was used throughout this study. In total 108 ablations at powers ranging from 20 to 130 W and lasting from 3 to 30 min were obtained on ex vivo bovine liver; 28 ablations at 60 W, 80 W and 100 W lasting 5 and 10 min were then obtained in an in vivo swine model. Finally, 32 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 19 liver metastases in 46 patients were treated percutaneously by administering 60 W for either 5 or 10 min. The treatment outcome was characterised in terms of maximum longitudinal and transversal axis of the induced ablation zone. Ex vivo ablation volumes increased linearly with deposited energy (r 2  = 0.97), with higher sphericity obtained at lower power for longer ablation times. Larger ablations were obtained on liver metastases compared to HCCs treated with 60 W for 10 min (p  0.08). For the selected MW ablation device, ex vivo data on bovine liver was more predictive of the actual clinical performance on liver malignancies than an in vivo porcine model. Equivalent MW treatments yielded a significantly different response for HCC and metastases at higher deposited energy, suggesting that outcomes are not only device-specific but must also be characterised on a tissue-by-tissue basis.

  5. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Ex vivo comparative study on three sinus lift tools for transcrestal detaching maxillary sinus mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfeng; Hu, Pin; Han, Yishi; Fan, Jiadong; Dong, Xinming; Ren, Huan; Yang, Chunhao; Shi, Tingting; Xia, Dong

    2017-07-04

    The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate 3 different sinus lift tools, namely umbrella-shaped sinus lift curette YSL-04, our recently designed probe-improved sinus lift curettes, and our newly invented elevator 014, using our previous developed goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time. Goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time were generated according to our previously developed protocol. The effectiveness for each tool was evaluated through the length of sinus mucosa detached in mesial and distal directions or buccal and palatal directions, and the space volume created by detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in mesial, distal, buccal and palatal directions. The results showed that all 3 sinus lift tools could transcrestally detach the maxillary sinus mucosa and create extra space under the elevated sinus floor on the goat ex vivo sinus models. Moreover, our newly invented elevator 014 had advantages over the other 2 in term of the capability to detach the sinus mucosa. Our newly invented elevator 014 might be a promising tool for detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in transcrestal maxillary sinus floor elevation.

  7. Characterization of ex vivo cultured neuronal- and glial- like cells from human idiopathic epiretinal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelić, Sofija; Lumi, Xhevat; Yan, Xiaohe; Graw, Jochen; Moe, Morten C; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovski, Goran

    2014-12-23

    Characterization of the neuro-glial profile of cells growing out of human idiopathic epiretinal membranes (iERMs) and testing their proliferative and pluripotent properties ex vivo is needed to better understand the pathogenesis of their formation. iERMs obtained during uneventful vitrectomies were cultivated ex vivo under adherent conditions and assessed by standard morphological and immunocytochemical methods. The intracellular calcium dynamics of the outgrowing cells was assessed by fluorescent dye Fura-2 in response to acetylcholine (ACh)- or mechano- stimulation. The cells from the iERMs formed sphere-like structures when cultured ex vivo. The diameter of the spheres increased by 5% at day 6 and kept an increasing tendency over a month time. The outgrowing cells from the iERM spheres had mainly glial- and some neuronal- like morphology. ACh- or mechano- stimulation of these cells induced intracellular calcium propagation in both cell types; in the neuronal-like cells resembling action potential from the soma to the dendrites. Immunocytochemistry confirmed presence of glial- and neuronal cell phenotype (GFAP and Nestin-1 positivity, respectively) in the iERMs, as well as presence of pluripotency marker (Sox2). iERMs contain cells of neuronal- and glial- like origin which have proliferative and pluripotent potential, show functionality reflected through calcium dynamics upon ACh and mechano- stimulation, and a corresponding molecular phenotype.

  8. Normothermic Ex Vivo Kidney Perfusion for the Preservation of Kidney Grafts prior to Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaths, J Moritz; Spetzler, Vinzent N; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Echeverri, Juan; Louis, Kristine S; Foltys, Daniel B; Strempel, Mari; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Robinson, Lisa; Selzner, Markus

    2015-07-15

    Kidney transplantation has become a well-established treatment option for patients with end-stage renal failure. The persisting organ shortage remains a serious problem. Therefore, the acceptance criteria for organ donors have been extended leading to the usage of marginal kidney grafts. These marginal organs tolerate cold storage poorly resulting in increased preservation injury and higher rates of delayed graft function. To overcome the limitations of cold storage, extensive research is focused on alternative normothermic preservation methods. Ex vivo normothermic organ perfusion is an innovative preservation technique. The first experimental and clinical trials for ex vivo lung, liver, and kidney perfusions demonstrated favorable outcomes. In addition to the reduction of cold ischemic injury, the method of normothermic kidney storage offers the opportunity for organ assessment and repair. This manuscript provides information about kidney retrieval, organ preservation techniques, and isolated ex vivo normothermic kidney perfusion (NEVKP) in a porcine model. Surgical techniques, set up for the perfusion solution and the circuit, potential assessment options, and representative results are demonstrated.

  9. Paediatric laparoscopic hernia repair: Ex vivo skills in the reduced training era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Parsons

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Changes to surgical working hours have resulted in shorter training times and fewer learning opportunities. Tools that develop surgical skills ex-vivo are of particular interest in this era. Laparoscopic skills are regarded as essential by many for modern paediatric surgery practice. Several generic skills models have been reported and validated. However, there is limited evidence regarding the role of procedure specific models. Here, a laparoscopic paediatric hernia repair model is trialled with surgical trainees and their competence compared with consultant colleagues. Patients and Methods: An ex-vivo paediatric inguinal hernia repair model was devised. Surgical trainees from 5 specialist centres were recruited and performed multiple standardised repairs. Results: 23 trainees performed 192 repairs. Experts performed 10 repairs for comparison. Trainees were timed performing the repair and their accuracy measured. With repeated attempts trainee′s timings and accuracy improved until by the 10 th repair they were no different from benchmark consultant scores. Conclusion: A simple, procedure specific ex-vivo training model has been evaluated for laparoscopic hernia training in paediatric surgery. The results suggest improvements in competence with repetition. Trainee and benchmark consultant scores are no different by the 10 th trainee attempt. We conclude that this model may have a valuable role in the training and assessment of future paediatric surgeons.

  10. Digital radiography for determination of primary tooth length: in vivo and ex vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Maria D; Jeremias, Fabiano; Cordeiro, Rita C L; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption) that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm). The apparent tooth length (APTL) was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0), whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL) was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson's correlation test. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P ≤ 0.48) between APTL and ACTL. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  11. Pre vivo, ex vivo and in vivo evaluations of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitterhauser, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria) and Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria) and Hospital Pharmacy, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.mitterhauser@meduniwien.ac.at; Toegel, Stefan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Wadsak, Wolfgang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Lanzenberger, Rupert R. [Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Mien, Leonhard-Key [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kuntner, Claudia [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf 2443 (Austria); Wanek, Thomas [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf 2443 (Austria); Eidherr, Harald [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Ettlinger, Dagmar E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Viernstein, Helmut [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kluger, Rainer [Department of Orthopedics, Donauspital, Vienna 1220 (Austria); Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Kletter, Kurt [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2007-05-15

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to develop a simple preparation method for [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP and to evaluate the applicability of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) bone imaging agent using pre vivo, ex vivo and in vivo models. Methods: [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP was prepared using [{sup 68}Ga]-gallium chloride eluted from the {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator and commercially available Multibone kits. Binding affinity to bone compartments was evaluated using a recently established pre vivo model. In vivo (microPET) and ex vivo experiments were performed in mice, and the results of which were compared with those obtained with [{sup 18}F]-fluoride. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP was accessible via simple kit preparation and predominantly accumulated in bone tissue in vivo, ex vivo and pre vivo. Binding to mineral bone was irreversible, and low binding was observed in organic bone. In vivo microPET evaluation revealed predominant uptake in bone with renal excretion. Compared with [{sup 18}F]-fluoride, the uptake was lower and the PET image quality was reduced. Conclusions: From the present evaluation, apart from the autonomy for PET centers without an onsite cyclotron, the advantage of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP over [{sup 18}F]-fluoride is not apparent and the future clinical prospect of [{sup 68}Ga]-EDTMP remains speculative.

  12. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard

    2017-01-01

    sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. METHODS: Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016....... In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping...... mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. CONCLUSION: Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients....

  13. Validating Baboon Ex Vivo and In Vivo Radiation-Related Gene Expression with Corresponding Human Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, M; Majewski, M; Herodin, F; Valente, M; Drouet, M; Forcheron, F; Tichy, A; Sirak, I; Zavrelova, A; Malkova, A; Becker, B V; Veit, D A; Waldeck, S; Badie, C; O'Brien, G; Christiansen, H; Wichmann, J; Eder, M; Beutel, G; Vachelova, J; Doucha-Senf, S; Abend, M

    2018-01-26

    The research for high-throughput diagnostic tests for victims of radio/nuclear incidents remains ongoing. In this context, we have previously identified candidate genes that predict risk of late-occurring hematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS) in a baboon model. The goal of the current study was to validate these genes after radiation exposure in humans. We also examined ex vivo relative to in vivo measurements in both species and describe dose-response relationships. Eighteen baboons were irradiated in vivo to simulate different patterns of partial- or total-body irradiation (TBI), corresponding to an equivalent dose of 2.5 or 5 Sv. Human in vivo blood samples were obtained from patients exposed to different dose ranges: diagnostic computerized tomography (CT; 0.004-0.018 Sv); radiotherapy for prostate cancer (0.25-0.3 Sv); and TBI of leukemia patients (2 × 1.5 or 2 × 2 Sv, five patients each). Peripheral whole blood of another five baboons and human samples from five healthy donors were cultivated ex vivo and irradiated with 0-4 Sv. RNA was isolated pairwise before and 24 h after irradiation and converted into cDNA. Gene expression of six promising candidate genes found previously by us in a baboon model ( WNT3, POU2AF1, CCR7, ARG2, CD177, WLS), as well as three genes commonly used in ex vivo whole blood experiments ( FDXR, PCNA, DDB2) was measured using qRT-PCR. We confirmed the six baboon candidate genes in leukemia patients. However, expression for the candidate gene FDXR showed an inverse relationship, as it was downregulated in baboons and upregulated in human samples. Comparisons among the in vivo and ex vivo experiments revealed the same pattern in both species and indicated peripheral blood cells to represent the radiation-responsive targets causing WNT3 and POU2AF1 gene expression changes. CCR7, ARG2, CD177 and WLS appeared to be altered due to radiation-responsive targets other than the whole blood cells. Linear dose-response relationships of

  14. A novel method for determining human ex vivo submaximal skeletal muscle mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Gram, Martin; Jensen, Martin Borch; Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite numerous studies, there is no consensus about whether mitochondrial function is altered with increased age. The novelty of the present study is the determination of mitochondrial function at submaximal activity rates, which is more physiologically relevant than the ex vivo functionality protocols used previously. Muscle biopsies were taken from 64 old or young male subjects (aged 60–70 or 20–30 years). Aged subjects were recruited as trained or untrained. Muscle biopsies were used for the isolation of mitochondria and subsequent measurements of DNA repair, anti-oxidant capacity and mitochondrial protein levels (complexes I–V). Mitochondrial function was determined by simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption, membrane potential and hydrogen peroxide emission using pyruvate + malate (PM) or succinate + rotenone (SR) as substrates. Proton leak was lower in aged subjects when determined at the same membrane potential and was unaffected by training status. State 3 respiration was lower in aged untrained subjects. This effect, however, was alleviated in aged trained subjects. H2O2 emission with PM was higher in aged subjects, and was exacerbated by training, although it was not changed when using SR. However, with a higher manganese superoxide dismuthase content, the trained aged subjects may actually have lower or similar mitochondrial superoxide emission compared to the untrained subjects. We conclude that ageing and the physical activity level in aged subjects are both related to changes in the intrinsic functionality of the mitochondrion in skeletal muscle. Both of these changes could be important factors in determining the metabolic health of the aged skeletal muscle cell. Key points The present study utilized a novel method aiming to investigate mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle at submaximal levels and at a predefined membrane potential. The effect of age and training status was investigated using a cross

  15. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    .037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis. PMID:24487698

  16. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Kim, Kang; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    ± 0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis. (paper)

  17. Administration of the cyclic peptide COR-1 in humans (phase I study): ex vivo measurements of anti-β1-adrenergic receptor antibody neutralization and of immune parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Götz; Boivin-Jahns, Valerie; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Adler, Kristin; Lappo, Mariola; Truöl, Stephan; Degen, Heidrun; Steiger, Nina; Lohse, Martin J; Jahns, Roland; Ungerer, Martin

    2012-11-01

    A novel concept for the treatment of heart failure is the neutralization of antibodies against the β(1)-adrenergic receptor (anti-β(1)AR-ab). In a rat model of autoimmune cardiomyopathy, the cyclic peptide COR-1 (given i.v. once monthly) neutralized anti-β(1)AR-abs and prevented anti-β(1)AR-ab-induced myocardial damage, and completely reverted cardiac dysfunction over 3-6 months. A clinical phase I trial was designed as a single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Fifty human volunteers received COR-1 or matching placebo as a single i.v. administration with ascending doses (10-240 mg). Primary endpoints were safety and tolerability, while the pharmacokinetic profile of COR-1 was assessed as a secondary endpoint. All five investigated dose groups were well tolerated; no drug-related side effects occurred. Pharmacokinetics revealed a favourable profile with an almost complete plasma clearance within 60 min after administration. Pharmacodynamic investigation showed dose-dependent efficacy with almost complete scavenging of pathological anti-β(1)AR-abs ex vivo at the two highest doses. No anti-COR-1 autoantibodies occurred. No other effects on the immune system (such as an increase of crucial cytokines) were observed up to 43 days after drug administration, nor upon incubation of anti-β(1)AR-ab-positive patient blood samples with COR-1 ex vivo. COR-1 was shown to be safe after i.v. administration in vivo; no relevant side effects occurred. Efficacy was estimated from ex vivo investigation of the potency to neutralize specific anti-β(1)-AR-abs. NCT 01043146, Eudra CT 2008-007745-31.

  18. Basic investigations on LCV micelle gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, S. B.; Rafic, M. K.; Ravindran, P. B.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using Leuco Crystal Violet (LCV) based micelle gel dosimeter as a quality assurance tool in radiotherapy applications. Basic properties such as absorption coefficient and diffusion of LCV gel phantom over time were evaluated. The gel formulation consisted of 25 mM Trichloroacetic acid, 1mM LCV, 4 mM Triton X-100, 4% gelatin by mass and distilled water. The advantages of using this gel are its tissue equivalence, easy and less preparation time, lower diffusion rate and it can be read with an optical scanner. We were able to reproduce some of the results of Babic et al. The peak absorption was found to be at 600 nm and hence a matrix of yellow LEDs was used as light source. The profiles obtained from projection images confirmed the diffusion of LCV gel after 6 hours of irradiation. Hence the LCV gel phantom should be read before 6 hours post irradiation to get accurate dose information as suggested previously.

  19. [68Ga]pentixafor for CXCR4 imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft model - comparison with [18F]FDG PET/CT, MRI and ex vivo receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M; Stenzel, Jan; Otto, Thomas; Helldorff, Heike V; Bergner, Carina; Kurth, Jens; Polei, Stefan; Lindner, Tobias; Rauer, Romina; Hohn, Alexander; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wester, Hans J; Vollmar, Brigitte; Krause, Bernd J

    2017-11-10

    The aim was to characterize the properties of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor as tracer for prostate cancer imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft mouse model and to investigate its correlation with [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo analyses. Static [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor and [ 18 F]FDG PET as well as morphological/ diffusion weighted MRI and 1 H MR spectroscopy was performed. Imaging data were correlated with ex vivo biodistribution and CXCR4 expression in PC-3 tumors (immunohistochemistry (IHC), mRNA analysis). Flow cytometry was performed for evaluation of localization of CXCR4 receptors ( in vitro PC-3 cell experiments). Tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was significantly lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. Ex vivo CXCR4 mRNA expression of tumors was shown by PCR. Only faint tumor CXCR4 expression was shown by IHC (immuno reactive score of 3). Accordingly, flow cytometry of PC-3 cells revealed only a faint signal, cell membrane permeabilisation showed a slight signal increase. There was no significant correlation of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake and ex vivo receptor expression. Spectroscopy showed typical spectra of prostate cancer. PC-3 tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was existent but lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. No significant correlation of ex vivo tumor CXCR4 receptor expression and [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake was shown. CXCR4 receptor expression on the surface of PC-3 cells was existent but rather low possibly explaining the limited [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake; receptor localization in the interior of PC-3 cells is presumable as shown by cell membrane permeabilisation. Further studies are necessary to define the role of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor in prostate cancer imaging.

  20. A novel approach to teaching surgical skills to medical students using an ex vivo animal training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Florian; Rommel, Niklas; Kreutzer, Kilian; Weitz, Jochen; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Gulati, Aakshay; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2014-01-01

    Traditional surgical teaching is influenced by restrictive factors, such as financial pressures and ethical constraints. The teaching of surgical skills during a medical school education seems not to be robust enough at present, possibly resulting in stressful circumstance for surgical novices. However, the authors are convinced that practical training is fundamental for preparing medical students optimally for challenges in the operating theater and have, therefore, examined a novel method of teaching basic surgical skills to medical students. A total of 20 medical students received surgical skill training, which included theoretical lessons, working with ex vivo pig training models, and active participation in the operating theater. All the trainees took written tests and were rated in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Before and after training, the students completed a self-assessment form involving the choice of the correct surgical indication and the performance of surgical procedures. The students' performance in the written examination and in the Objective Structured Clinical Examination increased significantly after training (p ≤ 0.001). Furthermore, the evaluation of the self-assessment form revealed significant improvements in all categories (p ≤ 0.001). Our surgical training method appears to improve the surgical abilities of medical students and to increase their self-confidence with respect to surgical procedures. Therefore, the authors recommend the integration of this method into the medical school curriculum to prepare medical students well for surgical challenges. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of micro-invasive trabecular bypass stents by ex vivo perfusion and computational flow modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter KS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kendall S Hunter,1 Todd Fjield,2 Hal Heitzmann,2 Robin Shandas,1 Malik Y Kahook3 1Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA; 3University of Colorado Hospital Eye Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery with the Glaukos iStent® or iStent inject® (Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA is intended to create a bypass through the trabecular meshwork to Schlemm's canal to improve aqueous outflow through the natural physiologic pathway. While the iStent devices have been evaluated in ex vivo anterior segment models, they have not previously been evaluated in whole eye perfusion models nor characterized by computational fluid dynamics. Intraocular pressure (IOP reduction with the iStent was evaluated in an ex vivo whole human eye perfusion model. Numerical modeling, including computational fluid dynamics, was used to evaluate the flow through the stents over physiologically relevant boundary conditions. In the ex vivo model, a single iStent reduced IOP by 6.0 mmHg from baseline, and addition of a second iStent further lowered IOP by 2.9 mmHg, for a total IOP reduction of 8.9 mmHg. Computational modeling showed that simulated flow through the iStent or iStent inject is smooth and laminar at physiological flow rates. Each stent was computed to have a negligible flow resistance consistent with an expected significant decrease in IOP. The present perfusion results agree with prior clinical and laboratory studies to show that both iStent and iStent inject therapies are potentially titratable, providing clinicians with the opportunity to achieve lower target IOPs by implanting additional stents. Keywords: glaucoma, iStent, trabecular bypass, intraocular pressure, ab-interno, CFD

  2. Evaluation of a novel electrosurgical sealing mode in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Karolin; Linzenbold, Walter; Enderle, Markus D; Nold, B; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Thiel, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar vessel sealing has been successfully introduced in a variety of procedures like prostatectomy, hysterectomy, and nephrectomy. In this study, we evaluated a new sealing mode-the thermoSEAL ® mode (TSM)-operated with the VIO3 generator in an ex vivo and in vivo animal study and compared the results with the commercially available BiClamp mode (BCM), operated with the VIO300D generator. Two different instruments were used in combination with both modes, BiCision ® and BiClamp ® 201T (Erbe Elektromedizin GmbH). In the ex vivo experiment, the sealing of renal arteries was evaluated using both instruments and modes. For the in vivo study, different types of arteries and veins were sealed using both modes and instruments in a side-by-side comparison for acute complications in a total of four animals. Mean burst pressure was in all cases significantly above 360 mmHg (p vivo setting was significantly shorter for TSM compared to BCM: BiCision ® (3.7 ± 0.4 vs. 7.1 ± 0.3 s; p vivo study was significantly shorter for TSM in combination with BiCision ® for arteries [TSM 3.0 ± 0.7 s vs. BCM 6.5 ± 1.3 s, (p 90%) were noted for both instruments and modes. While both modes used with two different instruments reveal high safety characterized by a high burst pressure, low thermal damage (ex vivo) zones, and high sealing rates (in vivo), the thermoSEAL ® mode convinces by its fast sealing speed probably helping to reduce operation time.

  3. In vivo percutaneous microwave ablation in kidneys: Correlation with ex vivo data and ablation work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, C; Leiner, J; Nasri, S; Petitpierre, F; Le Bras, Y; Yacoub, M; Grenier, N; Bernhard, J C; Cornelis, F

    2018-01-01

    To compare diameters of in vivo microwave ablation (MWA) performed in swine kidneys with ex vivo diameters, and to correlate with ablation work (AW), a new metric reflecting total energy delivered. Eighteen in vivo MWA were performed in 6 swine kidneys successively using one or two antennas (MicroThermX ® ). Ablation consisted in delivering power (45-120W) for 5-15minutes. Ex vivo diameters were provided by the vendors and obtained on bovine liver tissue. AW was defined as the sum of (power)*(time)*(number of antennas) for all phases of an ablation (in kJoules). Kidneys were removed laparoscopically immediately after ablation. After sacrifice, ablations zones were evaluated macroscopically, and maximum diameters of the zones were recorded. Wilcoxon sum rank test and Pearson's correlation were used for comparisons. For a single antenna (n=12), the in vivo diameters ranged from 12 to 35mm, and 15-49mm for 2 antennas (n=6). The in vivo diameters remained shorter than ex vivo diameters by 8.6%±30.1 on 1 antenna and 11.7%±26.5 on 2 antennas (P=0.31 and 0.44, respectively). AW ranged from 13.5 to 108kJ. Diameters increased linearly with AW both with 1 and 2 antennas, but only moderate correlations were observed (r=0.43 [95% confidence interval: -0.19; 0.81], P=0.16; and 0.57 [-0.44; 0.95], P=0.24, respectively). Although diameters after in vivo renal MWA increased linearly with AW, the moderate correlation and wide standard deviations observed may justify a careful imaging monitoring during treatment delivery and settings adaptation, if needed, for optimal ablation. Copyright © 2017 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Biobanking of human pancreas cancer tissue: impact of ex-vivo procurement times on RNA quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudloff, Udo; Bhanot, Umesh; Gerald, William; Klimstra, David S; Jarnagin, William R; Brennan, Murray F; Allen, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    Tissue banking has become a major initiative at many oncology centers. The influence of warm ex-vivo ischemia times, storage times, and biobanking protocols on RNA integrity and subsequent microarray data is not well documented. A prospective institutional review board-approved protocol for the banking of abdominal neoplasms was initiated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 2001. Sixty-four representative pancreas cancer specimens snap-frozen at various ex-vivo procurement times (1 h) and banked during three time periods (2001-2004, 2004-2006, 2006-2008) were processed. RNA integrity was determined by microcapillary electrophoresis using the RNA integrity number (RIN) algorithm and by results of laser-capture microdissection (LCM). Overall, 42% of human pancreas cancer specimens banked under a dedicated protocol yielded RNA with a RIN of > or =7. Limited warm ex-vivo ischemia times did not negatively impact RNA quality (percentage of tissue with total RNA with RIN of > or =7 for 60 min, 42%), and long-term storage of banked pancreas cancer biospecimens did not negatively influence RNA quality (total RNA with RIN of > or =7 banked 2001-2004, 44%; 2004-2006, 38%; 2006-2008, 50%). RNA retrieved from pancreatic cancer samples with RIN of > or =7 subject to LCM yielded RNA suitable for further downstream applications. Fresh-frozen pancreas tissue banked within a standardized research protocol yields high-quality RNA in approximately 50% of specimens and can be used for enrichment by LCM. Quality of tissues of the biobank were not adversely impacted by limited variations of warm ischemia times or different storage periods. This study shows the challenges and investments required to initiate and maintain high-quality tissue repositories.

  5. Combined in vivo and ex vivo analysis of mesh mechanics in a porcine hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Lindsey G; Lake, Spencer P; McAllister, Jared M; Tan, Wen Hui; Yu, Jennifer; Thompson, Dominic; Brunt, L Michael; Blatnik, Jeffrey A

    2018-02-01

    Hernia meshes exhibit variability in mechanical properties, and their mechanical match to tissue has not been comprehensively studied. We used an innovative imaging model of in vivo strain tracking and ex vivo mechanical analysis to assess effects of mesh properties on repaired abdominal walls in a porcine model. We hypothesized that meshes with dissimilar mechanical properties compared to native tissue would alter abdominal wall mechanics more than better-matched meshes. Seven mini-pigs underwent ventral hernia creation and subsequent open repair with one of two heavyweight polypropylene meshes. Following mesh implantation with attached radio-opaque beads, fluoroscopic images were taken at insufflation pressures from 5 to 30 mmHg on postoperative days 0, 7, and 28. At 28 days, animals were euthanized and ex vivo mechanical testing performed on full-thickness samples across repaired abdominal walls. Testing was conducted on 13 mini-pig controls, and on meshes separately. Stiffness and anisotropy (the ratio of stiffness in the transverse versus craniocaudal directions) were assessed. 3D reconstructions of repaired abdominal walls showed stretch patterns. As pressure increased, both meshes expanded, with no differences between groups. Over time, meshes contracted 17.65% (Mesh A) and 0.12% (Mesh B; p = 0.06). Mesh mechanics showed that Mesh A deviated from anisotropic native tissue more than Mesh B. Compared to native tissue, Mesh A was stiffer both transversely and craniocaudally. Explanted repaired abdominal walls of both treatment groups were stiffer than native tissue. Repaired tissue became less anisotropic over time, as mesh properties prevailed over native abdominal wall properties. This technique assessed 3D stretch at the mesh level in vivo in a porcine model. While the abdominal wall expanded, mesh-ingrown areas contracted, potentially indicating stresses at mesh edges. Ex vivo mechanics demonstrate that repaired tissue adopts mesh properties, suggesting

  6. Time- and temperature-dependent autolysis of urinary bladder epithelium during ex vivo preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erman, Andreja; Veranič, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Morphological and functional preservation of urinary bladder epithelium-urothelium after extirpation from an organism enables physiological studies of that tissue and provides the basis for successful organ transplantations. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal temperature for maintaining urothelium in ex vivo conditions. Mouse urinary bladders were kept at the three temperatures usually used for maintaining tissue during transportation: at the temperature of melting ice (1°C), at room temperature (22-24°C), and at the body temperature of most mammals (37°C). Autolytic structural changes were followed with electron microscopy, while destruction of cytoskeleton and intercellular junctions was observed by immunolabeling. The first ultrastructural changes, swelling of mitochondria and necrosis of individual cells, became evident 30 min after extirpation if the tissue was kept at 1°C. After 60 and 120 min in ex vivo conditions, the most severe changes with increasing plasma membrane ruptures were detected at 1°C, while at room temperature only mild changes were detected. At 37°C, the extent of ultrastructural changes was between those of the other two experimental temperatures. Autolytic destruction of cytoskeleton and intercellular junctions was not observed before 2 h after extirpation. After 4 h, severe degradation of cytokeratin 20 and microtubules were found at 1°C and 37°C, while being almost undisturbed at room temperature. On the other hand, the reduction of desmoplakin and ZO-1 labeling was more evident at 37°C than at 1°C and room temperature. These findings provide evidence that room temperature is most appropriate for short ex vivo preservation of urothelial tissue.

  7. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  8. Sleep deprivation decreases neuronal excitability and responsiveness in rats both in vivo and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Sándor; Világi, Ildikó; Haraszti, Zsófia; Szalontai, Örs; Hajnik, Tünde; Tóth, Attila; Détári, László

    2018-03-01

    Sleep deprivation has severe consequences for higher nervous functions. Its effects on neuronal excitability may be one of the most important factors underlying functional deterioration caused by sleep loss. In the present work, excitability changes were studied using two complementary in vivo and ex vivo models. Auditory evoked potentials were recorded from freely-moving animals in vivo. Amplitude of evoked responses showed a near-continuous decrease during deprivation. Prevention of sleep also reduced synaptic efficacy ex vivo, measured from brain slices derived from rats that underwent sleep deprivation. While seizure susceptibility was not affected significantly by sleep deprivation in these preparations, the pattern of spontaneous seizure activity was altered. If seizures developed, they lasted longer and tended to contain more spikes in slices obtained from sleep-deprived than from control rats. Current-source density analysis revealed that location and sequence of activation of local cortical networks recruited by seizures did not change by sleep deprivation. Moderate differences seen in the amplitude of individual sinks and sources might be explained by smaller net transmembrane currents as a consequence of decreased excitability. These findings contradict the widely accepted conception of synaptic homeostasis suggesting gradual increase of excitability during wakefulness. Our results also indicate that decreased neuronal excitability caused by sleep deprivation is preserved in slices prepared from rats immediately after deprivation. This observation might mean new opportunities to explore the effects of sleep deprivation in ex vivo preparations that allow a wider range of experimental manipulations and more sophisticated methods of analysis than in vivo preparations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Astrid A; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A M

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air-liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Testicular cells exhibit similar molecular responses to cigarette smoke condensate ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakky, Prabagaran; Hansen, Deborah A; Drury, Andrea M; Felder, Paul; Cusumano, Andrew; Moley, Kelle H

    2018-01-01

    Male exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with seminal defects and with congenital anomalies and childhood cancers in offspring. In mice, paternal exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) causes molecular defects in germ cells and phenotypic effects in their offspring. Here we used an ex vivo testicular explant model and in vivo exposure to determine the concentration at which CSC impairs spermatogenesis and offspring development. We explanted testis tissue at postnatal day (P)5.5 and cultured it until P11.5. Assessment of growth parameters by analyzing expression of cell-specific markers revealed that the explant system maintained structural and functional integrity. We exposed the P5.5 to -11.5 explants to various concentrations (40-160 µg/ml) of CSC and confirmed that nicotine in the CSC was metabolized to cotinine. We assessed various growth and differentiation parameters, as well as testosterone production, and observed that many spermatogenesis features were impaired at 160 µg/ml CSC. The same parameters were impaired by a similar CSC concentration in vivo Finally, females mated to males that were exposed to 160 µg/ml CSC neonatally had increased rates of pup resorption. We conclude that male exposure to CSC impairs offspring development and that the concentration at which CSC impairs spermatogenesis is similar in vivo and ex vivo. Given that the concentrations of CSC we used contained similar doses of nicotine as human smokers are exposed to, we argue that our model mimics human male reproductive effects of smoking.-Esakky, P., Hansen, D. A., Drury, A. M., Felder, P., Cusumano, A., Moley, K. H. Testicular cells exhibit similar molecular responses to cigarette smoke condensate ex vivo and in vivo . © FASEB.

  11. Endodontic filling removal procedure: an ex vivo comparative study between two rotary techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, Monica Sampaio do; Moreno, Melinna dos Santos; Silva, Priscila Macedo Franca da; Botelho, Thereza Cristina Farias

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared the ex vivo removal capacity of two endodontic rotary techniques and determined whether there was a significant quantitative difference in residual material when comparing root thirds. Forty extracted molars were used. The palatal roots were selected, and the canals were prepared using a step-back technique and filled using a lateral condensation technique with gutta-percha points and Endofill sealer. After two weeks of storage in a 0.9% saline solution at 37ºC...

  12. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J; Markowitz, John S

    2015-04-02

    Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodology in applied ethnopharmacological research. This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal׳s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybin A, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively, results which more

  13. Plaque characterization in ex vivo MRI evaluated by dense 3D correspondence with histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; de Bruijne, Marleen; Klein, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    registration of histology data with ex vivo MRI data, using non-rigid registration, both for training and evaluation. This is more objective than previously presented methods, as it eliminates selection bias that is introduced when 2D MRI slices are manually matched to histological slices before evaluation....... Histological slices of human atherosclerotic plaques were manually segmented into necrotic core, fibrous tissue and calcification. Classification of these three components was voxelwise evaluated. As features the intensity, gradient magnitude and Laplacian in four MRI sequences after different degrees...

  14. [Formulation aspects and ex-vivo examination of buccal drug delivery systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Barnabás; Hetényi, Gergely; Majoros, Klaudia; Miszori, Veronika; Kállai, Nikolett; Zelkó, Romána

    2011-01-01

    Application of buccal dosage forms has several advantages. Buccal route can be used for systemic delivery because the mucosa has a rich blood supply and it is relatively permeable. This route of drug delivery is of special advantages, including the bypass of first pass effect and the avoidance of presystemic elimination within the GIT. Buccal delivery systems enable the systemic delivery of peptides and proteins. In our previous study the physiological background of this application and the excipients of the possible formulations were reviewed. In the present work the formulation and ex vivo examination aspects of buccal drug delivery systems are summarized.

  15. Effects of zinc ex vivo on taurine uptake in goldfish retinal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nusetti, Sonia; Urbina, Mary; Lima, Lucimey

    2010-01-01

    Background Taurine and zinc exert neurotrophic effects in the central nervous system. Current studies demonstrate that Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporters, similar to that of taurine, are modulated by micromolar concentrations of zinc. This study examined the effect of zinc sulfate ex vivo on [3H]taurine transport in goldfish retina. Methods Isolated cells were incubated in Ringer with zinc (0.1?100 ?M). Taurine transport was done with 50 nM [3H]taurine or by isotopic dilution wit...

  16. Ex-vivo imaging of excised tissue using vital dyes and confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon; Rabinovitch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Vital dyes routinely used for staining cultured cells can also be used to stain and image live tissue slices ex-vivo. Staining tissue with vital dyes allows researchers to collect structural and functional data simultaneously and can be used for qualitative or quantitative fluorescent image collection. The protocols presented here are useful for structural and functional analysis of viable properties of cells in intact tissue slices, allowing for the collection of data in a structurally relevant environment. With these protocols, vital dyes can be applied as a research tool to disease processes and properties of tissue not amenable to cell culture based studies. PMID:22752953

  17. A protocol to study ex vivo mouse working heart at human-like heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2018-01-01

    Genetically modified mice are widely used as experimental models to study human heart function and diseases. However, the fast rate of normal mouse heart at 400-600bpm limits its capacity of assessing kinetic parameters that are important for the physiology and pathophysiology of human heart that beats at a much slower rate (75-180bpm). To extend the value of mouse models, we established a protocol to study ex vivo mouse working hearts at a human-like heart rate. In the presence of 300μM lidocaine to lower pacemaker and conductive activities and prevent arrhythmia, a stable rate of 120-130bpm at 37°C is achieved for ex vivo mouse working hearts. The negative effects of decreased heart rate on force-frequency dependence and lidocaine as a myocardial depressant on intracellular calcium can be compensated by using a higher but still physiological level of calcium (2.75mM) in the perfusion media. Multiple parameters were studied to compare the function at the human-like heart rate with that of ex vivo mouse working hearts at the standard rate of 480bpm. The results showed that the conditions for slower heart rate in the presence of 300μM lidocaine did not have depressing effect on left ventricular pressure development, systolic and diastolic velocities and stroke volume with maintained positive inotropic and lusitropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation. Compared with that at 480bpm, the human-like heart rate increased ventricular filling and end diastolic volume with enhanced Frank-Starling responses. Coronary perfusion was increased from longer relaxation time and interval between beats whereas cardiac efficiency was significantly improved. Although the intrinsic differences between mouse and human heart remain, this methodology for ex vivo mouse hearts to work at human-like heart rate extends the value of using genetically modified mouse models to study cardiac function and human heart diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ex-Vivo Cow Skin Viscoelastic Effect for Tribological Aspects in Endoprosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, K. A.; Tudor, A.; Hussein, E. K.; Wahad, H.; Chisiu, G.

