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Sample records for based transgene expression

  1. Transgene expression systems in the Triticeae cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Götz; Himmelbach, Axel; Chen, Wanxin; Douchkov, Dimitar K; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The control of transgene expression is vital both for the elucidation of gene function and for the engineering of transgenic crops. Given the dominance of the Triticeae cereals in the agricultural economy of the temperate world, the development of well-performing transgene expression systems of known functionality is of primary importance. Transgenes can be expressed either transiently or stably. Transient expression systems based on direct or virus-mediated gene transfer are particularly useful in situations where the need is to rapidly screen large numbers of genes. However, an unequivocal understanding of gene function generally requires that a transgene functions throughout the plant's life and is transmitted through the sexual cycle, since this alone allows its effect to be decoupled from the plant's response to the generally stressful gene transfer event. Temporal, spatial and quantitative control of a transgene's expression depends on its regulatory environment, which includes both its promoter and certain associated untranslated region sequences. While many transgenic approaches aim to manipulate plant phenotype via ectopic gene expression, a transgene sequence can be also configured to down-regulate the expression of its endogenous counterpart, a strategy which exploits the natural gene silencing machinery of plants. In this review, current technical opportunities for controlling transgene expression in the Triticeae species are described. Apart from protocols for transient and stable gene transfer, the choice of promoters and other untranslated regulatory elements, we also consider signal peptides, as they too govern the abundance and particularly the sub-cellular localization of transgene products.

  2. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

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    Tomotsugu Ichikawa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1 ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2 several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3 expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4 ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression.

  3. A BAC-based transgenic mouse specifically expresses an inducible Cre in the urothelium.

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    Tian Huai Shen

    Full Text Available Cre-loxp mediated conditional knockout strategy has played critical roles for revealing functions of many genes essential for development, as well as the causal relationships between gene mutations and diseases in the postnatal adult mice. One key factor of this strategy is the availability of mice with tissue- or cell type-specific Cre expression. However, the success of the traditional molecular cloning approach to generate mice with tissue specific Cre expression often depends on luck. Here we provide a better alternative by using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based recombineering to insert iCreERT2 cDNA at the ATG start of the Upk2 gene. The BAC-based transgenic mice express the inducible Cre specifically in the urothelium as demonstrated by mRNA expression and staining for LacZ expression after crossing with a Rosa26 reporter mouse. Taking into consideration the size of the gene of interest and neighboring genes included in a BAC, this method should be widely applicable for generation of mice with tissue specific gene expression or deletions in a more specific manner than previously reported.

  4. Physiological levels of HBB transgene expression from S/MAR element-based replicating episomal vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Spathas, Dionysios; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-08-20

    Replicating episomal vectors (REV) are in principle able to provide long-term transgene expression in the absence of integration into the target cell genome. The scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) located 5' of the human beta-interferon gene (IFNB1) has been shown to confer a stable episomal replication and retention function within plasmid vectors when stably transfected and selected in mammalian cells. The minimal requirement for the IFNB1 S/MAR to function in DNA replication and episomal retention is transcription through this element. We used the erythroid beta-globin locus control region-beta-globin gene (betaLCR-HBB) microlocus cassette as a model to assess tissue-specific expression from within an IFNB1 S/MAR-based plasmid REV. The betaLCR-HBB plus S/MAR combination constructs provided either high or low levels of transcription through the S/MAR element. Our results show that the betaLCR-HBB microlocus is able to reproducibly and stably express at full physiological levels on an episome copy number basis. In addition, our data show that even low levels of transcription from betaLCR-HBB through the S/MAR element are sufficient to allow efficient episomal replication and retention. These data provide the principles upon which generic and flexible expression cassette-S/MAR-based REVs can be designed for a wide range of applications.

  5. Heterologous expression in transgenic mosquitoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santhosh P K; Yu hua Deng; Weidong Gu; Xiaoguang Chen

    2010-01-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue virus afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Control of such pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. The failure of these conventional approaches due to emergence of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites demonstrate the need of novel and efficacious control strategies to combat these diseases. Genetic modification(GM) of mosquito vectors to impair their ability to be infected and transmit pathogens has emerged as a new strategy to reduce transmission of many vector-borne diseases and deliver public health gains. Several advances in developing transgenic mosquitoes unable to transmit pathogens have gained support, some of them attempt to manipulate the naturally occurring endogenous refractory mechanisms, while others initiate the identification of an exogenous foreign gene which disrupt the pathogen development in insect vectors. Heterologous expression of transgenes under a native or heterologous promoter is important for the screening and effecting of the transgenic mosquitoes. The effect of the transgene on mosquito fitness is a crucial parameter influencing the success of this transgenic approach. This review examines these two aspects and describes the basic research work that has been accomplished towards understanding the complex relation between the parasite and its vector and focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to vector-borne disease transmission.

  6. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    2002-01-01

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  7. Welfare assessment in transgenic pigs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Reinhard C.; Remuge, Liliana; Carlisle, Ailsa;

    2012-01-01

    Since large animal transgenesis has been successfully attempted for the first time about 25 years ago, the technology has been applied in various lines of transgenic pigs. Nevertheless one of the concerns with the technology—animal welfare—has not been approached through systematic assessment...... and statements regarding the welfare of transgenic pigs have been based on anecdotal observations during early stages of transgenic programs. The main aim of the present study was therefore to perform an extensive welfare assessment comparing heterozygous transgenic animals expressing GFP with wildtype animals...... months. The absence of significant differences between GFP and wildtype animals in the parameters observed suggests that the transgenic animals in question are unlikely to suffer from deleterious effects of transgene expression on their welfare and thus support existing anecdotal observations of pigs...

  8. Novel Strategy to Control Transgene Expression Mediated by a Sendai Virus-Based Vector Using a Nonstructural C Protein and Endogenous MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific control of gene expression is an invaluable tool for studying various biological processes and medical applications. Efficient regulatory systems have been utilized to control transgene expression in various types of DNA viral or integrating viral vectors. However, existing regulatory systems are difficult to transfer into negative-strand RNA virus vector platforms because of significant differences in their transcriptional machineries. In this study, we developed a novel strategy for regulating transgene expression mediated by a cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp). Because of the capacity of Sendai virus (SeV) nonstructural C proteins to specifically inhibit viral RNA synthesis, overexpression of C protein significantly reduced transgene expression mediated by SeVdp vectors. We found that SeV C overexpression concomitantly reduced SeVdp mRNA levels and genomic RNA synthesis. To control C expression, target sequences for an endogenous microRNA were incorporated into the 3′ untranslated region of the C genes. Incorporation of target sequences for miR-21 into the SeVdp vector restored transgene expression in HeLa cells by decreasing C expression. Furthermore, the SeVdp vector containing target sequences for let-7a enabled cell-specific control of transgene expression in human fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that SeV C can be used as an effective regulator for controlling transgene expression. This strategy will contribute to efficient and less toxic SeVdp-mediated gene transfer in various biological applications. PMID:27764162

  9. Robust RNAi-based resistance to mixed infection of three viruses in soybean plants expressing separate short hairpins from a single transgene.

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    Zhang, Xiuchun; Sato, Shirley; Ye, Xiaohong; Dorrance, Anne E; Morris, T Jack; Clemente, Thomas E; Qu, Feng

    2011-11-01

    Transgenic plants expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of virus origin have been previously shown to confer resistance to virus infections through the highly conserved RNA-targeting process termed RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi). In this study we applied this strategy to soybean plants and achieved robust resistance to multiple viruses with a single dsRNA-expressing transgene. Unlike previous reports that relied on the expression of one long inverted repeat (IR) combining sequences of several viruses, our improved strategy utilized a transgene designed to express several shorter IRs. Each of these short IRs contains highly conserved sequences of one virus, forming dsRNA of less than 150 bp. These short dsRNA stems were interspersed with single-stranded sequences to prevent homologous recombination during the transgene assembly process. Three such short IRs with sequences of unrelated soybean-infecting viruses (Alfalfa mosaic virus, Bean pod mottle virus, and Soybean mosaic virus) were assembled into a single transgene under control of the 35S promoter and terminator of Cauliflower mosaic virus. Three independent transgenic lines were obtained and all of them exhibited strong systemic resistance to the simultaneous infection of the three viruses. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this very straight forward strategy for engineering RNAi-based virus resistance in a major crop plant. More importantly, our strategy of construct assembly makes it easy to incorporate additional short IRs in the transgene, thus expanding the spectrum of virus resistance. Finally, this strategy could be easily adapted to control virus problems of other crop plants.

  10. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Wang; Sihai Zhao; Liang Bai; Jianglin Fan; Enqi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm ...

  11. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition.