    2018-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of ex-vivo cow skin was experimentally studied by applied load from different indenter types (circle, square and triangle, all types have the same area) for different times (10 sec, 30 sec, and 60 sec). The viscoelastic tests were carried out using a UMT series (UMT-II, CETR Corporation). The experimental results collected at different operating conditions showed that the cow skin has a higher reaction against the triangle indenter compared to the other shapes. Whereas the hysteresis of cow skin was lower at low applied load time and it's increased when the time increased.

  19. Modelo de conductancia hidráulica de la dentina humana ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hevia, J.; Fresno, C.; Martín, J.; Moncada, G.; Letelier, C.; Oliveira Junior, O.B.; Fernández, E.

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo principal de este trabajo fue montar y probar un modelo experimental para medir la conductancia hidráulica de la dentina ex vivo. Diecisiete terceros molares sanos, con indicación de exodoncia, de donantes sanos de edades entre 15 y 30 años fueron obtenidos mediante consentimiento informado. Luego de limpiarlos, desinfectarlos, incluirlos en resina epóxica y cortarlos se obtuvieron 17 muestras de dentina, correspondiente a un disco de resina con un corte coronal de diente que pres...

  20. Development of an Ex Vivo Organ Culture Technique to Evaluate Probiotic Utilization in IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnini, Cristiano; Martorelli, Michela; Lanini, Claudio; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    The consistent technical and conceptual progress in the study of the microbiota has led novel impulse to the research for therapeutical application of probiotic bacteria in human pathologies, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Considering the heterogenous results of probiotics in clinical studies, the model of translational medicine may lead to a more specific and efficacious utilization of probiotic bacteria in IBD. In this regard, the selection and utilization of appropriate experimental models may drive the transition from pure in vitro systems to practical clinical application. We developed a simple and reproducible ex vivo organ culture method with potential utilization for the evaluation of probiotic bacteria efficacy in IBD patients.

  1. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Fritz, F J; Harms, R L; Hildebrand, S; Tse, D H Y; Poser, B A; Goebel, R; Roebroeck, A

    2018-03-01

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample contrasts over the depth of the cortex and get closer to layer resolved imaging. Ex vivo MRI of human post mortem samples is an important stepping stone to investigate MRI contrast in the cortex, validate it against histology techniques applied in situ to the same tissue, and investigate the resolutions needed to translate ex vivo findings to in vivo UHF MRI. Here, we investigate key technology to extend such UHF studies to large human brain samples while maintaining high resolution, which allows investigation of the layered architecture of several cortical areas over their entire 3D extent and their complete borders where architecture changes. A 16 channel cylindrical phased array radiofrequency (RF) receive coil was constructed to image a large post mortem occipital lobe sample (~80×80×80mm 3 ) in a wide-bore 9.4T human scanner with the aim of achieving high-resolution anatomical and quantitative MR images. Compared with a human head coil at 9.4T, the maximum Signal-to-Noise ratio (SNR) was increased by a factor of about five in the peripheral cortex. Although the transmit profile with a circularly polarized transmit mode at 9.4T is relatively inhomogeneous over the large sample, this challenge was successfully resolved with parallel transmit using the kT-points method. Using this setup, we achieved 60μm anatomical images for the entire occipital lobe showing increased spatial definition of cortical details compared to lower resolutions. In addition, we were able to achieve sufficient control over SNR, B 0 and B 1 homogeneity and multi-contrast sampling to perform quantitative T 2 * mapping over the same volume at 200μm. Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling provided

  2. Phosphodiesterase inhibition mediates matrix metalloproteinase activity and the level of collagen degradation fragments in a liver fibrosis ex vivo rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veidal Sanne Skovgård

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity are hallmarks of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to develop a model of liver fibrosis combining ex vivo tissue culture of livers from CCl4 treated animals with an ELISA detecting a fragment of type III collagen generated in vitro by MMP-9 (C3M, known to be associated with liver fibrosis and to investigate cAMP modulation of MMP activity and liver tissue turnover in this model. Findings In vivo: Rats were treated for 8 weeks with CCl4/Intralipid. Liver slices were cultured for 48 hours. Levels of C3M were determined in the supernatants of slices cultured without treatment, treated with GM6001 (positive control or treated with IBMX (phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were studied by gelatin zymography. Ex vivo: The levels of serum C3M increased 77% in the CCl4-treated rats at week 8 (p 4-treated animals had highly increased MMP-9, but not MMP-2 activity, compared to slices derived from control animals. Conclusions We have combined an ex vivo model of liver fibrosis with measurement of a biochemical marker of collagen degradation in the condition medium. This technology may be used to evaluate the molecular process leading to structural fibrotic changes, as collagen species are the predominant structural part of fibrosis. These data suggest that modulation of cAMP may play a role in regulation of collagen degradation associated with liver fibrosis.

  3. Mice with diet-induced obesity demonstrate a relative prothrombotic factor profile and a thicker aorta with reduced ex-vivo function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uner, Aykut G; Unsal, Cengiz; Unsal, Humeyra; Erdogan, Mumin A; Koc, Ece; Ekici, Mehmet; Avci, Hamdi; Balkaya, Muharrem; Belge, Ferda; Tarin, Lokman

    2018-04-01

    : Classical risk factors such as cholesterol and lipoproteins are currently not sufficient to explain all physiopathological processes of obesity-related vascular dysfunction as well as atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the discovery of potential markers involved in vascular dysfunction in the obese state is still needed. Disturbances in hemostatic factors may be involved in the developmental processes associated with obesity-related cardiovascular disorders. We hypothesized that alterations of several hemostatic factors in the obese state could correlate with the function and morphology of the aorta and it could play an important role in the development of vascular dysfunction. To test this, we fed mice with a high-fat diet for 18 weeks and investigated the relationships between selected hemostatic factors (in either plasma or in the liver), metabolic hormones and morphology, and ex-vivo function of the aorta. Here, we show that 18-week exposure to a high-fat diet results in a higher plasma fibrinogen and prolonged prothrombin time in diet-induced obese mice compared to the controls. In addition, liver levels or activities of FII, FX, activated protein C, AT-III, and protein S are significantly different in diet-induced obese mice as compared to the controls. Curiously, FII, FVIII, FX, activated protein C, PTT, and protein S are correlated with both the aorta histology (aortic thickness and diameter) and ex-vivo aortic function. Notably, ex-vivo studies revealed that diet-induced obese mice show a marked attenuation in the functions of the aorta. Taken together, aforementioned hemostatic factors may be considered as critical markers for obesity-related vascular dysfunction and they could play important roles in diagnosing of the dysfunction.

  4. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Songbing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Yugang; Li, Dechun; Zhang, Yanyun

    2010-04-27

    To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1) ex vivo and in vivo. B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-gamma production was determined with an INF-gamma ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-gamma ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P anti-tumor immunity specific to gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo. This system may prove to be an efficient strategy for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  5. A novel technique for impaction bone grafting in acetabular reconstruction of revision total hip arthroplasty using an ex vivo compaction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Haruhiko; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Morishima, Takkan

    2011-01-01

    Impaction bone grafting allows restoration of the acetabular bone stock in revision hip arthroplasty. The success of this technique depends largely on achieving adequate initial stability of the component. To obtain well-compacted, well-graded allograft aggregates, we developed an ex vivo compaction device to apply it in revision total hip arthroplasty on the acetabular side, and characterized mechanical properties and putative osteoconductivity of allograft aggregates. Morselized allograft bone chips were compacted ex vivo using the creep technique and subsequent impaction technique to form the bone aggregates. Impaction allograft reconstruction of the acetabulum using an ex vivo compaction device was performed on eight hips. The mechanical properties and three-dimensional micro-CT-based structural characteristics of the bone aggregates were investigated. In clinical practice, this technique offered good reproducibility in reconstructing the cavity and the segmental defects of the acetabulum, with no migration and no loosening of the component. In vitro analysis showed that the aggregates generated from 25 g fresh-frozen bone chips gained compression stiffness of 13.5-15.4 MPa under uniaxial consolidation strain. The recoil of the aggregates after compaction was 2.6-3.9%. The compression stiffness and the recoil did not differ significantly from those measured using a variety of proportions of large- and small-sized bone chips. Micro-CT-based structural analysis revealed average pore sizes of 268-299 μm and average throat diameter of pores in the bone aggregates of more than 100 μm. These sizes are desirable for osteoconduction, although large interconnected pores of more than 500 μm were detectable in association with the proportion of large-sized bone chips. Cement penetration into the aggregates was related to the proportion of large-sized bone chips. This study introduces the value of an ex vivo compaction device in bone graft compaction in clinical

  6. Sirolimus inhibits key events of restenosis in vitro/ex vivo: evaluation of the clinical relevance of the data by SI/MPL- and SI/DES-ratio's

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    Kountides Margaratis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirolimus (SRL, Rapamycin has been used successfully to inhibit restenosis both in drug eluting stents (DES and after systemic application. The current study reports on the effects of SRL in various human in vitro/ex vivo models and evaluates the theoretical clinical relevance of the data by SI/MPL- and SI/DES-ratio's. Methods Definition of the SI/MPL-ratio: relation between significant inhibitory effects in vitro/ex vivo and the maximal plasma level after systemic administration in vivo (6.4 ng/ml for SRL. Definition of the SI/DES-ratio: relation between significant inhibitory effects in vitro/ex vivo and the drug concentration in DES (7.5 mg/ml in the ISAR drug-eluting stent platform. Part I of the study investigated in cytoflow studies the effect of SRL (0.01–1000 ng/ml on TNF-α induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 in human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC and human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCMSMC. Part II of the study analysed the effect of SRL (0.01–1000 ng/ml on cell migration of HCMSMC. In part III, IV, and V of the study ex vivo angioplasty (9 bar was carried out in a human organ culture model (HOC-model. SRL (50 ng/ml was added for a period of 21 days, after 21 and 56 days cell proliferation, apoptosis, and neointimal hyperplasia was studied. Results Expression of ICAM-1 was significantly inhibited both in HCAEC (SRL ≥ 0.01 ng/ml and HCMSMC (SRL ≥ 10 ng/ml. SRL in concentrations ≥ 0.1 ng/ml significantly inhibited migration of HCMSMC. Cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia was inhibited at day 21 and day 56, significance (p Conclusion SI/MPL-ratio's ≤ 1 (ICAM-1 expression, cell migration characterize inhibitory effects of SRL that can be theoretically expected both after systemic and local high dose administration, a SI/MPL-ratio of 7.81 (cell proliferation represents an effect that was achieved with drug concentrations 7.81-times the MPL. SI/DES-ratio's between 10

  7. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

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    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  8. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Vikram S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Valluru, Keerthi S; Joseph, Jean V; Ghazi, Ahmed; Yao, Jorge L; Evans, Katie; Messing, Edward M; Rao, Navalgund A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue. Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water. Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively. Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

  10. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

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    Pawel Tulinski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8 CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  11. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinski, Pawel; Fluit, Ad C; van Putten, Jos P M; de Bruin, Alain; Glorieux, Sarah; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8) CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  12. High resolution SAW elastography for ex-vivo porcine skin specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kanheng; Feng, Kairui; Wang, Mingkai; Jamera, Tanatswa; Li, Chunhui; Huang, Zhihong

    2018-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) elastography has been proven to be a non-invasive, non-destructive method for accurately characterizing tissue elastic properties. Current SAW elastography technique tracks generated surface acoustic wave impulse point by point which are a few millimeters away. Thus, reconstructed elastography has low lateral resolution. To improve the lateral resolution of current SAW elastography, a new method was proposed in this research. A M-B scan mode, high spatial resolution phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) system was employed to track the ultrasonically induced SAW impulse. Ex-vivo porcine skin specimen was tested using this proposed method. A 2D fast Fourier transform based algorithm was applied to process the acquired data for estimating the surface acoustic wave dispersion curve and its corresponding penetration depth. Then, the ex-vivo porcine skin elastogram was established by relating the surface acoustic wave dispersion curve and its corresponding penetration depth. The result from the proposed method shows higher lateral resolution than that from current SAW elastography technique, and the approximated skin elastogram could also distinguish the different layers in the skin specimen, i.e. epidermis, dermis and fat layer. This proposed SAW elastography technique may have a large potential to be widely applied in clinical use for skin disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  13. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

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    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  14. Automated Segmentation of in Vivo and Ex Vivo Mouse Brain Magnetic Resonance Images

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    Alize E.H. Scheenstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation.

  15. Sustained function of genetically modified porcine lungs in an ex vivo model of pulmonary xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, Glen P; Levvey, Browyn J; Salvaris, Evelyn; Gooi, Julian; Marasco, Sylvana; Rosenfeldt, Frank; Egan, Chris; McEgan Ccp, Robin; Mennen, Mark; Russell, Prue; Robson, Simon C; Nottle, Mark B; Dwyer, Karen M; Snell, Greg I; Cowan, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Xenotransplantation could provide a solution to the donor shortage that is currently the major barrier to solid-organ transplantation. The ability to breed pigs with multiple genetic modifications provides a unique opportunity to explore the immunologic challenges of pulmonary xenotransplantation. Explanted lungs from wild-type and 3 groups of genetically modified pigs were studied: (i) α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO); (ii) GTKO pigs expressing the human complementary regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59 (GTKO/CD55-59); and (iii) GTKO pigs expressing both CD55-59 and CD39 (GTKO/CD55-59/CD39). The physiologic, immunologic and histologic properties of porcine lungs were evaluated on an ex vivo rig after perfusion with human blood. Lungs from genetically modified pigs demonstrated stable pulmonary vascular resistance and better oxygenation of the perfusate, and survived longer than wild-type lungs. Physiologic function was inversely correlated with the degree of platelet sequestration into the xenograft. Despite superior physiologic profiles, lungs from genetically modified pigs still showed evidence of intravascular thrombosis and coagulopathy after perfusion with human blood. The ability to breed pigs with multiple genetic modifications, and to evaluate lung physiology and histology in real-time on an ex vivo rig, represent significant advances toward better understanding the challenges inherent to pulmonary xenotransplantation. © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Nehrt, Genevieve; Ouyang, Hui; Duerstock, Brad; Shi, Riyi

    2008-02-01

    We have previously shown that acrolein, a lipid peroxidation byproduct, is significantly increased following spinal cord injury in vivo, and that exposure to neuronal cells results in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased membrane permeability, impaired axonal conductivity, and eventually cell death. Acrolein thus may be a key player in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury, where lipid peroxidation is known to be involved. The current study demonstrates that the acrolein scavenger hydralazine protects against not only acrolein-mediated injury, but also compression in guinea pig spinal cord ex vivo. Specifically, hydralazine (500 mumol/L to 1 mmol/L) can significantly alleviate acrolein (100-500 mumol/L)-induced superoxide production, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of membrane integrity, and reduced compound action potential conduction. Additionally, 500 mumol/L hydralazine significantly attenuated compression-mediated membrane disruptions at 2 and 3 h following injury. This was consistent with our findings that acrolein-lys adducts were increased following compression injury ex vivo, an effect that was prevented by hydralazine treatment. These findings provide further evidence for the role of acrolein in spinal cord injury, and suggest that acrolein-scavenging drugs such as hydralazine may represent a novel therapy to effectively reduce oxidative stress in disorders such as spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a role.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of buspirone as determined by ex vivo (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethy, V.H.; Francis, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Ex vivo (/sup 3/H)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetraline ((/sup 3/H)-DPAT) binding to the hippocampus has been utilized to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone after i.v. and oral administration of this drug to rats. Intravenous buspirone rapidly penetrated the brain as demonstrated by a maximum inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding at 1 min. Elimination of drug from the brain was biphasic, with a first component half-life of 24.8 min and a second component half-life of 96 min. Oral buspirone at 3 times the i.v. dose produced less than one-third the maximum inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding compared to that observed with i.v. buspirone. The pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone observed in the present study are in agreement with those reported previously. Thus, the ex vivo binding assay could be utilized to determine the bioavailability of the drug to the brain, and its duration of action. 20 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of buspirone as determined by ex vivo (3H)-DPAT binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethy, V.H.; Francis, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Ex vivo ( 3 H)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetraline (( 3 H)-DPAT) binding to the hippocampus has been utilized to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone after i.v. and oral administration of this drug to rats. Intravenous buspirone rapidly penetrated the brain as demonstrated by a maximum inhibition of ( 3 H)-DPAT binding at 1 min. Elimination of drug from the brain was biphasic, with a first component half-life of 24.8 min and a second component half-life of 96 min. Oral buspirone at 3 times the i.v. dose produced less than one-third the maximum inhibition of ( 3 H)-DPAT binding compared to that observed with i.v. buspirone. The pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone observed in the present study are in agreement with those reported previously. Thus, the ex vivo binding assay could be utilized to determine the bioavailability of the drug to the brain, and its duration of action. 20 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  19. Ocular ketoconazole-loaded proniosomal gels: formulation, ex vivo corneal permeation and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbary, Ghada A; Amin, Maha M; Zakaria, Mohamed Y

    2017-11-01

    Vesicular drug carriers for ocular delivery have gained a real potential. Proniosomal gels as ocular drug carriers have been proven to be an effective way to improve bioavailability and patient compliance. Formulation and in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo characterization of ketoconazole (KET)-loaded proniosomal gels for the treatment of ocular keratitis. The effect of formulation variables; HLB value, type and concentration of non-ionic surfactants (Tweens, Spans, Brijs and Pluronics) with or without lecithin on the entrapment efficiency (EE%), vesicle size and in vitro KET release was evaluated. An ex vivo corneal permeation study to determine the level of KET in the external eye tissue of albino rabbits and an in vivo assessment of the level of KET in the aqueous humors were performed. In vivo evaluation showed an increase in bioavailability up to 20-folds from the optimum KET proniosomal gel formula in the aqueous humor compared to drug suspension (KET-SP). The selected formulae were composed of spans being hydrophobic suggesting the potential use of a more hydrophobic surfactant as Span during the formulation of formulae. Factors that stabilize the vesicle membrane and increase the entrapment efficiency of KET (namely low HLB, long alkyl chain, high phase transition temperature) slowed down the release profile. Proniosomal gels as drug delivery carriers were proven to be a promising approach to increase corneal contact and permeation as well as retention time in the eye resulting in a sustained action and enhanced bioavailability.

  20. In vivo and ex vivo evaluation of cosmetic properties of seedcakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz-Łyko, Anna; Arct, Jacek; Pytkowska, Katarzyna; Majewski, Sławomir

    2015-04-01

    The seedcakes are a potential source of natural bioactive substances: antioxidants, protein, and carbohydrates. Thus, they may scavenge free radicals and have an effect on the stratum corneum hydration and epidermal barrier function. The aim of the study was to evaluate the in vivo and ex vivo properties of emulsions with the seedcake extracts using the pH meter, corneometer, tewameter, methyl nicotinate model of micro-inflammation in human skin, and tape stripping of the stratum corneum. The in vivo and ex vivo studies showed that the emulsions with Oenothera biennis, Borago officinalis, and Nigella sativa seedcake extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. The 6-week topical application of the emulsions with the B. officinalis and N. sativa seedcakes significantly reduced skin irritation and influenced the improvement of the skin hydration and epidermal barrier function compared with placebo. The seedcakes due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have potential application in anti-aging, moisturizing, mitigating, and protective cosmetics.

  1. DNA damage in lens epithelium of cataract patients in vivo and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øsnes-Ringen, Oyvind; Azqueta, Amaia O; Moe, Morten C; Zetterström, Charlotta; Røger, Magnus; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Collins, Andrew R

    2013-11-01

    DNA damage has been described in the human cataractous lens epithelium, and oxidative stress generated by UV radiation and endogenous metabolic processes has been suggested to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cataract. In this study, the aim was to explore the quality and relative quantity of DNA damage in lens epithelium of cataract patients in vivo and after incubation in a cell culture system. Capsulotomy specimens were analysed, before and after 1 week of ex vivo cultivation, using the comet assay to measure DNA strand breaks, oxidized purine and pyrimidine bases and UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. DNA strand breaks were barely detectable, oxidized pyrimidines and pyrimidine dimers were present at low levels, whereas there was a relatively high level of oxidized purines, which further increased after cultivation. The observed levels of oxidized purines in cataractous lens epithelium may support a theory consistent with light damage and oxidative stress as mediators of molecular damage to the human lens epithelium. Damage commonly associated with UV-B irradiation was relatively low. The levels of oxidized purines increased further in a commonly used culture system. This is of interest considering the importance and versatility of ex vivo systems in studies exploring the pathogenesis of cataract. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. High embryonic recovery rates with in vivo and ex vivo techniques in the bitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, M R; de Holanda, C C; Pereira, J J; Freitas, P M C; Salgado, A E P; Giannotti, J Di Giorgio; de Oliveira, S B; Teixeira, N S; Guaitolini, C R de Freitas

    2011-08-01

    The embryonic collection techniques in dogs present a vast methodological variation and low recovery rates. The objectives were to compare and describe two techniques as to the recovery of canine embryos, on the 12th day after the first mating or artificial insemination. Embryos were recovered through uterine horn flushing in vivo, before performing the ovariohysterectomy (OHE) (Group 1; n = 9) or ex vivo, immediately after the OHE (Group 2; n = 9). In total, 43 and 47 embryonic structures were recovered in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between groups on recovery rates (72.8% and 81.0%, respectively). We inferred that both in vivo and ex vivo techniques allow a high rate of embryonic recovery; in the collection technique prior to the OHE, it is essential to carefully handle the reproductive system during the trans-surgical period and that the 12th day (D12) after the first mating/artificial insemination is an efficient option for the high recovery rate of morulae and blastocysts. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Ex vivo analysis identifies effective HIV-1 latency–reversing drug combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Gregory M.; Bullen, C. Korin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Martin, Alyssa R.; Hill, Alison L.; Durand, Christine M.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Reversal of HIV-1 latency by small molecules is a potential cure strategy. This approach will likely require effective drug combinations to achieve high levels of latency reversal. Using resting CD4+ T cells (rCD4s) from infected individuals, we developed an experimental and theoretical framework to identify effective latency-reversing agent (LRA) combinations. Utilizing ex vivo assays for intracellular HIV-1 mRNA and virion production, we compared 2-drug combinations of leading candidate LRAs and identified multiple combinations that effectively reverse latency. We showed that protein kinase C agonists in combination with bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 or histone deacetylase inhibitors robustly induce HIV-1 transcription and virus production when directly compared with maximum reactivation by T cell activation. Using the Bliss independence model to quantitate combined drug effects, we demonstrated that these combinations synergize to induce HIV-1 transcription. This robust latency reversal occurred without release of proinflammatory cytokines by rCD4s. To extend the clinical utility of our findings, we applied a mathematical model that estimates in vivo changes in plasma HIV-1 RNA from ex vivo measurements of virus production. Our study reconciles diverse findings from previous studies, establishes a quantitative experimental approach to evaluate combinatorial LRA efficacy, and presents a model to predict in vivo responses to LRAs. PMID:25822022

  4. Ex vivo administration of trimetazidine improves post-transplant lung function in pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgun, Tugba; Iskender, Ilker; Yamada, Yoshito; Arni, Stephan; Lipiski, Miriam; van Tilburg, Koen; Weder, Walter; Inci, Ilhan

    2017-07-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is not only used to assess marginal donor lungs but is also used as a platform to deliver therapeutic agents outside the body. We previously showed the beneficial effects of trimetazidine (TMZ) on ischaemia reperfusion (IR) injury in a rat model. This study evaluated the effects of TMZ in a pig EVLP transplant model. Pig lungs were retrieved and stored for 24 h at 4°C, followed by 4 h of EVLP. Allografts were randomly allocated to 2 groups ( n  = 5 each). TMZ (5 mg/kg) was added to the prime solution prior to EVLP. After EVLP, left lungs were transplanted and recipients were observed for 4 h. Allograft gas exchange function and lung mechanics were recorded hourly throughout reperfusion. Microscopic lung injury and inflammatory and biochemical parameters were assessed. There was a trend towards better oxygenation during EVLP in the TMZ group ( P  = 0.06). After transplantation, pulmonary gas exchange was significantly better during the 4-h reperfusion period and after isolation of the allografts for 10 min ( P  Ex vivo treatment of donor lungs with TMZ significantly improved immediate post-transplant lung function. Further studies are warranted to understand the effect of this strategy on long-term lung function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Transplantation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood (NiCord) Decreases Early Infection and Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sarah; Thomas, Samantha; Hyslop, Terry; Adcock, Janet; Corbet, Kelly; Gasparetto, Cristina; Lopez, Richard; Long, Gwynn D; Morris, Ashley K; Rizzieri, David A; Sullivan, Keith M; Sung, Anthony D; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Chao, Nelson J; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-07-01

    Delayed hematopoietic recovery contributes to increased infection risk following umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation. In a Phase 1 study, adult recipients of UCB stem cells cultured ex vivo for 3 weeks with nicotinamide (NiCord) had earlier median neutrophil recovery compared with historical controls. To evaluate the impact of faster neutrophil recovery on clinically relevant early outcomes, we reviewed infection episodes and hospitalization during the first 100 days in an enlarged cohort of 18 NiCord recipients compared with 86 standard UCB recipients at our institution. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was shorter in NiCord recipients compared with standard UCB recipients (12.5 days versus 26 days; P analysis; this effect persisted after adjustment for age, disease stage, and grade II-IV acute GVHD. NiCord recipients also had significantly more time out of the hospital in the first 100 days post-transplantation after adjustment for age and Karnofsky Performance Status (69.9 days versus 49.7 days; P = .005). Overall, transplantation of NiCord was associated with faster neutrophil engraftment, fewer total and bacterial infections, and shorter hospitalization in the first 100 days compared with standard UCB transplantation. In conclusion, rapid hematopoietic recovery from an ex vivo expanded UCB transplantation approach is associated with early clinical benefit. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent by using the direct explant cell culture technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, Gürkan Raşit; Aydıntuğ, Yavuz Sinan; Günhan, Omer; Oztürk, Kamile; Gülses, Aydın

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of ex vivo produced oral mucosal equivalents using keratinocytes cultured by direct explant technique. Oral mucosa tissue samples were obtained from the keratinized gingival tissues of 14 healthy human subjects. Human oral mucosa keratinocytes from an oral mucosa biopsy specimen were dissociated by the explant technique. Once a sufficient population of keratinocytes was reached, they were seeded onto the type IV collagen coated "AlloDerm" and taken for histological and immunohistochemical examinations at 11 days postseeding of the keratinocytes on the cadaveric human dermal matrix. Histopathologically and immunohistochemically, 12 out of 14 successful ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalents (EVPOME) that consisted of a stratified epidermis on a dermal matrix have been developed with keratinocytes cultured by the explant technique. The technical handling involved in the direct explant method at the beginning of the process has fewer steps than the enzymatic method and use of the direct explant technique protocol for culturing of human oral mucosa keratinocyte may be more adequate for EVPOME production.

  7. Clinical application of sentinel lymph node mapping in colon cancer: in vivo vs. ex vivo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Yeop; Kim, Do Yoon; Kim, Young Bae; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2014-09-01

    Clinical usefulness of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in colorectal cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the SLN mapping technique using serial sectioning, and to compare the results between ex vivo and in vivo techniques. From February 2011 to October 2012, 34 colon cancer patients underwent SLN mapping during surgical resection. Eleven patients were analyzed with the in vivo method, and 23 patients with the ex vivo method. Patient characteristics and results of SLN mapping were evaluated. The SLN mapping was performed in 34 patients. Mean age was 67.3 years (range, 44-81 years). Primary tumors were located in the following sites: 13 in the right colon (38.2%) and 21 in the left colon (61.8%). SLN mapping was performed successfully in 88.2% of the patients. There was no significant difference in the identification rate between the two methods (90.9% vs. 87.0%, P = 1.000). Both the mapping methods showed a low sensitivity and high rate of skip metastasis. This study showed that SLN evaluation using serial sectioning could not predict the nodal status with clinically acceptable accuracy despite the high detection rate.

  8. Ex vivo-activated MHC-unrestricted immune effectors for cancer adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuci, Valeria; Mesiano, Giulia; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Todorovic, Maja; Giraudo, Lidia; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario

    2014-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of metastatic tumors and current research efforts are directed to define the optimal approach and facilitate the transferability from preclinical to clinical settings. Among several approaches it is possible to schematically distinguish strategies based on either MHC-restricted or MHC-unrestricted immune effectors. The first are mainly based on the infusion of tumor-specific T lymphocytes capable of recognizing determined MHC-restricted tumor associated antigens (TAA) through their T cell receptor. MHC-unrestricted approaches do not target specific tumor associated antigens and are mainly mediated by effectors of the innate immune system, like natural killer (NK) cells or NKT cells, first barrier against pathogens and tumorigenesis processes, or by ex vivo activated lymphocytes like cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells. MHC-unrestricted effectors are usually more abundant than TAA-specific precursors and easier to expand. Furthermore their activity is not restricted to precise HLA-haplotypes, not limited to a single tumor histotype and could overcome downregulation of MHC molecules operated by tumor cells as immune escape mechanism. In this review we will discuss the main cancer immunotherapy strategies based on MHC-unrestricted immune effectors. The topic will be approached from the angle of ex vivo expansion protocols in clinical prospective, as well as potential approaches to favorably modulate their functions.

  9. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Gonchukov, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Koenig, K [JenLab GmbH, Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  10. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard; Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Eiholm, Susanne; Toxværd, Anders; Riis, Lene Buhl; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    Identification of lymph nodes and pathological analysis is crucial for the correct staging of colon cancer. Lymph nodes that drain directly from the tumor area are called "sentinel nodes" and are believed to be the first place for metastasis. The purpose of this study was to perform sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016. In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 13 cases. In seven cases, no sentinel nodes were identified. A total of 51 sentinel nodes were identified, only one of these where identified by both techniques (2.0%). In vivo sentinel node mapping identified 32 sentinel nodes, while 20 sentinel nodes were identified by ex vivo sentinel node mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients.

  11. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  12. Comparison of ex vivo and in vivo micro-computed tomography of rat tibia at different scanning settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Amanda B; Salmon, Phil L; Ward, Wendy E

    2017-08-01

    The parameters of a micro-computed tomography (μCT) scan, including whether a bone is imaged in vivo or ex vivo, determine the quality of the resulting image. In turn, this impacts the accuracy of the trabecular and cortical outcomes. The absolute impact of μCT scanning at different voxel sizes and whether the sample is imaged in vivo or ex vivo on the morphological outcomes of the proximal tibia in the rat is unknown. The right proximal tibia of 6-month-old Sham-control and ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n = 8/group) was scanned using μCT (SkyScan 1176, Bruker, Kontich, Belgium) using three sets of parameters (9 μm ex vivo, 18 μm ex vivo, 18 μm in vivo) to compare the trabecular and cortical outcomes. Regardless of scan protocols, differences between Sham and OVX groups were observed as expected. At a voxel size of 18 μm, scanning in vivo or ex vivo had no effect on any of the outcomes measured. However, compared to a 9 μm voxel size scan, imaging at 18 μm resulted in significant underestimation of the connectivity density (p vivo scanning. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1690-1698, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Real-Time Amperometric Recording of Extracellular H2O2 in the Brain of Immunocompromised Mice: An In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Characterisation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Caroline H.; Finnerty, Niall J.

    2017-01-01

    We detail an extensive characterisation study on a previously described dual amperometric H2O2 biosensor consisting of H2O2 detection (blank) and degradation (catalase) electrodes. In vitro investigations demonstrated excellent H2O2 sensitivity and selectivity against the interferent, ascorbic acid. Ex vivo studies were performed to mimic physiological conditions prior to in vivo deployment. Exposure to brain tissue homogenate identified reliable sensitivity and selectivity recordings up to seven days for both blank and catalase electrodes. Furthermore, there was no compromise in pre- and post-implanted catalase electrode sensitivity in ex vivo mouse brain. In vivo investigations performed in anaesthetised mice confirmed the ability of the H2O2 biosensor to detect increases in amperometric current following locally perfused/infused H2O2 and antioxidant inhibitors mercaptosuccinic acid and sodium azide. Subsequent recordings in freely moving mice identified negligible effects of control saline and sodium ascorbate interference injections on amperometric H2O2 current. Furthermore, the stability of the amperometric current was confirmed over a five-day period and analysis of 24-h signal recordings identified the absence of diurnal variations in amperometric current. Collectively, these findings confirm the biosensor current responds in vivo to increasing exogenous and endogenous H2O2 and tentatively supports measurement of H2O2 dynamics in freely moving NOD SCID mice. PMID:28698470

  14. Real-Time Amperometric Recording of Extracellular H₂O₂ in the Brain of Immunocompromised Mice: An In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Characterisation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Caroline H; Finnerty, Niall J

    2017-07-08

    We detail an extensive characterisation study on a previously described dual amperometric H₂O₂ biosensor consisting of H₂O₂ detection (blank) and degradation (catalase) electrodes. In vitro investigations demonstrated excellent H₂O₂ sensitivity and selectivity against the interferent, ascorbic acid. Ex vivo studies were performed to mimic physiological conditions prior to in vivo deployment. Exposure to brain tissue homogenate identified reliable sensitivity and selectivity recordings up to seven days for both blank and catalase electrodes. Furthermore, there was no compromise in pre- and post-implanted catalase electrode sensitivity in ex vivo mouse brain. In vivo investigations performed in anaesthetised mice confirmed the ability of the H₂O₂ biosensor to detect increases in amperometric current following locally perfused/infused H₂O₂ and antioxidant inhibitors mercaptosuccinic acid and sodium azide. Subsequent recordings in freely moving mice identified negligible effects of control saline and sodium ascorbate interference injections on amperometric H₂O₂ current. Furthermore, the stability of the amperometric current was confirmed over a five-day period and analysis of 24-h signal recordings identified the absence of diurnal variations in amperometric current. Collectively, these findings confirm the biosensor current responds in vivo to increasing exogenous and endogenous H₂O₂ and tentatively supports measurement of H₂O₂ dynamics in freely moving NOD SCID mice.

  15. Ex vivo and In vivo Evaluation of Chitosan Coated Nanostructured Lipid Carriers for Ocular Delivery of Acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfoddin, Ali; Sherwin, Trevor; Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Taylor, John A; Al-Kassas, Raida

    2016-01-01

    Herpes keratitis is the most common infectious cause of blindness in the developed world. It may be treated by acyclovir (ACV), however this antiviral drug is poorly soluble with low ocular bioavailability requiring high and frequent dosing. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were investigated to improve the ocular bioavailability of ACV by enhancing corneal penetration as well as prolonging the exposure of infected cells to the antiviral agent. Cell uptake studies, ex vivo tolerance and cell uptake efficacy as well as in vivo corneal permeation of the developed lipid based formulations were investigated. NLCs were fabricated by the hot microemulsion technique and coated with 0.5% w/v chitosan. NLCs were capable of increasing the cell uptake of encapsulated fluorescein and ACV as examined by fluorescence microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) respectively. When entrapped in NLCs, the antiviral efficacy of ACV was increased by 3.5 fold after 24 hrs of exposure. The in vivo corneal permeation of the formulation was studied on Albino rabbits with NLCs capable of increasing the corneal bioavailability by 4.5 fold when compared to a commercially available ACV ophthalmic ointment. NLCs enhanced the ocular bioavailability and antiviral properties of ACV through cell internalisation, sustained release, and increased corneal permeation.

  16. Ex vivo hyperpolarized MR spectroscopy on isolated renal tubular cells: A novel technique for cell energy phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Troels; Palm, Fredrik; Nielsen, Per Mose; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that hyperpolarized 13 C MR is a useful tool to study cultured cells. However, cells in culture can alter phenotype, which raises concerns regarding the in vivo significance of such findings. Here we investigate if metabolic phenotyping using hyperpolarized 13 C MR is suitable for cells isolated from kidney tissue, without prior cell culture. Isolation of tubular cells from freshly excised kidney tissue and treatment with either ouabain or antimycin A was investigated with hyperpolarized MR spectroscopy on a 9.4 Tesla preclinical imaging system. Isolation of tubular cells from less than 2 g of kidney tissue generally resulted in more than 10 million live tubular cells. This amount of cells was enough to yield robust signals from the conversion of 13 C-pyruvate to lactate, bicarbonate and alanine, demonstrating that metabolic flux by means of both anaerobic and aerobic pathways can be quantified using this technique. Ex vivo metabolic phenotyping using hyperpolarized 13 C MR in a preclinical system is a useful technique to study energy metabolism in freshly isolated renal tubular cells. This technique has the potential to advance our understanding of both normal cell physiology as well as pathological processes contributing to kidney disease. Magn Reson Med 78:457-461, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. A finite element model to study the effect of tissue anisotropy on ex vivo arterial shear wave elastography measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, D A; Debusschere, N; Caenen, A; Iannaccone, F; Pernot, M; Swillens, A; Segers, P

    2017-07-07

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound (US) diagnostic method for measuring the stiffness of soft tissues based on generated shear waves (SWs). SWE has been applied to bulk tissues, but in arteries it is still under investigation. Previously performed studies in arteries or arterial phantoms demonstrated the potential of SWE to measure arterial wall stiffness-a relevant marker in prediction of cardiovascular diseases. This study is focused on numerical modelling of SWs in ex vivo equine aortic tissue, yet based on experimental SWE measurements with the tissue dynamically loaded while rotating the US probe to investigate the sensitivity of SWE to the anisotropic structure. A good match with experimental shear wave group speed results was obtained. SWs were sensitive to the orthotropy and nonlinearity of the material. The model also allowed to study the nature of the SWs by performing 2D FFT-based and analytical phase analyses. A good match between numerical group velocities derived using the time-of-flight algorithm and derived from the dispersion curves was found in the cross-sectional and axial arterial views. The complexity of solving analytical equations for nonlinear orthotropic stressed plates was discussed.

  18. Comparison of In Vivo and Ex Vivo MRI of the Human Hippocampal Formation in the Same Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, L E M; Adler, D H; Ittyerah, R; Pluta, J B; Robinson, J L; Schuck, T; Trojanowski, J Q; Grossman, M; Detre, J A; Elliott, M A; Toledo, J B; Liu, W; Pickup, S; Das, S R; Wolk, D A; Yushkevich, P A

    2017-11-01

    Multiple techniques for quantification of hippocampal subfields from in vivo MRI have been proposed. Linking in vivo MRI to the underlying histology can help validate and improve these techniques. High-resolution ex vivo MRI can provide an intermediate modality to map information between these very different imaging modalities. This article evaluates the ability to match information between in vivo and ex vivo MRI in the same subjects. We perform rigid and deformable registration on 10 pairs of in vivo (3 T, 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.6 mm3) and ex vivo (9.4 T, 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 mm3) scans, and describe differences in MRI appearance between these modalities qualitatively and quantitatively. The feasibility of using this dataset to validate in vivo segmentation is evaluated by applying an automatic hippocampal subfield segmentation technique (ASHS) to in vivo scans and comparing SRLM (stratum/radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare) surface to manual tracing on corresponding ex vivo scans (and in 2 cases, histology). Regional increases in thickness are detected in ex vivo scans adjacent to the ventricles and were not related to scanner, resolution differences, or susceptibility artefacts. Satisfactory in vivo/ex vivo registration and subvoxel accuracy of ASHS segmentation of hippocampal SRLM demonstrate the feasibility of using this dataset for validation, and potentially, improvement of in vivo segmentation methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Quantification of plaque lipids in the aortic root of ApoE-deficient mice by 3D DIXON magnetic resonance imaging in an ex vivo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietel, Barbara; Kuehn, Constanze; Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Erlangen (Germany); Budinsky, Lubos [Campus Science Support Facilities (CSF), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna (Austria); Uder, Michael [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hess, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-31

    To establish a dedicated protocol for the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of plaque lipids in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup -/-}) mice using ex vivo MRI. ApoE{sup -/-} mice were fed a high-fat diet (n = 10) or normal food (n = 10) for 3 months. Subsequently, a 3D FLASH MRI sequence was used to view the anatomy of the aortic root in the isolated hearts, where a 3D double-echo two-excitation pulse sequence (DIXON sequence) was used to selectively image plaque lipids. The vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid volumes were quantified by MRI and histology for correlation analysis. DIXON MRI allowed visualisation and accurate quantification of plaque lipids. When comparing the vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid sizes in the aortic root, Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis revealed a close correlation between MRI results and the histological data both on a slice-by-slice basis and of the volumetric measurements (vessel wall: r{sup 2} = 0.775, p < 0.001; vessel lumen: r{sup 2} = 0.875; p = 0.002; plaque lipid: r{sup 2} = 0.819, p = 0.003). The combination of 3D FLASH and DIXON-sequence MRI permits an accurate ex vivo assessment of the investigated plaque parameters in the aortic root of mice, particularly the lipid content. (orig.)

  20. In vivo/ex vivo targeting of Langerhans cells after topical application of the immune response modifier TMX-202: confocal Raman microscopy and histology analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Thiede, Gisela; Ascencio, Saul Mujica; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Hasche, Daniel; Rösl, Frank; May, Roberto; Hazot, Yohan; Tamarkin, Dov; Lademann, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The increased ability of TMX-202 (derivative of imiquimod) to penetrate the intact stratum corneum (SC) and the follicular orifices of porcine ear skin was shown ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy and laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, to assess whether TMX-202 is able to reach the immune cells, Langerhans cells extracted from pretreated human skin were investigated ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy combined with multivariate statistical methods. Tracking the Raman peak of dimethyl sulfoxide centered at 690 cm-1, the absorption of TMX-202 containing formulation by Langerhans cells was shown. To answer the question whether the TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells, the attraction of immune cells to TMX-202 containing formulation treated skin was measured in the in vivo rodent model Mastomys coucha. The results show that TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells after penetrating through the intact skin and subsequently attract immune cells. Both the intercellular/transcellular as well as the follicular pathways allow the penetration through the intact barrier of the SC.

  1. Non-Euclidean phasor analysis for quantification of oxidative stress in ex vivo human skin exposed to sun filters using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth M.; Wang, Hequn; Suita, Yusuke; Murphy, Michael; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical sun filters are commonly used as active ingredients in sunscreens due to their efficient absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Yet, it is known that these compounds can photochemically react with UV light and generate reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in vitro, though this has yet to be validated in vivo. One label-free approach to probe oxidative stress is to measure and compare the relative endogenous fluorescence generated by cellular coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides and flavin adenine dinucleotides. However, chemical sun filters are fluorescent, with emissive properties that contaminate endogenous fluorescent signals. To accurately distinguish the source of fluorescence in ex vivo skin samples treated with chemical sun filters, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data were processed on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-Euclidean separation algorithm based on Mahalanobis distance and validated on simulated data. Applying this method, ex vivo samples exhibited a small oxidative shift when exposed to sun filters alone, though this shift was much smaller than that imparted by UV irradiation. Given the need for investigative tools to further study the clinical impact of chemical sun filters in patients, the reported methodology may be applied to visualize chemical sun filters and measure oxidative stress in patients' skin.

  2. Tailored nanostructured platforms for boosting transcorneal permeation: Box-Behnken statistical optimization, comprehensive in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Sayed, Sinar

    2017-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery systems suffer from rapid drainage, intractable corneal permeation and short dosing intervals. Transcorneal drug permeation could increase the drug availability and efficiency in the aqueous humor. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize nanostructured formulations to provide accurate doses, long contact time and enhanced drug permeation. Nanovesicles were designed based on Box-Behnken model and prepared using the thin film hydration technique. The formed nanodispersions were evaluated by measuring the particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and gelation temperature. The obtained desirability values were utilized to develop an optimized nanostructured in situ gel and insert. The optimized formulations were imaged by transmission and scanning electron microscopes. In addition, rheological characters, in vitro drug diffusion, ex vivo and in vivo permeation and safety of the optimized formulation were investigated. The optimized insert formulation was found to have a relatively lower viscosity, higher diffusion, ex vivo and in vivo permeation, when compared to the optimized in situ gel. So, the lyophilized nanostructured insert could be considered as a promising carrier and transporter for drugs across the cornea with high biocompatibility and effectiveness.

  3. Tailored nanostructured platforms for boosting transcorneal permeation: Box–Behnken statistical optimization, comprehensive in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Sayed, Sinar

    2017-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery systems suffer from rapid drainage, intractable corneal permeation and short dosing intervals. Transcorneal drug permeation could increase the drug availability and efficiency in the aqueous humor. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize nanostructured formulations to provide accurate doses, long contact time and enhanced drug permeation. Nanovesicles were designed based on Box–Behnken model and prepared using the thin film hydration technique. The formed nanodispersions were evaluated by measuring the particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and gelation temperature. The obtained desirability values were utilized to develop an optimized nanostructured in situ gel and insert. The optimized formulations were imaged by transmission and scanning electron microscopes. In addition, rheological characters, in vitro drug diffusion, ex vivo and in vivo permeation and safety of the optimized formulation were investigated. The optimized insert formulation was found to have a relatively lower viscosity, higher diffusion, ex vivo and in vivo permeation, when compared to the optimized in situ gel. So, the lyophilized nanostructured insert could be considered as a promising carrier and transporter for drugs across the cornea with high biocompatibility and effectiveness. PMID:29133980

  4. Selective venous vasodilator properties of the analgesic metamizole (dipyrone) in a human ex vivo model-implications for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicka, Markus; Gorki, Hagen; Traeger, Karl; Liebold, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Metamizole (dipyrone) is a first-line, non-opioid analgesic used for postoperative pain management. Clinical data and animal experiments indicate a possible vasodilator action of this drug. We investigated the effects of metamizole on human artery and vein tone in an ex vivo model to assess potential contributions to venous pooling. Excess segments of bypass grafts were harvested during coronary artery bypass grafting procedures. Tensions were measured in an organ bath for 120 min after adding metamizole to the preconstricted vessels. Contribution of endothelium was assessed in endothelium-denuded vessels, and indometacin was used to identify cyclooxygenase-mediated effects. Internal mammary arteries (n = 6) constricted after addition of 1, 3, and 10 μM metamizole and remained constricted at the lower doses. Transient constrictions also occurred in saphenous veins (n = 20), but veins relaxed below solvent controls after 20 min at all concentrations. Endothelium removal (n = 12) and cyclooxygenase inhibition (n = 12) suppressed the vasoconstrictor effect but not the vasodilator effect. Metamizole and its metabolites display counteracting effects on blood vessel tone ex vivo. The vasoconstrictor effect is mediated by cyclooxygenase-derived products. The net effect is site-specific, resulting in a selective venous vasodilator action. This may exacerbate unwanted venous pooling during postoperative pain therapy.

  5. The Effects of Ex Vivo Administration of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Endotoxin on Cytokine Release of Whole Blood Are Determined by Priming Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nierhaus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα secretion in critically ill patients can be considered as a measure of immune responsiveness. It can be enhanced by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF. We investigated the effect of GM-CSF on ex vivo stimulated cytokine production using various preincubation regimens in healthy donors and patients with sepsis. Results. The maxima for the stimuli occurred 3 hours after stimulation. In donors, there was an increase (p<0.001 of LPS-induced TNFα levels following incubation with GM-CSF. The simultaneous incubation with GM-CSF and LPS caused an inhibition of TNFα production (p<0.001. Postincubation with GM-CSF did not yield any difference. In patients, preincubation with GM-CSF yielded an enhanced ex vivo TNFα-response when TNFα levels were low. Patients with increased TNFα concentrations did not show a GM-CSF stimulation effect. The GM-CSF preincubation yielded an increase of IL-8 production in patients and donors. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the immune-modulating properties of GM-CSF depending on the absence or presence of LPS or systemic TNFα. The timing of GM-CSF administration may be relevant for the modulation of the immune system in sepsis. The lack of stimulation in patients with high TNFα may represent endotoxin tolerance.

  6. Quantification of plaque lipids in the aortic root of ApoE-deficient mice by 3D DIXON magnetic resonance imaging in an ex vivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietel, Barbara; Kuehn, Constanze; Achenbach, Stephan; Budinsky, Lubos; Uder, Michael; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    To establish a dedicated protocol for the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of plaque lipids in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice using ex vivo MRI. ApoE -/- mice were fed a high-fat diet (n = 10) or normal food (n = 10) for 3 months. Subsequently, a 3D FLASH MRI sequence was used to view the anatomy of the aortic root in the isolated hearts, where a 3D double-echo two-excitation pulse sequence (DIXON sequence) was used to selectively image plaque lipids. The vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid volumes were quantified by MRI and histology for correlation analysis. DIXON MRI allowed visualisation and accurate quantification of plaque lipids. When comparing the vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid sizes in the aortic root, Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis revealed a close correlation between MRI results and the histological data both on a slice-by-slice basis and of the volumetric measurements (vessel wall: r 2 = 0.775, p 2 = 0.875; p = 0.002; plaque lipid: r 2 = 0.819, p = 0.003). The combination of 3D FLASH and DIXON-sequence MRI permits an accurate ex vivo assessment of the investigated plaque parameters in the aortic root of mice, particularly the lipid content. (orig.)

  7. A Study Ex Vivo of the Effect of Epicardial Fat on the HeartLander Robotic Crawler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patronik, N A; Zenati, M A; Riviere, C N

    2012-01-01

    A tethered epicardial crawling robot known as HeartLander has been developed for minimally-invasive surgery on the beating heart. The crawler has been tested in vivo many times in a porcine model, a model which provides generally authentic conditions in many ways; however, the pigs tested generally have little epicardial fat, whereas the epicardial fat in human patients will be considerable. As a result, it is necessary to determine the effect of such fat on the performance of the crawler. In one experiment, using fresh ovine hearts ex vivo, clogging of the suction chambers of the crawler during sliding over tissue with active suction was investigated for a variety of thicknesses of epicardial fat. In a second experiment, the maximum traction force during each step was measured when sliding with active suction repeatedly over the same location for a variety of fat thicknesses. The clogging experiment showed accumulation of fat in the suction chamber, with the amount dependent on the state of the epicardial membrane, but the suction line did not clog. The traction experiment showed that traction was maintained in all cases except when the epicardial membrane was excised completely.

  8. Allergenicity evaluation of fragrance mix and its ingredients by using ex vivo local lymph node assay-BrdU endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Ozge Cemiloglu; Kaymak, Yesim; Karakaya, Asuman

    2014-03-01

    The present studies were performed to compare the differences between sensitization potency of fragrance mix and its ingredients (oak moss absolute, isoeugenol, eugenol, cinnamal, hydroxycitronellal, geraniol, cinnamic alcohol, alpha amyl cinnamal), by using ex vivo LLNA-BrdU ELISA. The SI and EC3 values were calculated and potency classification was found for the mixture and for each ingredients. TH1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ) and TH2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5) releases from lymph node cell culture were also investigated as contact sensitization endpoints. The EC3 values were calculated and the potency of contact sensitization were classified for fragrance mix, oak moss absolute, isoeugenol, eugenol, cinnamal, hydroxycitronellal, geraniol, cinnamic alcohol, alpha amyl cinnamal respectively: 4.4% (moderate), 3.4% (moderate), 0.88% (strong), 16.6% (weak), 1.91% (moderate), 9.77% (moderate), 13.1% (weak), 17.93% (weak), 7.74% (moderate). According to our results it should be concluded that exposure to fragrance mix does not constitute an evidently increased hazard compared to exposure to each of the eight fragrance ingredients separately. Cytokine analyses results indicate that both TH1 and TH2 cytokines are involved in the regulation of murine contact allergy and can be considered as useful endpoints. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in metabolic proteins in ex vivo rat retina during glutamate-induced neural progenitor cell induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Baron, Byron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Nobuko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how energy metabolism and related proteins influence neural progenitor cells in adult tissues is critical for developing new strategies in clinical tissue regeneration therapy. We have recently reported that a subtoxic concentration of glutamate-induced neural progenitor cells in the mature ex vivo rat retina. We herein explore changes in the metabolic pathways during the process. We firstly observed an increase in lactate and lactate dehydrogenase concentration in the glutamate-treated retina. We then investigated the levels of glycolytic enzymes and confirmed significant upregulation of pyruvate kinase M type (PKM), especially PKM2, enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) in the glutamate-treated retina compared to the untreated retina. An analysis of the subcellular localization of PKM2 revealed nuclear translocation in the treated retina, which has been reported to regulate cell cycle proliferation and glycolytic enzymes. Our findings indicate that the mature rat retina undergoes an increase in aerobic glycolysis. PKM2, both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, may thus play an important role during neural progenitor cell induction, as it does in other proliferating cells.

  10. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  11. Preparation and In Vitro/Ex Vivo Evaluation of Moxifloxacin-Loaded PLGA Nanosuspensions for Ophthalmic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Meetali; Pawar, Pravin K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to prepare a colloidal ophthalmic formulation to improve the residence time of moxifloxacin. Moxifloxacin-loaded poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanosuspensions were prepared by using the solvent evaporation technique. The nanosuspensions were characterised physically by using different techniques like particle size, zeta potential, FTIR, DSC, and XRD analysis. In vitro and ex vivo studies of nanosuspensions were carried out using a modified USP dissolution apparatus and all-glass Franz diffusion cells, respectively. The antibacterial activities of the nanosuspension and marketed formulations were performed against S. aureus and P. aeroginosa. The moxifloxacin-loaded PLGA nanosuspensions showed uniform particle size, ranging between 164-490 nm with negative zeta potential for all batches. The percentage entrapment efficiency of the drug-loaded nano-suspension was found to be between 84.09 to 92.05%. In vitro drug release studies suggest that all of the formulations showed extended drug release profiles and follow Korsemeyer-Peppas release kinetics. In vitro corneal permeability was found to be comparable with that of the marketed formulation across isolated goat cornea, indicating the suitability of the nanosuspension formulation in the ophthalmic delivery of moxifloxacin. The optimised nano-suspension was found to be more active against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa compared to the marketed eye drops.

  12. Antibiotic resistance gene transfer between Streptococcus gordonii and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals of teeth ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgley, Christine M; Lee, Esther H; Martin, Matthew J; Flannagan, Susan E

    2008-05-01

    Multiple bacterial species coexisting in infected root canals might interact, but evidence for interspecies gene transfer is lacking. This study tested the hypothesis that horizontal exchange of antibiotic resistance can occur between different bacterial species in root canals. Transfer of the conjugative plasmid pAM81 carrying erythromycin resistance between 2 endodontic infection-associated species, Streptococcus gordonii and Enterococcus faecalis, was investigated in an ex vivo tooth model. Equal numbers of each species (one with pAM81 and the other plasmid-free) were combined in prepared root canals of sterilized teeth and incubated at 37 degrees C. At 24 and 72 hours, bidirectional interspecies antibiotic resistance gene transfer was evident in microorganisms recovered from teeth; average transfer frequencies from S. gordonii to E. faecalis were 10(-3) transconjugants per donor and from E. faecalis to S. gordonii were 10(-6) and 10(-7) transconjugants per donor at 24 and 72 hours, respectively. Microbial accumulations were observed on root canal walls with scanning electron microscopy. Horizontal genetic exchange in endodontic infections might facilitate adoption of an optimal genetic profile for survival.

  13. Measurement of ventilation- and perfusion-mediated cooling during laser ablation in ex vivo human lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietze, Andrea; Koch, Franziska; Laskowski, Ulrich; Linder, Albert; Hosten, Norbert

    2011-11-01

    Perfusion-mediated tissue cooling has often been described in the literature for thermal ablation therapies of liver tumors. The objective of this study was to investigate the cooling effects of both perfusion and ventilation during laser ablation of lung malignancies. An ex vivo lung model was used to maintain near physiological conditions for the specimens. Fourteen human lung lobes containing only primary lung tumors (non-small cell lung cancer) were used. Laser ablation was carried out using a Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and laser fibers with 30 mm diffusing tips. Continuous invasive temperature measurement in 10 mm distance from the laser fiber was performed. Laser power was increased at 2 W increments starting at 10 W up to a maximum power of 12-20 W until a temperature plateau around 60 °C was reached at one sensor. Ventilation and perfusion were discontinued for 6 min each to assess their effects on temperature development. The experiments lead to 25 usable temperature profiles. A significant temperature increase was observed for both discontinued ventilation and perfusion. In 6 min without perfusion, the temperature rose about 5.5 °C (mean value, Pcooling are significant influencing factors on temperature development during thermal ablation. They should be taken into account during the planning and preparation of minimally invasive lung tumor treatment in order to achieve complete ablation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm. Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies.

  15. Late Effects of Heavy Ion Irradiation on Ex Vivo Osteoblastogenesis and Cancellous Bone Microarchitecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luan Hoang; Alwood, Joshua; Kumar, Akhilesh; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight causes degeneration of skeletal tissue with incomplete recovery even after return to Earth. We hypothesize that heavy ion irradiation, a component of Galactic Cosmic Radiation, damages osteoblast progenitors and may contribute to bone loss during long duration space travel beyond the protection of the Earth's magnetosphere. Male, 16 week old C57BL6/J mice were exposed to high LET (56 Fe, 600MeV) radiation using either low (5 or 10cGy) or high (50 or 200cGy) doses at the NASA Space Radiation Lab and were euthanized 3 - 4, 7, or 35 days later. Bone structure was quantified by microcomputed tomography (6.8 micron pixel size) and marrow cell redox assessed using membrane permeable, free radical sensitive fluorogenic dyes. To assess osteoblastogenesis, adherent marrow cells were cultured ex vivo, then mineralized nodule formation quantified by imaging and gene expression analyzed by RT PCR. Interestingly, 3 - 4 days post exposure, fluorogenic dyes that reflect cytoplasmic generation of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species (DAF FM Diacetate or CM H2DCFDA) revealed irradiation (50cGy) reduced free radical generation (20-45%) compared to sham irradiated controls. Alternatively, use of a dye showing relative specificity for mitochondrial superoxide generation (MitoSOX) revealed an 88% increase compared to controls. One week after exposure, reactive oxygen/nitrogen levels remained lower(24%) relative to sham irradiated controls. After one month, high dose irradiation (200 cGy) caused an 86% decrement in ex vivo nodule formation and a 16-31% decrement in bone volume to total volume and trabecular number (50, 200cGy) compared to controls. High dose irradiation (200cGy) up regulated expression of a late osteoblast marker (BGLAP) and select genes related to oxidative metabolism (Catalase) and DNA damage repair (Gadd45). In contrast, lower doses (5, 10cGy) did not affect bone structure or ex vivo nodule formation, but did down regulate iNOS by 0.54 - 0.58 fold

  16. Evaluation of ex vivo produced endothelial progenitor cells for autologous transplantation in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meng; Guan, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Bin; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Qingyu; Ma, Yupo; Jiang, Yongping

    2018-01-22

    Autologous transplantation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of various vascular diseases. We previously reported a two-step culture system for scalable generation of human EPCs derived from cord blood CD34 + cells ex vivo. Here, we now apply this culture system to expand and differentiate human and nonhuman primate EPCs from mobilized peripheral blood (PB) CD34 + cells for the therapeutic potential of autologous transplantation. The human and nonhuman primate EPCs from mobilized PB CD34 + cells were cultured according to our previously reported system. The generated adherent cells were then characterized by the morphology, surface markers, nitric oxide (NO)/endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) levels and Dil-acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL) uptake/fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin binding actives. Furthermore, the efficacy and safety studies were performed by autologous transplantation via hepatic portal vein injection in a nonhuman primate model with acute liver sinusoidal endothelial cell injury. The mobilized PB CD34 + cells from both human and nonhuman primate were efficiently expanded and differentiated. Over 2 × 10 8 adherent cells were generated from 20 mL mobilized primate PB (1.51 × 10 6  ± 3.39 × 10 5 CD34 + cells) by 36-day culture and more than 80% of the produced cells were identified as EPCs/endothelial cells (ECs). In the autologous transplant model, the injected EPC/ECs from nonhuman primate PB were scattered in the intercellular spaces of hepatocytes at the hepatic tissues 14 days post-transplantation, indicating successful migration and reconstitution in the liver structure as the functional EPCs/ECs. We successfully applied our previous two-step culture system for the generation of primate EPCs from mobilized PB CD34 + cells, evaluated the phenotypes ex vivo, and transplanted autologous EPCs/ECs in a nonhuman primate model. Our study indicates that

  17. Monitoring Dopamine ex Vivo during Electrical Stimulation Using Liquid-Microjunction Surface Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Emily L; Marks, Megan; Yost, Richard A; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Garrett, Timothy J

    2017-12-19

    Liquid-microjunction surface sampling (LMJ-SS) is an ambient ionization technique based on the continuous flow of solvent using an in situ microextraction device in which solvent moves through the probe, drawing in the analytes in preparation for ionization using an electrospray ionization source. However, unlike traditional mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, it operates under ambient pressure and requires no sample preparation, thereby making it ideal for rapid sampling of thicker tissue sections for electrophysiological and other neuroscientific research studies. Studies interrogating neural synapses, or a specific neural circuit, typically employ thick, ex vivo tissue sections maintained under near-physiological conditions to preserve tissue viability and maintain the neural networks. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure used to treat the neurological symptoms that are associated with certain neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder which is commonly treated with DBS therapy. PD is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta portion of the brain. Here, we demonstrate that the LMJ-SS methodology can provide a platform for ex vivo analysis of the brain during electrical stimulation, such as DBS. We employ LMJ-SS in the ex vivo analysis of mouse brain tissue for monitoring dopamine during electrical stimulation of the striatum region. The mouse brain tissue was sectioned fresh post sacrifice and maintained in artificial cerebrospinal fluid to create near-physiological conditions before direct sampling using LMJ-SS. A selection of metabolites, including time-sensitive metabolites involved in energy regulation in the brain, were identified using standards, and the mass spectral database mzCloud was used to assess the feasibility of the methodology. Thereafter, the intensity of m/z 154 corresponding to protonated dopamine was monitored before

  18. Ex vivo kinematic studies of a canine unlinked semi-constrained hybrid total elbow arthroplasty system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, N D; Channon, S; Pettitt, R; Smirthwaite, P; Innes, J F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of the Sirius® canine total elbow arthroplasty system, and presentation of the results of a passive range-of-motion analysis based on ex vivo kinematic studies pre-and post-implantation. Thoracic limbs (n = 4) of medium sized dogs were harvested by forequarter amputation. Plain orthogonal radiographs of each limb were obtained pre- and post-implantation. Limbs were prepared by placement of external fixator pins and Kirschner wires into the humerus and radius. Each limb was secured into a custom-made box frame and retro-reflective markers were placed on the exposed ends of the pins and wires. Each elbow was manually moved through five ranges-of-motion manoeuvres. Data collected included six trials of i) full extension to full flexion and ii) pronation and supination in 90° flexion; a three-dimensional motion capture system was used to collect and analyse the data. The Sirius elbow prosthesis was subsequently implanted and the same measurements were repeated. Data sets were tested for normality. Paired t-tests were used for comparison of pre- and post-implantation motion parameters. Kinematic analysis showed that the range-of-motion (mean and SD) for flexion and extension pre-implantation was 115° ± 6 (range: 25° to 140°). The range-of-motion in the sagittal plane post-implantation was 90° ± 4 (range: 36° to 130°) and this reduction was significant (p = 0.0001). The ranges-of-motion (mean and SD) for supination and pronation at 90° were 50° ± 5, whereas the corresponding mean ranges-of-motion post-implantation were 38° ± 6 (p = 0.0188). Compared to a normal elbow, the range-of-motion was reduced. Post-implantation, supination and pronation range-of-motion was significantly reduced at 90° over pre-implantation values. These results provide valuable information regarding the effect of the Sirius system on ex vivo kinematics of the normal canine elbow joint. Further, this particular ex vivo model allowed for satisfactory and repeatable

  19. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  20. Ex vivo flexural mechanical properties of bovine bone plates after tibiae osteosynthesis in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Aleluia Drago

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Drago M.A., Drago M., Cerqueira H.D.B., Tiburcio M.F., Souza G.B., Barbosa D.H., Santos C.M.L., Silva R.V. & Freitas P.M.C. [Ex vivo flexural mechanical properties of bovine bone plates after tibiae osteosynthesis in rabbits.] Avaliação ex vivo das propriedades mecânicas em flexão de placas ósseas bovina na osteossíntese de tíbias de coelhos. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(3:245-249, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES, Alto Universitário, s/nº, Bairro Guararema, Alegre, ES 29500-000, Brasil. E-mail: manudrago@hotmail.com The use of materials produced from bovine bone has been proposed in the manufacture of implants such as pins, plates and screws, due to their osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties or functions of bone graft. However, structural and mechanical aspects must be evaluated prior to the use, in vivo of bone implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate mechanical strength, through a mechanical bending test, of plates produced from bovine cortical bone, used to repair fractures of the tíbia of rabbits ex vivo. Twenty six plates were manufactured from bovine cortical bone and stored in saturated salt solution. Three study groups were used: group GP (n = 10, made up of the bone plates; GTP group (n = 16, rabbit tibia osteotomized and stabilized with bone plates and four screws and Group GT (n = 10, intact tibia. A three-point bending biomechanical test was used to determine the maximum tension, maximum deflection, and stiffness. The results were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test (p <0.05 and the Dunn test. Comparing GT with the GTP, an 80% reduction was observed in maximum tension. Also noted was a reduction of 87% in maximum tension when comparing GP with GTP. Therefore, the bovine bone plate had a higher maximum tension then the intact rabbit tibia. There was a reduction of 52% in the rigidity of GTP to GT. No

  1. Matrix type transdermal therapeutic system containing captopril: formulation optimization, in vitro and ex vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoğlu, Oya; Keskin, Ebru; Dortunç, Betül; Anah, Sela

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal therapeutic systems (TTS) containing captopril were developed by using synthetic and pH independent polymers, Eudragit RL 100 and RS 100. The formulations were characterized in terms of their appearance, thickness, captopril content, in vitro release rate and diffusion profiles. In vitro release studies demonstrated controlled release for each formulation developed. In viro and ex vivo diffusion rate studies were performed through various synthetic membranes with different thickness, pore size and type (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) and through human skin by using Franz diffusion cells. Type of membrane and composition of the formulation affected the diffusion profiles of captopril from the transdermal therapeutic systems. Transdermal therapeutic systems containing captopril were successfully prepared and especially two of the formulations (F15 and F16) are considered to be suitable to administer captopril via skin.

  2. Ex vivo evaluation of Tono-Pen and pneumotonometry in cat eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Josef; Fernandez, Viviana; Lamar, Peggy D; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Fantes, Francisco; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the validity and intraobserver reliability of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements with both pneumotonometry and the Tono-Pen in a closed ex vivo system in cat eyes. IOP was increased step by step in 5 enucleated cat eyes, while taking IOP measurements with the Tono-Pen and pneumotonometry. The outcomes were compared to readings of a digital manometer simultaneously measuring the actual pressure in the anterior chamber. Pneumotonometry overestimated IOP below 15 mm Hg and underestimated pressures above 20 mm Hg. Tono-Pen tonometry considerably underestimated IOP over the whole spectrum in all of the eyes tested. The pneumotonometer was identified as the more valid and reliable instrument for cat eyes. Both tonometers are clinically useful tools to assess IOP for glaucoma studies using a cat animal model. However, one has to consider underestimation of IOP in the upper ranges. A correction formula can be used to calculate the actual IOP.

  3. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauer, S.; Richter, H.; Kuntsche, Judith

    2014-01-01

    the in vivo movement of hairs in the hair follicles. In the present study, massage was applied to skin mounted to Franz diffusion cells. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, the influence of massage and occlusion on the follicular penetration depths of rigid and flexible liposomes loaded......Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates...... confirm that massage is an important tool for increasing follicular penetration in ex vivo studies using Franz diffusion cells. Occlusion may reduce the efficacy of follicular penetration depending on the specific liposomal preparation. Rigidity in particular appears to be a relevant parameter. (c) 2013...

  4. Ex-vivo partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Nyame

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.

  5. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...... otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...

  6. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmakienė Ada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration.

  7. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its......% improved oxygenation. The median time to extubation, time in intensive care unit and the admission period were 1, 7 and 39 days, respectively. CONCLUSION: In the first year after the introduction of EVLP in Denmark, seven pairs of donor lungs that previously would have been rejected have been transplanted...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...

  8. Radiographic diagnosis of incipient proximal caries: an ex-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, José Moreira; dos Santos, Rosenês Lima; Sampaio, Maria Carmeli Correia; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Passos, Isabela Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare visual clinical and radiographic examinations to the histological analysis for proximal caries diagnosis in extracted permanent molars and premolars. The relationship between clinical aspects and carious lesions was also evaluated. Eighty-eight proximal surfaces (44 freshly extracted teeth) were longitudinally sectioned with a 370-microm diamond disk, thinned with wet silicon carbide paper and observed with a stereomicroscope at x40 magnification. Sensitivity and specificity were 65.6% and 83.3% for clinical examination and 29.7% and 95.8% for radiographic examination, respectively. Kappa values ranged from 0.64 to 0.91. The white spots corresponded to lesions restricted to enamel, while the dark spots corresponded to lesions that reached the dentinoenamel junction. In most cases, cavitation corresponded to dentin lesions. It may be concluded that interproximal radiographic examination is not a reliable method for detection of incipient proximal carious lesions.