  12. Influence of DNA methylation on transgene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression in eukaryote. But DNA methylation of transgene usually leads to target gene silencing in plant genetic engineering. In this research, reporter gene b-glu- curonidase (GUS) gene (uidA) was introduced into tobaccos via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, and the foreign uidA gene became inactive in some transgenic tobaccos. No mRNA of uidA was detected in these plants by Northern blotting analysis, and DNA methylation of promoter region was found. The results indicated that gene silencing might be caused by DNA methylation of promoter.

  13. Production of Transgenic Korean Native Cattle Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Using a FIV-Based Lentiviral Vector Injected into MII Oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Nan Xu; Joon-Ho Yoon; Dae-Hwan Ko; Teoan Kim; Nam-Hyung Kim; Sang-Jun Uhm; Bon-Chul Koo; Mo-Sun Kwon; Ji-Yeol Roh; Jung-Seok Yang; Hyun-Yong Choi; Young-Tae Heo; Xiang-Shun Cui

    2013-01-01

    The potential benefits of generating and using transgenic cattle range from improvements in agriculture to the production of large quantities of pharmaceutically relevant proteins.Previous studies have attempted to produce transgenic cattle and other livestock by pronuclear injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer,but these approaches have been largely ineffective; however,a third approach,lentivirus-mediated transgenesis,has successfully produced transgenic livestock.In this study,we generated transgenic (TG) Korean native cattle using perivitelline space injection of viral vectors,which expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) systemically.Two different types of lentiviral vectors derived from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)carrying EGFP were injected into the perivitelline space of MII oocytes.EGFP expression at 8-cell stage was significantly higher in the FIV group compared to the HIV group (47.5% ± 2.2% v.s.22.9% ± 2.9%).Eight-cell embryos that expressed EGFP were cultured into blastocysts and then transferred into 40 heifers.Ten heifers were successfully impregnated and delivered 10 healthy calves.All of these calves expressed EGFP as detected by in vivo imaging,PCR and Southern blotting.In addition,we established an EGFP-expressing cell line from TG calves,which was followed by nuclear transfer (NT).Recloned 8-cell embryos also expressed EGFP,and there were no differences in the rates of fusion,cleavage and development between cells derived from TG and non-TG calves,which were subsequently used for NT.These results illustrate that FIV-based lentiviruses are useful for the production of TG cattle.Moreover,our established EGFP cell line can be used for additional studies that involve induced pluripotent stem cells.

  14. Regulation of transgene expression in genetic immunization

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    Harms J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mammalian gene expression vectors has become increasingly important for genetic immunization and gene therapy as well as basic research. Essential for the success of these vectors in genetic immunization is the proper choice of a promoter linked to the antigen of interest. Many genetic immunization vectors use promoter elements from pathogenic viruses including SV40 and CMV. Lymphokines produced by the immune response to proteins expressed by these vectors could inhibit further transcription initiation by viral promoters. Our objective was to determine the effect of IFN-g on transgene expression driven by viral SV40 or CMV promoter/enhancer and the mammalian promoter/enhancer for the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I gene. We transfected the luciferase gene driven by these three promoters into 14 cell lines of many tissues and several species. Luciferase assays of transfected cells untreated or treated with IFN-g indicated that although the viral promoters could drive luciferase production in all cell lines tested to higher or lower levels than the MHC I promoter, treatment with IFN-g inhibited transgene expression in most of the cell lines and amplification of the MHC I promoter-driven transgene expression in all cell lines. These data indicate that the SV40 and CMV promoter/enhancers may not be a suitable choice for gene delivery especially for genetic immunization or cancer cytokine gene therapy. The MHC I promoter/enhancer, on the other hand, may be an ideal transgene promoter for applications involving the immune system.

  15. Non-integrating lentiviral vectors based on the minimal S/MAR sequence retain transgene expression in dividing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Lingling; Lu, Jing; Xu, Peng; Liu, Guang; Xie, Xuemin; Mu, Wenli; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Depei

    2016-10-01

    Safe and efficient gene transfer systems are the basis of gene therapy applications. Non-integrating lentiviral (NIL) vectors are among the most promising candidates for gene transfer tools, because they exhibit high transfer efficiency in both dividing and non-dividing cells and do not present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. However, non-integrating lentiviral vectors cannot introduce stable exogenous gene expression to dividing cells, thereby limiting their application. Here, we report the design of a non-integrating lentiviral vector that contains the minimal scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) sequence (SNIL), and this SNIL vector is able to retain episomal transgene expression in dividing cells. Using SNIL vectors, we detected the expression of the eGFP gene for 61 days in SNIL-transduced stable CHO cells, either with selection or not. In the NIL group without the S/MAR sequence, however, the transduced cells died under selection for the transient expression of NIL vectors. Furthermore, Southern blot assays demonstrated that the SNIL vectors were retained extrachromosomally in the CHO cells. In conclusion, the minimal S/MAR sequence retained the non-integrating lentiviral vectors in dividing cells, which indicates that SNIL vectors have the potential for use as a gene transfer tool.

  16. Regulation of endothelial-specific transgene expression by the LacI repressor protein in vivo.

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    Susan K Morton

    Full Text Available Genetically modified mice have played an important part in elucidating gene function in vivo. However, conclusions from transgenic studies may be compromised by complications arising from the site of transgene integration into the genome and, in inducible systems, the non-innocuous nature of inducer molecules. The aim of the present study was to use the vascular system to validate a technique based on the bacterial lac operon system, in which transgene expression can be repressed and de-repressed by an innocuous lactose analogue, IPTG. We have modified an endothelium specific promoter (TIE2 with synthetic LacO sequences and made transgenic mouse lines with this modified promoter driving expression of mutant forms of connexin40 and an independently translated reporter, EGFP. We show that tissue specificity of this modified promoter is retained in the vasculature of transgenic mice in spite of the presence of LacO sequences, and that transgene expression is uniform throughout the endothelium of a range of adult systemic and cerebral arteries and arterioles. Moreover, transgene expression can be consistently down-regulated by crossing the transgenic mice with mice expressing an inhibitor protein LacI(R, and in one transgenic line, transgene expression could be de-repressed rapidly by the innocuous inducer, IPTG. We conclude that the modified bacterial lac operon system can be used successfully to validate transgenic phenotypes through a simple breeding schedule with mice homozygous for the LacI(R protein.

  17. [Generation of sugar beet transgenic plants expressing bar gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishutkina, Ia V; Kamionskaia, A M; Skriabin, K G

    2010-01-01

    The parameters of transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA 105 for 5 domestic sorts and lines of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera (Alef) Krass) were optimized. The system of transgenic tissue selection based on resistance to phosphinothricin, allowing to avoid the appearing of chimeric shoots among initial transformants was developed. The transgenic plants of sugar beet sorts Ramonskaya single seed 47, L'govskaya single seed 52 and RMS 73, and LBO 17 and LBO 19 lines expressing the gene of phosphinothricin acetyl transferase bar have been obtained. The resistance of these sorts and lines to the effect of phosphinothricin in vitro has been shown.

  18. Gamma-irradiation enhances transgene expression in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecque, R; Saudemont, A; Wickham, T J; Gonzalez, R; Hetuin, D; Fenaux, P; Quesnel, B

    2003-02-01

    The majority of immunotherapy-based gene therapy protocols consist of ex vivo gene transfer in tumor cells. To prevent further in vivo growth, modified cells must be irradiated before reinjection into patients. The present study examines the effects of gamma-irradiation on transgene expression in transduced leukemic cells. Human and murine leukemic cells were transfected with retroviral vectors or plasmids carrying beta-galactosidase, GM-CSF or CD80 genes. Fresh leukemic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were transfected with AdZ.F(pK7) adenoviral vector. gamma-irradiation at various lethal doses enhanced transgene expression in leukemic cell lines and fresh AML cells when the gene of interest was under CMV promoter but not when SV40 promoter was used. Oxidative stress also enhanced transgene expression and both irradiation and oxidative stress effects were inhibited by addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a thiol anti-oxidant, indicating the involvement of reactive oxygen species. Transgene expression was also enhanced in vivo 48 and 120 h after subcutaneous injection of irradiated leukemic cells in syngeneic mice. These results show that a cell vaccine protocol using ex vivo gene transfer of transduced cells might be feasible in acute leukemia even if leukemic cells must be irradiated at lethal doses prior to reinjection to patients.