  9. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  10. An "ex vivo model" contributing to the diagnosis and evaluation of new drugs in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, A M; Scorza, M; Amato, F; Comegna, M; Raia, V; Maiuri, L; Ilardi, G; Cantone, E; Castaldo, G; Iengo, M

    2017-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. About 2000 mutations have been described so far. We setup an ex vivo model of human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) to study CF patients testing the effect of novel mutations and molecular therapies. We performed sampling (by brushing), followed by culture and analysis of HNECs using a series of molecular techniques. We performed 50 brushings from CF patients and controls. Using cultured cells, we: i) demonstrated the widely heterogeneous CFTR expression in patients and in controls; ii) defined the splicing effect of a CFTR mutation; iii) assessed the CFTR gating activity in patients bearing different mutations; iv) demonstrated that butyrate significantly enhances CFTR expression. Based on our data, we can conclude: 1) HNEC brushing is performed without anaesthesia and is well tolerated in all CF patients (children and adults); 2) HNECs can be preserved for up to 48 hours before culture allowings multicentre studies; 3) HNECs culture can be considered a suitable model to study the molecular effects of new CFTR gene mutations and/or uncertain meaning specific mutations of carriers; 4) an ex vivo model of HNECs may be used to evaluate, before human use, the effect of new drugs on patients' cells bearing specific CFTR mutations; 5) the methodology is adequate for a quantitative measurement, by fluorescence, of the CFTR gating activity of the HNECs from patients with different genotypes identifying: a) CF patients bearing two severe mutations with an activity < 10% (compared to controls - 100%); b) CF patients bearing at least a mild mutation with an activity of 10-20%; c) CF carriers (heterozygous subjects) with an activity between 40-70%. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  11. Manufacturing blood ex vivo: a futuristic approach to deal with the supply and safety concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal kishor Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusions are routinely done in every medical regimen and a world wide established collection, processing/storage centers provide their services for the same. There have been extreme global demands for both raising the current collections and supply of safe/adequate blood due to increasingly demanding population. Since, various risks remain associated with the donor derived blood, and a number of post collection blood screening and processing methods put extreme constraints on supply system especially in the underdeveloped countries. A logistic approach to manufacture erythrocytes ex-vivo by using modern tissue culture techniques have surfaced in past few years. There are several reports showing possibilities of RBCs (and even platelets/ neutrophils expansion under tightly regulated conditions. In fact, ex vivo synthesis of few units of clinical grade RBCs from a single dose of starting material such as umbilical cord blood has been well established. Similarly, many different sources are also being explored for the same purpose such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the major concerns remain elusive before the manufacture and clinical use of different blood components may be used to successfully replace the present system of donor derived blood transfusion. Most important factor shall include the large scale of RBCs production from each donation unit within a limited time period and cost of their production both of these issues need to be handled carefully since many of the recipients among developing countries are unable to pay even for the freely available donor derived blood. Anyways, keeping these issue in mind, present article shall be focused on the feasibilities of blood production and their use in near future.

  12. Characterization and ex vivo Expansion of Human Placenta-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokui eZhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical studies suggest that adoptive transfer of donor-derived natural killer (NK cells may improve clinical outcome in hematological malignancies and some solid tumors by direct antitumor effects as well as by reduction of graft versus host disease (GVHD. NK cells have also been shown to enhance transplant engraftment during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT for hematological malignancies. The limited ex vivo expansion potential of NK cells from peripheral blood (PB or umbilical cord blood (UCB has however restricted their therapeutic potential. Here we define methods to efficiently generate NK cells from donor matched, full-term human placenta perfusate (termed Human Placenta-Derived Stem Cell, HPDSC and UCB. Following isolation from cryopreserved donor-matched HPDSC and UCB units, CD56+CD3- placenta-derived NK cells, termed pNK cells, were expanded in culture for up to 3 weeks to yield an average of 1.2 billion cells per donor that were >80% CD56+CD3-, comparable to doses previously utilized in clinical applications. Ex vivo-expanded pNK cells exhibited a marked increase in anti-tumor cytolytic activity coinciding with the significantly increased expression of NKG2D, NKp46 and NKp44 (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, respectively. Strong cytolytic activity was observed against a wide range of tumor cell lines in vitro. pNK cells display a distinct microRNA (miRNA expression profile, immunophenotype and greater antitumor capacity in vitro compared to PB NK cells used in recent clinical trials. With further development, pNK may represent a novel and effective cellular immunotherapy for patients with high clinical needs and few other therapeutic options.

  13. Characterization and ex vivo Expansion of Human Placenta-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lin; Voskinarian-Berse, Vanessa; Law, Eric; Reddin, Tiffany; Bhatia, Mohit; Hariri, Alexandra; Ning, Yuhong; Dong, David; Maguire, Timothy; Yarmush, Martin; Hofgartner, Wolfgang; Abbot, Stewart; Zhang, Xiaokui; Hariri, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies suggest that adoptive transfer of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells may improve clinical outcome in hematological malignancies and some solid tumors by direct anti-tumor effects as well as by reduction of graft versus host disease (GVHD). NK cells have also been shown to enhance transplant engraftment during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for hematological malignancies. The limited ex vivo expansion potential of NK cells from peripheral blood (PB) or umbilical cord blood (UCB) has however restricted their therapeutic potential. Here we define methods to efficiently generate NK cells from donor-matched, full-term human placenta perfusate (termed Human Placenta-Derived Stem Cell, HPDSC) and UCB. Following isolation from cryopreserved donor-matched HPDSC and UCB units, CD56+CD3− placenta-derived NK cells, termed pNK cells, were expanded in culture for up to 3 weeks to yield an average of 1.2 billion cells per donor that were >80% CD56+CD3−, comparable to doses previously utilized in clinical applications. Ex vivo-expanded pNK cells exhibited a marked increase in anti-tumor cytolytic activity coinciding with the significantly increased expression of NKG2D, NKp46, and NKp44 (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, respectively). Strong cytolytic activity was observed against a wide range of tumor cell lines in vitro. pNK cells display a distinct microRNA (miRNA) expression profile, immunophenotype, and greater anti-tumor capacity in vitro compared to PB NK cells used in recent clinical trials. With further development, pNK may represent a novel and effective cellular immunotherapy for patients with high clinical needs and few other therapeutic options. PMID:23641243

  14. Hemofiltration in ex vivo lung perfusion-a study in experimentally induced pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Tobias; Hansson, Christoffer; Wallinder, Andreas; Malm, Carl-Johan; Silverborn, Martin; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Dellgren, Göran

    2016-02-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) can potentially reduce pulmonary edema. In a pig model with induced pulmonary edema, we evaluated the effect of hemofiltration (HF) during EVLP on lung function, perfusate oncotic pressure, and lung weight. In anesthetized pigs (n = 14), pulmonary edema was induced by a balloon in the left atrium, combined with crystalloid infusion (20 mL/kg), for 2 hours. The lungs were harvested, stored cold for 2 hours, and randomized to EVLP, with or without a hemofilter (HF and noHF groups, respectively, n = 7 for each). EVLP was performed with cellular perfusate at a hematocrit of 10% to 15%. Oncotic pressure, lung performance, and weight were measured before and after 180 minutes of EVLP reconditioning with or without HF. After in vivo induction of edema, arterial oxygen tension (Pao2)/inspired oxygen fraction (Fio2), and compliance decreased by 63% and 16%, respectively. Pao2/Fio2 was considerably improved at first evaluation ex vivo in both groups. HF increased oncotic pressure by 43% and decreased lung weight by 15%. The effects were negligible in the noHF group. Compliance decreased in both groups during reconditioning, although less so in the HF group (P Pulmonary flow index decreased in both groups, and was partially reversed by nitroglycerin. Dorsal atelectatic consolidations were seen in both groups. In this lung-edema model, EVLP reconditioning with hyperoncotic solution did not affect the degree of lung edema. HF during EVLP increased perfusate oncotic pressure, decreased lung weight with beneficial effects on compliance, but did not improve lung oxygenation capacity. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ex vivo validation of a stoichiometric dual energy CT proton stopping power ratio calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunhe; Ainsley, Christopher; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; McDonough, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2018-03-01

    A major source of uncertainty in proton therapy is the conversion of Hounsfield unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio relative to water (SPR). In this study, we measured and quantified the accuracy of a stoichiometric dual energy CT (DECT) SPR calibration. We applied a stoichiometric DECT calibration method to derive the SPR using CT images acquired sequentially at 80 kVp and 140 kVp . The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the effective atomic number (Z eff), relative electron density ({{ρ }e} ), and SPRs of phantom and biological materials. Two methods were used to verify the derived SPRs. The first method measured the sample’s water equivalent thicknesses to deduce the SPRs using a multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) device. The second method utilized Gafchromic EBT3 film to directly compare relative ranges between sample and water after proton pencil beam irradiation. Ex vivo validation was performed using five different types of frozen animal tissues with the MLIC and three types of fresh animal tissues using film. In addition, the residual ranges recorded on the film were used to compare with those from the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT derived SPRs. Bland-Altman analysis indicates that the differences between DECT and SPR measurement of tissue surrogates, frozen and fresh animal tissues has a mean of 0.07% and standard deviation of 0.58% compared to 0.55% and 1.94% respectively for single energy CT (SECT) and SPR measurement. Our ex vivo study indicates that the stoichiometric DECT SPR calibration method has the potential to be more accurate than SECT calibration under ideal conditions although beam hardening effects and other image artifacts may increase this uncertainty.

  16. MR elastography and diffusion-weighted imaging of ex vivo prostate cancer: quantitative comparison to histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Nir, Guy; Gagnon, Louis O; Ischia, Joseph; Jones, Edward C; Chang, Silvia D; Yung, Andrew; Honarvar, Mohammad; Fazli, Ladan; Goldenberg, S Larry; Rohling, Robert; Sinkus, Ralph; Kozlowski, Piotr; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was (1) to develop a magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) system for imaging of the ex vivo human prostate and (2) to assess the diagnostic power of mono-frequency and multi-frequency MRE and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) alone and combined as correlated with histopathology in a patient study. An electromagnetic driver was designed specifically for MRE studies in small-bore MR scanners. Ex vivo prostate specimens (post-fixation) of 14 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were imaged with MRE at 7 T (nine cases had DWI). In six patients, the MRE examination was performed at three frequencies (600, 800, 1000 Hz) to extract the power-law exponent Gamma. The images were registered to wholemount pathology slides marked with the Gleason score. The areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were calculated. The methods were validated in a phantom study and it was demonstrated that (i) the driver does not interfere with the acquisition process and (ii) the driver can generate amplitudes greater than 100 µm for frequencies less than 1 kHz. In the quantitative study, cancerous tissue with Gleason score at least 3 + 3 was distinguished from normal tissue in the peripheral zone (PZ) with an average AUC of 0.75 (Gd ), 0.75 (Gl ), 0.70 (Gamma-Gd ), 0.68 (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC), and 0.82 (Gd  + Gl  + ADC). The differentiation between PZ and central gland was modest for Gd (p analysis did not appear to improve the results. However, in light of the effect of tissue fixation, the clinical implication of our results may be inconclusive and more experiments are needed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. In vitro and ex vivo anticholinesterase activities of Erythrina velutina leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wanderson Praxedes; da Silva Carvalho, Ana Carla; dos Santos Estevam, Charles; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti

    2012-07-01

    Erythrina velutina (EV) Willd (Fabaceae-Faboideae) is a medicinal tree that is commonly used in Brazil for the treatment of several central nervous system disorders. The anticholinesterase activity of EV is described in this work. Concentration-response curves (0-1.6 mg/mL) for EV leaf aqueous extract (AE) and alkaloid-rich extracts (AKEs) were performed in vitro. Cholinesterase inhibition was examined in mouse brains, as the cholinesterase source, and in pure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). Mice were treated with AE or AKE (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and their brains were used for the measurement of cholinesterase activity (CA) ex vivo. CA was inhibited by AE (IC(50) = 0.57 [0.43-0.75] mg/mL) and AKE (IC(50) = 0.52 [0.39-0.70] mg/mL) in brain homogenates in a concentration-dependent manner. The ex vivo experiments indicated that AE (400 mg/kg, p activities in a concentration-dependent manner (AE: IC(50AChE) = 0.56 [0.38-0.81] mg/mL, IC(50BuChE) = 2.95 [1.51-5.76] mg/mL, AKE: IC(50AChE) = 0.87 [0.60-12.5] mg/mL, IC(50BuChE) = 2.67 [0.87-8.11] mg/mL). These data indicated that AE and AKE crossed the blood-brain barrier to inhibit CA in the brain. AE and AKE also exhibited a dual inhibitory action on acetyl- and BuChE.

  18. Ex-vivo α-galactosylceramide activation of NKT cells in humans and macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Caroline S; Cameron, Garth; Godfrey, Dale I; Kent, Stephen J

    2012-08-31

    NKT cells are key mediators of antiviral and anticancer immunity. Experiments in mice have demonstrated that activation of NKT cells in vivo induces the expression of multiple effector molecules critical to successful immunity. Human clinical trials have shown similar responses, although in vivo activation of NKT cells in humans or primate models are far more limited in number and scope. Measuring ex vivo activation of NKT cells by the CD1d-restricted glycolipid ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) through cytokine expression profiles is a useful marker of NKT cell function, but for reasons that are unclear, this approach does not appear to work as well in humans and non-human primate macaque models in comparison to mice. We performed a series of experiments on human and macaque (Macaca nemestrina) fresh whole blood samples to define optimal conditions to detect NKT cell cytokine (TNF, IFNγ, IL-2) and degranulation marker (CD107a) expression by flow cytometry. We found that conditions previously described for mouse splenocyte NKT cell activation were suboptimal on human or macaque blood NKT cells. In contrast, a 6h incubation with brefeldin A added for the last 4h, in a 96-well plate based assay, and using an α-GalCer concentration of 1 μg/ml were optimal methods to stimulate NKT cells in fresh blood from both humans and macaques. Unexpectedly, we noted that blood NKT cells from macaques infected with SIV were more readily activated by α-GalCer than NKT cells from uninfected macaques, suggesting that SIV infection may have primed the NKT cells. In conclusion, we describe optimized methods for the ex vivo antigen-specific activation of human and macaque blood NKT cells. These assays should be useful in monitoring NKT cells in disease and in immunotherapy studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of convolution filtering on coronary plaque attenuation values: Observations in an ex vivo model of multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo); L. la Grutta (Ludovico); G. Runza (Giuseppe); A. Palumbo (Alessandro); E. Maffei (Erica); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); T.V. Bartolotta (Tommaso); P. Somers (Pamela); M.W. Knaapen (Michiel); S. Verheye (Stefan); M. Midiri (Massimo); R. Hamers (Ronald); N. Bruining (Nico)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAttenuation variability (measured in Hounsfield Units, HU) of human coronary plaques using multislice computed tomography (MSCT) was evaluated in an ex vivo model with increasing convolution kernels. MSCT was performed in seven ex vivo left coronary arteries sunk into oil followingthe

  20. Quantitative assessment of human T lymphocytes in RAG2(-/-)gammac(-/-) mice: the impact of ex vivo manipulation on in vivo functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; Simonetti, Elles R.; Hagenbeek, Anton; Bonyhadi, Mark; Storm, Gert; Martens, Anton C. M.; Ebeling, Saskia B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent clinical trials of adoptive immunotherapy showed diminished reactivity of human T cells upon ex vivo manipulation. For a safe and effective clinical application of human T cells, it is necessary to improve ex vivo manipulation procedures and evaluate their impact on in vivo

  1. Comparison of iodinated contrast media for the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque attenuation values by CT coronary angiography: Observations in an ex vivo model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. la Grutta (Ludovico); M. Galia (Massimo); G. Gentile; G. Lo Re (G.); E. Grassedonio (Emanuele); F. Coppolino; E. Maffei (Erica); E. Maresi (E.); A. Lo Casto (A.); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); M. Midiri (Massimo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the influence of different iodinated contrast media with several dilutions on plaque attenuation in an ex vivo coronary model studied by multislice CT coronary angiography. Methods: In six ex vivo left anterior descending coronary arteries immersed in oil, CT

  2. Comparative ex vivo study on humidifying function of three speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger for tracheotomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, C.; Lansaat, L.; Muller, S.H.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assessment of humidifying function of tracheotomy speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger. Design Ex vivo measurement of water exchange and storage capacity of three tracheotomy speaking valves: Humidiphon Plus, Spiro and ProTrach DualCare (with two different heat and

  3. Comparative ex vivo study on humidifying function of three speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger for tracheotomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boer, C.; Lansaat, L.; Muller, S. H.; van den Brekel, M. W. M.; Hilgers, F. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of humidifying function of tracheotomy speaking valves with integrated heat and moisture exchanger. Ex vivo measurement of water exchange and storage capacity of three tracheotomy speaking valves: Humidiphon Plus, Spiro and ProTrach DualCare (with two different heat and moisture

  4. Correlations between in vivo (1)H MRS and ex vivo (1)H HRMAS metabolite measurements in adult human gliomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstad, K.S.; Wright, A.J.; Bell, B.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess how accurately ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) from small biopsy tissues relate to in vivo (1)H MRS (from larger tumor volumes) in human astrocytomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo (PRESS, TE = 30 msec) and ex

  5. Descemet Membrane Thickening as a Sign for the Diagnosis of Corneal Graft Rejection: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, Ryan; Diakonis, Vasilios F; Bozung, Alison; Gameiro, Gustavo Rosa; Fischer, Oliver; El Dakkak, Ahmed; Ulloa-Padilla, Jan Paul; Anagnostopoulos, Apostolos; Dubovy, Sander; Abou Shousha, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    To disclose, using an ex vivo study, the histopathological mechanism behind in vivo thickening of the endothelium/Descemet membrane complex (En/DM) observed in rejected corneal grafts (RCGs). Descemet membrane (DM), endothelium, and retrocorneal membranes make up the total En/DM thickness. These layers are not differentiable by high-definition optical coherence tomography; therefore, the source of thickening is unclear from an in vivo perspective. A retrospective ex vivo study (from September 2015 to December 2015) was conducted to measure the thicknesses of DM, endothelium, and retrocorneal membrane in 54 corneal specimens (31 RCGs and 23 controls) using light microscopy. Controls were globes with posterior melanoma without corneal involvement. There were 54 corneas examined ex vivo with mean age 58.1 ± 12.2 in controls and 51.7 ± 27.9 years in RCGs. The ex vivo study uncovered the histopathological mechanism of En/DM thickening to be secondary to significant thickening (P vivo study shows that DM is responsible for thickening of the En/DM in RCGs observed in vivo by high-definition optical coherence tomography and not the endothelium or retrocorneal membrane.

  6. Comparison of in vivo cardiac function with ex vivo cardiac performance of the rat heart after thoracic irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A.; Camps, J. A.; van Ravels, F. J.; van der Laarse, A.; Pauwels, E. K.; Wondergem, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in vivo cardiac function with ex vivo cardiac performance after local heart irradiation in the same rat. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured in vivo by radionuclide ventriculography in Sprague-Dawley rats up to 16 months after a single dose of

  7. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA...

  8. Ex vivo measures of muscle mitochondrial capacity reveal quantitative limits of oxygen delivery by the circulation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity measured ex vivo provides a physiological reference to assess cellular oxidative capacity as a component in the oxygen cascade in vivo. In this article, the magnitude of muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise involving a small-to-large fracti...... capacity measured ex vivo underestimates the maximal in vivo oxygen uptake of muscle by up to ∼2-fold. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaptation and therapy.......Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity measured ex vivo provides a physiological reference to assess cellular oxidative capacity as a component in the oxygen cascade in vivo. In this article, the magnitude of muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise involving a small-to-large fraction...... of the body mass will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial capacity measured ex vivo. These analyses reveal that as the mass of muscle engaged in exercise increases from one-leg knee extension, to 2-arm cranking, to 2-leg cycling and x-country skiing, the magnitude of blood flow and oxygen delivery...

  9. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (ppolarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after diffe...

  11. Identification of factors promoting ex vivo maintenance of mouse hematopoietic stem cells by long-term single-cell quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Drew, Erin; Endele, Max; Loeffler, Dirk; Hoppe, Philipp S; Hilsenbeck, Oliver; Schauberger, Bernhard; Hinzen, Christoph; Skylaki, Stavroula; Theodorou, Marina; Kieslinger, Matthias; Lemischka, Ihor; Moore, Kateri; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-09-01

    The maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during ex vivo culture is an important prerequisite for their therapeutic manipulation. However, despite intense research, culture conditions for robust maintenance of HSCs are still missing. Cultured HSCs are quickly lost, preventing their improved analysis and manipulation. Identification of novel factors supporting HSC ex vivo maintenance is therefore necessary. Coculture with the AFT024 stroma cell line is capable of maintaining HSCs ex vivo long-term, but the responsible molecular players remain unknown. Here, we use continuous long-term single-cell observation to identify the HSC behavioral signature under supportive or nonsupportive stroma cocultures. We report early HSC survival as a major characteristic of HSC-maintaining conditions. Behavioral screening after manipulation of candidate molecules revealed that the extracellular matrix protein dermatopontin (Dpt) is involved in HSC maintenance. DPT knockdown in supportive stroma impaired HSC survival, whereas ectopic expression of the Dpt gene or protein in nonsupportive conditions restored HSC survival. Supplementing defined stroma- and serum-free culture conditions with recombinant DPT protein improved HSC clonogenicity. These findings illustrate a previously uncharacterized role of Dpt in maintaining HSCs ex vivo. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Decreased ex vivo production of interferon-gamma is associated with severity and poor prognosis in patients with lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Park, Eun Seong; Shim, Joo Sung; Ha, Sang-Jun; Kim, Beom Seok; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Jason Jungsik

    2017-08-25

    Lupus pathogenesis is closely associated with interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which plays a central role in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ex vivo production of IFN-γ after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in patients with lupus, according to disease activity. This study included 118 patients with lupus who had undergone IFN-γ-releasing assays (IGRAs) to screen for tuberculosis. Data on IFN-γ production in negative (nil) and positive (mitogen with PHA) controls were collected and analysed. The difference (mitogen minus nil) was used to calculate ex vivo IFN-γ production. Disease activity was evaluated using the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2 K). Poor hospitalisation outcome was defined as in-hospital mortality or intensive care unit admission. Associations among disease activity, poor hospitalisation outcome, and ex vivo IFN-γ production were assessed. The level of ex vivo IFN-γ production was significantly lower in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n = 64) than in those with inactive SLE (n = 54) (median 0.92 vs. 11.06 IU/mL, p vivo IFN-γ production was correlated with the SLEDAI-2 K (r = - 0.587, p vivo IFN-γ production ≤ 7.19 IU/mL was an independent predictor for discriminating active and inactive lupus. In addition, patients with ex vivo IFN-γ production ≤ 0.40 IU/mL had more frequent poor hospitalisation outcomes than those with ex vivo IFN-γ production > 0.40 (40.0% vs. 9.3%, p = 0.001). The proportion of indeterminate IGRA results was higher in patients with active lupus than in those with inactive lupus (45.3% vs. 0.0%, p vivo IFN-γ production. Ex vivo IFN-γ production is a useful biomarker for assessing disease activity and predicting poor clinical outcomes of SLE.

  13. 'En face' ex vivo reflectance confocal microscopy to help the surgery of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinasse, Marine; Cinotti, Elisa; Grivet, Damien; Labeille, Bruno; Prade, Virginie; Douchet, Catherine; Cambazard, Frédéric; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe; Perrot, Jean Luc

    2017-07-01

    Ex vivo confocal microscopy is a recent imaging technique for the perioperative control of skin tumour margins. Up to date, it has been used in the fluorescence mode and with vertical sections of the specimen margins. The aim of this study was to evaluate its use in the reflectance mode and with a horizontal ('en face') scanning of the surgical specimen in a series of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid. Prospective consecutive cohort study was performed at the University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, France. Forty-one patients with 42 basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid participated in this study. Basal cell carcinomas were excised with a 2-mm-wide clinically safe margin. The surgical specimens were analysed under ex vivo confocal microscopy in the reflectance mode and with an en face scanning in order to control at a microscopic level if the margins were free from tumour invasion. Histopathogical examination was later performed in order to compare the results. Sensitivity and specificity of ex vivo confocal microscopy for the presence of tumour-free margins. Ex vivo confocal microscopy results were consistent with histopathology in all cases (tumour-free margins in 40 out of 42 samples; sensitivity and specificity of 100%). Ex vivo confocal microscopy in the reflectance mode with an 'en face' scanning can control tumour margins of eyelid basal cell carcinomas and optimize their surgical management. This procedure has the advantage on the fluorescent mode of not needing any contrast agent to examine the samples. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  14. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lack of rivaroxaban influence on a prothrombinase-based assay for the detection of activated C protein resistance: an Italian ex vivo and in vitro study in normal subjects and factor V Leiden carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessoni, G; Valverde, S; Valle, L; Gessoni, F; Caruso, P; Valle, R

    2017-08-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCr) leads to hypercoagulability and is due, often but not exclusively, to Factor V Leiden (FVL). The aim of this study was to assess the ex vivo and in vitro interference of the direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban (RIV) on a prothrombinase-based assay for APCr detection. An ex vivo study was performed on fresh plasma samples obtained from 44 subjects with FV wild-type and seven with FVL heterozygous, all treated with RIV. An in vitro study was performed on 15 plasma samples (six from normal subjects, six from heterozygous, and three from homozygous FVL carriers, all frozen specimens) spiked with RIV. RIV concentration was evaluated using a chromogenic assay, and APCr was evaluated by a prothrombinase-based assay. No significant interference of RIV on APCr results obtained by a prothrombinase-based assay was observed for drug concentrations up to 400 ng/mL in FV wild-type and FVL carriers (homozygous and heterozygous). These results were confirmed both ex vivo and in vitro. RIV did not significantly interfere with the prothrombinase-based assay used for the assessment of APCr, and this was observed to occur independently of FV status. However, only concentrations up to 400 ng/mL were tested and, therefore, what occurs in the presence of higher doses remains to be investigated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. In Vivo Consumption of Cranberry Exerts ex Vivo Antiadhesive Activity against FimH-Dominated Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: A Combined in Vivo, ex Vivo, and in Vitro Study of an Extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjany, Nasli; Senker, Jandirk; Brandt, Simone; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-10-14

    For investigation of the molecular interaction of cranberry extract with adhesins of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), urine from four volunteers consuming standardized cranberry extract (proanthocyanidin content = 1.24%) was analyzed within ex vivo experiments, indicating time-dependent significant inhibition of 40-50% of bacterial adhesion of UPEC strain NU14 to human T24 bladder cells. Under in vitro conditions a dose-dependent increase in bacterial adhesion was observed with proanthocyanidin-enriched cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon extract (proanthocyanidin content = 21%). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy proved that V.m. extract led to the formation of bacterial clusters on the outer plasma membrane of the host cells without subsequent internalization. This agglomerating activity was not observed when a PAC-depleted extract (V.m. extract(≠PAC)) was used, which showed significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in cases where type 1 fimbriae dominated and mannose-sensitive UPEC strain NU14 was used. V.m. extract(≠PAC) had no inhibitory activity against P- and F1C-fimbriae dominated strain 2980. Quantitative gene expression analysis indicated that PAC-containing as well as PAC-depleted cranberry extracts increased the fimH expression in NU14 as part of a feedback mechanism after blocking FimH. For strain 2980 the PAC-containing extract led to up-regulation of P- and F1C-fimbriae, whereas the PAC-depleted extract had no influence on gene expression. V.m. and V.m. extract(≠PAC) did not influence biofilm and curli formation in UPEC strains NU14 and 2980. These data lead to the conclusion that also proanthocyanidin-free cranberry extracts exert antiadhesive activity by interaction with mannose-sensitive type 1 fimbriae of UPEC.

  17. The role of interleukin-1β as a predictive biomarker and potential therapeutic target during clinical ex vivo lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Anders S I; Borthwick, Lee A; Gillespie, Colin; Jiwa, Kasim; Scott, Jonathan; Henderson, Paul; Mayes, Jonny; Romano, Rosalba; Roman, Marius; Ali, Simi; Fildes, James E; Marczin, Nandor; Dark, John H; Fisher, Andrew J

    2017-09-01

    Extended criteria donor lungs deemed unsuitable for immediate transplantation can be reconditioned using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). Objective identification of which donor lungs can be successfully reconditioned and will function well post-operatively has not been established. This study assessed the predictive value of markers of inflammation and tissue injury in donor lungs undergoing EVLP as part of the DEVELOP-UK study. Longitudinal samples of perfusate, bronchoalveolar lavage, and tissue from 42 human donor lungs undergoing clinical EVLP assessments were analyzed for markers of inflammation and tissue injury. Levels were compared according to EVLP success and post-transplant outcomes. Neutrophil adhesion to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) conditioned with perfusates from EVLP assessments was investigated on a microfluidic platform. The most effective markers to differentiate between in-hospital survival and non-survival post-transplant were perfusate interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve = 1.00, p = 0.002) and tumor necrosis factor-α (area under the curve = 0.95, p = 0.006) after 30 minutes of EVLP. IL-1β levels in perfusate correlated with upregulation of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 in donor lung vasculature (R 2 = 0.68, p < 0.001) and to a lesser degree upregulation of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (R 2 = 0.30, p = 0.001) and E-selectin (R 2 = 0.29, p = 0.001) in conditioned HPMECs and neutrophil adhesion to conditioned HPMECs (R 2 = 0.33, p < 0.001). Neutralization of IL-1β in perfusate effectively inhibited neutrophil adhesion to conditioned HPMECs (91% reduction, p = 0.002). Donor lungs develop a detectable and discriminatory pro-inflammatory signature in perfusate during EVLP. Blocking the IL-1β pathway during EVLP may reduce endothelial activation and subsequent neutrophil adhesion on reperfusion; this requires further investigation in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Development and validation of an ex vivo electron paramagnetic resonance fingernail bio-dosimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiaoming; Swarts, Steven G.; Marsh, Stephen D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B.; Grinberg, Oleg; Gui, Jiang; Mariani, Michael; Ruuge, Andres E.; Tipikin, Dmitry; Swartz, Harold M.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Wilcox, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an imperative need to develop methods that can rapidly and accurately determine individual exposure to radiation for screening (triage) populations and guiding medical treatment in an emergency response to a large-scale radiological/nuclear event. To this end, a number of methods that rely on dose-dependent chemical and/or physical alterations in biomaterials or biological responses are in various stages of development. One such method, ex vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) nail dosimetry using human nail clippings, is a physical bio-dosimetry technique that takes advantage of a stable radiation-induced signal (RIS) in the keratin matrix of fingernails and toenails. This dosimetry method has the advantages of ubiquitous availability of the dosimetric material, easy and non-invasive sampling, and the potential for immediate and rapid dose assessment. The major challenge for ex vivo EPR nail dosimetry is the overlap of mechanically induced signals and the RIS. The difficulties of analysing the mixed EPR spectra of a clipped irradiated nail were addressed in the work described here. The following key factors lead to successful spectral analysis and dose assessment in ex vivo EPR nail dosimetry: (1) obtaining a thorough understanding of the chemical nature, the decay behaviour, and the microwave power dependence of the EPR signals, as well as the influence of variation in temperature, humidity, water content, and O 2 level; (2) control of the variability among individual samples to achieve consistent shape and kinetics of the EPR spectra; (3) use of correlations between the multiple spectral components; and (4) use of optimised modelling and fitting of the EPR spectra to improve the accuracy and precision of the dose estimates derived from the nail spectra. In the work described here, two large clipped nail datasets were used to test the procedures and the spectral fitting model of the results obtained with it. A 15-donor nail set with 90 nail samples

  19. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Renal artery aneurysms is relatively uncommon with reported incidence ranges from 0.3% to 1%. However, considering all visceral artery aneurysms the percentage of renal artery aneurysms is relatively high between 15-25%. The distal forms of renal artery aneurysms sometimes require "ex vivo" reconstruction and kidney autotransplantation. CASE REPORT A 75-year-old male presented with the right abdominal and back pain. He suffered from a long history of arterial hypertension and chronic renal failure over the last few months (urea blood = 19.8 mmol/l; creatinine = 198 mmol/l. Duplex ultrasonography showed abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent translumbarangiography revealed juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with distal right renal artery aneurysm. The operation was performed under combined thoracic epidural analgesia and general anesthesia using transperitoneal approach. After the laparotomy, the ascending colon was mobilized and reflected medially followed by Kocher maneuver. The result was visualization of the anterior aspect of the right kidney, the collecting system, ureter as well as the right renal vein and artery with large saccular aneurysm located distally. After mobilization of the renal vessels and careful dissection of the ureter, the kidney was explanted. The operation was continued by two surgical teams. The first team performed abdominal aortic aneurysm resection and reconstruction with bifurcated Dacron graft. The second team performed ex vivo reparation of renal artery aneurysm. All time during the explantation, the kidney was perfused by Collins' solution. The saccular right renal artery aneurysm 4 cm in diameter was located at the kidney hilus at the first bifurcation. Three branches originated from the aneurysm. The aneurysm was resected completely. The longest and widest of three branches arising from the aneurysmal sac was end-to-end anastomized with 6 mm PTFE graft. After this intervention, one of

  20. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown during ex vivo erythropoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Pasha, Roya; Brand, Marjorie

    2011-07-16

    Erythropoiesis is a commonly used model system to study cell differentiation. During erythropoiesis, pluripotent adult human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differentiate into oligopotent progenitors, committed precursors and mature red blood cells. This process is regulated for a large part at the level of gene expression, whereby specific transcription factors activate lineage-specific genes while concomitantly repressing genes that are specific to other cell types. Studies on transcription factors regulating erythropoiesis are often performed using human and murine cell lines that represent, to some extent, erythroid cells at given stages of differentiation. However transformed cell lines can only partially mimic erythroid cells and most importantly they do not allow one to comprehensibly study the dynamic changes that occur as cells progress through many stages towards their final erythroid fate. Therefore, a current challenge remains the development of a protocol to obtain relatively homogenous populations of primary HSCs and erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in quantities that are sufficient to perform genomics and proteomics experiments. Here we describe an ex vivo cell culture protocol to induce erythroid differentiation from human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that have been isolated from either cord blood, bone marrow, or adult peripheral blood mobilized with G-CSF (leukapheresis). This culture system, initially developed by the Douay laboratory, uses cytokines and co-culture on mesenchymal cells to mimic the bone marrow microenvironment. Using this ex vivo differentiation protocol, we observe a strong amplification of erythroid progenitors, an induction of differentiation exclusively towards the erythroid lineage and a complete maturation to the stage of enucleated red blood cells. Thus, this system provides an opportunity to study the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation as hematopoietic stem cells progress along

  1. Ex vivo piperaquine resistance developed rapidly in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in northern Cambodia compared to Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Lon, Chanthap; Jongsakul, Krisada; Gawee, Jariyanart; Sok, Somethy; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Kong, Nareth; Thamnurak, Chatchadaporn; Chann, Soklyda; Chattrakarn, Sorayut; Praditpol, Chantida; Buathong, Nillawan; Uthaimongkol, Nichapat; Smith, Philip; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Huy, Rekol; Prom, Satharath; Fukuda, Mark M; Bethell, Delia; Walsh, Douglas S; Lanteri, Charlotte; Saunders, David

    2016-10-21

    The recent dramatic decline in dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) efficacy in northwestern Cambodia has raised concerns about the rapid spread of piperaquine resistance just as DHA-PPQ is being introduced as first-line therapy in neighbouring countries. Ex vivo parasite susceptibilities were tracked to determine the rate of progression of DHA, PPQ and mefloquine (MQ) resistance from sentinel sites on the Thai-Cambodian and Thai-Myanmar borders from 2010 to 2015. Immediate ex vivo (IEV) histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP-2) assays were used on fresh patient Plasmodium falciparum isolates to determine drug susceptibility profiles. IEV HRP-2 assays detected the precipitous emergence of PPQ resistance in Cambodia beginning in 2013 when 40 % of isolates had an IC 90 greater than the upper limit of prior years, and this rate doubled to 80 % by 2015. In contrast, Thai-Myanmar isolates from 2013 to 14 remained PPQ-sensitive, while northeastern Thai isolates appeared to have an intermediate resistance profile. The opposite trend was observed for MQ where Cambodian isolates appeared to have a modest increase in overall sensitivity during the same period, with IC 50 declining to median levels comparable to those found in Thailand. A significant association between increased PPQ IC 50 and IC 90 among Cambodian isolates with DHA-PPQ treatment failure was observed. Nearly all Cambodian and Thai isolates were deemed artemisinin resistant with a >1 % survival rate for DHA in the ring-stage assay (RSA), though there was no correlation among isolates to indicate cross-resistance between PPQ and artemisinins. Clinical DHA-PPQ failures appear to be associated with declines in the long-acting partner drug PPQ, though sensitivity appears to remain largely intact for now in western Thailand. Rapid progression of PPQ resistance associated with DHA-PPQ treatment failures in northern Cambodia limits drugs of choice in this region, and urgently requires alternative therapy. The

  2. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Christoph; Meixner, Miriam; Giesemann, Petra; Roël, Giulietta; Bulwin, Grit-Carsta; Smink, Jeske J

    2016-11-15

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don's chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids) that is in clinical use in Germany. Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids before implantation and a higher regeneration potential

  3. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don’s chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids that is in clinical use in Germany. Methods Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. Results After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids

  4. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of ex vivo liver undergoing thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntur, Sitaramanjaneya Reddy; Lee, Kang Il; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2013-10-01

    Thermotherapy uses a heat source that raises temperatures in the target tissue, and the temperature rise depends on the thermal properties of the tissue. Little is known about the temperature-dependent thermal properties of tissue, which prevents us from accurately predicting the temperature distribution of the target tissue undergoing thermotherapy. The present study reports the key thermal parameters (specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and heat diffusivity) measured in ex vivo porcine liver while being heated from 20 ° C to 90 ° C and then naturally cooled down to 20 ° C. The study indicates that as the tissue was heated, all the thermal parameters resulted in plots with asymmetric quasi-parabolic curves with temperature, being convex downward with their minima at the turning temperature of 35-40 ° C. The largest change was observed for thermal conductivity, which decreased by 9.6% from its initial value (at 20 ° C) at the turning temperature (35 ° C) and rose by 45% at 90 ° C from its minimum (at 35 ° C). The minima were 3.567 mJ/(m(3) ∙ K) for specific heat capacity, 0.520 W/(m.K) for thermal conductivity and 0.141 mm(2)/s for thermal diffusivity. The minimum at the turning temperature was unique, and it is suggested that it be taken as a characteristic value of the thermal parameter of the tissue. On the other hand, the thermal parameters were insensitive to temperature and remained almost unchanged when the tissue cooled down, indicating that their variations with temperature were irreversible. The rate of the irreversible rise at 35 ° C was 18% in specific heat capacity, 40% in thermal conductivity and 38.3% in thermal diffusivity. The study indicates that the key thermal parameters of ex vivo porcine liver vary largely with temperature when heated, as described by asymmetric quasi-parabolic curves of the thermal parameters with temperature, and therefore, substantial influence on the temperature distribution of the tissue undergoing

  5. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, UMR 5242 CNRS INRA Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon 1, 46 allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Ali, Sazan [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Chaspoul, Florence [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Unité de Chimie-Physique, Faculté de Pharmacie 13005, Marseille (France); Lanteaume, André [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Achard, Vincent [Laboratoire de Biologie de la Reproduction, AP-HM, Hôpital de la Conception, 147, Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Gallice, Philippe [Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR CNRS IMBE 7263, FR 3098 ECCOREV, 13005, Marseille (France); Unité de Chimie-Physique, Faculté de Pharmacie 13005, Marseille (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, UMR 5242 CNRS INRA Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon 1, 46 allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); and others

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2‐week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the “motheaten” SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium induces ex-vivo severe time- and dose-dependent germ cell abnormalities. ► Cadmium at very low concentration (0.1 µg/l) induces synaptonemal complex abnormalities. ► The lowest concentration inducing adverse effect varied with the cell parameter studied. ► Cadmium alters proteins involved in pairing and recombination. ► Cadmium leads to achiasmate univalents and

  6. Ex vivo piperaquine resistance developed rapidly in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in northern Cambodia compared to Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanna Chaorattanakawee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent dramatic decline in dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ efficacy in northwestern Cambodia has raised concerns about the rapid spread of piperaquine resistance just as DHA-PPQ is being introduced as first-line therapy in neighbouring countries. Methods Ex vivo parasite susceptibilities were tracked to determine the rate of progression of DHA, PPQ and mefloquine (MQ resistance from sentinel sites on the Thai–Cambodian and Thai–Myanmar borders from 2010 to 2015. Immediate ex vivo (IEV histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP-2 assays were used on fresh patient Plasmodium falciparum isolates to determine drug susceptibility profiles. Results IEV HRP-2 assays detected the precipitous emergence of PPQ resistance in Cambodia beginning in 2013 when 40 % of isolates had an IC90 greater than the upper limit of prior years, and this rate doubled to 80 % by 2015. In contrast, Thai–Myanmar isolates from 2013 to 14 remained PPQ-sensitive, while northeastern Thai isolates appeared to have an intermediate resistance profile. The opposite trend was observed for MQ where Cambodian isolates appeared to have a modest increase in overall sensitivity during the same period, with IC50 declining to median levels comparable to those found in Thailand. A significant association between increased PPQ IC50 and IC90 among Cambodian isolates with DHA-PPQ treatment failure was observed. Nearly all Cambodian and Thai isolates were deemed artemisinin resistant with a >1 % survival rate for DHA in the ring-stage assay (RSA, though there was no correlation among isolates to indicate cross-resistance between PPQ and artemisinins. Conclusions Clinical DHA-PPQ failures appear to be associated with declines in the long-acting partner drug PPQ, though sensitivity appears to remain largely intact for now in western Thailand. Rapid progression of PPQ resistance associated with DHA-PPQ treatment failures in northern Cambodia limits drugs of choice in

  7. Modeling the Human Tibiofemoral Joint Using Ex Vivo Determined Compliance Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberto, Giuliano; Richard, Vincent; Dumas, Raphaël; Valentini, Pier Paolo; Pennestrì, Ettore; Lu, Tung-Wu; Camomilla, Valentina; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2016-06-01

    Several approaches have been used to devise a model of the human tibiofemoral joint for embedment in lower limb musculoskeletal models. However, no study has considered the use of cadaveric 6 × 6 compliance (or stiffness) matrices to model the tibiofemoral joint under normal or pathological conditions. The aim of this paper is to present a method to determine the compliance matrix of an ex vivo tibiofemoral joint for any given equilibrium pose. Experiments were carried out on a single ex vivo knee, first intact and, then, with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transected. Controlled linear and angular displacements were imposed in single degree-of-freedom (DoF) tests to the specimen, and the resulting forces and moments were measured using an instrumented robotic arm. This was done starting from seven equilibrium poses characterized by the following flexion angles: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. A compliance matrix for each of the selected equilibrium poses and for both the intact and ACL-deficient specimen was calculated. The matrix, embedding the experimental load-displacement relationship of the examined DoFs, was calculated using a linear least squares inversion based on a QR decomposition, assuming symmetric and positive-defined matrices. Single compliance matrix terms were in agreement with the literature. Results showed an overall increase of the compliance matrix terms due to the ACL transection (2.6 ratio for rotational terms at full extension) confirming its role in the joint stabilization. Validation experiments were carried out by performing a Lachman test (the tibia is pulled forward) under load control on both the intact and ACL-deficient knee and assessing the difference (error) between measured linear and angular displacements and those estimated using the appropriate compliance matrix. This error increased nonlinearly with respect to the values of the load. In particular, when an incremental posterior-anterior force

  8. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanyun

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3 and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1 ex vivo and in vivo. Methods B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. For adenoviral (Ad-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-γ production was determined with an INF-γ ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. Results F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-γ ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P P Conclusions CCL3 and CCL20-recruited DCs modified by adenovirus-trasnsduced, tumor-associated antigen, MAGE-1, can stimulate anti-tumor immunity specific to gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo. This system may prove to be an efficient strategy for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  9. A porcine ex vivo lung perfusion model with maximal argon exposure to attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Martens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Argon (Ar is a noble gas with known organoprotective effects in rodents and in vitro models. In a previous study we failed to find a postconditioning effect of Ar during ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP on warm-ischemic injury in a porcine model. In this study, we further investigated a prolonged exposure to Ar to decrease cold ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation in a porcine model with EVLP assessment. Domestic pigs (n = 6/group were pre-conditioned for 6 hours with 21% O 2 and 79% N 2 (CONTR or 79% Ar (ARG. Subsequently, lungs were cold flushed and stored inflated on ice for 18 hours inflated with the same gas mixtures. Next, lungs were perfused for 4 hours on EVLP (acellular while ventilated with 12% O 2 and 88% N 2 (CONTR group or 88% Ar (ARG group. The perfusate was saturated with the same gas mixture but with the addition of CO 2 to an end-tidal CO 2 of 35-45 mmHg. The saturated perfusate was drained and lungs were perfused with whole blood for an additional 2 hours on EVLP. Evaluation at the end of EVLP did not show significant effects on physiologic parameters by prolonged exposure to Ar. Also wet-to-dry weight ratio did not improve in the ARG group. Although in other organ systems protective effects of Ar have been shown, we did not detect beneficial effects of a high concentration of Ar on cold pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine lung model after prolonged exposure to Ar in this porcine model with EVLP assessment.

  10. Comparative biomechanic performances of locked cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs in an ex vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croog, Alexander; Goldstein, Rachel; Nasser, Philip; Lee, Steve K

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the effects of 3 different locking configurations on repair strength when used in a cruciate four-strand repair. Sixty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and repaired with cruciate four-strand core suture repairs with 3 different locking configurations: simple locks (a modification of the Pennigton method), circle locks, and cross locks. Half of the repairs in each locking group were reinforced with a peripheral suture. The tendon repairs were subjected to linear load-to-failure testing. Outcome measures were 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength. The cross lock repair had significantly greater 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength than the simple lock repair, both with and without a peripheral suture. The cross lock repair showed significantly greater 2-mm gap force without a peripheral suture and significantly greater ultimate tensile strength with a peripheral suture than the circle lock repair. With peripheral reinforcement, the cross lock cruciate repair had a mean 2-mm gap force of 92 N and ultimate tensile strength of 119 N. The cross lock cruciate repair consistently produced the strongest biomechanic performance in all outcome measures. Locking configuration influences the biomechanic performance of cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs. Our results suggest that the cruciate repair with cross locks is stronger than repairs with simple locks or circle locks. Whether the results of this ex vivo porcine linear model can be translated to the clinical arena is unknown, because the factors of tendon/sheath friction, tendon healing, and compromised tendon viability from the lock were not addressed.

  11. Ex vivo malignant glioma cells are sensitive to Fas (CD95/APO-1) ligand-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, K; Ambar, B; Adachi, N; Yonekawa, Y; Fontana, A

    1998-07-01

    Fas (also known as CD95/APO-1) is a cell surface receptor and member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily which mediates apoptosis in sensitive cells upon oligomerization by specific antibodies or by its ligand (FasL). Recently, human glioma cell lines were found to be susceptible to Fas-mediated apoptosis triggered by alpha-Fas antibodies. However, whether the Fas system can also be targeted in ex vivo high grade gliomas is at present unknown. In the present investigation, alpha-Fas antibodies and FasL were tested in short-term monolayer cultures or in colony forming assays established from freshly resected tumors of patients with anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade IV). Anti-Fas antibodies induced only moderate apoptosis in four of the 19 tested glioma cell cultures. This contrasts FasL which induced apoptosis in all of the 19 tumor cell cultures analyzed. Mean cytotoxicity of glioma cell cultures treated for 48 h with alpha-Fas antibodies or FasL was 9.6% and 44.3%, respectively. Irrespective of whether alpha-Fas antibodies or FasL were used, pretreatment with recombinant hu (rhu) IFN-gamma and rhuTNF-alpha for 48 h did not sensitize glioma cells to Fas-mediated cytotoxicity. The long-term effect by FasL on tumor colony formation was more striking. FasL treatment resulted in more than 90% inhibition of clonal tumor cell growth of all the eight high grade gliomas analyzed. These results suggest that Fas targeting by FasL but not by alpha-Fas antibodies may provide a promising approach for locoregional glioma treatment.

  12. [Effects of oxymetazoline hydrochloride on ex vivo human nasal cilia movement measured with high-speed digital microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Luo; Han, De-Min; Wang, Kui-Ji; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Wei

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effects of oxymetazoline hydrochloride on ex vivo human nasal cilia movement. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of cultured human nasal epithelial cells was measured by high-speed digital microscopy in HBSS and oxymetazoline hydrochloride of different concentrations in 20 minutes. RESULTS; CBF of cultured nasal epithelial cells in HBSS and 0.25 g/L oxymetazoline hydrochloride did not show significant changes in 20 minutes (F = 0.098, P = 1.00). However, in 0.50 g/L and 1.00 g/L oxymetazoline hydrochloride, CBF increased slightly in 3 -4 minutes and reached the apex, then decreased gradually. At the end of observation, CBF showed no significant difference in 0.50 g/L, (F = 2.94, P = 0.05) but there was a significant lower CBF in 1.00 g/L. In the first 3 minutes, the CBF in 2.00 g/L oxymetazoline hydrochloride was stable, and then slowed gradually. After 16 minutes, there was significant difference. In initial, the highest normalized CBF of each group showed no significant difference. However, the lowest normalized CBF of 1.00 and 2.00 g/L oxymetazoline hydrochloride showed a significant difference with HBSS, 0.25 and 0.50 g/L oxymetazoline hydrochloride. Oxymetazoline had a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on cultured human nasal CBF from 0.25 to 2.00 g/L. The inhibitory effect increased with the concentration going up. Oxymetazoline hydrochloride of 0.50 g/L might be the optimal choice for clinical application.

  13. Rye bran bread intake elevates urinary excretion of ferulic acid in humans, but does not affect the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, H.; Tetens, I.; Let, Mette Bruni

    2004-01-01

    Background Rye bread contributes an important part of the whole grain intake in the Scandinavian diet. Ferulic acid is the major phenolic compound in rye bran and is an antioxidant in vitro and may, therefore, contribute to cardioprotective effects of whole grain consumption. Aim of study Firstly...... women after a dietary intake of rye bran or an inert wheat bran (control) in a crossover study (2 x 6 weeks with 4 weeks washout). The potential antioxidative effect of the rye bran intervention was investigated by measuring low-density lipoprotein (LDL) susceptibility to copper oxidation ex vivo...... of intervention, the elevated ferulic acid did not produce a measurable antioxidative effect on the subjects' LDL. It is suggested that the determination of ferulic acid in urine is a useful biomarker to assess the intake of ferulic acid from a regular diet....

  14. Linomide increases plasma corticosterone in normal rats, but does not prevent the inhibitory action of IL-1 on beta-cells in vivo or ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U B; Mauricio, D; Reimers, J I

    1996-01-01

    received 4.0 microg/kg of recombinant human IL-1beta (rhIL-1beta) i.p. daily for 5 days with or without Linomide (8-9 mg/kg/day) in the drinking water. Litters of neonatal Wistar rats were pretreated for 3 days with injections of 10 mg/kg of Linomide i.p., and pancreatic islets of Langerhans were isolated......-cells leading to IDDM. This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of Linomide on IL-1beta induced diabetogenic and hormonal changes in the rat in vivo, and on IL-1beta mediated synthesis of NO and inhibition of insulin secretion in isolated islets of Langerhans ex vivo. Normal male Wistar Kyoto rats...

  15. Ex Vivo Correlation of the Permeability of Metoprolol Across Human and Porcine Buccal Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2014-01-01

    The pH partition theory proposes a correlation between fraction of unionized drug substance and permeability. The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of metoprolol and mannitol in ex vivo human and porcine buccal mucosa models at varying pH to validate whether the porcine permeability...... model is predictive for human buccal absorption. Human (n = 9-10) and porcine (n = 6-7) buccal mucosa were mounted in a modified Ussing chamber, and the kinetics of metoprolol and mannitol transport was assessed for a period of 5.5 h with the pH values of donor medium set at 7.4, 8.5, and 9.......0. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-van Gieson were used as tissue stains to evaluate the histology and the presence of acidic polysaccharides (e.g., mucins), respectively. The permeability of metoprolol was decreased in human buccal mucosa by almost twofold when compared with porcine buccal mucosa...

  16. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  17. Preliminary results of ex vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging in the management of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Vikram S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Valluru, Keerthi S; Moalem, Jacob; Giampoli, Ellen J; Evans, Katie; Rao, Navalgund A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate whether ex vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging can be used to differentiate malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal human thyroid tissue. Fifty patients undergoing thyroidectomy because of thyroid lesions participated in this study. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed on surgically excised thyroid tissue, and chromophore images that represented optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure, the pathologist marked malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal regions on histopathologic slides, and digital images of the marked histopathologic slides were obtained. The histopathologic images were coregistered with chromophore images. Areas corresponding to malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal tissue were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each area were averaged to determine the mean intensities of deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, lipid, and water. There was a statistically significant difference between malignant and benign nodules with respect to mean intensity of deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.014). There was a difference between malignant and normal tissue in mean intensity of deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.003), lipid (p = 0.001), and water (p multispectral photoacoustic imaging can be used to differentiate malignant and benign nodules and normal human thyroid tissue.

  18. In-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging of murine liver microvasculature ex vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Beilei; Xu Min; Shi Hongcheng; Chen Shaoliang; Wu Weizhong; Peng Guanyun; Zhang Xi; Peng Yifeng

    2012-01-01

    Imaging blood vessels is of importance for determining the vascular distribution of organs and tumors. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging can reveal the vessels in much more detail than conventional X-ray absorption method. Visualizing murine liver microvasculature ex vivo with phase-contrast X-ray imaging was performed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Barium sulfate and physiological saline were used as contrast agents for the blood vessels. Blood vessels of <Φ20 μm could be detected by replacing resident blood with physiological saline or barium sulfate. An entire branch of the portal vein (from the main axial portal vein to the ninth generation of branching) could be captured in a single phase-contrast image. It is demonstrated that selective angiography based on phase contrast X-ray imaging, with a physiological material of low Z elements (such as saline) being the contrast agent, is a viable imaging strategy. Further efforts will be focused on using the technique to image tumor angiogenesis. (authors)

  19. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 gene expression profiling during ex vivo colonization of porcine nasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinski, Pawel; Duim, Birgitta; Wittink, Floyd R; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M; van Putten, Jos P; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Fluit, Ad C

    2014-10-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human and animal opportunistic pathogen. In humans nasal carriage of S. aureus is a risk factor for various infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is highly prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. The mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. Previously, we developed a nasal colonization model of porcine nasal mucosa explants to identify molecular traits involved in nasal MRSA colonization of pigs. We report the analysis of changes in the transcription of MRSA ST398 strain S0462 during colonization on the explant epithelium. Major regulated genes were encoding metabolic processes and regulation of these genes may represent metabolic adaptation to nasal mucosa explants. Colonization was not accompanied by significant changes in transcripts of the main virulence associated genes or known human colonization factors. Here, we documented regulation of two genes which have potential influence on S. aureus colonization; cysteine extracellular proteinase (scpA) and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp, encoded on SaPIbov5). Colonization with isogenic-deletion strains (Δvwbp and ΔscpA) did not alter the ex vivo nasal S. aureus colonization compared to wild type. Our results suggest that nasal colonization with MRSA ST398 is a complex event that is accompanied with changes in bacterial gene expression regulation and metabolic adaptation.

  20. Irrigation eliminates smoke formation in laser laparoscopic surgery: ex vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Hao; Xu, Chuan-Liang; Wang, Lin-Hui; Hou, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the desmoke effects of irrigation on surgical smoke generated during laser laparoscopic surgery using ex vivo model. A hand-piece was devised as both an irrigation tube and a laser fiber holder. The laser system used was a diode pumped continuous wave Thulium YAG laser (Lisa laser products OHG, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany) emitting at 2.01-mum through a quartz fiber with a core diameter of 365 mum. Using a transparent container as experimental model (approximately 3 L in volume), 6 irrigation rates (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 mL/min) were tested combining with 4 laser power settings (20, 30, 40, and 50 W). To evaluate the desmoke efficiency of irrigation, lasing time with effective visibility under different combination of irrigation rates and laser powers were documented, and corresponding smoke generation rate were calculated (=3 L/lasing time). Analysis of variance was used to compare difference and significance was indicated at Pirrigation rate. At 4 tested laser powers, calculated smoke generation rates were high (mean: 91.4 to 306.6 mL/s) when no water presented, but were significantly decreased (mean: 12.6 to 55.0 mL/s, Pirrigation rate for future clinical practice would be around 40 mL/min. Irrigation eliminates smoke formation accompanying laser tissue irradiation. It shows promise for future application in laser laparoscopic surgery.

  1. Cell Density Plays a Critical Role in Ex Vivo Expansion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangzhong Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful ex vivo expansion of a large numbers of T cells is a prerequisite for adoptive immunotherapy. In this study, we found that cell density had important effects on the process of expansion of T cells in vitro. Resting T cells were activated to expand at high cell density but failed to be activated at low cell density. Activated T cells (ATCs expanded rapidly at high cell density but underwent apoptosis at low cell density. Our studies indicated that low-cell-density related ATC death is mediated by oxidative stress. Antioxidants N-acetylcysteine, catalase, and albumin suppressed elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in low-density cultures and protected ATCs from apoptosis. The viability of ATCs at low density was preserved by conditioned medium from high-density cultures of ATCs in which the autocrine survival factor was identified as catalase. We also found that costimulatory signal CD28 increases T cell activation at lower cell density, paralleled by an increase in catalase secretion. Our findings highlight the importance of cell density in T cell activation, proliferation, survival and apoptosis and support the importance of maintaining T cells at high density for their successful expansion in vitro.

  2. External negative electric potential accelerates exocytosis of lamellar bodies in human skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Junichi; Goto, Makiko; Denda, Sumiko; Nakatani, Masashi; Takasugi, Yuya; Tsuchiya, Katsunori; Shimizu, Yuji; Takatsuru, Yusuke; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2013-06-01

    Exocytosis of lamellar bodies at the uppermost nucleated layer of the epidermis is a crucial process for epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis. We have previously suggested that skin surface electric potential might be associated with barrier homoeostasis. Thus, we hypothesized that the potential might drive exocytosis of lamellar bodies. In this study, we tested this idea by applying negative electric potential (-0.5 V) to human skin samples ex vivo for 2 h and observing the ultrastructure of the uppermost layer. The secretion of lamellar bodies was accelerated in the potential-applied skin, compared to that in untreated control skin. Multiphoton observation indicated that extracellular lipid domains were more extensive in treated skin than in control skin. Moreover, the calcium ion gradient was greater at the uppermost layer of the epidermis of treated skin, compared to that in control skin. These results indicate that electric potential may regulate lamellar body secretion in healthy human skin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An ex vivo model for anti-angiogenic drug testing on intact microvascular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S Azimi

    Full Text Available New models of angiogenesis that mimic the complexity of real microvascular networks are needed. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated that cultured rat mesentery tissues contain viable microvascular networks and could be used to probe pericyte-endothelial cell interactions. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the rat mesentery culture model for anti-angiogenic drug testing by time-lapse quantification of network growth. Mesenteric windows were harvested from adult rats, secured in place with an insert, and cultured for 3 days according to 3 experimental groups: 1 10% serum (angiogenesis control, 2 10% serum + sunitinib (SU11248, and 3 10% serum + bevacizumab. Labeling with FITC conjugated BSI-lectin on Day 0 and 3 identified endothelial cells along blood and lymphatic microvascular networks. Comparison between day 0 (before and 3 (after in networks stimulated by 10% serum demonstrated a dramatic increase in vascular density and capillary sprouting. Growing networks contained proliferating endothelial cells and NG2+ vascular pericytes. Media supplementation with sunitinib (SU11248 or bevacizumab both inhibited the network angiogenic responses. The comparison of the same networks before and after treatment enabled the identification of tissue specific responses. Our results establish, for the first time, the ability to evaluate an anti-angiogenic drug based on time-lapse imaging on an intact microvascular network in an ex vivo scenario.

  4. Metabolomics reveals the heterogeneous secretome of two entomopathogenic fungi to ex vivo cultured insect tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charissa de Bekker

    Full Text Available Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied.

  5. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method's performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue.

  6. Endovascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo: venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after endovenous therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Oliver A. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Schmedt, Claus-Georg; Steckmeier, Bernd M. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Vascular Surgery and Phlebology, Munich (Germany); Hunger, Kathrin; Reiser, Maximilian; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Hetterich, Holger; Rieber, Johannes [Ludwig Maximilians University, Division of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Sroka, Ronald [Ludwig Maximilians University, Laser Research Laboratory, LIFE-Center, Munich (Germany); Babaryka, Gregor [Ludwig Maximilians University, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Siebert, Uwe [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment and Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Department of Public Health, Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment, Hall/Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-09-15

    Endovascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging modality providing histology-like information of the venous wall. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laser therapy (ELT) are accepted alternatives to surgery. This study evaluated OCT for qualitative assessment of venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after RFA and ELT in bovine venous specimens. One hundred and thirty-four venous segments were obtained from ten ex-vivo bovine hind limbs. OCT signal characteristics for different wall layers were assessed in 180/216 (83%) quadrants from 54 normal venous cross-sections. Kappa statistics ({kappa}) were used to calculate intra- and inter-observer agreement. Qualitative changes after RFA (VNUS-Closure) and ELT (diode laser 980 nm, energy densities 15 Joules (J)/cm, 25 J/cm, 35 J/cm) were described in 80 venous cross-sections. Normal veins were characterized by a three-layered appearance. After RFA, loss of three-layered appearance and wall thickening at OCT corresponded with circular destruction of tissue structures at histology. Wall defects after ELT ranged from non-transmural punctiform damage to complete perforation, depending on the energy density applied. Intra- and inter-observer agreement for reading OCT images was very high (0.90 and 0.88, respectively). OCT allows for reproducible evaluation of normal venous wall and alterations after endovenous therapy. OCT could prove to be valuable for optimizing endovenous therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  7. In and ex-vivo Myocardial Tissue Temperature Monitoring by Combined Infrared and Ultrasonic Thermometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engrand, C.; Laux, D.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.; Sinquet, J.-C.; Demaria, R.; Le Clézio, E.

    The success of cardiac surgery essentially depends on tissue preservation during intervention. Consequently a hypothermic cardio-plegia is applied in order to avoid ischemia. However, myocardial temperature is not monitored during operation. The aim of this study is then to find a relevant and simple method for myocardial global temperature estimation in real time using both ultrasounds and infra-red thermography. In order to quantify the sensitivity of ultrasonic velocity to temperature, a 2.25 MHz ultrasonic probe was used for ex-vivo tests. Pig myocards (n=25) were placed in a thermostatically-controlled water bath and measurements of the ultrasound velocity were realized from 10 to 30 ˚C. The results of this study indicate that the specificity and sensitivity of the ultrasonic echo delay induced by the modification of temperature can be exploited for in-depth thermometry. In parallel, for TIR experiments, a bolometer was used to detect the myocardium surface thermal evolution during in-vivo pig heart experiments. Hypothermic cardioplegic solutions were injected and infra-red surface imaging was performed during one hour. In the near futur, the correlation of the ultrasound and the infrared measurements should allow the real time estimation of the global temperature of the heart. The final objective being to realize in vivo measurements on human hearts, this information may have a very high importance in terms of per-operation inspection as well as decision making process during medical interventions.

  8. Ex-vivo HIFU experiments using a 32×32-element CMUT array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Chang, Chienliu; Jang, Ji Hoon; Bhuyan, Anshuman; Choe, Jung Woo; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Watkins, Ronald; Stephens, Doug; Butts Pauly, Kim; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus

    2016-09-05

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used as noninvasive treatment for various diseases. For these therapeutic applications, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have advantages that make them potentially preferred transducers over traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this paper, we present the design and the fabrication process of an 8×8-mm2, 32×32-element 2-D CMUT array for HIFU applications. To reduce the system complexity for addressing the 1024 transducer elements, we propose to group the CMUT array elements into eight HIFU channels based on the phase delay from the CMUT element to the targeted focal point. Designed to focus at an 8-mm depth with a 5-MHz exciting frequency, this grouping scheme was realized using a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). With a 40-V DC bias and a 60-V peak-to-peak AC excitation, the surface pressure was measured 1.2 MPa peak-to-peak and stayed stable for a long enough time to create a lesion. With this DC and AC voltage combination, the measured peak-to-peak output pressure at the focus was 8.5 MPa, which is expected to generate a lesion in a minute according to the temperature simulation. Following ex-vivo tissue experiments successfully demonstrated its capability to make lesions in both bovine muscle and liver tissue.

  9. Ex-vivo HIFU experiments using a 32 × 32-element CMUT array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Chang, Chienliu; Jang, Ji Hoon; Bhuyan, Anshuman; Choe, Jung Woo; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Watkins, Ronald D.; Stephens, Douglas N.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used as noninvasive treatment for various diseases. For these therapeutic applications, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have advantages that make them potentially preferred transducers over traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this paper, we present the design and the fabrication process of an 8 × 8-mm2, 32 × 32-element 2-D CMUT array for HIFU applications. To reduce the system complexity for addressing the 1024 transducer elements, we propose to group the CMUT array elements into eight HIFU channels based on the phase delay from the CMUT element to the targeted focal point. Designed to focus at an 8-mm depth with a 5-MHz exciting frequency, this grouping scheme was realized using a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). With a 40-V DC bias and a 60-V peak-to-peak AC excitation, the surface pressure was measured 1.2 MPa peak-to-peak and stayed stable for a long enough time to create a lesion. With this DC and AC voltage combination, the measured peak-to-peak output pressure at the focus was 8.5 MPa, which is expected to generate a lesion in a minute according to the temperature simulation. Following ex-vivo tissue experiments successfully demonstrated its capability to make lesions in both bovine muscle and liver tissue. PMID:27913330

  10. Ex Vivo HIFU Experiments Using a $32 \\times 32$ -Element CMUT Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Chang, Chienliu; Jang, Ji Hoon; Bhuyan, Anshuman; Choe, Jung Woo; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Watkins, Ronald D; Stephens, Douglas N; Butts Pauly, Kim; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2016-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used as noninvasive treatment for various diseases. For these therapeutic applications, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have advantages that make them potentially preferred transducers over traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this paper, we present the design and the fabrication process of an 8 ×8 -mm 2 32 ×32 -element 2-D CMUT array for HIFU applications. To reduce the system complexity for addressing the 1024 transducer elements, we propose to group the CMUT array elements into eight HIFU channels based on the phase delay from the CMUT element to the targeted focal point. Designed to focus at an 8-mm depth with a 5-MHz exciting frequency, this grouping scheme was realized using a custom application-specific integrated circuit. With a 40-V dc bias and a 60-V peak-to-peak ac excitation, the surface pressure was measured 1.2 MPa peak-to-peak and stayed stable for a long enough time to create a lesion. With this dc and ac voltage combination, the measured peak-to-peak output pressure at the focus was 8.5 MPa, which is expected to generate a lesion in a minute according to the temperature simulation. The following ex vivo tissue experiments successfully demonstrated its capability to make lesions in both bovine muscle and liver tissue.

  11. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  12. Ex vivo rabbit and human corneas as models for bacterial and fungal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Abigail; Shivshetty, Nagaveni; Roy, Sanhita; Rimmer, Stephen; Douglas, Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Garg, Prashant

    2017-02-01

    In the study of microbial keratitis, in vivo animal models often require a large number of animals, and in vitro monolayer cell culture does not maintain the three-dimensional structure of the tissues or cell-to-cell communication of in vivo models. Here, we propose reproducible ex vivo models of single- and dual-infection keratitis as an alternative to in vivo and in vitro models. Excised rabbit and human corneoscleral rims maintained in organ culture were infected using 10 8 cells of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans or Fusarium solani. The infection was introduced by wounding with a scalpel and exposing corneas to the microbial suspension or by intrastromal injection. Post-inoculation, corneas were maintained for 24 and 48 h at 37 °C. After incubation, corneas were either homogenised to determine colony-forming units (CFU)/cornea or processed for histological examination using routine staining methods. Single- and mixed-species infections were compared. We observed a significant increase in CFU after 48 h compared to 24 h with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. However, no such increase was observed in corneas infected with C. albicans or F. solani. The injection method yielded an approximately two- to 100-fold increase (p keratitis, particularly when this might be due to two infective organisms.

  13. Bactericidal effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation on some endodontic pathogens ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmans, L; Moisiadis, P; Teughels, W; Van Meerbeek, B; Quirynen, M; Lambrechts, P

    2006-07-01

    To define the role of neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers in root canal disinfection along with a minimally invasive treatment concept. The hypothesis was tested ex vivo that Nd:YAG laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect on endodontic pathogens inoculated in root canals. Resultant colony-forming unit counts were associated with observations of bacterial cell structural changes using conventional scanning electron microscopy (CSEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) on inoculated dentine surfaces, following indirect and direct Nd:YAG laser irradiation, respectively. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation (1.5 W, 15 Hz, four times for 5 s) of Enterococcus faecalis inoculated canals resulted in a significant reduction (P laser energy applied. After 2 h of incubation and three cycles of indirect laser treatment (i.e. through a 1-mm-thick dentine disc), no morphologically intact bacteria of Actinomyces naeslundii or Streptococcus anginosus were discernible. However, when micro-colonies of S. anginosus and specially biofilms of E. faecalis were present after 2 days, the in situ experiment using ESEM and direct laser treatment showed that bacterial eradication was reduced in deep layers. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation is not an alternative but a possible supplement to existing protocols for canal disinfection as the properties of laser light may allow a bactericidal effect beyond 1 mm of dentine. Endodontic pathogens that grow as biofilms, however, are difficult to eradicate even upon direct laser exposure.

  14. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Burkitt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems.