  19. Two types of Tet-On transgenic lines for doxycycline-inducible gene expression in zebrafish rod photoreceptors and a gateway-based tet-on toolkit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah J Campbell

    Full Text Available The ability to control transgene expression within specific tissues is an important tool for studying the molecular and cellular mechanisms of development, physiology, and disease. We developed a Tet-On system for spatial and temporal control of transgene expression in zebrafish rod photoreceptors. We generated two transgenic lines using the Xenopus rhodopsin promoter to drive the reverse tetracycline-controlled transcriptional transactivator (rtTA, one with self-reporting GFP activity and one with an epitope tagged rtTA. The self-reporting line includes a tetracycline response element (TRE-driven GFP and, in the presence of doxycycline, expresses GFP in larval and adult rods. A time-course of doxycycline treatment demonstrates that maximal induction of GFP expression, as determined by the number of GFP-positive rods, is reached within approximately 24 hours of drug treatment. The epitope-tagged transgenic line eliminates the need for the self-reporting GFP activity by expressing a FLAG-tagged rtTA protein. Both lines demonstrate strong induction of TRE-driven transgenes from plasmids microinjected into one-cell embryos. These results show that spatial and temporal control of transgene expression can be achieved in rod photoreceptors. Additionally, system components are constructed in Gateway compatible vectors for the rapid cloning of doxycycline-inducible transgenes and use in other areas of zebrafish research.

  20. Transgenic Expression of the Recombinant Phytase in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiao-quan; LI Qian-feng; JIANG Li; ZHANG Da-jiang; WANG Hong-mei; GU Ming-hong; YAO Quan-hong

    2006-01-01

    In most of the cereal crop, phytic acid is the main storage form of phosphorus, which can decrease the bioavailability of phosphate. Transgenic expression of phytase is regarded as an efficient way to release phosphate from phytate in transgenic plants.In this study, a plant expression vector, containing the recombinant phytase gene driven by the maize ubiquitin (Ubi) promoter was constructed and introduced into an elite rice variety via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. During the experiment, a total of 15 independent transgenic rice lines were regenerated. The results of PCR and Southern blot indicated that the target gene was integrated into the genome of transgenic rice plants. Moreover, the RT-PCR analysis of total RNAs extracted from the immature seeds of several transgenic lines showed that the recombinant phytase gene could be normally expressed. The inorganic phosphorus content, both in the mature seeds and the leaf was significantly higher in the transgenic plants than in the untransformed wild type.

  1. Generation of stable Xenopus laevis transgenic lines expressing a transgene controlled by weak promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'hostis-Guidet, Anne; Recher, Gaëlle; Guillet, Brigitte; Al-Mohammad, Abdulrahim; Coumailleau, Pascal; Tiaho, François; Boujard, Daniel; Madigou, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    Combining two existing protocols of trangenesis, namely the REMI and the I-SceI meganuclease methods, we generated Xenopus leavis expressing a transgene under the control of a promoter that presented a restricted pattern of activity and a low level of expression. This was realized by co-incubating sperm nuclei, the I-SceI enzyme and the transgene prior to transplantation into unfertilized eggs. The addition of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element in our constructs further enhanced the expression of the transgene without affecting the tissue-specificity of the promoter activity. Using this combination of methods we produced high rates of fully transgenic animals that stably transmitted the transgene to the next generations with a transmission rate of 50% indicating a single integration event.

  2. Position-independent expression of transgenes in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldovic, L; Agalliu, D; Hackett, P B

    1999-10-01

    The variability in expression patterns of transgenes, caused by the influence of neighboring chromatin, is called 'position effect'. Border elements are DNA sequences, which have the ability to alleviate position effects. The abilities of two types of border elements, scs/scs' from the D. melanogaster 87A7 heat shock locus and the A-element from the chicken lysozyme gene, to protect transgenes from position effects were quantified in developing zebrafish embryos. The transgenic construct used was FV3CAT, which consists of the carp beta-actin transcriptional regulatory region, the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and the 3'-untranslated region from the Chinook salmon growth hormone gene. FV3CAT constructs flanked by either scs/scs'-elements or A-elements were introduced into zebrafish chromosomes and the spatial and temporal expression patterns of the transgenes were quantified in multiple generations of transgenic zebrafish. Levels of transgene expression were uniform in the pre-differentiated and fully differentiated populations of cells present during embryonic development. Levels of transgene expression were proportional to the numbers of integrated transgenes. Expression of transgenes per cell varied less than two-fold in different transgenic lines. Both types of border elements were able to prevent the influences of neighboring chromatin on transgene expression through three generations of fish. The results are consistent with the ability of border elements to function with equal efficiencies in the many cell types found in vertebrates. Thus, inclusion of border elements in genetic constructs can provide reliable and reproducible levels of gene expression in multiple lines of fish.

  3. Spatial and temporal control of transgene expression in zebrafish.

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    Alexander A Akerberg

    Full Text Available Transgenic zebrafish research has provided valuable insights into gene functions and cell behaviors directing vertebrate development, physiology, and disease models. Most approaches use constitutive transgene expression and therefore do not provide control over the timing or levels of transgene induction. We describe an inducible gene expression system that uses new tissue-specific zebrafish transgenic lines that express the Gal4 transcription factor fused to the estrogen-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor. We show these Gal4-ERT driver lines confer rapid, tissue-specific induction of UAS-controlled transgenes following tamoxifen exposure in both embryos and adult fish. We demonstrate how this technology can be used to define developmental windows of gene function by spatiotemporal-controlled expression of constitutively active Notch1 in embryos. Given the array of existing UAS lines, the modular nature of this system will enable many previously intractable zebrafish experiments.

  4. Combinatorial Control of Transgene Expression by Hypoxia-Responsive Promoter and MicroRNA Regulation for Neural Stem Cell-Based Cancer Therapy

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    Yumei Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their strong migratory capacity, tumor tropism, and tumor inhibitory effect, neural stem cells (NSCs have recently emerged as one of the most attractive gene delivery vectors for cancer therapy. However, further animal studies found that proportional NSC vectors were distributed to nontarget organs after intravenous injection and the nonspecific transgene expression led to significant cytotoxic effects in these organs. Hence, an expression cassette that controls the transgene expression within NSC vectors in a tumor site-specific manner is desired. Considering hypoxia as a hallmark of tumor microenvironment, we have developed a novel NSC vector platform coupling transcriptional targeting with microRNA (miRNA regulation for tumor hypoxia targeting. This combinatorial vector employed a hypoxia-responsive promoter and repeated targeting sequences of an miRNA that is enriched in NSCs but downregulated upon hypoxia induction to control the transgene expression. This resulted in significantly improved hypoxic selectivity over the use of a control vector without miRNA regulation. Thus, incorporating miRNA regulation into a transcriptional targeting vector adds an extra layer of security to prevent off-target transgene expression and should be useful for the development of NSC vectors with high targeting specifcity for cancer therapy.

  5. Temporal and spatial patterning of transgene expression by near-infrared irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Leyre; Lopez, Daniel; Arruebo, Manuel; Wilson, Christopher G; Franceschi, Renny T.; Voellmy, Richard; Santamaria, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether near-infrared (NIR) light could be employed for patterning transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Hollow gold nanoparticles with a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at ~750 nm, a wavelength within the so called “tissue optical window”, were used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These composites, which efficiently transduce NIR photon energy into heat, were loaded with genetically-modified cells that harbor a heat-activated and ligand-dependent gene switch for regulating transgene expression. NIR laser irradiation in the presence of ligand triggered 3-dimensional patterns of transgene expression faithfully matching the illuminated areas of plasmonic cell constructs. This noninvasive technology was proven useful for remotely controlling in vivo the spatiotemporal bioavailability of transgenic vascular endothelial growth factor. The combination of spatial control by means of NIR irradiation along with safe and timed transgene induction presents a high application potential for engineering tissues in regenerative medicine scenarios. PMID:24957294

  6. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm cocoon, the mammary glands of transgenic animals have enormous potential. Compared with other mammalian species (pig, goat, sheep, and cow that are currently being studied as bioreactors, rabbits offer many advantages: high fertility, easy generation of transgenic founders and offspring, insensitivity to prion diseases, relatively high milk production, and no transmission of severe diseases to humans. Noticeably, for a small- or medium-sized facility, the rabbit system is ideal to produce up to 50 kg of protein per year, considering both economical and hygienic aspects; rabbits are attractive candidates for the mammary-gland-specific expression of recombinant proteins. We also reviewed recombinant proteins that have been produced by targeted expression in the mammary glands of rabbits and discussed the limitations of transgenic animal bioreactors.

  7. Transgenic zebrafish recapitulating tbx16 gene early developmental expression.

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    Simon Wells

    Full Text Available We describe the creation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP driven by a 7.5 kb promoter region of the tbx16 gene. This promoter segment is sufficient to recapitulate early embryonic expression of endogenous tbx16 in the presomitic mesoderm, the polster and, subsequently, in the hatching gland. Expression of GFP in the transgenic lines later in development diverges to some extent from endogenous tbx16 expression with the serendipitous result that one line expresses GFP specifically in commissural primary ascending (CoPA interneurons of the developing spinal cord. Using this line we demonstrate that the gene mafba (valentino is expressed in CoPA interneurons.