  15. Endovascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo: venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after endovenous therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Oliver A.; Schmedt, Claus-Georg; Steckmeier, Bernd M.; Hunger, Kathrin; Reiser, Maximilian; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich; Hetterich, Holger; Rieber, Johannes; Sroka, Ronald; Babaryka, Gregor; Siebert, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Endovascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging modality providing histology-like information of the venous wall. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laser therapy (ELT) are accepted alternatives to surgery. This study evaluated OCT for qualitative assessment of venous wall anatomy and tissue alterations after RFA and ELT in bovine venous specimens. One hundred and thirty-four venous segments were obtained from ten ex-vivo bovine hind limbs. OCT signal characteristics for different wall layers were assessed in 180/216 (83%) quadrants from 54 normal venous cross-sections. Kappa statistics (κ) were used to calculate intra- and inter-observer agreement. Qualitative changes after RFA (VNUS-Closure) and ELT (diode laser 980 nm, energy densities 15 Joules (J)/cm, 25 J/cm, 35 J/cm) were described in 80 venous cross-sections. Normal veins were characterized by a three-layered appearance. After RFA, loss of three-layered appearance and wall thickening at OCT corresponded with circular destruction of tissue structures at histology. Wall defects after ELT ranged from non-transmural punctiform damage to complete perforation, depending on the energy density applied. Intra- and inter-observer agreement for reading OCT images was very high (0.90 and 0.88, respectively). OCT allows for reproducible evaluation of normal venous wall and alterations after endovenous therapy. OCT could prove to be valuable for optimizing endovenous therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  16. Critical role of acrolein in secondary injury following ex vivo spinal cord trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Durkes, Abigail; Ouyang, Hui; Uchida, Koji; Pond, Amber; Shi, Riyi

    2008-11-01

    The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the initial, primary injury followed by secondary injury processes in which oxidative stress is a critical component. Secondary injury processes not only exacerbate pathology at the site of primary injury, but also result in spreading of injuries to the adjacent, otherwise healthy tissue. The lipid peroxidation byproduct acrolein has been implicated as one potential mediator of secondary injury. To further and rigorously elucidate the role of acrolein in secondary injury, a unique ex vivo model is utilized to isolate the detrimental effects of mechanical injury from toxins such as acrolein that are produced endogenously following SCI. We demonstrate that (i) acrolein-Lys adducts are capable of diffusing from compressed tissue to adjacent, otherwise uninjured tissue; (ii) secondary injury by itself produces significant membrane damage and increased superoxide production; and (iii) these injuries are significantly attenuated by the acrolein scavenger hydralazine. Furthermore, hydralazine treatment results in significantly less membrane damage 2 h following compression injury, but not immediately after. These findings support our hypothesis that, following SCI, acrolein is increased to pathologic concentrations, contributes significantly to secondary injury, and thus represents a novel target for scavenging to promote improved recovery.

  17. An ex vivo spinal cord injury model to study ependymal cells in adult mouse tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; Codeluppi, Simone; Uhlén, Per

    2017-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an initial cell loss that is followed by a concerted cellular response in an attempt to restore the damaged tissue. Nevertheless, little is known about the signaling mechanisms governing the cellular response to injury. Here, we have established an adult ex vivo system that exhibits multiple hallmarks of spinal cord injury and allows the study of complex processes that are difficult to address using animal models. We have characterized the ependymal cell response to injury in this model system and found that ependymal cells can become activated, proliferate, migrate out of the central canal lining and differentiate in a manner resembling the in vivo situation. Moreover, we show that these cells respond to external adenosine triphosphate and exhibit spontaneous Ca 2+ activity, processes that may play a significant role in the regulation of their response to spinal cord injury. This model provides an attractive tool to deepen our understanding of the ependymal cell response after spinal cord injury, which may contribute to the development of new treatment options for spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Wnt3a nanodisks promote ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalefar, Nahal R.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Simonsen, Jens Bæk

    2016-01-01

    Background : Wnt proteins modulate development, stem cell fate and cancer through interactions with cell surface receptors. Wnts are cysteine-rich, glycosylated, lipid modified, two domain proteins that are prone to aggregation. The culprit responsible for this behavior is a covalently bound palm...... to Lin- Sca-1+ c-Kit+ cell expansion, an effect that was not mediated through β-catenin. Conclusions : The data indicate Wnt3a ND constitute a water-soluble transport vehicle capable of promoting ex vivo expansion of HSPC.......Background : Wnt proteins modulate development, stem cell fate and cancer through interactions with cell surface receptors. Wnts are cysteine-rich, glycosylated, lipid modified, two domain proteins that are prone to aggregation. The culprit responsible for this behavior is a covalently bound...... palmitoleoyl moiety in the N-terminal domain. Results : By combining murine Wnt3a with phospholipid and apolipoprotein A-I, ternary complexes termed nanodisks (ND) were generated. ND-associated Wnt3a is soluble in the absence of detergent micelles and gel filtration chromatography revealed that Wnt3a co...

  19. Virulence diversity among bacteremic Aeromonas isolates: ex vivo, animal, and clinical evidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to compare virulence among different Aeromonas species causing bloodstream infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine of four species of Aeromonas blood isolates, including A. dhakensis, A. hydrophila, A. veronii and A. caviae were randomly selected for analysis. The species was identified by the DNA sequence matching of rpoD. Clinically, the patients with A. dhakensis bacteremia had a higher sepsis-related mortality rate than those with other species (37.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.028. Virulence of different Aeromonas species were tested in C. elegans, mouse fibroblast C2C12 cell line and BALB/c mice models. C. elegans fed with A. dhakensis and A. caviae had the lowest and highest survival rates compared with other species, respectively (all P values <0.0001. A. dhakensis isolates also exhibited more cytotoxicity in C2C12 cell line (all P values <0.0001. Fourteen-day survival rate of mice intramuscularly inoculated with A. dhakensis was lower than that of other species (all P values <0.0001. Hemolytic activity and several virulence factor genes were rarely detected in the A. caviae isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinical data, ex vivo experiments, and animal studies suggest there is virulence variation among clinically important Aeromonas species.

  20. Regulation of ex vivo tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity is not altered by chronic lead (Pb) exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasley, S.M.; Green, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that chronic Pb exposure results in impaired regulation of CNS dopamine (DA) synthesis in rats. The present study was designed to directly assess TH activity in exposed animals compared to controls, employing a pharmacological model that assesses the functional status of dopaminergic synthesis-modulating autoreceptors. At birth dams received 0.2% Pb acetate in drinking water. Offspring were weaned to and maintained on the same solution until termination at 60 or 120 days. Rats were given saline or a DA agonist (EMD 23448 or CGS 15855A) 45 min before sacrifice followed 15 min later by gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Regional TH activity was measured by a modification of the tritium release method. DA content was determined by liquid chromatography. The ability of EMD 23448 to prevent the GBL-induced increase in DA content was significantly diminished in caudate-putamen (C-P) of exposed rats compared to controls, similar to previous observations. However, an analogous effect of Pb on TH activity in this drug model was not observed using CGS 15855A in rats either 60 or 120 days of age. These findings suggest that chronic Pb exposure has no effect on autoreceptor-mediated regulation of TH in DA neurons when TH activity is measured ex vivo

  1. New 'ex vivo' radioisotopic method of quantitation of platelet deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badimon, L.; Fuster, V.; Chesebro, J.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive and quantitative method of 'ex vivo' evaluation of platelet deposition on collagen strips, from rabbit Achilles tendon, superfused by flowing blood and applied it to four animal species, cat, rabbit, dog and pig. Autologous platelets were labeled with indium-111-tropolone, injected to the animal 24 hr before the superfusion and the number of deposited platelets was quantitated from the tendon gamma-radiation and the blood platelet count. We detected some platelet consumption with superfusion time when blood was reinfused entering the contralateral jugular vein after collagen contact but not if blood was discarded after the contact. Therefore, in order to have a more physiological animal model we decided to discard blood after superfusion of the tendon. In all species except for the cat there was a linear relationship between increase of platelet on the tendon and time of exposure to blood superfusion. The highest number of platelets deposited on the collagen was found in cats, the lowest in dogs. Ultrastructural analysis showed the platelets were deposited as aggregates after only 5 min of superfusion.

  2. Theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation of laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo porcine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Caponero, Michele Arturo; Di Matteo, Francesco Maria; Martino, Margareth; Pandolfi, Monica; Silvestri, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) has been recently applied to pancreas in animal models for ablation purpose. Assessment of thermal effects due to the laser-pancreatic tissue interaction is a critical factor in validating the procedure feasibility and safety. A mathematical model based on bioheat equation and its experimental assessment was developed. The LITT procedure was performed on 40 ex vivo porcine pancreases, with an Nd:YAG (1064 nm) energy of 1000 J and power from 1.5 up to 10 W conveyed by a quartz optical fiber with 300 μm diameter. Six fiber Bragg grating sensors have been utilized to measure temperature distribution as a function of time at fixed distances from the applicator tip within pancreas undergoing LITT. Simulations and experiments show temperature variations Δ T steeply decreasing with distance from the applicator at higher power values: at 6 W, ∆T > 40 °C at 5 mm and Δ T is approximately equal to 5 °C at 10 mm. Δ T nonlinearly increases with power close to the applicator. Ablated and coagulated tissue volumes have also been measured and experimental results agree with theoretical ones. Despite the absence of data in the current literature on pancreas optical parameters, the model allowed a quite good prediction of thermal effects. The prediction of LITT effects on pancreas is necessary to assess laser dosimetry.

  3. Protein adsorption on ex vivo catheters and polymers exposed to peritoneal dialysis effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Naoko; Li, Dai-Qing; Ljungh, Asa

    2004-01-01

    Deposition of proteins on surfaces of medical devices has been recognized to putatively relate to the process of regulation of biomaterial-associated complications by attachment of fibrin clots, eukaryotic cells, and microbes. The molecules adsorb to a varying extent, depending not only on the physicochemical properties of the biomaterial, but also on the composition of the host fluid. Adsorption of proteins on catheters exposed both ex vivo and in vitro to dialysate of patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) was studied. Peritoneal dialysis effluent was collected from 5 patients with end-stage renal disease on continuous ambulatory PD. Tenckhoff catheters were obtained from 16 patients. Deposition of proteins on excised Tenckhoff catheters and tubing of different materials exposed to PD effluent in vitro was studied using 125iodine-labeled antibodies. Adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains was quantified on tubing exposed to PD effluent in vitro. The presence of albumin, transferrin, immunoglobulin G, fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin, and thrombospondin was determined at various concentrations in PD effluent. All proteins analyzed were detected on PD catheters removed from patients. The extent of protein deposition on Tenckhoff catheters exposed to PD effluent, in vitro, rapidly reached a plateau and remained constant, as it did on polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene tubing. Adhesion of staphylococci was enhanced on Tenckhoff catheters exposed to PD effluent compared to unused PD solution. The data identify surface exposed proteins that may serve as adhesion sites for microbes on peritoneal catheters indwelled in patients undergoing PD.

  4. Assessing Wear of the Acetabular Cup Using Computed Tomography: an ex vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivecrona, L.; Jedenmalm, A.; Aspelin, P.; Weidenhielm, L.; Noz, M.E.; Maguire, G.Q.; Zeleznik, M.P.; Olivecrona, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a clinically useful method for measuring acetabular cup wear using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Eight uncemented acetabular cups were scanned twice ex vivo using CT. The linear penetration depth of the femoral component head into the cup and the thickness of the remaining polyethylene liner were measured in the CT volumes using dedicated software. Two independent examiners twice assessed each volume. The CT measurements were compared to direct measurements using a coordinate measuring device and micrometer measurements. Results: Accuracy of wear measurements expressed as penetration depth was ±0.6 and ±1.0 mm for the two examiners, respectively, with no significant differences between examiners, trials, and CT scans. Accuracy of measurements of remaining polyethylene was ±1.3 and ±1.0 mm, respectively, for the two examiners. Systematic differences between examiners were found, but no significant differences between trials and CT scans. These differences were due to different interpretations of metal artifacts in the volumes. Conclusion: The proposed CT method for evaluating wear as head penetration depth allows for reliable wear detection at a clinically relevant level. Measurements of remaining polyethylene on CT volumes are not as reliable as wear measurements owing to metal artifacts

  5. EX VIVO MODEL FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF DRYWALL INTRAOCULAR FOREIGN BODIES ON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Reema; Kim, Sung-Hye; Palacio, Agustina; Nunery, William R; Schaal, Shlomit

    2017-06-06

    The study was inspired after the authors encountered a patient with a penetrating globe injury due to drywall, who had retained intraocular drywall foreign body. Computed tomography (CT) was read as normal in this patient. Open globe injury with drywall has never been reported previously in the literature and there are no previous studies describing its radiographic features. The case report is described in detail elsewhere. This was an experimental study. An ex vivo model of 15 porcine eyes with 1 mm to 5 mm fragments of implanted drywall, 2 vitreous only samples with drywall and 3 control eyes were used. Eyes and vitreous samples were CT scanned on Days 0, 1, and 3 postimplantation. Computed ocular images were analyzed by masked observers. Size and radiodensity of intraocular drywall were measured using Hounsfield units (HUs) over time. Intraocular drywall was hyperdense on CT. All sizes studied were detectable on Day 0 of scanning. Mean intraocular drywall foreign body density was 171 ± 52 Hounsfield units (70-237) depending on fragment size. Intraocular drywall foreign body decreased in size whereas Hounsfield unit intensity increased over time. Drywall dissolves in the eye and becomes denser over time as air in the drywall is replaced by fluid. This study identified Hounsfield Units specific to intraocular drywall foreign body over time.

  6. Ex vivo irradiation of human blood to determine DNA damage using molecular techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Angel; Agapito, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is the assessment of absorbed dose in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation from blood samples based on the radiation induced damage in cellular DNA. The aim of this study was to determine the damage in the DNA through the assessment of an experimental ex vivo assay using irradiated samples of human blood cells. For this purpose, blood samples were irradiated at low doses (<100 mGy) considering the following parameters: blood volume (3mL), temperature (37 °C) and incubation time (0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h). Dose values were: 0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mGy using Cesium -137 gamma rays at 662 keV and a dose rate of 38.46 mGy/h. The qualitative damage in the genomic DNA was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the p53 gene in a sequence of 133 pb of exon 7, related to the protein that acts in the cell repair process. The results of the qualitative analysis showed no degradation of genomic DNA; also an increase in the DNA concentration was observed up to the fourth hour of incubation, finding maximum values for all doses in the two samples. As a conclusion, the effects of ionizing radiation at doses used in this experiment do not generate a detectable damage, by means of molecular techniques such as those used in the present study. (authors).

  7. Telomere Attrition Occurs during Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mokry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a detailed characteristic of stem cells isolated and expanded from the human dental pulp. Dental pulp stem cells express mesenchymal cell markers STRO-1, vimentin, CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166, and stem cell markers Sox2, nestin, and nucleostemin. They are multipotent as shown by their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential. We measured relative telomere length in 11 dental pulp stem cell lines at different passages by quantitative real-time PCR. Despite their large proliferative capacity, stable viability, phenotype, and genotype over prolonged cultivation, human dental pulp stem cells suffer from progressive telomere shortening over time they replicate in vitro. Relative telomere length (T/S was inversely correlated with cumulative doubling time. Our findings indicate that excessive ex vivo expansion of adult stem cells should be reduced at minimum to avoid detrimental effects on telomere maintenance and measurement of telomere length should become a standard when certificating the status and replicative age of stem cells prior therapeutic applications.

  8. Effect of temperature on the optical properties of ex vivo human dermis and subdermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laufer, Jan; Simpson, Rebecca; Kohl, Matthias; Cope, Mark; Essenpreis, M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the optical properties of human dermis and subdermis as a function of near-infrared wavelength has been studied between 25 deg. C and 40 deg. C. Measurements were performed ex vivo on a total of nine skin samples taken from the abdomen of three individuals. The results show a reproducible effect of temperature on the transport scattering coefficient of dermis and subdermis. The relative change of the transport scattering coefficient showed an increase for dermis ((4.7±0.5)x10 -3 deg. C -1 ) and a decrease for subdermis ((-1.4±0.28)x10 -3 deg. C -1 ). Note that the magnitude of the temperature coefficient of scattering was greater for dermis than subdermis. A reproducible effect of temperature on the absorption coefficient could not be found within experimental errors. System reproducibility in transport scattering coefficient with repeated removal and repositioning of the same tissue sample at the same temperature was excellent at ±0.35% for all measurements. This reproducibility enabled such small changes in scattering coefficient to be detected. (author)

  9. Amniotic fluid for ex vivo skin preservation: a comparative study of tissue preservation solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseman, Jason; Rinker, Alexander B; Rinker, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Ex vivo skin preservation is important for skin banks, burn centers, and in research; however, the optimal preservation solution is not known. Human amniotic fluid (HAF), in addition to its role in fetal wound healing, has promise as an effective and readily available preservation solution. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of several solutions, including HAF, in full-thickness skin preservation. Human amniotic fluid was obtained from patients undergoing amniocentesis. Full-thickness skin obtained during abdominoplasty was divided into 1-cm(2) samples. These specimens were preserved in either saline, HAF from a single patient, pooled HAF, University of Wisconsin solution, or custodial histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution at 4°C. There were 5 samples in each group. Specimens were examined for keratinocyte survival at 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days using the trypan blue assay. The first 200 cells identified were counted to calculate the degree of cell death. Comparisons were made between the groups, and a multivariable repeated-measures analysis was performed to determine statistical significance, which was defined as P skin banks, burn centers, and research.

  10. Assessing ocular irritation potential using a modified ex vivo rabbit eye test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, James V; Lam, Larry; Wahlert, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the ocular irritancy potential of an unknown environmental contaminant, para-toluene sulfonic acid (pTSA), compared with that of known irritants, 5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 10% acetic acid (AA), using a simplified, ex vivo rabbit eye test modified to measure cytotoxicity as a mechanistic correlate to the Draize rabbit eye test. Rabbit eyes were obtained fresh within 24 hours from an abattoir and then exposed to 50 microL of test material. Eyes were then incubated intact for 3 hours or 1 day, and the corneas were removed, stained with calcein acetoxymethylester (AM)/ethidium homodimer (live/dead assay, Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA, USA), and evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The number of dead cells was then quantified and the difference was statistically compared. For corneas exposed to 1 ppm and 1% pTSA, there was no significant difference in the number of dead cells compared with water-exposed, control corneas at either 3 hours or 1 day after exposure. However, corneas exposed to 10% and 50% pTSA showed significantly increased (p eye test using the live/dead assay may be a useful model for developing ocular irritation assays.

  11. Transcostal high-intensity-focused ultrasound: ex vivo adaptive focusing feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, J-F; Pernot, M; Marquet, F; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, CNRS UMR 7587, Universite Paris VII, Inserm, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: jean-francois.aubry@espci.fr

    2008-06-07

    Ex vivo experiments have been conducted through excised pork rib with bone, cartilage, muscle and skin. The aberrating effect of the ribcage has been experimentally evaluated. Adaptive ultrasonic focusing through ribs has been studied at low power. Without any correction, the pressure fields in the focal plane were both affected by inhomogeneous attenuation and phase distortion and three main effects were observed: a mean 2 mm shift of the main lobe, a mean 1.25 mm spreading of the half width of the main lobe and up to 20 dB increase of the secondary lobe level. Thanks to time-reversal focusing, a 5 dB decrease in the secondary lobes was obtained and the ratio between the energy deposited at the target location and the total amount of energy emitted by the therapeutic array was six times higher than that without correction. Time-reversal minimizes the heating of the ribs by automatically sonicating between the ribs, as demonstrated by temperature measurements using thermocouples placed at different locations on the ribcage. It is also discussed how this aberration correction process could be achieved non-invasively for clinical application.

  12. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9-1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

  13. Cholesterol-lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum in vitro, ex vivo, and in hamsters and minipigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajjaj H

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There has been renewed interest in mushroom medicinal properties. We studied cholesterol lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum (Gl, a renowned medicinal species. Results Organic fractions containing oxygenated lanosterol derivatives inhibited cholesterol synthesis in T9A4 hepatocytes. In hamsters, 5% Gl did not effect LDL; but decreased total cholesterol (TC 9.8%, and HDL 11.2%. Gl (2.5 and 5% had effects on several fecal neutral sterols and bile acids. Both Gl doses reduced hepatic microsomal ex-vivo HMG-CoA reductase activity. In minipigs, 2.5 Gl decreased TC, LDL- and HDL cholesterol 20, 27, and 18%, respectively (P Conclusions Overall, Gl has potential to reduce LDL cholesterol in vivo through various mechanisms. Next steps are to: fully characterize bioactive components in lipid soluble/insoluble fractions; evaluate bioactivity of isolated fractions; and examine human cholesterol lowering properties. Innovative new cholesterol-lowering foods and medicines containing Gl are envisioned.

  14. Myogel supports the ex-vivo amplification of corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, D; Abberton, K; Thompson, E; Daniell, M

    2009-03-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency leads to conjunctivalisation of the cornea and subsequent loss of vision. The recent development of transplantation of ex-vivo amplified corneal epithelium, derived from limbal stem cells, has shown promise in treating this challenging condition. The purpose of this research was to compare a variety of cell sheet carriers for their suitability in creating a confluent corneal epithelium from amplified limbal stem cells. Cadaveric donor limbal cells were cultured using an explant technique, free of 3T3 feeder cells, on a variety of cell sheet carriers, including denuded amniotic membrane, Matrigel, Myogel and stromal extract. Comparisons in rate of growth and degree of differentiation were made, using immunocytochemistry (CK3, CK19 and ABCG2). The most rapid growth was observed on Myogel and denuded amniotic membrane, these two cell carriers also provided the most reliable substrata for achieving confluence. The putative limbal stem cell marker, ABCG2, stained positively on cells grown over Myogel and Matrigel but not for those propagated on denuded amniotic membrane. In the clinical setting amniotic membrane has been demonstrated to provide a suitable carrier for limbal stem cells and the resultant epithelium has been shown to be successful in treating limbal stem cell deficiency. Myogel may provide an alternative cell carrier with a further reduction in risk as it is has the potential to be derived from an autologous muscle biopsy in the clinical setting.

  15. Intrapulpal thermal changes during direct provisionalization using various autopolymerizing resins: Ex-vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ronauk; Tripathi, Arvind; Dhiman, R.K.; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Resin materials used in the fabrication of direct provisional restoration exhibit an exothermic reaction and the extent of damage may also depend on the remaining dentine thickness. An ex-vivo study was envisaged to compare the time related temperature changes in the pulp chamber during the fabrication of fixed partial denture provisional restorations using direct technique. The effect of differently prepared teeth (with varying remaining dentine thickness) on the above mentioned temperature changes were also evaluated. Methods Thermal changes were calculated in pulp chamber of three differently prepared tooth having different amount of remaining dentinal thickness (45 samples) and control with no tooth media (15 samples), using three different types of autopolymerizing provisional restorative materials using Cr/Al thermocouple connected to digital thermometer. Results The data for the mean peak temperature rise was subjected to one way ANOVA analysis for relative comparison among subgroups within each main group and across the main groups. The results showed a statistically significant difference across both the subgroups and the main groups (p provisional restorative resin when employing direct technique of fabricating provisional restorations for a specific tooth preparation which would cause minimal thermal trauma to pulpal tissue. PMID:26843745

  16. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(ΔT ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT , ΔL, RT ,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  17. Mechanical removal of dendritic cell-generating non-classical monocytes via ex vivo lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John P; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Sjöberg, Trygve; Steen, Stig; Yonan, Nizar; Fildes, James E

    2014-08-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel procedure designed to rapidly assess and recondition unusable donor lungs for transplantation (LTx). EVLP may reduce graft immunogenicity and allorecognition via removal of passenger leukocytes. We aimed to explore this hypothesis using human EVLP and in vitro analysis. Explanted human lungs (n = 7) underwent standard EVLP. Perfusate samples and the leukocyte filter were collected, and cells characterized via flow cytometry. Isolated alveolar monocytes (from post-LTx bronchoalveolar lavage) were differentiated to dendritic cells and characterized (n = 10). An in vitro (air epithelial-liquid endothelial) lung model was utilized to evaluate monocyte migration and differentiation within the lung. Non-classical monocytes (NCM, normally <1% of total white blood cell repertoire) mobilized within 30 minutes of EVLP and represented 80.04% of the passenger leukocyte population. This subset readily differentiated to dendritic cells and secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-2) after stimulation. NCM rapidly diapedesed from the vascular bed to the alveolus and, when cultured on the alveolus, differentiated to dendritic cells with inflammatory phenotypes. The lung possesses a reservoir of NCM, which can readily diapedese to the alveolus or mobilize in the circulation. After activation, NCM differentiate to inflammatory dendritic cells with T-cell co-stimulatory capacity. EVLP may impart additional benefits after LTx via the removal of passenger monocytes, which may represent a previously unidentified beneficial mechanism of action. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Image-guided ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Karunakaran, Chandra P.; Besse, John A.; Heinlein, Grace E.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2007-02-01

    Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.

  19. Repopulating Decellularized Kidney Scaffolds: An Avenue for Ex Vivo Organ Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. McKee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that fully developed organs can be decellularized, resulting in a complex scaffold and extracellular matrix (ECM network capable of being populated with other cells. This work has resulted in a growing field in bioengineering focused on the isolation, characterization, and modification of organ derived acellular scaffolds and their potential to sustain and interact with new cell populations, a process termed reseeding. In this review, we cover contemporary advancements in the bioengineering of kidney scaffolds including novel work showing that reseeded donor scaffolds can be transplanted and can function in recipients using animal models. Several major areas of the field are taken into consideration, including the decellularization process, characterization of acellular and reseeded scaffolds, culture conditions, and cell sources. Finally, we discuss future avenues based on the advent of 3D bioprinting and recent developments in kidney organoid cultures as well as animal models of renal genesis. The ongoing mergers and collaborations between these fields hold the potential to produce functional kidneys that can be generated ex vivo and utilized for kidney transplantations in patients suffering with renal disease.

  20. Ex vivo imaging of early dental caries within the interproximal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark D.; Dufour, Marc L.; Fulton, Crystal; Qiu, Pingli; Gauthier, Bruno; Padioleau, Christian; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Dong, Cecilia; Cleghorn, Blaine M.; Lamouche, Guy; Sowa, Michael G.

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is emerging as a technology that can potentially be used for the detection and monitoring of early dental enamel caries since it can provide high-resolution depth imaging of early lesions. To date, most caries detection optical technologies are well suited for examining caries at facial, lingual, incisal and occlusal surfaces. The approximal surfaces between adjacent teeth are difficult to examine due to lack of visual access and limited space for these new caries detection tools. Using a catheter-style probe developed at the NRC-Industrial Materials Institute, the probe was inserted into the interproximal space to examine the approximal surfaces with OCT imaging at 1310 nm. The probe was rotated continuously and translated axially to generate depth images in a spiral fashion. The probe was used in a mock tooth arch model consisting of extracted human teeth mounted with dental rope wax in their anatomically correct positions. With this ex vivo model, the probe provided images of the approximal surfaces revealing morphological structural details, regions of calculus, and especially regions of early dental caries (white spot lesions). Results were compared with those obtained from OCT imaging of individual samples where the approximal surfaces of extracted teeth are accessible on a lab-bench. Issues regarding access, regions of interest, and factors to be considered in an in vivo setting will be discussed. Future studies are aimed at using the probe in vivo with patient volunteers.

  1. Cryopreservation of human limbal stem cells ex vivo expanded on amniotic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Jung; Yao, Chao-Ling; Chen, Hsin-I; Cheng, Huey-Chuan; Hwang, Shiaw-Min

    2008-04-01

    After cornea transplantation, the donor's limbal zone is currently discarded as medical waste. However, the limbal zone is rich in limbal stem cells and can be used in therapeutic applications of limbus loss. This study aimed to increase the availability of limbal stem cells and develop the optimal conditions of cryopreservation for ex vivo expanded limbal stem cells. Pieces of the limbus were cultured on amniotic membrane (AM) to outgrow limbal stem cells as cell sheets for 3 weeks. Different formulas of cryoprotectants were tested to preserve the expanded cell sheets in liquid nitrogen. Before and after cryopreservation, expanded cell sheets were assessed for cellular characteristics by viability, histologic examination, and expression of ABCG2, vimentin, and keratin 3. Expanded cell sheets usually exhibited 3-6 stratified layers after 3-week culture on AM and expressed specific markers of ABCG2 and vimentin for limbal stem cells. The effects of cryopreservation with different cryoprotectants were analyzed by histopathology, stem cell markers, and cell viability. The results showed that the optimal formula of cryoprotectants for expanded limbal cell sheets was 60% Dulbecco modified Eagle medium, 30% fetal bovine serum, and 10% dimethyl sulfoxide. After 8-week cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, the characteristics of limbal stem cells were maintained, and the average viability of thawed cells was 53.8% +/- 5.8%. These results showed that limbal stem cells expanded on AM could be cryopreserved and provide a promising source without delay, if banking, for patients with limbal stem cell deficiency in the future.

  2. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function.

  3. Assessment of the diagnostic performance and interobserver variability of endocytoscopy in Barrett’s esophagus: A pilot ex-vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Yutaka; Iyer, Prasad G; Wongkeesong, Louis M; Buttar, Navtej S; Lutzke, Lori S; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Wang, Kenneth K

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a classification of endocytoscopy (ECS) images in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and evaluate its diagnostic performance and interobserver variability. METHODS: ECS was applied to surveillance endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) specimens of BE ex-vivo. The mucosal surface of specimen was stained with 1% methylene blue and surveyed with a catheter-type endocytoscope. We selected still images that were most representative of the endoscopically suspect lesion and matched with the final histopathological diagnosis to accomplish accurate correlation. The diagnostic performance and inter-observer variability of the new classification scheme were assessed in a blinded fashion by physicians with expertise in both BE and ECS and inexperienced physicians with no prior exposure to ECS. RESULTS: Three staff physicians and 22 gastroenterology fellows classified eight randomly assigned unknown still ECS pictures (two images per each classification) into one of four histopathologic categories as follows: (1) BEC1-squamous epithelium; (2) BEC2-BE without dysplasia; (3) BEC3-BE with dysplasia; and (4) BEC4-esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in BE. Accuracy of diagnosis in staff physicians and clinical fellows were, respectively, 100% and 99.4% for BEC1, 95.8% and 83.0% for BEC2, 91.7% and 83.0% for BEC3, and 95.8% and 98.3% for BEC4. Interobserver agreement of the faculty physicians and fellows in classifying each category were 0.932 and 0.897, respectively. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to investigate classification system of ECS in BE. This ex-vivo pilot study demonstrated acceptable diagnostic accuracy and excellent interobserver agreement. PMID:24379583

  4. A novel system for the treatment of aortic annular dilation: an ex vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallav; Romagnoni, Claudia; Jaworek, Michal; Lucherini, Federico; Contino, Monica; Menkis, Alan; Gelpi, Guido; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Antona, Carlo; Vismara, Riccardo

    2017-12-01

    The main reason for aortic repair failures is recurrent annular dilatation. The fibrous portion of left ventricular outflow tract dilates. A novel device was designed to tackle this problem. The device consists of an internal ring applied at the aortic annulus plus an external flexible band at the level of the aortic root. The internal ring has a semi-rigid portion (40%, placed at ventriculo-arterial junction) and a flexible portion to allow it to conform along the curves of the non-coronary/right coronary leaflet and right coronary/left coronary leaflet commissures. The external band acts as a reinforcement to the internal ring. A pulsatile mock loop capable of housing porcine aortic valve was used. Working conditions were 60 bpm of heart rate, 75 of stroke volumes and 120-80 mmHg of simulated pressure. Mean gradient, effective orifice area, annular diameter, coaptation height and length were recorded on 11 aortic root units (ARUs). High-speed video and standard echocardiographic images were also recorded. All data were acquired in the following conditions: (i) basal (untreated ARU); (ii) pathological condition (left coronary/non-coronary triangle was dilated by suturing an aortic patch); and (iii) ARU treated with the device. Gradients and effective orifice area were respectively 0.9 ± 0.64 mmHg and 3.1 ± 0.7cm2 (pathological) and 3.7 ± 1.1 mmHg and 1.5 ± 0.2cm2 (treated, P < 0.05). Left coronary/non-coronary diameter decreased from 2.4 ± 0.2 cm (pathological) to 2.0 ± 0.2 (treated, P < 0.05). Coaptation length and height were fully restored to basal values following treatment. Visual inspection showed proper dynamics of the leaflet, confirmed by high-speed video and echocardiography. The device allowed for restoring physiologic-like coaptation in the experimental model, without inducing clinically relevant worsening of the haemodynamics of the treated ARU. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Defensin protein from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam 'Tainong 57') storage roots exhibits antioxidant activities in vitro and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chen, Hsien-Jung; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Liao, Jung-Chun; Hou, Wen-Chi; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant activities of sweet potato defensin (SPD1) in vitro and ex vivo. Antioxidant status [2,2'-azinobis[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay], scavenging activity against DPPH (1,1-dipheny-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical method, reducing power method, Fe(2+)-chelating ability, FTC (ferric thiocyanate) method, and protection of calf thymus DNA against hydroxyl radical-induced damage were studied in vitro. The ex vivo experiments revealed that SPD1 could decrease the production of intracellular peroxide in HepG2 cells. Four peptides, namely GFR, GPCSR, CFCTKPC and MCESASSK for testing antioxidative activity, were synthesized according to tryptic hydrolysis simulation. In the TEAC assay CFCTKPC performed the best (13.5±0.3μmol TE/g dw), even better than reduced glutathione (7.3±0.2μmol TE/g dw). In the DPPH radical assay (%), [IC(50) (μM) (the concentration required for scavenging 50% activity)] CFCTKPC again had the highest antioxidant activity (IC(50) is 11.3±3.2μM) even better than reduced glutathione (IC(50) is 74.3±2.4μM). In the lipid peroxidation assay, once again CFCTKPC performed the best, with an IC(50) value of 0.5±0.0μM better than reduced glutathione (1.2±0.1μM). These findings mean that cysteine residue is most important in antioxidant activities. It was suggested that SPD1 might contribute its antioxidant activities against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Corneal Cross-Linking for Treatment of Fungal Keratitis: Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy on an Ex Vivo Human Corneal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Jawaher M; Caballero-Lima, David; Hillarby, M Chantal; Shawcross, Susan G; Brahma, Arun; Carley, Fiona; Read, Nick D; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2016-11-01

    Some previous reports have established the use of photoactivated chromophore-induced corneal cross-linking (PACK-CXL) in treating fungal keratitis. The results of these case reports have often been conflicting. To systematically study the effect of PACK-CXL in the management of Fusarium keratitis, we have developed an ex vivo model of human corneal infection using eye-banked human corneas. Sixteen healthy ex vivo human corneas were divided into four study groups: (1) untreated control, (2) cross-linked, (3) infected with fungal spores, and (4) infected with fungal spores and then cross-linked. All infected corneas were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum spores. The PACK-CXL procedure was performed 24 hours post inoculation for group 4. For PACK-CXL treatment, the corneas were debrided of epithelium; then 1% (wt/vol) isotonic riboflavin was applied dropwise at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes and during the course of UV-A cross-linking for another 30 minutes. The corneas were imaged using a confocal microscope at 48 hours post inoculation, and the Fusarium hyphal volume and spore concentration were calculated. The infected and then cross-linked group had a significantly lower volume of Fusarium hyphae, compared to the infected (P = 0.001) group. In the infected and then cross-linked group there was significant inhibition of Fusarium sporulation compared with the infected (P = 0.007) group. A model of human corneal infection was successfully developed for investigation of the effects of PACK-CXL on fungal keratitis. A treatment regimen of combined UV-A/riboflavin-induced corneal cross-linking appears to be a valuable approach to inhibit the growth and sporulation of Fusarium and suppress the progression of fungal keratitis.