  8. Generation of transgenic dogs that conditionally express green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Kim, Teoan; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Ko, Chemyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-06-01

    We report the creation of a transgenic dog that conditionally expresses eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) under the regulation of doxycycline. Briefly, fetal fibroblasts infected with a Tet-on eGFP vector were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently reconstructed oocytes were transferred to recipients. Three clones having transgenes were born and one dog was alive. The dog showed all features of inducible expression of eGFP upon doxycycline administration, and successful breeding resulted in eGFP-positive puppies, confirming stable insertion of the transgene into the genome. This inducible dog model will be useful for a variety of medical research studies.

  9. Indication of the Expression of Transgene in Rice Plant Based on Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technique Ⅱ-Growth Monitoring of Samples in the Contrast Experiment%Indication of the Expression of Transgene in Rice Plant Based on Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technique Ⅱ——Growth Monitoring of Samples in the Contrast Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ru; CHEN Jin-song; YUAN Ding-yang; LIN Hui; TAN Yan-ning; YUE Yue-min

    2011-01-01

    Since the complication of monitoring and evaluating the problems about the transgenic expression and its impacts on the receptor in the transgenic crop breeding and other relevant evaluated works, the authors in the present work tried to assess the differences of spectral parameters of the transgenic rice in contrast with its parent group quantitatively and qualitatively, fulfilling the growth monitoring of the transgenic samples.The spectral parameters (spectral morphological characteristics and indices) chosen are highly related to internal or external stresses to the receipts, and thus could be applied as indicators of biophysical or biochemical processes changes of plant. By ASD portable field spectroradiometer with high-density probe, fine foliar spectra of 8 groups were obtained. By analyzing spectral angle and continuum removal, the spectral morphological differences and their locations of sample spectra were found which could be as auxiliary priori knowledge for quantitative analysis. By investigating spectral indices of the samples, the quantitative differences of spectra were revealed about foliar chlorophyll a+b and carotenoid content. In this study both the spectral differences between transgenic and parent groups and among transgenic groups were investigated. The results show that hyperspectral technique is promising and a helpful auxiliary tool in the study of monitoring the transgenic crop and other relevant researches. By this technique, quantitative and qualitative results of sample spectra could be provided as prior knowledge, as certain orientation, for laboratory professional advanced transgenic breeding study.

  10. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  11. TRANSGENIC PLANTS EXPRESSING BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DELTA-ENDOTOXINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-rong,Li; BrendaOppert; KunYanZhu; RandallA.Higgins; Fang-nengHuang; LawrentL.Buschman

    2003-01-01

    Commercial varieties of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants have been developed in many countries to control target pests. Initially, the expression of native Bt genes in plants was low due to mRNA instability, improper splicing, and post-translation modifications. Subsequently, modifications of the native Bt genes greatly enhanced expression levels. This is a review of the developments that made modem high-expression transgenic Bt plants possible, with an emphasis on the reasons for the low-level expression of native Bt genes in plant systems, and the techniques that have been used to improve plant expression of Bt toxin genes.

  12. Transgenic Anopheles gambiae expressing an antimalarial peptide suffer no significant fitness cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Clare C; Meredith, Janet M; Eggleston, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases present some of the greatest health challenges faced by the world today. In many cases, existing control measures are compromised by insecticide resistance, pathogen tolerance to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines. In light of these difficulties, new genetic tools for disease control programmes, based on the deployment of genetically modified mosquitoes, are seen as having great promise. Transgenic strains may be used to control disease transmission either by suppressing vector populations or by replacing susceptible with refractory genotypes. In practice, the fitness of the transgenic strain relative to natural mosquitoes will be a critical determinant of success. We previously described a transgenic strain of Anopheles gambiae expressing the Vida3 peptide into the female midgut following a blood-meal, which exhibited significant protection against malaria parasites. Here, we investigated the fitness of this strain relative to non-transgenic controls through comparisons of various life history traits. Experiments were designed, as far as possible, to equalize genetic backgrounds and heterogeneity such that fitness comparisons focussed on the presence and expression of the transgene cassette. We also employed reciprocal crosses to identify any fitness disturbance associated with inheritance of the transgene from either the male or female parent. We found no evidence that the presence or expression of the effector transgene or associated fluorescence markers caused any significant fitness cost in relation to larval mortality, pupal sex ratio, fecundity, hatch rate or longevity of blood-fed females. In fact, fecundity was increased in transgenic strains. We did, however, observe some fitness disturbances associated with the route of inheritance of the transgene. Maternal inheritance delayed male pupation whilst paternal inheritance increased adult longevity for both males and unfed females. Overall, in comparison to controls, there was

  13. Transgenic Anopheles gambiae expressing an antimalarial peptide suffer no significant fitness cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare C McArthur

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases present some of the greatest health challenges faced by the world today. In many cases, existing control measures are compromised by insecticide resistance, pathogen tolerance to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines. In light of these difficulties, new genetic tools for disease control programmes, based on the deployment of genetically modified mosquitoes, are seen as having great promise. Transgenic strains may be used to control disease transmission either by suppressing vector populations or by replacing susceptible with refractory genotypes. In practice, the fitness of the transgenic strain relative to natural mosquitoes will be a critical determinant of success. We previously described a transgenic strain of Anopheles gambiae expressing the Vida3 peptide into the female midgut following a blood-meal, which exhibited significant protection against malaria parasites. Here, we investigated the fitness of this strain relative to non-transgenic controls through comparisons of various life history traits. Experiments were designed, as far as possible, to equalize genetic backgrounds and heterogeneity such that fitness comparisons focussed on the presence and expression of the transgene cassette. We also employed reciprocal crosses to identify any fitness disturbance associated with inheritance of the transgene from either the male or female parent. We found no evidence that the presence or expression of the effector transgene or associated fluorescence markers caused any significant fitness cost in relation to larval mortality, pupal sex ratio, fecundity, hatch rate or longevity of blood-fed females. In fact, fecundity was increased in transgenic strains. We did, however, observe some fitness disturbances associated with the route of inheritance of the transgene. Maternal inheritance delayed male pupation whilst paternal inheritance increased adult longevity for both males and unfed females. Overall, in comparison to

  14. Enhanced transgene expression in sugarcane by co-expression of virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Ji Gao

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional gene silencing is commonly observed in polyploid species and often poses a major limitation to plant improvement via biotechnology. Five plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing were evaluated for their ability to counteract gene silencing and enhance the expression of the Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (EYFP or the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene in sugarcane, a major sugar and biomass producing polyploid. Functionality of these suppressors was first verified in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells, and later tested by transient expression in sugarcane young leaf segments and protoplasts. In young leaf segments co-expressing a suppressor, EYFP reached its maximum expression at 48-96 h post-DNA introduction and maintained its peak expression for a longer time compared with that in the absence of a suppressor. Among the five suppressors, Tomato bushy stunt virus-encoded P19 and Barley stripe mosaic virus-encoded γb were the most efficient. Co-expression with P19 and γb enhanced EYFP expression 4.6-fold and 3.6-fold in young leaf segments, and GUS activity 2.3-fold and 2.4-fold in protoplasts compared with those in the absence of a suppressor, respectively. In transgenic sugarcane, co-expression of GUS and P19 suppressor showed the highest accumulation of GUS levels with an average of 2.7-fold more than when GUS was expressed alone, with no detrimental phenotypic effects. The two established transient expression assays, based on young leaf segments and protoplasts, and confirmed by stable transgene expression, offer a rapid versatile system to verify the efficiency of RNA silencing suppressors that proved to be valuable in enhancing and stabilizing transgene expression in sugarcane.

  15. Tetracycline-inducible Expression Systems: New Strategies and Practices in the Transgenic Mouse Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan SUN; Xigu CHEN; Dong XIAO

    2007-01-01

    To accurately analyze the function of transgene(s) of interest in transgenic mice, and to generate credible transgenic animal models for multifarious human diseases to precisely mimic human disease states, it is critical to tightly regulate gene expression in the animals in a conditional manner. The ability to turn gene expression on or off in the restricted cells or tissues at specific time permits unprecedented flexibility in dissecting gene functions in health and disease. Pioneering studies in conditional transgene expression have brought about the development of a wide variety of controlled gene expression systems, which meet this criterion. Among them, the tetracycline-controlled expression systems (e.g. Tet-off system and Tet-on system) have been used extensively in vitro and in vivo. In recent years, some strategies derived from tetracycline-inducible system alone, as well as the combined use of Tet-based systems and Cre/lox P switching gene expression system, have been newly developed to allow more flexibility for exploring gene functions in health and disease, and produce credible transgenic animal models for various human diseases. In this review these newly developed strategies are discussed.