  7. PLGA/DPPC/trimethylchitosan spray-dried microparticles for the nasal delivery of ropinirole hydrochloride: in vitro, ex vivo and cytocompatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavasili, Christina [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Bouropoulos, Nikolaos [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature, P.O. Box 1414, 26504 Patras (Greece); Sygellou, Lamprini [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature, P.O. Box 1414, 26504 Patras (Greece); Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S. [Laboratory of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Fatouros, Dimitrios G., E-mail: dfatouro@pharm.auth.gr [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece)

    2016-02-01

    In the present study we investigated polymer-lipid microparticles loaded with ropinirole hydrochloride (RH) for nasal delivery. RH microparticles were further evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ζ-potential measurements, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). In vitro release studies were performed in simulated nasal electrolyte solution (SNES) pH 5.5 at 35 °C. Ex vivo permeation studies were conducted across sheep nasal mucosa. Cytocompatibility was tested in cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3). SEM studies revealed spheroid microparticles in the range of 2.09 μm to 2.41 μm. The presence of trimethylchitosan (TMC) induced a slight shift towards less negative ζ-potential values. Surface chemistry (XPS) revealed the presence of dipalmitoylphospatidylcholine (DPPC) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) onto microparticles' surface, further corroborating the FT-IR and XRD findings. In vitro release studies showed that the microparticle composition can partly modulate the release of RH. Ex vivo studies demonstrated a 2.35-folded enhancement of RH permeation when RH was co-formulated with TMC of low molecular weight, compared to the control. All formulations tested were found to be non-toxic to cells. The results suggest that polymer-lipid microparticles may be a promising carrier for the nasal delivery of RH. - Highlights: • Development of microparticles comprising PLGA/DPPC/TMC for nasal drug delivery. • Physicochemical characterization showed that DPPC dominated microparticles' surface. • Microparticles enhanced permeation of ropinirole across sheep nasal epithelium. • The cytotoxicity assay with Calu-3 cells demonstrated satisfactory cell viability.

  8. Differential gene expression in chicken primary B cells infected ex vivo with attenuated and very virulent strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulwich, Katherine L; Giotis, Efstathios S; Gray, Alice; Nair, Venugopal; Skinner, Michael A; Broadbent, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae and is economically important to the poultry industry worldwide. IBDV infects B cells in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), causing immunosuppression and morbidity in young chickens. In addition to strains that cause classical Gumboro disease, the so-called 'very virulent' (vv) strain, also in circulation, causes more severe disease and increased mortality. IBDV has traditionally been controlled through the use of live attenuated vaccines, with attenuation resulting from serial passage in non-lymphoid cells. However, the factors that contribute to the vv or attenuated phenotypes are poorly understood. In order to address this, we aimed to investigate host cell-IBDV interactions using a recently described chicken primary B-cell model, where chicken B cells are harvested from the BF and cultured ex vivo in the presence of chicken CD40L. We demonstrated that these cells could support the replication of IBDV when infected ex vivo in the laboratory. Furthermore, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of B cells infected with an attenuated strain (D78) and a very virulent strain (UK661) by microarray. We found that key genes involved in B-cell activation and signalling (TNFSF13B, CD72 and GRAP) were down-regulated following infection relative to mock, which we speculate could contribute to IBDV-mediated immunosuppression. Moreover, cells responded to infection by expressing antiviral type I IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes, but the induction was far less pronounced upon infection with UK661, which we speculate could contribute to its virulence.

  9. Radiosynthesis and ex vivo evaluation of (R)-(-)-2-chloro-N-[1-11C-propyl]n-propylnorapomorphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; McCormick, Patrick; Gillings, Nic

    2010-01-01

    provide PET brain images with limited contrast or have affinity for both D(2) and D(3) receptors. We here present the carbon-11 radiolabeling and ex vivo evaluation of 2-Cl-(-)-NPA, a novel PET-tracer candidate with high in vitro D(2)/D(3) selectivity. METHODS: 2-Cl-[(11)C]-(-)-NPA and [(11)C...... compound in the plasma after 30 min. The specific binding of 2-Cl-[(11)C]-(-)-NPA was completely blocked and inhibition of P-glycoprotein did not alter the brain uptake. CONCLUSION: Ex vivo experiments showed, despite a favorable D(2)/D(3) selectivity, that 2-Cl-[(11)C]-(-)-NPA is inferior to [(11)C...

  10. Ex-vivo and live animal models are equally effective training for the management of a penetrating cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Hishikawa, Shuji; Muronoi, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Keisuke; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Suzukawa, Masayuki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai

    2016-01-01

    Live tissue models are considered the most useful simulation for training in the management for hemostasis of penetrating injuries. However, these models are expensive, with limited opportunities for repetitive training. Ex-vivo models using tissue and a fluid pump are less expensive, allow repetitive training and respect ethical principles in animal research. The purpose of this study is to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of ex-vivo training with a pump, compared to live animal model training. Staff surgeons and residents were divided into live tissue training and ex-vivo training groups. Training in the management of a penetrating cardiac injury was conducted for each group, separately. One week later, all participants were formally evaluated in the management of a penetrating cardiac injury in a live animal. There are no differences between the two groups regarding average years of experience or previous trauma surgery experience. All participants achieved hemostasis, with no difference between the two groups in the Global Rating Scale score (ex-vivo: 25.2 ± 6.3, live: 24.7 ± 6.3, p = 0.646), blood loss (1.6 ± 0.7, 2.0 ± 0.6, p = 0.051), checklist score (3.7 ± 0.6, 3.6 ± 0.9, p = 0.189), or time required for repair (101 s ± 31, 107 s ± 15, p = 0.163), except overall evaluation (3.8 ± 0.9, 3.4 ± 0.9, p = 0.037). The internal consistency reliability and inter-rater reliability in the Global Rating Scale were excellent (0.966 and 0.953 / 0.719 and 0.784, respectively), and for the checklist were moderate (0.570 and 0.636 / 0.651 and 0.607, respectively). The validity is rated good for both the Global Rating Scale (Residents: 21.7 ± 5.6, Staff: 28.9 ± 4.7, p = 0.000) and checklist (Residents: 3.4 ± 0.9, Staff Surgeons: 3.9 ± 0.3, p = 0.003). The results of self-assessment questionnaires were similarly high (4.2-4.9) with scores in self-efficacy increased after

  11. Correction of the disease phenotype in canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency using ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Hai, Mehreen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Gu, Yu-chen; Sokolic, Robert A.; Ferguson, Cole; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2006-01-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) represents the canine counter-part of the human disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Defects in the leukocyte integrin CD18 adhesion molecule in both CLAD and LAD lead to recurrent, life-threatening bacterial infections. We evaluated ex vivo retroviral-mediated gene therapy in CLAD using 2 nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens—200 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) or 10 mg/kg busulfan—with or without posttransplantation immunosuppression. In...

  12. Evaluation of ex-vivo 9.4T MRI in post-surgical specimens from temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Benjamin Y M; Salehi, Fateme; Kope, Ryan; Lee, Donald H; Sharma, Manas; Hammond, Robert; Burneo, Jorge G; Steven, David; Peters, Terry; Khan, Ali R

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates hippocampal pathology through usage of ultra-high field 9.4T ex-vivo imaging of resected surgical specimens in patients who have undergone temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This is a retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data. MRI scanning of resected surgical specimens from patients who have undergone temporal lobe epilepsy surgery was performed on a 9.4T small bore Varian MR magnet. Structural images employed a balanced steady-state free precession sequence (TrueFISP). Six patients (3 females; 3 males) were included in this study with an average age at surgery of 40.7 years (range 20Y_"60) (one was used as a control reference). Two neuroradiologists qualitatively reviewed the ex-vivo MRIs of resected specimens while blinded to the histopathology reports for the ability to identify abnormal features in hippocampal subfield structures. The hippocampal subfields were reliably identified on the 9.4T ex-vivo scans in the hippocampal head region and hippocampal body region by both neuroradiologists in all 6 patients. There was high concordance to pathology for abnormalities detected in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and CA4 subfields. Detection of abnormalities in the dentate gyrus was also high with detection in 4 of 5 cases. The Cohen's kappa between the two neuroradiologists was calculated at 0.734 SE=0.102. Ex-vivo 9.4T specimen imaging can detect abnormalities in CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4 and DG in both the hippocampal head and body. There was good concordance between qualitative findings and histopathological abnormalities for CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4 and DG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Ex Vivo Dual Perfusion of the Human Placenta: Disease Simulation, Therapeutic Pharmacokinetics and Analysis of Off-Target Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Sebire, Neil; McGillick, Erin V; Ellery, Stacey; Murthi, Padma

    2018-01-01

    In recent years ex vivo dual perfusion of the human placental lobule is seeing an international renaissance in its application to understanding fetal health and development. Here, we discuss the methods and uses of this technique in the evaluation of (1) vascular function, (2) transplacental clearance, (3) hemodynamic and oxygenation changes associated with pregnancy complications on placental structure and function, and (4) placental toxicology and post-perfusion evaluation of tissue architecture.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) rind extracts applied topically to ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, David M J; Bugert, Joachim; Denyer, Stephen P; Heard, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    Coadministered pomegranate rind extract (PRE) and zinc (II) produces a potent virucidal activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV); however, HSV infections are also associated with localised inflammation and pain. Here, the objective was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity and relative depth penetration of PRE, total pomegranate tannins (TPT) and zinc (II) in skin, ex vivo. PRE, TPT and ZnSO 4 were dosed onto freshly excised ex vivo porcine skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells and analysed for COX-2, as a marker for modulation of the arachidonic acid inflammation pathway, by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Tape stripping was carried out to construct relative depth profiles. Topical application of PRE to ex vivo skin downregulated expression of COX-2, which was significant after just 6h, and maintained for up to 24h. This was achieved with intact stratum corneum, proving that punicalagin penetrated skin, further supported by the depth profiling data. When PRE and ZnSO 4 were applied together, statistically equal downregulation of COX-2 was observed when compared to the application of PRE alone; no effect followed the application of ZnSO 4 alone. TPT downregulated COX-2 less than PRE, indicating that tannins alone may not be entirely responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PRE. Punicalagin was found throughout the skin, in particular the lower regions, indicating appendageal delivery as a significant route to the viable epidermis. Topical application of TPT and PRE had significant anti-inflammatory effects in ex vivo skin, confirming that PRE penetrates the skin and modulates COX-2 regulation in the viable epidermis. Pomegranates have potential as a novel approach in ameliorating the inflammation and pain associated with a range of skin conditions, including cold sores and herpetic stromal keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Protandim attenuates intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins cultured ex vivo via a catalase-dependent pathway.

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    Joddar, Binata; Reen, Rashmeet K; Firstenberg, Michael S; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; McCord, Joe M; Zweier, Jay L; Gooch, Keith J

    2011-03-15

    Human saphenous veins (HSVs) are widely used for bypass grafts despite their relatively low long-term patency. To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling in intima hyperplasia (IH), an early stage pathology of vein-graft disease, and to explore the potential therapeutic effects of up-regulating endogenous antioxidant enzymes, we studied segments of HSV cultured ex vivo in an established ex vivo model of HSV IH. Results showed that HSV cultured ex vivo exhibit an ~3-fold increase in proliferation and ~3.6-fold increase in intimal area relative to freshly isolated HSV. Treatment of HSV during culture with Protandim, a nutritional supplement known to activate Nrf2 and increase the expression of antioxidant enzymes in several in vitro and in vivo models, blocks IH and reduces cellular proliferation to that of freshly isolated HSV. Protandim treatment increased the activity of SOD, HO-1, and catalase 3-, 7-, and 12-fold, respectively, and decreased the levels of superoxide (O(2)(•-)) and the lipid peroxidation product 4-HNE. Blocking catalase activity by cotreating with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole abrogated the protective effect of Protandim on IH and proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggest that ROS-sensitive signaling mediates the observed IH in cultured HSV and that up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes can have a protective effect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In Vivo Tracking of Murine Adipose Tissue-Derived Multipotent Adult Stem Cells and Ex Vivo Cross-Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Garrovo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types, while stem cell therapy is believed to treat a number of different human diseases through either cell regeneration or paracrine effects. Herein, an in vivo and ex vivo near infrared time domain (NIR TD optical imaging study was undertaken to evaluate the migratory ability of murine adipose tissue-derived multipotent adult stem cells [mAT-MASC] after intramuscular injection in mice. In vivo NIR TD optical imaging data analysis showed a migration of DiD-labelled mAT-MASC in the leg opposite the injection site, which was confirmed by a fibered confocal microendoscopy system. Ex vivo NIR TD optical imaging results showed a systemic distribution of labelled cells. Considering a potential microenvironmental contamination, a cross-validation study by multimodality approaches was followed: mAT-MASC were isolated from male mice expressing constitutively eGFP, which was detectable using techniques of immunofluorescence and qPCR. Y-chromosome positive cells, injected into wild-type female recipients, were detected by FISH. Cross-validation confirmed the data obtained by in vivo/ex vivo TD optical imaging analysis. In summary, our data demonstrates the usefulness of NIR TD optical imaging in tracking delivered cells, giving insights into the migratory properties of the injected cells.

  17. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hernández-Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA—assessed implant stability (ISQ values with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP (n=7 or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA (n=10. Sixty 4.5×13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA (P0.5 in all cases, and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P>0.08. Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA. This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  19. An ex vivo model in human femoral heads for histopathological study and resonance frequency analysis of dental implant primary stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Monje, Alberto; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Mesa, Francisco; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David; O'Valle, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)-assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  20. Numerical and ex vivo studies of a bioprobe developed for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in contact with liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, T; Carpentier, O; Genestie, B; Hornez, J-C; Monchau, F

    2016-08-01

    This work is based on the production of a bioprobe that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in liver cancer laser therapy. This probe is made of an alumina tube (3-mm diameter) in which an optical fibre is centred and fixed. A shooting window (20mm) is created using a mechanical rectifier. The device is then consolidated by the injection of a transparent and heat-resistant resin. Through numerical modelling, the thermal power damping of the laser source is evaluated as well as the propagation of the heat in the ex vivo liver tissue according to different heating scenarios. These analyses allow for an estimation of the irradiated volume. Ex vivo tests were performed on bovine liver to confirm the adequacy of the bioprobe for LITT and of the irradiated volumes predicted by the numerical model. There was a difference of 8% between the simulations and ex vivo experiments. The pulsed mode heating scenario was the most effective under the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How to Recondition Ex Vivo Initially Rejected Donor Lungs for Clinical Transplantation: Clinical Experience from Lund University Hospital

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    Sandra Lindstedt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem in clinical lung transplantation is the shortage of donor lungs. Only about 20% of donor lungs are accepted for transplantation. We have recently reported the results of the first six double lung transplantations performed with donor lungs reconditioned ex vivo that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation by the Scandiatransplant, Eurotransplant, and UK Transplant organizations because the arterial oxygen pressure was less than 40 kPa. The three-month survival of patients undergoing transplant with these lungs was 100%. One patient died due to sepsis after 95 days, and one due to rejection after 9 months. Four recipients are still alive and well 24 months after transplantation, with no signs of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The donor lungs were reconditioned ex vivo in an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit using STEEN solution mixed with erythrocytes, to dehydrate edematous lung tissue. Functional evaluation was performed with deoxygenated perfusate at different inspired fractions of oxygen. The arterial oxygen pressure was significantly improved in this model. This ex vivo evaluation model is thus a valuable addition to the armamentarium in increasing the number of acceptable lungs in a donor population with inferior arterial oxygen pressure values, thereby, increasing the lung donor pool for transplantation. In the following paper we present our clinical experience from the first six patients in the world. We also present the technique we used in detail with flowchart.

  2. [Ex Vivo Testing of Mechanical Properties of Canine Metacarpal/Metatarsal Bones after Simulated Implant Removal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, R; Fedorová, P; Pěnčík, J; Vojtová, L; Sedlinská, M; Nečas, A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In a long-term perspective, it is better to remove implants after fracture healing. However, subsequent full or excessive loading of an extremity may result in refracture, and the bone with holes after screw removal may present a site with predilection for this. The aim of the study was to find ways of how to decrease risk factors for refracture in such a case. This involved support to the mechanical properties of a bone during its remodelling until defects following implant removal are repaired, using a material tolerated by bone tissue and easy to apply. It also included an assessment of the mechanical properties of a bone after filling the holes in it with a newly developed biodegradable polymer-composite gel ("bone paste"). The composite also has a prospect of being used to repair bony defects produced by pathological processes. MATERIAL AND METHODS Experiments were carried out on intact weight-bearing small bones in dogs. A total of 27 specimens of metacarpal/metatarsal bones were used for ex vivo testing. They were divided into three groups: K1 (n = 9) control undamaged bones; K2 (n = 9) control bones with iatrogenic damage simulating holes left after cortical screw removal; EXP (n = 9) experimental specimens in which simulated holes in bone were filled with the biodegradable self-hardening composite. The bone specimens were subjected to three-point bending in the caudocranial direction by a force acting parallel to the direction of drilling in their middiaphyses. The value of maximum load achieved (N) and the corresponding value of a vertical displacement (mm) were recorded in each specimen, then compared and statistically evaluated. RESULTS On application of a maximum load (N), all bone specimens broke in the mid-part of their diaphyses. In group K1 the average maximum force of 595.6 ± 79.5 N was needed to break the bone; in group K2 it was 347.6 ± 58.6 N; and in group EXP it was 458.3 ± 102.7 N. The groups with damaged bones, K2 and

  3. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashar, Abu E; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1 and then delivered these cells by intravitreal injection to the retina of the Rs1h knockout mouse model of XLRS. MSCs were electroporated with two transgene expression systems (cytomegalovirus (CMV)-controlled constitutive and doxycycline-induced Tet-On controlled inducible), both driving expression of human RS1 cDNA. The stably transfected cells, using either constitutive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) or inducible MSC cassettes, were assayed for their RS1 secretion profile. For single injection studies, 100,000 genetically modified MSCs were injected into the vitreous cavity of the Rs1h knockout mouse eye at P21, and data were recorded at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-injection. The control groups received either unmodified MSCs or vehicle injection. For the multiple injection studies, the mice received intravitreal MSC injections at P21, P60, and P90 with data collection at P120. For the single- and multiple-injection studies, the outcomes were measured with electroretinography, optokinetic tracking responses (OKT), histology, and immunohistochemistry. Two lines of genetically modified MSCs were established and found to secrete RS1 at a rate of 8 ng/million cells/day. Following intravitreal injection, RS1-expressing MSCs were found mainly in the inner retinal layers. Two weeks after a single injection of MSCs, the area of the schisis

  4. Mean scatterer spacing estimation in normal and thermally coagulated ex vivo bovine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-04-01

    The liver has been hypothesized to have a unique arrangement of microvasculature that presents as an arrangement of quasiperiodic scatterers to an interrogating ultrasound pulse. The mean scatterer spacing (MSS) of these quasiperiodic scatterers has been proposed as a useful quantitative ultrasound biomarker for characterizing liver tissue. Thermal ablation is an increasingly popular method for treating hepatic tumors, and ultrasonic imaging approaches for delineating the extent of thermal ablation are in high demand. In this work, we examine the distribution of estimated MSS in thermally coagulated bovine liver and normal untreated bovine liver ex vivo. We estimate MSS by detecting local maxima in the spectral coherence function of radio frequency echoes from a clinical transducer, the Siemens VFX 9L4 transducer operating on an S2000 scanner. We find that normal untreated bovine liver was characterized by an MSS of approximately 1.3 mm. We examined regions of interest 12 mm wide laterally, and ranging from 12 mm to 18 mm axially, in 2 mm increments. Over these parameters, the mode of the MSS estimates was between 1.25 and 1.37 mm. On the other hand, estimation of MSS in thermally coagulated liver tissue yields a distribution of MSS estimates whose mode varied between 0.45 and 1.0 mm when examining regions of interest over the same sizes. We demonstrate that the estimated MSS in thermally coagulated liver favors small spacings because the randomly positioned scatterers in this tissue are better modeled as aperiodic scatterers. The submillimeter spacings result from the fact that this was the most probable spacing to be estimated if the discretely sampled spectral coherence function was a uniformly random two-dimensional function.

  5. Ex vivo determined experimental correction factor for the ultrasonic source term in the bioheat equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortela, Guillermo A; Pereira, Wagner C A; Negreira, Carlos A

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work is to propose an effective absorption coefficient (α effec ) as an empirical correction factor in the source term of the bioheat equation. The temperature rise in biological tissue due to ultrasound insonification is produced by energy absorption. Usually, the ultrasonic absorption coefficient (α A ) is used as a source term in the bioheat equation to quantify the temperature rise, and the effect of scattering is disregarded. The coefficient α effec includes the scattering contribution as an additional absorption term and should allow us to make a better estimation of the thermal dose (TD), which is important for clinical applications. We simulated the bioheat equation with the source term considering α A or α effec , and with heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound (1MHz, 2.0Wcm -2 ) for about 5.5min (temperature range 36-46°C). Experimental data were obtained in similar heating conditions for a bovine muscle tissue (ex vivo) and temperature curves were measured for depths 7, 30, 35, 40 and 45mm. The TD values from the experimental temperature curves at each depth were compared with the numerical solution of the bioheat equation with the classical and corrected source terms. The highest percentual difference between simulated and experimental TD was 42.5% when assuming the classical α A , and 8.7% for the corrected α effec . The results show that the effective absorption coefficient is a feasible parameter to improve the classical bioheat transfer model, especially for depths larger than the mean free propagation path. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood as a means to determine glucocorticoid sensitivity

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    Burnsides C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Burnsides,1,* Jacqueline Corry,1,* Jacob Alexander,1 Catherine Balint,1 David Cosmar,1 Gary Phillips,2 Jeanette I Webster Marketon1,31Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Center for Biostatistics, 3Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*JC and CB have equally contributed to this workPurpose: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed to treat a number of diseases including the majority of inflammatory diseases. Despite considerable interpersonal variability in response to glucocorticoids, an insensitivity rate of about 30%, and the risk of adverse side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, currently no assay is performed to determine sensitivity.Patients and methods: Here we propose a whole blood ex vivo stimulation assay to interrogate known glucocorticoid receptor (GR up- and downregulated genes to indicate glucocorticoid sensitivity. We have chosen to employ real-time PCR in order to provide a relatively fast and inexpensive assay.Results: We show that the GR-regulated genes, GILZ and FKBP51, are upregulated in whole blood by treatment with dexamethasone and that LPS-induction of cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα are repressed by dexamethasone in a dose responsive manner. There is considerable interpersonal variability in the maximum induction of these genes but little variation in the EC50 and IC50 concentrations. The regulation of the GR-induced genes differs throughout the day whereas the suppression of LPS-induced cytokines is not as sensitive to time of day.Conclusion: In all, this assay would provide a method to determine glucocorticoid receptor responsiveness in whole blood.Keywords: glucocorticoid responsiveness, gene regulation, nuclear receptor, GILZ, FKBP51, cytokines

  7. Visualization of ex vivo human ciliated epithelium and induced flow using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuye; Gamm, Uta A.; Yao, Xinwen; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Emala, Charles W.; Choma, Michael A.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-04-01

    The ciliated epithelium is important to the human respiratory system because it clears mucus that contains harmful microorganisms and particulate matter. We report the ex vivo visualization of human trachea/bronchi ciliated epithelium and induced flow characterized by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A total number of 17 samples from 7 patients were imaged. Samples were obtained from Columbia University Department of Anesthesiology's tissue bank. After excision, the samples were placed in Gibco Medium 199 solution with oxygen at 4°C until imaging. The samples were maintained at 36.7°C throughout the experiment. The imaging protocol included obtaining 3D volumes and 200 consecutive B-scans parallel to the head-to-feet direction (superior-inferior axis) of the airway, using Thorlabs Telesto system at 1300 nm at 28 kHz A-line rate and a custom built high resolution SDOCT system at 800nm at 32 kHz A-line rate. After imaging, samples were processed with H and E histology. Speckle variance of the time resolved datasets demonstrate significant contrast at the ciliated epithelium sites. Flow images were also obtained after injecting 10μm polyester beads into the solution, which shows beads traveling trajectories near the ciliated epithelium areas. In contrary, flow images taken in the orthogonal plane show no beads traveling trajectories. This observation is in line with our expectation that cilia drive flow predominantly along the superior-inferior axis. We also observed the protective function of the mucus, shielding the epithelium from the invasion of foreign objects such as microspheres. Further studies will be focused on the cilia's physiological response to environmental changes such as drug administration and physical injury.

  8. Endodontic filling removal procedure: an ex vivo comparative study between two rotary techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Mônica Sampaio do; Moreno, Melinna dos Santos; Silva, Priscila Macêdo França da; Botelho, Thereza Cristina Farias

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared the ex vivo removal capacity of two endodontic rotary techniques and determined whether there was a significant quantitative difference in residual material when comparing root thirds. Forty extracted molars were used. The palatal roots were selected, and the canals were prepared using a step-back technique and filled using a lateral condensation technique with gutta-percha points and Endofill sealer. After two weeks of storage in a 0.9% saline solution at 37 ºC in an oven, the specimens were divided into 2 groups of 20, with group 1 samples subjected to Gates-Glidden drills and group 2 samples subjected to the ProTaper retreatment System. Hedstroem files and eucalyptol solvent were used in both groups to complete the removal procedure. Then, the roots thirds were radiographed and the images were submitted to the NIH ImageJ program to measure the residual filling material in mm. Each root third was related to the total area of the root canals. The data were analyzed using Student's t test. There was a statistically significant difference between the two techniques as more filling material was removed by technique 2 (ProTaper) than technique 1 (Gates-Glidden drills, p < 0.05). The apical third had a greater amount of residual filling material than the cervical and middle thirds, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). None of the selected techniques removed all filling material, and the material was most difficult to remove from the apical third. The ProTaper files removed more material than the Gates-Glidden drills.

  9. Endodontic filling removal procedure: an ex vivo comparative study between two rotary techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sampaio do Vale

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared the ex vivo removal capacity of two endodontic rotary techniques and determined whether there was a significant quantitative difference in residual material when comparing root thirds. Forty extracted molars were used. The palatal roots were selected, and the canals were prepared using a step-back technique and filled using a lateral condensation technique with gutta-percha points and Endofill sealer. After two weeks of storage in a 0.9% saline solution at 37ºC in an oven, the specimens were divided into 2 groups of 20, with group 1 samples subjected to Gates-Glidden drills and group 2 samples subjected to the ProTaper retreatment System. Hedstroem files and eucalyptol solvent were used in both groups to complete the removal procedure. Then, the roots thirds were radiographed and the images were submitted to the NIH ImageJ program to measure the residual filling material in mm. Each root third was related to the total area of the root canals. The data were analyzed using Student's t test. There was a statistically significant difference between the two techniques as more filling material was removed by technique 2 (ProTaper than technique 1 (Gates-Glidden drills, p < 0.05. The apical third had a greater amount of residual filling material than the cervical and middle thirds, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05. None of the selected techniques removed all filling material, and the material was most difficult to remove from the apical third. The ProTaper files removed more material than the Gates-Glidden drills

  10. Inflation Pressures for Ex Vivo Lung Biopsies After Application of Graduated Compression Staples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Darren J; Monnet, Eric

    2016-01-01

    To compare 2 graduated compression staples (Tri-Staple™, Covidien, Norwalk, CT) and standard staples (Endo GIA™, Covidien) for lung biopsy in dogs. Ex vivo experimental study, randomized, unblocked. Lung lobes (n = 18) from 4 canine cadavers. Eighteen lung lobes were harvested from 4 dogs immediately after euthanasia and randomized to 1 of 3 staples (n = 6 per stapler type). Each lung lobe was intubated and maintained inflated at 10 cmH2O. A biopsy of the periphery of each lung lobe was taken approximately 3 cm from the edge with a stapling device; the Tri-Staple™ medium/thick (TST), Tri-Staple™ vascular/medium (TSV), and Endo GIA™ 45-2.5 (EG). Each lobe was inflated to a maximum of 45 cmH2O of water to determine the pressure at which air leakage occurred (leak pressure). The mean (95% confidence interval) leak pressure was 38.0 cmH2O (33.1-42.9) for EG, 29.2 (24.3-34.0) for TSV, and 26.0 (21.1-30.9) for TST. The mean leak pressure was significantly higher for EG than TSV (P = .016) and for EG than TST (P = .002), but was not different between TSV and TST (P = .344). One TSV leaked at 20 cmH2O and 1 TST leaked at 17 cmH2O. The surface area of the biopsy samples was not significantly different for staple types (P = .183). Both TST and TSV leaked at significantly lower airway pressures than EG and may not be suitable for canine lung biopsy as some specimens leaked at pressures of 20 cmH2O or less. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Assessing leukocyte-endothelial interactions under flow conditions in an ex vivo autoperfused microflow chamber assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulki, Lama; Sweigard, J Harry; Connor, Kip M

    2014-12-30

    Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are early and critical events in acute and chronic inflammation and can, when dysregulated, mediate tissue injury leading to permanent pathological damage. Existing conventional assays allow the analysis of leukocyte adhesion molecules only after the extraction of leukocytes from the blood. This requires the blood to undergo several steps before peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) can be ready for analysis, which in turn can stimulate PBLs influencing the research findings. The autoperfused micro flow chamber assay, however, allows scientists to study early leukocytes functional dysregulation using the systemic flow of a live mouse while having the freedom of manipulating a coated chamber. Through a disease model, the functional expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules can be assessed and quantified in a micro-glass chamber coated with immobilized endothelial adhesion molecules ex vivo. In this model, the blood flows between the right common carotid artery and left external jugular vein of a live mouse under anesthesia, allowing the interaction of native PBLs in the chamber. Real-time experimental analysis is achieved with the assistance of an intravital microscope as well as a Harvard Apparatus pressure device. The application of a flow regulator at the input point of the glass chamber allows comparable physiological flow conditions amongst the experiments. Leukocyte rolling velocity is the main outcome and is measured using the National Institutes of Health open-access software ImageJ. In summary, the autoperfused micro flow chamber assay provides an optimal physiological environment to study leukocytes endothelial interaction and allows researchers to draw accurate conclusions when studying inflammation.

  12. Structural layers of ex vivo rat hippocampus at 7T MRI.

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    Jeanine Manuella Kamsu

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI applied to the hippocampus is challenging in studies of the neurophysiology of memory and the physiopathology of numerous diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and depression. The hippocampus is a well-delineated cerebral structure with a multi-layered organization. Imaging of hippocampus layers is limited to a few studies and requires high magnetic field and gradient strength. We performed one conventional MRI sequence on a 7T MRI in order to visualize and to delineate the multi-layered hippocampal structure ex vivo in rat brains. We optimized a volumic three-dimensional T2 Rapid Acquisition Relaxation Enhancement (RARE sequence and quantified the volume of the hippocampus and one of its thinnest layers, the stratum granulare of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we tested passive staining by gadolinium with the aim of decreasing the acquisition time and increasing image contrast. Using appropriated settings, six discrete layers were differentiated within the hippocampus in rats. In the hippocampus proper or Ammon's Horn (AH: the stratum oriens, the stratum pyramidale of, the stratum radiatum, and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 were differentiated. In the dentate gyrus: the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulare layer were seen distinctly. Passive staining of one brain with gadolinium decreased the acquisition time by four and improved the differentiation between the layers. A conventional sequence optimized on a 7T MRI with a standard receiver surface coil will allow us to study structural layers (signal and volume of hippocampus in various rat models of neuropathology (anxiety, epilepsia, neurodegeneration.

  13. Measurement of the hyperelastic properties of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples

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    O'Hagan, Joseph J.; Samani, Abbas

    2009-04-01

    The elastic and hyperelastic properties of biological soft tissues have been of interest to the medical community. There are several biomedical applications where parameters characterizing such properties are critical for a reliable clinical outcome. These applications include surgery planning, needle biopsy and brachtherapy where tissue biomechanical modeling is involved. Another important application is interpreting nonlinear elastography images. While there has been considerable research on the measurement of the linear elastic modulus of small tissue samples, little research has been conducted for measuring parameters that characterize the nonlinear elasticity of tissues included in tissue slice specimens. This work presents hyperelastic measurement results of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples. For each sample, five hyperelastic models have been used, including the Yeoh, N = 2 polynomial, N = 1 Ogden, Arruda-Boyce, and Veronda-Westmann models. Results show that the Yeoh, polynomial and Ogden models are the most accurate in terms of fitting experimental data. The results indicate that almost all of the parameters corresponding to the pathological tissues are between two times to over two orders of magnitude larger than those of normal tissues, with C11 showing the most significant difference. Furthermore, statistical analysis indicates that C02 of the Yeoh model, and C11 and C20 of the polynomial model have very good potential for cancer classification as they show statistically significant differences for various cancer types, especially for invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the potential for use in cancer classification, the presented data are very important for applications such as surgery planning and virtual reality based clinician training systems where accurate nonlinear tissue response modeling is required.

  14. Measurement of the hyperelastic properties of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples

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    O' Hagan, Joseph J; Samani, Abbas [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: asamani@uwo.ca

    2009-04-21

    The elastic and hyperelastic properties of biological soft tissues have been of interest to the medical community. There are several biomedical applications where parameters characterizing such properties are critical for a reliable clinical outcome. These applications include surgery planning, needle biopsy and brachtherapy where tissue biomechanical modeling is involved. Another important application is interpreting nonlinear elastography images. While there has been considerable research on the measurement of the linear elastic modulus of small tissue samples, little research has been conducted for measuring parameters that characterize the nonlinear elasticity of tissues included in tissue slice specimens. This work presents hyperelastic measurement results of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples. For each sample, five hyperelastic models have been used, including the Yeoh, N = 2 polynomial, N = 1 Ogden, Arruda-Boyce, and Veronda-Westmann models. Results show that the Yeoh, polynomial and Ogden models are the most accurate in terms of fitting experimental data. The results indicate that almost all of the parameters corresponding to the pathological tissues are between two times to over two orders of magnitude larger than those of normal tissues, with C{sub 11} showing the most significant difference. Furthermore, statistical analysis indicates that C{sub 02} of the Yeoh model, and C{sub 11} and C{sub 20} of the polynomial model have very good potential for cancer classification as they show statistically significant differences for various cancer types, especially for invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the potential for use in cancer classification, the presented data are very important for applications such as surgery planning and virtual reality based clinician training systems where accurate nonlinear tissue response modeling is required.