  16. Calcium electrotransfer for termination of transgene expression in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Spanggaard, Iben; Olsen, Caroline Holkman;

    2011-01-01

    in vivo imaging of infrared fluorescent "Katushka" and erythropoietin evaluated by ELISA and hemoglobin. Histology was performed. Electrotransfer of Katushka and erythropoietin yielded significant expression. Maximal calcium uptake occurred after injection of Ca(2+) before electropulsing using eight high......Gene electrotransfer is expanding in clinical use, thus we have searched for an emergency procedure to stop transgene expression in case of serious adverse events. Calcium is cytotoxic at high intracellular levels, so we tested effects of calcium electrotransfer on transgene expression in muscle....... A clinical grade calcium solution (20 µl, 168 mM) was injected into transfected mouse or rat tibialis cranialis muscle. Ca(2+) uptake was quantified using calcium 45 ((45)Ca), and voltage and time between injection and pulsation were varied. Extinction of transgene expression was investigated by using both...

  17. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  18. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  19. Live imaging of protein kinase activities in transgenic mice expressing FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Yuji; Sumiyama, Kenta; Mizuno, Rei; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Genetically-encoded biosensors based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been widely used in biology to visualize the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling molecules. Despite the increasing multitude of these biosensors, their application has been mostly limited to cultured cells with transient biosensor expression, due to particular difficulties in the development of transgenic mice that express FRET biosensors. In this study, we report the efficient generation of transgenic mouse lines expressing heritable and functional biosensors for ERK and PKA. These transgenic mice were created by the cytoplasmic co-injection of Tol2 transposase mRNA and a circular plasmid harbouring Tol2 recombination sites. High expression of the biosensors in a wide range of cell types allowed us to screen newborn mice simply by inspection. Observation of these transgenic mice by two-photon excitation microscopy yielded real-time activity maps of ERK and PKA in various tissues, with greatly improved signal-to-background ratios. Our transgenic mice may be bred into diverse genetic backgrounds; moreover, the protocol we have developed paves the way for the generation of transgenic mice that express other FRET biosensors, with important applications in the characterization of physiological and pathological signal transduction events in addition to drug development and screening.

  20. Knockdown of myostatin expression by RNAi enhances muscle growth in transgenic sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei Hu

    Full Text Available Myostatin (MSTN has been shown to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and growth. MSTN dysfunction therefore offers a strategy for promoting animal growth performance in livestock production. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using RNAi-based technology to generate transgenic sheep with a double-muscle phenotype. A shRNA expression cassette targeting sheep MSTN was used to generate stable shRNA-expressing fibroblast clones. Transgenic sheep were further produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT technology. Five lambs developed to term and three live lambs were obtained. Integration of shRNA expression cassette in three live lambs was confirmed by PCR. RNase protection assay showed that the shRNAs targeting MSTN were expressed in muscle tissues of three transgenic sheep. MSTN expression was significantly inhibited in muscle tissues of transgenic sheep when compared with control sheep. Moreover, transgenic sheep showed a tendency to faster increase in body weight than control sheep. Histological analysis showed that myofiber diameter of transgenic sheep M17 were bigger than that of control sheep. Our findings demonstrate a promising approach to promoting muscle growth in livestock production.

  1. Efficient expression of transgenes in adult zebrafish by electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao S Hari

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of transgenes in muscle by injection of naked DNA is widely practiced. Application of electrical pulses at the site of injection was demonstrated to improve transgene expression in muscle tissue. Zebrafish is a precious model to investigate developmental biology in vertebrates. In this study we investigated the effect of electroporation on expression of transgenes in 3–6 month old adult zebrafish. Results Electroporation parameters such as number of pulses, voltage and amount of plasmid DNA were optimized and it was found that 6 pulses of 40 V·cm-1 at 15 μg of plasmid DNA per fish increased the luciferase expression 10-fold compared to controls. Similar enhancement in transgene expression was also observed in Indian carp (Labeo rohita. To establish the utility of adult zebrafish as a system for transient transfections, the strength of the promoters was compared in A2 cells and adult zebrafish after electroporation. The relative strengths of the promoters were found to be similar in cell lines and in adult zebrafish. GFP fluorescence in tissues after electroporation was also studied by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusion Electroporation after DNA injection enhances gene expression 10-fold in adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters for optimum transfection of adult zebrafish with tweezer type electrode were presented. Enhanced reporter gene expression upon electroporation allowed comparison of strengths of the promoters in vivo in zebrafish.

  2. MAR elements and transposons for improved transgene integration and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Déborah; Harraghy, Niamh; Le Fourn, Valérie; Bire, Solenne; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Regamey, Alexandre; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence; Bigot, Yves; Mermod, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Reliable and long-term expression of transgenes remain significant challenges for gene therapy and biotechnology applications, especially when antibiotic selection procedures are not applicable. In this context, transposons represent attractive gene transfer vectors because of their ability to promote efficient genomic integration in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, expression from genome-integrating vectors may be inhibited by variable gene transcription and/or silencing events. In this study, we assessed whether inclusion of two epigenetic control elements, the human Matrix Attachment Region (MAR) 1-68 and X-29, in a piggyBac transposon vector, may lead to more reliable and efficient expression in CHO cells. We found that addition of the MAR 1-68 at the center of the transposon did not interfere with transposition frequency, and transgene expressing cells could be readily detected from the total cell population without antibiotic selection. Inclusion of the MAR led to higher transgene expression per integrated copy, and reliable expression could be obtained from as few as 2-4 genomic copies of the MAR-containing transposon vector. The MAR X-29-containing transposons was found to mediate elevated expression of therapeutic proteins in polyclonal or monoclonal CHO cell populations using a transposable vector devoid of selection gene. Overall, we conclude that MAR and transposable vectors can be used to improve transgene expression from few genomic transposition events, which may be useful when expression from a low number of integrated transgene copies must be obtained and/or when antibiotic selection cannot be applied.

  3. MAR elements and transposons for improved transgene integration and expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Ley

    Full Text Available Reliable and long-term expression of transgenes remain significant challenges for gene therapy and biotechnology applications, especially when antibiotic selection procedures are not applicable. In this context, transposons represent attractive gene transfer vectors because of their ability to promote efficient genomic integration in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, expression from genome-integrating vectors may be inhibited by variable gene transcription and/or silencing events. In this study, we assessed whether inclusion of two epigenetic control elements, the human Matrix Attachment Region (MAR 1-68 and X-29, in a piggyBac transposon vector, may lead to more reliable and efficient expression in CHO cells. We found that addition of the MAR 1-68 at the center of the transposon did not interfere with transposition frequency, and transgene expressing cells could be readily detected from the total cell population without antibiotic selection. Inclusion of the MAR led to higher transgene expression per integrated copy, and reliable expression could be obtained from as few as 2-4 genomic copies of the MAR-containing transposon vector. The MAR X-29-containing transposons was found to mediate elevated expression of therapeutic proteins in polyclonal or monoclonal CHO cell populations using a transposable vector devoid of selection gene. Overall, we conclude that MAR and transposable vectors can be used to improve transgene expression from few genomic transposition events, which may be useful when expression from a low number of integrated transgene copies must be obtained and/or when antibiotic selection cannot be applied.

  4. Transgenic rice homozygous lines expressing GNA showed enhanced resistance to rice brown planthopper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mature seed-derived calli from two elite Chinese japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars Eyi 105 and Ewan 5 were co-transformed with two plasmids, pWRG1515 and pRSSGNA1, containing the selectable marker hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hpt), the reporter β-glucuronidase gene (gusA) and the snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis)lectin gene (gna) via particle bombardment. 61 independent transgenic rice plants were regenerated from 329 bombarded calli. 79% transgenic plants contained all the three genes, revealed by PCR/Southern blot analysis. Western blot analysis revealed that 36 out of 48 gna-containing transgenic plants expressed GNA (75 %) at various levels with the highest expression being approximately 0.5% of total soluble protein. Genetic analysis confirmed Mendelian segregation of transgenes in progeny. From the R2 generations whose R1 parent plants showing 3:1 Mendelian segregation patterns,we identified five independent homozygous lines containing and expressing all the three transgenes. Insect bioassay and feeding tests showed that these homozygous lines had significant inhibition to rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens, BPH) by decreasing BPH survival and overall fecundity, retarding BPH development and declining BPH feeding.These BPH-resistant lines have been incorporated into rice insect resistance breeding program. This is the first report that homozygous transgenic rice lines expressing GNA, developed by genetic transformation and through genetic analysis-based selection, conferred enhanced resistance to BPH, one of the most damaging insect pests in rice.

  5. Transgenic labeling of parvalbumin-expressing neurons with tdTomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, T; Ting, J T; Monteiro, P; Feng, G

    2016-05-03

    Parvalbumin (PVALB)-expressing fast-spiking interneurons subserve important roles in many brain regions by modulating circuit function and dysfunction of these neurons is strongly implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and autism. To facilitate the study of PVALB neuron function we need to be able to identify PVALB neurons in vivo. We have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorophore tdTomato under the control of endogenous regulatory elements of the Pvalb gene locus (JAX # 027395). We show that the tdTomato transgene is faithfully expressed relative to endogenous PVALB expression throughout the brain. Furthermore, targeted patch clamp recordings confirm that the labeled populations in neocortex, striatum, and hippocampus are fast-spiking interneurons based on intrinsic properties. This new transgenic mouse line provides a useful tool to study PVALB neuron function in the normal brain as well as in mouse models of psychiatric disease.

  6. Transgene expression in the basidiomycete root pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toward development of a genetic transformation system for Armillaria mellea, we used particle bombardment to identify promoters for driving transgene expression. The plasmid tested was pYES-hph-004iGFP, on which the green fluorescence protein gene, gfp, is linked to the Agaricus bisporus gpdII promo...

  7. Calcium electrotransfer for termination of transgene expression in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Spanggaard, Iben; Olsen, Caroline Holkman

    2011-01-01

    . A clinical grade calcium solution (20 μl, 168 mM) was injected into transfected mouse or rat tibialis cranialis muscle. Ca(2+) uptake was quantified using calcium 45 ((45)Ca), and voltage and time between injection and pulsation were varied. Extinction of transgene expression was investigated by using both...

  8. Nuclear Expression of a Mitochondrial DNA Gene: Mitochondrial Targeting of Allotopically Expressed Mutant ATP6 in Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Dunn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear encoding of mitochondrial DNA transgenes followed by mitochondrial targeting of the expressed proteins (allotopic expression; AE represents a potentially powerful strategy for creating animal models of mtDNA disease. Mice were created that allotopically express either a mutant (A6M or wildtype (A6W mt-Atp6 transgene. Compared to non-transgenic controls, A6M mice displayed neuromuscular and motor deficiencies (wire hang, pole, and balance beam analyses; P0.05. This study illustrates a mouse model capable of circumventing in vivo mitochondrial mutations. Moreover, it provides evidence supporting AE as a tool for mtDNA disease research with implications in development of DNA-based therapeutics.

  9. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Lundt, Ramona; Gennequin, Benjamin; Schrage, Hanna; Beins, Eva; Krämer, Alexandra; Zimmer, Till; Limmer, Andreas; Zimmer, Andreas; Otte, David-Marian

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2). As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg) to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  10. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Caroline Schmöle

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2. As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  11. Exogenous gypsy insulator sequences modulate transgene expression in the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballar-Lejarazú, Rebeca; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A

    2013-04-30

    Malaria parasites are transmitted to humans by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles, and these insects are the targets of innovative vector control programs. Proposed approaches include the use of genetic strategies based on transgenic mosquitoes to suppress or modify vector populations. Although substantial advances have been made in engineering resistant mosquito strains, limited efforts have been made in refining mosquito transgene expression, in particular attenuating the effects of insertions sites, which can result in variations in phenotypes and impacts on fitness due to the random integration of transposon constructs. A promising strategy to mitigate position effects is the identification of insulator or boundary DNA elements that could be used to isolate transgenes from the effects of their genomic environment. We applied quantitative approaches that show that exogenous insulator-like DNA derived from the Drosophila melanogaster gypsy retrotransposon can increase and stabilize transgene expression in transposon-mediated random insertions and recombinase-catalyzed, site-specific integrations in the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi. These sequences can contribute to precise expression of transgenes in mosquitoes engineered for both basic and applied goals.

  12. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  13. Effects of Transgenic Expression of Botulinum Toxins in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Backhaus, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins (botulinum toxins and tetanus toxin) disrupt neurotransmitter release by cleaving neuronal SNARE proteins. We generated transgenic flies allowing for conditional expression of different botulinum toxins and evaluated their potential as tools for the analysis of synaptic and neuronal network function in Drosophila melanogaster by applying biochemical assays and behavioral analysis. On the biochemical level, cleavage assays in cultured Drosophila S2 cells were performed ...

  14. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  15. Gene expression of beta carotene genes in transgenic biofortified cassava

    OpenAIRE

    Telengech, P. K.; Maling’a, J. N.; Nyende, A. B.; Gichuki, S. T.; Wanjala, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    Cassava is an important food for millions of people around the world. However, cassava is deficient in protein, iron, zinc, pro-vitamin A and vitamin E. Cassava biofortified with pro-vitamin A can help reduce Vitamin A Deficiency among the undernourished communities that rely upon it for sustenance. BioCassava Plus project has developed transgenic cassava that expresses beta carotene in roots using root specific patatin promoter. This study aimed at confirming expression of nptII, crtB and DX...

  16. Expression and purification of recombinant human serum albumin from selectively terminable transgenic rice*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Feng-zhen; Shen, Zhi-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is widely utilized for medical purposes and biochemical research. Transgenic rice has proved to be an attractive bioreactor for mass production of recombinant HSA (rHSA). However, transgene spread is a major environmental and food safety concern for transgenic rice expressing proteins of medical value. This study aimed to develop a selectively terminable transgenic rice line expressing HSA in rice seeds, and a simple process for recovery and purification of rHSA for ...

  17. Lupine leghemoglobin I: expression in transgenic Lotus and tobacco tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strózycki, P M; Karłowski, W M; Dessaux, Y; Petit, A; Legocki, A B

    2000-03-01

    The proximal parts of the promoters of the genes for symbiotic-type hemoglobins are generally conserved, but the promoter of the lbI gene of lupine (LulbI) shows some unusual structural features. It lacks typical organ-specific elements characteristic of all the leghemoglobin gene promoters described thus far. We have analysed its functional activity in transgenic Lotus corniculatus. A fusion construct between the lbI promoter and the GUS reporter gene was expressed mainly in the central zone of the root nodule, but the product was also detected in the non-nodule root zone and in roots in tissue culture. In roots of transgenic tobacco, the activity of the promoter was only 24% lower than in Lotus nodules. LulbI promoter activity was also detected in tobacco leaves. Lupine hemoglobin I has a higher sequence identity to symbiotic-type hemoglobins and thus it groups within the "Class II" hemoglobins.

  18. Transgene expression in plants : Position-induced spatial and temporal variations of luciferase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van W.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis we have examined the spatial and temporal aspects of gene expression and the position induced differences in transgene expression between individual transformants. For this purpose we imaged luciferase ( luc ) gene expression driven by three different promoters that are active through

  19. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  20. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression.

  1. Transgenic CHD1L expression in mouse induces spontaneous tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amplification of 1q21 is the most frequent genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, which was detected in 58-78% of primary HCC cases by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Using chromosome microdissection/hybrid selection approach we recently isolated a candidate oncogene CHD1L from 1q21 region. Our previous study has demonstrated that CHD1L had strong oncogenic ability, which could be effectively suppressed by siRNA against CHD1L. The molecular mechanism of CHD1L in tumorigenesis has been associated with its role in promoting cell proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further investigate the in vivo oncogenic role of CHD1L, CHD1L ubiquitous-expression transgenic mouse model was generated. Spontaneous tumor formations were found in 10/41 (24.4% transgenic mice, including 4 HCCs, but not in their 39 wild-type littermates. In addition, alcohol intoxication was used to induce hepatocyte pathological lesions and results found that overexpression of CHD1L in hepatocytes could promote tumor susceptibility in CHD1L-transgenic mice. To address the mechanism of CHD1L in promoting cell proliferation, DNA content between CHD1L-transgenic and wildtype mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs was compared by flow cytometry. Flow cytometry results found that CHD1L could facilitate DNA synthesis and G1/S transition through the up-regulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4, and down-regulation of Rb, p27(Kip1, and p53. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data strongly support that CHD1L is a novel oncogene and plays an important role in HCC pathogenesis.