  15. Corneal epithelial cell viability of an ex vivo porcine eye model.

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    Chan, Ka Yin; Cho, Pauline; Boost, Maureen

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to assess the consistency of corneal epithelial cell viability of an ex vivo porcine eye model. Six porcine eye models (four test and two control) were prepared for each experiment. The model has a computer-controlled mechanical arm, which could move the eyelid of the porcine eye and apply phosphate buffered saline to simulate blinking and lacrimation. The four test eyes were set up to simulate evaporative dry eyes with simulated lacrimation and blinking (one blink and one drop of buffered saline per minute) over three hours. Control A models were set up to collect pre-experimental baseline data, while those of control B were the same as the test eyes but without lacrimation and blinking simulation. All porcine eyes were kept in a closed chamber with temperature and humidity well controlled. After three hours, the cells of all eyes (except control A, which were assessed immediately before commencement of the experiment) were assessed. The eyes were first dipped into 0.4 per cent trypan blue solution. Following the dissection and separation of the cells, the number of dead cells were then counted under the microscope with a field size of 0.25 mm(2). The experiment was repeated 11 times. No significant differences were found in the number of dead cells among the four test eyes in both the central and peripheral cornea. There were significantly more dead cells in the test eyes compared to control A but significantly less when compared to control B. More dead cells were found in the central cornea than the peripheral cornea in the test eyes but the difference was not observed in controls A and B. Epithelial cell viabilities among the four porcine eye models with simulated lacrimation and blinking were consistent. The majority of cells were viable before the experiment and simulated lacrimation and blinking maintained more viable cells over time. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  16. Tissue shrinkage in microwave ablation of liver: an ex vivo predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Claudio; Farina, Laura; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Cassarino, Simone; Tosoratti, Nevio; Goldberg, S Nahum; Cavagnaro, Marta

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of the shrinkage of liver tissues in microwave ablation. Thirty-seven cuboid specimens of ex vivo bovine liver of size ranging from 2 cm to 8 cm were heated exploiting different techniques: 1) using a microwave oven (2.45 GHz) operated at 420 W, 500 W and 700 W for 8 to 20 min, achieving complete carbonisation of the specimens, 2) using a radiofrequency ablation apparatus (450 kHz) operated at 70 W for a time ranging from 6 to 7.5 min obtaining white coagulation of the specimens, and 3) using a microwave (2.45 GHz) ablation apparatus operated at 60 W for 10 min. Measurements of specimen dimensions, carbonised and coagulated regions were performed using a ruler with an accuracy of 1 mm. Based on the results of the first two experiments a predictive model for the contraction of liver tissue from microwave ablation was constructed and compared to the result of the third experiment. For carbonised tissue, a linear contraction of 31 ± 6% was obtained independently of the heating source, power and operation time. Radiofrequency experiments determined that the average percentage linear contraction of white coagulated tissue was 12 ± 5%. The average accuracy of our model was determined to be 3 mm (5%). The proposed model allows the prediction of the shrinkage of liver tissues upon microwave ablation given the extension of the carbonised and coagulated zones. This may be useful in helping to predict whether sufficient tissue volume is ablated in clinical practice.

  17. Ultrasound functional imaging in an ex vivo beating porcine heart platform

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    Petterson, Niels J.; Fixsen, Louis S.; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; Pijls, Nico H. J.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, novel ultrasound functional imaging (UFI) techniques have been introduced to assess cardiac function by measuring, e.g. cardiac output (CO) and/or myocardial strain. Verification and reproducibility assessment in a realistic setting remain major issues. Simulations and phantoms are often unrealistic, whereas in vivo measurements often lack crucial hemodynamic parameters or ground truth data, or suffer from the large physiological and clinical variation between patients when attempting clinical validation. Controlled validation in certain pathologies is cumbersome and often requires the use of lab animals. In this study, an isolated beating pig heart setup was adapted and used for performance assessment of UFI techniques such as volume assessment and ultrasound strain imaging. The potential of performing verification and reproducibility studies was demonstrated. For proof-of-principle, validation of UFI in pathological hearts was examined. Ex vivo porcine hearts (n  =  6, slaughterhouse waste) were resuscitated and attached to a mock circulatory system. Radio frequency ultrasound data of the left ventricle were acquired in five short axis views and one long axis view. Based on these slices, the CO was measured, where verification was performed using flow sensor measurements in the aorta. Strain imaging was performed providing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain to assess reproducibility and inter-subject variability under steady conditions. Finally, strains in healthy hearts were compared to a heart with an implanted left ventricular assist device, simulating a failing, supported heart. Good agreement between ultrasound and flow sensor based CO measurements was found. Strains were highly reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficients  >0.8). Differences were found due to biological variation and condition of the hearts. Strain magnitude and patterns in the assisted heart were available for different pump action, revealing

  18. Bridging the gap: functional healing of embryonic small intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Oltrabella, Francesca; Khalil, Basem A; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2016-02-01

    The ability to grow embryonic organs ex vivo provides an opportunity to follow their differentiation in a controlled environment, with resulting insights into normal development. Additionally, similar strategies can be used to assess effects on organogenesis of physical and chemical manipulations. This study aimed to create an organ culture model with which to test physical manipulations to enhance healing of gut segments, thus generating a single functional organ. Embryonic mouse jejunum was isolated and cut into 2-3 mm tubes, which were placed in pairs, separated by a small gap, on semi-permeable supports. Each pair was linked by a nylon suture threaded through their lumens. After 3 days in organ culture fed by defined serum-free media, the rudiments differentiated to form tubes of smooth muscle surrounding a core of rudimentary villi. Of 34 such pairs, 74% had touching and well aligned proximate ends. Of these joined structures, 80% (59% of the total pairs) had a continuous lumen, as assessed by observing the trajectories of fluorescent dextrans injected into their distal ends. Fused organ pairs formed a single functional unit, as assessed by spontaneous contraction waves propagated along their lengths. In these healed intestines, peripherin(+) neurons formed a nexus in the zone of fusion, linking the rudiment pairs. In future, this system could be used to test whether growth factors enhance fusion. Such results should in turn inform the design of novel treatments for short bowel syndrome, a potentially fatal condition with a currently limited and imperfect range of therapies. ©2015. The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation Heat Energy Transfer in anEx-VivoModel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Shivani; Lavito, Sandi; Grobner, Elizabeth; Grobner, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Little work has been done to consider the temperature changes and energy transfer that occur in the tissue outside the vein with ultrasound-guided vein ablation therapy. In this experiment, a Ex-Vivo model of the human calf was used to analyze heat transfer and energy degradation in tissue surrounding the vein during endovascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A clinical vein ablation protocol was used to determine the tissue temperature distribution in 10 per cent agar gel. Heat energy from the radiofrequency catheter was measured for 140 seconds at fixed points by four thermometer probes placed equidistant radially at 0.0025, 0.005, and 0.01 m away from the RFA catheter. The temperature rose 1.5°C at 0.0025 m, 0.6°C at 0.005 m, and 0.0°C at 0.01 m from the RFA catheter. There was a clinically insignificant heat transfer at the distances evaluated, 1.4 ± 0.2 J/s at 0.0025 m, 0.7 ± 0.3 J/s at 0.0050 m, and 0.3 ± 0.0 J/s at 0.01 m. Heat degradation occurred rapidly: 4.5 ± 0.5 J (at 0.0025 m), 4.0 ± 1.6 J (at 0.0050 m), and 3.9 ± 3.6 J (at 0.01 m). Tumescent anesthesia injected one centimeter around the vein would act as a heat sink to absorb the energy transferred outside the vein to minimize tissue and nerve damage and will help phlebologists strategize options for minimizing damage.

  20. Computational modeling of radiofrequency ablation: evaluation on ex vivo data using ultrasound monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigier, Chloé; Kim, Younsu; Dillow, Austin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the most widely used minimally invasive ablative therapy for liver cancer, but it is challenged by a lack of patient-specific monitoring. Inter-patient tissue variability and the presence of blood vessels make the prediction of the RFA difficult. A monitoring tool which can be personalized for a given patient during the intervention would be helpful to achieve a complete tumor ablation. However, the clinicians do not have access to such a tool, which results in incomplete treatment and a large number of recurrences. Computational models can simulate the phenomena and mechanisms governing this therapy. The temperature evolution as well as the resulted ablation can be modeled. When combined together with intraoperative measurements, computational modeling becomes an accurate and powerful tool to gain quantitative understanding and to enable improvements in the ongoing clinical settings. This paper shows how computational models of RFA can be evaluated using intra-operative measurements. First, simulations are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, which is then evaluated on two ex vivo datasets. RFA is simulated on a simplified geometry to generate realistic longitudinal temperature maps and the resulted necrosis. Computed temperatures are compared with the temperature evolution recorded using thermometers, and with temperatures monitored by ultrasound (US) in a 2D plane containing the ablation tip. Two ablations are performed on two cadaveric bovine livers, and we achieve error of 2.2 °C on average between the computed and the thermistors temperature and 1.4 °C and 2.7 °C on average between the temperature computed and monitored by US during the ablation at two different time points (t = 240 s and t = 900 s).

  1. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  2. Novel Techniques for Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood: Clinical Trials

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    Rohtesh S Mehta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cord blood (CB provides an excellent alternative source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC for patients lacking human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched peripheral blood or bone marrow graft for transplantation. However, due to the limited cell dose in CB graft, it is associated with prolonged time to engraftment, risk of graft rejection, infections and treatment-related mortality. To increase the cell dose, a variety of ex vivo expansion techniques have been developed. Results of traditional methods of CB expansion using cytokines alone were disappointing. Expanding CB cells with mesenchymal progenitor cells led to sizeable increase in graft content and improved engraftment. Other methods used HPC-differentiation blockers, such as nicotinamide analogs, copper chelators, inducing constitutive Notch signaling, or an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist (StemReginin1. Many of these methods lead to substantial expansions of total nucleated cells and CD34+ cells, and significantly improved time to neutrophil or platelet engraftment in patients transplanted with the expanded products compared to the recipients of unmanipulated CBT. These studies differ not only in the expansion method, but also with regards to the cytokines used, patient population, conditioning regimens and transplantation practices, to name a few. Some of these methods employed expansion of a portion of CB unit in the setting of single CBT, while others in the setting of double CBT. Here, we review various procedures used for CB expansion and highlight some of the key differences. Novel methods of improving engraftment that aim at improving bone marrow homing potential of CB cells are not reviewed.

  3. Effect of nutritional status on oxidative stress in an ex vivo perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Michaela; Nuyens, Vincent; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin; Boogaerts, Jean G

    2005-11-01

    Normothermic ischemia-reperfusion is a determinant in liver injury occurring during surgical procedures, ischemic state, and multiple organ failure. The preexisting nutritional status of the liver might contribute to the extent of tissue injury and primary nonfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the role of starvation on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in normal rat livers. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: one had free access to food, the other was fasted for 16 h. The portal vein was cannulated, and the liver was removed and perfused in a closed ex vivo system. Two modes of perfusion were applied in each series of rats, fed and fasting. In the ischemia-reperfusion mode, the experiment consisted of perfusion for 15 min, warm ischemia for 60 min, and reperfusion during 60 min. In the nonischemia mode, perfusion was maintained during the 135-min study period. Five rats were included in each experimental condition, yielding a total of 20 rats. Liver enzymes, potassium, glucose, lactate, free radicals, i.e., dienes and trienes, and cytochrome c were analyzed in perfusate samples. The proportion of glycogen in hepatocytes was determined in tissue biopsies. Transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium, and free radical concentrations were systematically higher in fasting rats in both conditions, with and without ischemia. Cytochrome c was higher after reperfusion in the fasting rats. Glucose and lactate concentrations were greater in the fed group. The glycogen content decreased in both groups during the experiment but was markedly lower in the fasting rats. In fed rats, liver injury was moderate, whereas hepatocytes integrity was notably impaired both after continuous perfusion and warm ischemia in fasting animals. Reduced glycogen store in hepatocytes may explain reduced tolerance.

  4. Ex-Vivo Uterine Environment (EVE Therapy Induced Limited Fetal Inflammation in a Premature Lamb Model.

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    Yuichiro Miura

    Full Text Available Ex-vivo uterine environment (EVE therapy uses an artificial placenta to provide gas exchange and nutrient delivery to a fetus submerged in an amniotic fluid bath. Development of EVE may allow us to treat very premature neonates without mechanical ventilation. Meanwhile, elevations in fetal inflammation are associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. In the present study, we analysed fetal survival, inflammation and pulmonary maturation in preterm lambs maintained on EVE therapy using a parallelised umbilical circuit system with a low priming volume.Ewes underwent surgical delivery at 115 days of gestation (term is 150 days, and fetuses were transferred to EVE therapy (EVE group; n = 5. Physiological parameters were continuously monitored; fetal blood samples were intermittently obtained to assess wellbeing and targeted to reference range values for 2 days. Age-matched animals (Control group; n = 6 were surgically delivered at 117 days of gestation. Fetal blood and tissue samples were analysed and compared between the two groups.Fetal survival time in the EVE group was 27.0 ± 15.5 (group mean ± SD hours. Only one fetus completed the pre-determined study period with optimal physiological parameters, while the other 4 animals demonstrated physiological deterioration or death prior to the pre-determined study end point. Significant elevations (p0.05 in surfactant protein mRNA expression level between the two groups.In this study, we achieved limited fetal survival using EVE therapy. Despite this, EVE therapy only induced a modest fetal inflammatory response and did not promote lung maturation. These data provide additional insight into markers of treatment efficacy for the assessment of future studies.

  5. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy. © 2015

  6. Ex vivo evaluation of new 2D and 3D dental radiographic technology for detecting caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaalaas, Laurence; Tyndall, Donald; Mol, André; Everett, Eric T; Bangdiwala, Ananta

    2016-01-01

    Proximal dental caries remains a prevalent disease with only modest detection rates by current diagnostic systems. Many new systems are available without controlled validation of diagnostic efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three potentially promising new imaging systems. This study evaluated the caries detection efficacy of Schick 33 (Sirona Dental, Salzburg, Austria) intraoral digital detector images employing an advanced sharpening filter, Planmeca ProMax(®) (Planmeca Inc., Helsinki, Finland) extraoral "panoramic bitewing" images and Sirona Orthophos XG3D (Sirona Dental) CBCT images with advanced artefact reduction. Conventional photostimulable phosphor images served as the control modality. An ex vivo study design using extracted human teeth, ten expert observers and micro-CT ground truth was employed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated similar diagnostic efficacy of all systems (ANOVA p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the Schick 33 images (0.48) was significantly lower than the other modalities (0.53-0.62). The specificity of the Planmeca images (0.86) was significantly lower than Schick 33 (0.96) and XG3D (0.97). The XG3D showed significantly better cavitation detection sensitivity (0.62) than the other modalities (0.48-0.57). The Schick 33 images demonstrated reduced caries sensitivity, whereas the Planmeca panoramic bitewing images demonstrated reduced specificity. XG3D with artefact reduction demonstrated elevated sensitivity and specificity for caries detection, improved depth accuracy and substantially improved cavitation detection. Care must be taken to recognize potential false-positive caries lesions with Planmeca panoramic bitewing images. Use of CBCT for caries detection must be carefully balanced with the presence of metal artefacts, time commitment, financial cost and radiation dose.

  7. Ex vivo reversal of effects of rivaroxaban evaluated using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, B.; Würtinger, P.; Streif, W.; Sturm, W.; Fries, D.; Bachler, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In major bleeding events, the new direct oral anticoagulants pose a great challenge for physicians. The aim of the study was to test for ex vivo reversal of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban with various non-specific reversal agents: prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), and fibrinogen concentrate (FI). Methods Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients treated with rivaroxaban. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with rivaroxaban to test the correlation between rivaroxaban concentration and coagulation tests. Patient blood samples were spiked with various concentrations of the above-mentioned agents and analysed using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation. Results When added in vitro, rivaroxaban was significantly (P<0.05) correlated with ROTEM® thromboelastometry EXTEM (extrinsic coagulation pathway) clotting time (CT), time to maximal velocity (MaxV−t), and with all measured thrombin generation parameters. In vivo, CT, MaxV−t, lag time, and peak thrombin generation (Cmax) were significantly correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations. Regarding reversal of rivaroxaban, all tested agents significantly (P<0.05) reduced EXTEM CT, but to different extents: rFVIIa by 68%, aPCC by 47%, PCC by 17%, and FI by 9%. Only rFVIIa reversed EXTEM CT to baseline values. Both PCC (+102%) and aPCC (+232%) altered overall thrombin generation (area under the curve) and increased Cmax (+461% for PCC, +87.5% for aPCC). Conclusions Thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assays do not favour the same reversal agents for rivaroxaban anticoagulation. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to establish doses and clinical efficacy of potential reversal agents. Clinical trial registration EudracCT trial no. 213-00474-30. PMID:27623677

  8. Intraoral versus extraoral bitewing radiography in detection of enamel proximal caries: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Ela, Walaa Hussein; Farid, Mary Medhat; Mostafa, Mostafa Saad El-Din

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of digital intraoral and extraoral bitewing (EO BW) radiography in the detection of enamel proximal caries regardless of their ability to separate contacts. Artificial caries with different degrees of decalcification was induced in 80 human sound premolars and molars using formic acid. Intraoral radiographs were taken with photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), using the paralleling bitewing technique. Extraoral bitewing radiographs were obtained using Sirona digital panoramic X-ray unit (Sirona Siemens, Bensheim, Germany). In total, 160 proximal surfaces were assessed by 2 observers twice. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) values for each image type, observer and reading were compared using z-tests, with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value for each observer and reading were calculated. Spearman's test showed a strong positive correlation between the duration of demineralization and histological grading of carious teeth surfaces. For the three radiographic techniques, intraobserver reliability was strong to excellent. Moreover, interobserver agreement was strong. The differences between all detection methods were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Intraoral bitewing using CMOS sensor had the highest sensitivity while EO BW had the highest specificity in the detection of incipient proximal caries. Within the limits of the ex vivo design, the difference in diagnostic accuracy between the three radiographic techniques was not significant. EO BW could be used in the detection of enamel proximal caries with results comparable with intraoral bitewing with PSP plate and CMOS sensor.

  9. An ex vivo study of arrested primary teeth caries with silver diamine fluoride therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, May L; Ito, L; Cao, Y; Lo, Edward C M; Li, Q L; Chu, C H

    2014-04-01

    This ex vivo study compared the physico-chemical structural differences between primary carious teeth biannually treated with silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and carious teeth without such treatment. Twelve carious primary upper-central incisors were collected from 6-year-old children. Six teeth had arrested caries after 24-month biannual SDF applications and 6 had active caries when there was no topical fluoride treatment. The mineral density, elemental contents, surface morphology, and crystal characteristics were assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Micro-CT examination revealed a superficial opaque band approximately 150μm on the arrested cavitated dentinal lesion. This band was limited in the active carious lesion. EDX examination detected a higher intensity of calcium and phosphate of 150μm in the surface zone than in the inner zone, but this zone was restricted in the active cavitated dentinal lesion. SEM examination indicated that the collagens were protected from being exposed in the arrested cavitated dentinal lesion, but were exposed in the active cavitated dentinal lesion. TEM examination suggested that remineralised hydroxyapatites were well aligned in the arrested cavitated dentinal lesion, while those in the active cavitated dentinal lesion indicated a random apatite arrangement. A highly remineralised zone rich in calcium and phosphate was found on the arrested cavitated dentinal lesion of primary teeth with an SDF application. The collagens were protected from being exposed in the arrested cavitated dentinal lesion. Clinical SDF application positively influences dentine remineralisation. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  11. Intrapulpal thermal changes during direct provisionalization using various autopolymerizing resins: Ex-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ronauk; Tripathi, Arvind; Dhiman, R K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-12-01

    Resin materials used in the fabrication of direct provisional restoration exhibit an exothermic reaction and the extent of damage may also depend on the remaining dentine thickness. An ex-vivo study was envisaged to compare the time related temperature changes in the pulp chamber during the fabrication of fixed partial denture provisional restorations using direct technique. The effect of differently prepared teeth (with varying remaining dentine thickness) on the above mentioned temperature changes were also evaluated. Thermal changes were calculated in pulp chamber of three differently prepared tooth having different amount of remaining dentinal thickness (45 samples) and control with no tooth media (15 samples), using three different types of autopolymerizing provisional restorative materials using Cr/Al thermocouple connected to digital thermometer. The data for the mean peak temperature rise was subjected to one way ANOVA analysis for relative comparison among subgroups within each main group and across the main groups. The results showed a statistically significant difference across both the subgroups and the main groups (p temperature rise were statistically significant for the three resins (p temperature rise value followed by polyethyl methacrylate (Tempron) and Bis-acrylate composite (CoolTemp). The maximum temperature rise was found on molar full veneer preparation followed by molar three quarter preparation and premolar three quarter preparation. Data and results from current study may assist clinicians to select an autopolymerizing provisional restorative resin when employing direct technique of fabricating provisional restorations for a specific tooth preparation which would cause minimal thermal trauma to pulpal tissue.

  12. Cytokine filtration modulates pulmonary metabolism and edema formation during ex vivo lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Ilker; Cosgun, Tugba; Arni, Stephan; Trinkwitz, Michael; Fehlings, Stefan; Yamada, Yoshito; Cesarovic, Nikola; Yu, Keke; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Weder, Walter; Inci, Ilhan

    2017-05-20

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has improved the process of donor lung management. Cytokine accumulation during EVLP has been shown to correlate with worse outcome after lung transplantation. Our objective in this study was to test the safety and efficacy of cytokine filtration during EVLP in a large animal model. Pig donor lungs were preserved for 24 hours at 4°C, followed by 12 hours of EVLP, according to the Toronto protocol. The perfusate was continuously run through an absorbent device (CytoSorb) via a veno-venous shunt from the reservoir in the filter group. EVLP was performed according to the standard protocol in the control group (n = 5 each). EVLP physiology, lung X-ray, perfusate biochemistry, inflammatory response and microscopic injury were assessed. Cytokine filtration significantly improved airway pressure and dynamic compliance during the 12-hour perfusion period. Lung X-rays acquired at the end of perfusion showed increased consolidation in the control group. Electrolyte imbalance, determined by increased hydrogen, potassium and calcium ion concentrations in the perfusate, was markedly worsened in the control group. Glucose consumption and lactate production were markedly reduced, along with the lactate/pyruvate ratio in the filter group. Cytokine expression profile, tissue myeloperoxidase activity and microscopic lung injury were significantly reduced in the filter group. Continuous perfusate filtration through sorbent beads is effective and safe during prolonged EVLP. Cytokine removal decreased the development of pulmonary edema and electrolyte imbalance through the suppression of anaerobic glycolysis and neutrophil activation in this setting. Further studies are needed to test the beneficial effect of cytokine filtration on post-transplant lung function. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transgenic Expression of Osteoactivin/gpnmb Enhances Bone Formation In Vivo and Osteoprogenitor Differentiation Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frara, Nagat; Abdelmagid, Samir M; Sondag, Gregory R; Moussa, Fouad M; Yingling, Vanessa R; Owen, Thomas A; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-01-01

    Initial identification of osteoactivin (OA)/glycoprotein non-melanoma clone B (gpnmb) was demonstrated in an osteopetrotic rat model, where OA expression was increased threefold in mutant bones, compared to normal. OA mRNA and protein expression increase during active bone regeneration post-fracture, and primary rat osteoblasts show increased OA expression during differentiation in vitro. To further examine OA/gpnmb as an osteoinductive agent, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of transgenic mouse overexpressing OA/gpnmb under the CMV-promoter (OA-Tg). Western blot analysis showed increased OA/gpnmb in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to wild-type (WT). In OA-Tg mouse femurs versus WT littermates, micro-CT analysis showed increased trabecular bone volume and thickness, and cortical bone thickness; histomorphometry showed increased osteoblast numbers, bone formation and mineral apposition rates in OA-Tg mice; and biomechanical testing showed higher peak moment and stiffness. Given that OA/gpnmb is also over-expressed in osteoclasts in OA-Tg mice, we evaluated bone resorption by ELISA and histomorphometry, and observed decreased serum CTX-1 and RANK-L, and decreased osteoclast numbers in OA-Tg, compared to WT mice, indicating decreased bone remodeling in OA-Tg mice. The proliferation rate of OA-Tg osteoblasts in vitro was higher, compared to WT, as was alkaline phosphatase staining and activity, the latter indicating enhanced differentiation of OA-Tg osteoprogenitors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed increased TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptors I and II expression in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to WT. Together, these data suggest that OA overexpression has an osteoinductive effect on bone mass in vivo and stimulates osteoprogenitor differentiation ex vivo. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation on Enterococcus faecalis from Root Canals: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; de Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista; Watanabe, Evandro; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic irrigation aims to clean and disinfect the root canal system. Passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) is based on the use of an ultrasound-activated instrument into the root canal filled with irrigant. The aim of this study was to evaluate, ex vivo, the effectiveness of PUI in eliminating Enterococcus faecalis from root canals. Seventy-five extracted human single-root teeth were used. After root canal preparation, specimens were inoculated with E. faecalis and incubated at 37 °C for 21 days. Specimens were distributed into five groups (n=15), according to the irrigation method: PUI + saline solution (PUI/SS); PUI + 1% NaOCl (PUI/NaOCl); conventional needle irrigation (CNI) + saline solution (CNI/SS); CNI + 1% NaOCl (CNI/NaOCl); No irrigation (control). Microbiological samples were collected at three time points: initial (21 days after inoculation), post-irrigation (immediately after irrigation), and final (7 days after irrigation). Data were obtained in CFU mL-1 and subjected to analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's tests at 5% significance level. The post-irrigation samples did not demonstrate statistical difference between PUI/SS and CNI/SS nor between PUI/NaOCl and CNI/NaOCl (p>0.05), but PUI/NaOCl and CNI/NaOCl had lower CFU mL-1 number than the other groups (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference was observed between the initial and post-irrigation samples and between the post-irrigation and final samples (p<0.05) in all groups, except in the control. The final samples of all groups presented bacterial counts similar to the initial samples. PUI or CNI with 1% NaOCl contribute to disinfection, but are unable to eradicate E. faecalis from the root canal system.

  15. Effect of root canal sealers on human periodontal ligament fibroblast viability: ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurko, Grzegorz; Pawińska, Małgorzata; Łuczaj-Cepowicz, Elżbieta; Kierklo, Anna; Marczuk-Kolada, Grażyna; Hołownia, Adam

    2017-12-14

    The aim of the study was to compare ex vivo the toxic effects of six root canal sealers immediately after mixing or setting on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLF). Freshly mixed (I group) or set (allowed to dry for 24 h) (II group) specimens of AH Plus Jet (AH), Apexit Plus (AP), MTA Fillapex (FL), GuttaFlow (GF), MetaSEAL Soft (META), and Tubli-Seal (TS) were prepared. HPdLF were exposed for 24 h to the specimens. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolo-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to examine the effect of the root canal sealers on mitochondrial metabolic activity. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-annexin V (AnV) and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry was used to identify the effects of the materials on cell apoptosis/necrosis. Statistical analyses were performed by one-way ANOVA followed by post hoc tests, and significance was determined at P analysis showed significant differences in HPdLF viability between the individual materials in each group (P < 0.001). AH and AP induced a significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells, while TS, FL, and META elevated the proportion of necrotic cells compared with other materials and the controls (p < 0.05). The cytotoxic effects of the tested root canal sealers (both fresh and set) on HPdLF varied. Both forms of sealers were able to cause toxic effects by inducing apoptosis and necrosis in HPdLF. The cytotoxicity of FL, META, TS was mainly associated with necrosis, while AH and AP with apoptosis.

  16. Optic nerve sheath diameter measurement techniques: examination using a novel ex-vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Antonsen, Erik; Bockhorst, Kurt H; Easley, R Blaine; Clark, Jonathan B; Brady, Kenneth M; Kibler, Kathleen K; Sutton, Jeffrey P; Kramer, Larry; Sargsyan, Ashot E

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) and MRI measurements of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) have been proposed as intracranial pressure measurement surrogates, but these methods have not been fully evaluated or standardized. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex-vivo model for evaluating ONSD measurement techniques by comparing U/S and MRI measurements to physical measurements. The left eye of post mortem juvenile pigs (N = 3) was excised and the subdural space of the optic nerve cannulated. Caliper measurements and U/S imaging measurements of the ONSD were acquired at baseline and following 1 cc saline infusion into the sheath. The samples were then embedded in 0.5% agarose and imaged in a 7 Tesla (7T) MRI. The ONSD was subsequently measured with digital calipers at locations and directions matching the U/S and direct measurements. Both MRI and sonographic measurements were in agreement with direct measurements. U/S data, especially axial images, exhibited a positive bias and more variance (bias: 1.318, 95% limit of agreement: 8.609) compared to MRI (bias: 0.3156, 95% limit of agreement: 2.773). In addition, U/S images were much more dependent on probe placement, distance between probe and target, and imaging plane. This model appears to be a valid test-bed for continued scrutiny of ONSD measurement techniques. In this model, 7T MRI was accurate and potentially useful for in-vivo measurements where direct measurements are not available. Current limitations with ultrasound imaging for ONSD measurement associated with image acquisition technique and equipment necessitate further standardization to improve its clinical utility.

  17. Modeling activity and target-dependent developmental cell death of mouse retinal ganglion cells ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Voyatzis

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is widespread during the development of the central nervous system and serves multiple purposes including the establishment of neural connections. In the mouse retina a substantial reduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurs during the first postnatal week, coinciding with the formation of retinotopic maps in the superior colliculus (SC. We previously established a retino-collicular culture preparation which recapitulates the progressive topographic ordering of RGC projections during early post-natal life. Here, we questioned whether this model could also be suitable to examine the mechanisms underlying developmental cell death of RGCs. Brn3a was used as a marker of the RGCs. A developmental decline in the number of Brn3a-immunolabelled neurons was found in the retinal explant with a timing that paralleled that observed in vivo. In contrast, the density of photoreceptors or of starburst amacrine cells increased, mimicking the evolution of these cell populations in vivo. Blockade of neural activity with tetrodotoxin increased the number of surviving Brn3a-labelled neurons in the retinal explant, as did the increase in target availability when one retinal explant was confronted with 2 or 4 collicular slices. Thus, this ex vivo model reproduces the developmental reduction of RGCs and recapitulates its regulation by neural activity and target availability. It therefore offers a simple way to analyze developmental cell death in this classic system. Using this model, we show that ephrin-A signaling does not participate to the regulation of the Brn3a population size in the retina, indicating that eprhin-A-mediated elimination of exuberant projections does not involve developmental cell death.

  18. Ex vivo characterization of pathologic fluids with quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography

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    Richter, Vivien, E-mail: vivien.richter@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Weg 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Willner, Marian S., E-mail: marian.willner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Henningsen, John, E-mail: john.henningsen@tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Birnbacher, Lorenz, E-mail: lorenz.birnbacher@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Marschner, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.marschner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herzen, Julia, E-mail: julia.herzen@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kimm, Melanie A., E-mail: melanie.kimm@tum.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) provides additional information beyond absorption characteristics by detecting the phase shift of the X-ray beam passing through material. The grating-based system works with standard polychromatic X-ray sources, promising a possible clinical implementation. PCI has been shown to provide additional information in soft-tissue samples. The aim of this study was to determine if ex vivo quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) may differentiate between pathologic fluid collections. Materials and methods: PCCT was performed with the grating interferometry method. A protein serial dilution, human blood samples and 17 clinical samples of pathologic fluid retentions were imaged and correlated with clinical chemistry measurements. Conventional and phase-contrast tomography images were reconstructed. Phase-contrast Hounsfield Units (HUp) were used for quantitative analysis analogously to conventional HU. The imaging was analyzed using overall means, ROI values as well as whole-volume-histograms and vertical gradients. Contrast to noise ratios were calculated between different probes and between imaging methods. Results: HUp showed a very good linear correlation with protein concentration in vitro. In clinical samples, HUp correlated rather well with cell count and triglyceride content. PCI was better than absorption imaging at differentiating protein concentrations in the protein samples as well as at differentiating blood plasma from cellular components. PCI also allowed for differentiation of watery samples (such as lymphoceles) from pus. Conclusion: Phase-contrast computed tomography is a promising tool for the differentiation of pathologic fluids that appear homogenous with conventional attenuation imaging.

  19. α(1) adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, actively contracts early rat rib fracture callus ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart J; Dooley, Philip C; McDonald, Aaron C; Djouma, Elvan; Schuijers, Johannes A; Ward, Alex R; Grills, Brian L

    2011-05-01

    Early, soft fracture callus that links fracture ends together is smooth muscle-like in nature. We aimed to determine if early fracture callus could be induced to contract and relax ex vivo by similar pathways to smooth muscle, that is, contraction via α(1) adrenergic receptor (α(1) AR) activation with phenylephrine (PE) and relaxation via β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2) AR) stimulation with terbutaline. A sensitive force transducer quantified 7 day rat rib fracture callus responses in modified Krebs-Henseliet (KH) solutions. Unfractured ribs along with 7, 14, and 21 day fracture calluses were analyzed for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR gene expression using qPCR, whilst 7 day fracture callus was examined via immunohistochemistry for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR- immunoreactivity. In 7 day callus, PE (10(-6)  M) significantly induced an increase in force that was greater than passive force generated in calcium-free KH (n = 8, mean 51% increase, 95% CI: 26-76%). PE-induced contractions in calluses were attenuated by the α(1) AR antagonist, prazosin (10(-6)  M; n = 7, mean 5% increase, 95% CI: 2-11%). Terbutaline did not relax callus. Gene expression of α(1) ARs was constant throughout fracture healing; however, β(2) AR expression was down-regulated at 7 days compared to unfractured rib (p contract. We propose that increased concentrations of α(1) AR agonists such as noradrenaline may tonically contract callus in vivo to promote osteogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  20. Robotic splenectomy with ex vivo bench surgery and hemi-spleen autotransplant: the first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianotti, Pier Cristoforo; Daskalaki, Despoina; Gonzalez-Ciccarelli, Luis F; Bianco, Francesco M

    2017-06-01

    We describe our experience with what is, to our knowledge, the first case of robotic assisted ex vivo partial splenectomy with auto-transplantation for a benign non parasitic cyst. The patient is a 32 year-old female with a giant, benign splenic cyst causing persistent abdominal pain. Preoperative imaging showed a cystic lesion measuring 8.3 × 7.6 cm, in the middle portion of the spleen. Due to the central location of the bulky lesion a partial splenectomy was not feasible. As an alternative to a total splenectomy, a possible reimplantation of hemi-spleen after bench surgery was offered. We proceeded with a robotic total splenectomy and bench hemisplenectomy, preserving the lower pole and a portion of the middle segment of the organ. A robotic reconstruction of the splenic vessels was then performed intra-abdominally. The reperfusion was optimal. The total operative time was 305 min, with 78 min of robotic time. Postoperative ultrasound confirmed a patent arterial and venous flow. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The pathology report was consistent with epithelial cyst of the spleen. The patient is doing well at 6-month follow-up. The optimized vision and dexterity provided by the robotic system allowed a safe and precise reconstruction of the splenic vessels, even in a deep and narrow operative field. Partial splenectomy with autotransplantation of the organ was thus achieved, avoiding a total splenectomy in a young patient.

  1. A glovebox with three levels of containment and clean room facilities for growing and handling biological material at physiologically correct gas compositions and with optimal quality assessment for tissue-engineering, ex vivo expansion, manipulation and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, J A; Voeten, R G H M; Mosborg Peterson, P

    2002-07-01

    several international regulatory bodies. The new concept will find its use in microgravity biotechnology and will set new standards on groun