  2. Growth, fecundity and competitive ability of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum subsp. subterraneum cv. Leura expressing a sunflower seed albumin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfree, Robert C; Woods, Matthew J; Young, Andrew G; Burdon, Jeremy J; Higgins, T J V

    2004-01-01

    Ecological risk assessment is an important step in the production and commercialisation of transgenic plants. To date, however, most risk assessment studies have been performed on crop plants, and few have considered the ecological consequences associated with genetic modification of pasture species. In this study we compared the growth, yield, population dynamics and competitive ability of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum subsp. subterraneum cv. Leura (subclover) expressing a nutritive sunflower seed albumin (ssa) gene with the equivalent non-transgenic commercial line in a glasshouse competition trial. Plants were grown in low-fertility soil typical of unimproved native southeastern Australian grasslands. We measured survivorship, seed production rate, seed germination rate, seed weight, dry weight yield and the intrinsic rate of population increase (lambda) of plants grown in mixtures and monocultures over a range of densities (250 to 2000 plants m(-2)), and also determined intragenotypic and intergenotypic competition coefficients for each line. There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic plants in any of the measured variables except survivorship; transgenic plants had a significantly lower survival rate than non-transgenic plants when grown at high densities (pdensity-dependent effects were observed for all measured variables, and in all models plant density affected the response variables more than the presence of the transgene. Based on these results, we conclude that the ssa gene construct appears to confer no advantage to transgenic T. s. subterraneum cv. Leura growing in mixed or pure swards under the fertility and density regimes examined in the trial. Our data also suggest that transgenic subterranean clover expressing the ssa gene is unlikely to exhibit a competitive advantage over associated non-transgenic commercial cultivars when grown in dense swards in low-fertility pastures.

  3. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment.

  4. Cell-specific promoter in adenovirus vector for transgenic expression of SERCA1 ATPase in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inesi, G; Lewis, D; Sumbilla, C; Nandi, A; Strock, C; Huff, K W; Rogers, T B; Johns, D C; Kessler, P D; Ordahl, C P

    1998-03-01

    Adenovirus-mediated transfer of cDNA encoding the chicken skeletal muscle sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1) yielded selective expression in cultured chick embryo cardiac myocytes under control of a segment (-268 base pair) of the cell-specific cardiac troponin T (cTnT) promoter or nonselective expression in myocytes and fibroblasts under control of a constitutive viral [cytomegalovirus (CMV)] promoter. Under optimal conditions nearly all cardiac myocytes in culture were shown to express transgenic SERCA1 ATPase. Expression was targeted to intracellular membranes and was recovered in subcellular fractions with a pattern identical to that of the endogenous SERCA2a ATPase. Relative to control myocytes, transgenic SERCA1 expression increased up to four times the rates of ATP-dependent (and thapsigargin-sensitive) Ca2+ transport activity of cell homogenates. Although the CMV promoter was more active than the cTnT promoter, an upper limit for transgenic expression of functional enzyme was reached under control of either promoter by adjustment of the adenovirus plaque-forming unit titer of infection media. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration transients and tension development of whole myocytes were also influenced to a similar limit by transgenic expression of SERCA1 under control of either promoter. Our experiments demonstrate that a cell-specific protein promoter in recombinant adenovirus vectors yields highly efficient and selective transgene expression of a membrane-bound and functional enzyme in cardiac myocytes.

  5. Production of transgenic pigs over-expressing the antiviral gene Mx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanmei; Yang, Huaqiang; Yang, Dongshan; Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Liu, Zhaoming; Fan, Nana; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Gu, Weiwang; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    The myxovirus resistance gene (Mx1) has a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. It is therefore an interesting candidate gene to improve disease resistance in farm animals. In this study, we report the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic pigs over-expressing the Mx1 gene. These transgenic pigs express approximately 15-25 times more Mx1 mRNA than non-transgenic pigs, and the protein level of Mx1 was also markedly enhanced. We challenged fibroblast cells isolated from the ear skin of transgenic and control pigs with influenza A virus and classical swine fever virus (CFSV). Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed a profound decrease of influenza A proliferation in Mx1 transgenic cells. Growth kinetics showed an approximately 10-fold reduction of viral copies in the transgenic cells compared to non-transgenic controls. Additionally, we found that the Mx1 transgenic cells were more resistant to CSFV infection in comparison to non-transgenic cells. These results demonstrate that the Mx1 transgene can protect against viral infection in cells of transgenic pigs and indicate that the Mx1 transgene can be harnessed to develop disease-resistant pigs.

  6. RNA interference is responsible for reduction of transgene expression after Sleeping Beauty transposase mediated somatic integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rauschhuber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrating non-viral vectors based on transposable elements are widely used for genetically engineering mammalian cells in functional genomics and therapeutic gene transfer. For the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposase system it was demonstrated that convergent transcription driven by the SB transposase inverted repeats (IRs in eukaryotic cells occurs after somatic integration. This could lead to formation of double-stranded RNAs potentially presenting targets for the RNA interference (RNAi machinery and subsequently resulting into silencing of the transgene. Therefore, we aimed at investigating transgene expression upon transposition under RNA interference knockdown conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish RNAi knockdown cell lines we took advantage of the P19 protein, which is derived from the tomato bushy stunt virus. P19 binds and inhibits 21 nucleotides long, small-interfering RNAs and was shown to sufficiently suppress RNAi. We found that transgene expression upon SB mediated transposition was enhanced, resulting into a 3.2-fold increased amount of colony forming units (CFU after transposition. In contrast, if the transgene cassette is insulated from the influence of chromosomal position effects by the chicken-derived cHS4 insulating sequences or when applying the Forg Prince transposon system, that displays only negligible transcriptional activity, similar numbers of CFUs were obtained. CONCLUSION: In summary, we provide evidence for the first time that after somatic integration transposon derived transgene expression is regulated by the endogenous RNAi machinery. In the future this finding will help to further improve the molecular design of the SB transposase vector system.

  7. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O;

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific tra...... of the transgene was observed in cell types other than beta-islet cells.......Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50...

  8. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katter, Katharina; Geurts, Aron M; Hoffmann, Orsolya; Mátés, Lajos; Landa, Vladimir; Hiripi, László; Moreno, Carol; Lazar, Jozef; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Popova, Elena; Jerchow, Boris; Becker, Katja; Devaraj, Anantharam; Walter, Ingrid; Grzybowksi, Michael; Corbett, Molly; Filho, Artur Rangel; Hodges, Matthew R; Bader, Michael; Ivics, Zoltán; Jacob, Howard J; Pravenec, Michal; Bosze, Zsuzsanna; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2013-03-01

    Germline transgenesis is an important procedure for functional investigation of biological pathways, as well as for animal biotechnology. We have established a simple, nonviral protocol in three important biomedical model organisms frequently used in physiological studies. The protocol is based on the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system, SB100X, which reproducibly promoted generation of transgenic founders at frequencies of 50-64, 14-72, and 15% in mice, rats, and rabbits, respectively. The SB100X-mediated transgene integrations are less prone to genetic mosaicism and gene silencing as compared to either the classical pronuclear injection or to lentivirus-mediated transgenesis. The method was successfully applied to a variety of transgenes and animal models, and can be used to generate founders with single-copy integrations. The transposon vector also allows the generation of transgenic lines with tissue-specific expression patterns specified by promoter elements of choice, exemplified by a rat reporter strain useful for tracking serotonergic neurons. As a proof of principle, we rescued an inborn genetic defect in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat by SB100X transgenesis. A side-by-side comparison of the SB100X- and piggyBac-based protocols revealed that the two systems are complementary, offering new opportunities in genome manipulation.

  9. The substantive equivalence of transgenic (Bt and Chi) and non-transgenic cotton based on metabolite profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modirroosta, Bentol Hoda; Tohidfar, Masoud; Saba, Jalal; Moradi, Foad

    2014-03-01

    Compositional studies comparing transgenic with non-transgenic counterpart plants are almost universally required by governmental regulatory bodies. In the present study, two T(2) transgenic cotton lines containing chitinase (Line 11/57) and Bt lines (Line 61) were compared with non-transgenic counterpart. To do this, biochemical characteristics of leaves and seeds, including amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, anions, and cations contents of the studied lines were analyzed using GC/MS, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and ion chromatography (IC) analyzers, respectively. polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analyses confirmed the presence and expression of Chi and Bt genes in the studied transgenic lines. Although, compositional analysis of leaves contents confirmed no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic counterpart lines, but it was shown that glucose content of chitinase lines, fructose content of transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) and asparagine and glutamine of chitinase lines were significantly higher than the non-transgenic counterpart plants. Both the transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) showed significant decrease in the amounts of sodium in comparison to the non-transgenic counterpart plants. The experiments on the seeds showed that histidine, isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine contents of all transgenic and non-transgenic lines were the same, whereas other amino acids were significantly increased in the transgenic lines. Surprisingly, it was observed that the concentrations of stearic acid, myristic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid in the chitinase line were significantly different than those of non-transgenic counterpart plants, but these components were the same in both Bt line and its non-transgenic counterpart. It seems that more changes observed in the seed contents than leaves is via this point that seeds are known as metabolites storage organs, so they show greater changes in the

  10. Establishment of a pig fibroblast-derived cell line for locus-directed transgene expression in cell cultures and blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jannik E; Li, Juan; Moldt, Brian;

    2011-01-01

    We report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalized pig cell line designated Pig Flip-in Visualize (PFV) for locus-directed transgene expression in pig cells and blastocysts. The PFV cell line was isolated from pig ear fibroblasts transfected with a Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon......-based docking vector harbouring a selection gene, an eGFP reporter gene, and an Flp recombinase site for locus-directed gene insertion. PFV cells have insertion of a single docking vector with stable eGFP expression and generated phenotypic normal blastocysts with transgene expression after somatic cell nuclear...

  11. Bacterial xylanase expression in mammalian cells and transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, C M; Ali, S; Gilbert, H J; Hazlewood, G P; Hirst, B H; Hall, J

    1999-06-11

    The energy which simple-stomached livestock can derive from dietary plant material is limited by the lack of plant polysaccharide degrading enzymes in their gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and the inefficient microbial fermentation of such material in their hind-gut. In poultry the non-starch polysaccharides found in cereal grains can also impair normal digestive function as they form viscous gels in the GI tract inhibiting the breakdown and absorption of nutrients. The nutrition of such livestock could, therefore, be improved by the introduction of enzymes able to degrade plant polysaccharides in the small intestine. We describe the expression of a xylanase, XYLY', from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum in mammalian cells and the exocrine pancreas of transgenic mice. The enzyme is synthesised, secreted and functionally active in the eukaryote system. This work demonstrates the feasibility of generating animals with the endogenous capacity to depolymerise the xylan component of hemi-cellulose.

  12. Expression of the Nicotiana protein kinase (NPK1) enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Huixia; Bordallo, Patricia; Wang, Kan

    2004-05-01

    Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting the productivity of maize. Previous studies have shown that expression of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene activated an oxidative signal cascade and led to the tolerance of freezing, heat, and salinity stress in transgenic tobacco. To analyse the role of activation of oxidative stress signalling in improving drought tolerance in major crops, a tobacco MAPKKK (NPK1) was expressed constitutively in maize. Results show that NPK1 expression enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize. Under drought conditions, transgenic maize plants maintained significantly higher photosynthesis rates than did the non-transgenic control, suggesting that NPK1 induced a mechanism that protected photosynthesis machinery from dehydration damage. In addition, drought-stressed transgenic plants produced kernels with weights similar to those under well-watered conditions, while kernel weights of drought-stressed non-transgenic control plants were significantly reduced when compared with their non-stressed counterparts.

  13. Characterization of expression of Puumala virus nucleocapsid protein in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Darai, Gholamreza; Süle, Sandor; Rösen-Wolff, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing a foreign gene are a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens in high amounts that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study, the expression of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus serotype Puumala in tobacco and potato plants was investigated. Transgenic tobacco and potato plants were generated and established. These transgenic plants expressed the N protein of Puumala virus strain CG-1820. No major differences were observed when the phenotype and growth rates of transgenic plants were compared to those of normal plants. However, it was found that the leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were more slender and the tubers of transgenic potato plants were smaller than those in normal plants. In order to investigate the distribution of the expression of the foreign gene in transgenic plants, the proteins of leaves and roots of the individual transgenic tobacco and potato plants were examined by Western blot analyses. It was found that all transgenic tobacco and potato plants expressed the N protein in the leaves, whereas transgenic potato plants are able to significantly express the viral proteins also in the tubers and roots. The antigens were expressed at a level of 1 ng of protein/5 microg of dried leaves. The hantaviral recombinant N proteins obtained from transgenic tobacco and potato plants were able to elicit specific humoral and mucosal immune responses when administered intraperitoneally or orally to rabbits and mice. The expression of viral proteins in plants has two major advantages compared to other expression systems: firstly, there is no risk of contamination with mammalian viruses or other pathogens, and secondly, the production of high amounts of antigens is cheap and therefore of great economic interest.

  14. Expression of transgenes targeted to the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus is orientation dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Strathdee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting transgenes to a chosen location in the genome has a number of advantages. A single copy of the DNA construct can be inserted by targeting into regions of chromatin that allow the desired developmental and tissue-specific expression of the transgene. METHODOLOGY: In order to develop a reliable system for reproducibly expressing transgenes it was decided to insert constructs at the Gt(ROSA26Sor locus. A cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter was used to drive expression of the Tetracycline (tet transcriptional activator, rtTA2(s-M2, and test the effectiveness of using the ROSA26 locus to allow transgene expression. The tet operator construct was inserted into one allele of ROSA26 and a tet responder construct controlling expression of EGFP was inserted into the other allele. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of the targeted transgenes was shown to be affected by both the presence of selectable marker cassettes and by the orientation of the transgenes with respect to the endogenous ROSA26 promoter. These results suggest that transcriptional interference from the endogenous gene promoter or from promoters in the selectable marker cassettes may be affecting transgene expression at the locus. Additionally we have been able to determine the optimal orientation for transgene expression at the ROSA26 locus.

  15. Effect of β‑globin MAR characteristic elements on transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Dong, Weihua; Wang, Tianyun; Liu, Zhonghe; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoyin; Zhao, Chunpeng; Zhang, Junhe; Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the characteristic elements of matrix attachment region (MAR) on transgene expression. Human β‑globin MAR was obtained by PCR amplification. A splicing MAR fragment containing all the characteristic elements of β‑globin MAR was artificially synthesized and then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector. Following digestion and sequence identification, we transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the two vectors, and then screened for the transformation of stable cells. The transgene expression level was analyzed by ELISA, and the copy numbers of the CAT gene were analyzed by real‑time fluorescent quantitative PCR. β‑globin MAR enhanced CAT reporter gene expression by 2.1489‑fold, whereas the β‑globin MAR characteristic elements did not enhance this expression. The real‑time fluorescent quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that the relative copy numbers of the CAT gene of the β‑globin MAR expression vector were 1.2‑fold higher compared with those of the non‑MAR expression vector. MAR was able to improve the transgene expression level to a certain extent. The MAR characteristic elements did not improve the transgene expression alone. The transgenic expression levels were not linear with the transgene copy number; however, the enhancement of transgenic expression was relative to the increase in the gene copy number.

  16. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray

  17. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies.

  18. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: Assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons Elsa

    2012-07-01

    trees expressing the selectable marker genes that are most commonly used in citrus transformation were substantially equivalent to the non-transformed controls with regard to their overall agronomic performance, as based on the use of robust and powerful assessment techniques. Therefore, future studies of the possible pleiotropic effects induced by the integration and expression of transgenes in field-grown GM citrus may focus on the newly inserted trait(s of biotechnological interest.

  19. An efficient strategy for producing a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Zhang, Yuli; Bi, Lihui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2015-03-05

    We developed an efficient strategy that combines a method for the post-integration elimination of all transposon sequences, a site-specific recombination system, and an optimized fibroin H-chain expression system to produce a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) that overcomes the disadvantages of random insertion and post-integration instability of transposons. Here, we generated four different transgenic silkworm strains, and of one the transgenic strains, designated TS1-RgG2, with up to 16% (w/w) of the target protein in the cocoons, was selected. The subsequent elimination of all the transposon sequences from TS1-RgG2 was completed by the heat-shock-induced expression of the transposase in vivo. The resulting transgenic silkworm strain was designated TS3-g2 and contained only the attP-flanked optimized fibroin H-chain expression cassette in its genome. A phiC31/att-system-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) method could be used to integrate other genes of interest into the same genome locus between the attP sites in TS3-g2. Controlling for position effects with phiC31-mediated RMCE will also allow the optimization of exogenous protein expression and fine gene function analyses in the silkworm. The strategy developed here is also applicable to other lepidopteran insects, to improve the ecological safety of transgenic strains in biocontrol programs.

  20. Analysis of two novel midgut-specific promoters driving transgene expression in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes.

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    Tony Nolan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue-specific promoters controlling the expression of transgenes in Anopheles mosquitoes represent a valuable tool both for studying the interaction between these malaria vectors and the Plasmodium parasites they transmit and for novel malaria control strategies based on developing Plasmodium-refractory mosquitoes by expressing anti-parasitic genes. With this aim we have studied the promoter regions of two genes from the most important malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, whose expression is strongly induced upon blood feeding. RESULTS: We analysed the A. gambiae Antryp1 and G12 genes, which we have shown to be midgut-specific and maximally expressed at 24 hours post-bloodmeal (PBM. Antryp1, required for bloodmeal digestion, encodes one member of a family of 7 trypsin genes. The G12 gene, of unknown function, was previously identified in our laboratory in a screen for genes induced in response to a bloodmeal. We fused 1.1 kb of the upstream regions containing the putative promoter of these genes to reporter genes and transformed these into the Indian malaria vector A. stephensi to see if we could recapitulate the expression pattern of the endogenous genes. Both the Antryp1 and G12 upstream regions were able to drive female-predominant, midgut-specific expression in transgenic mosquitoes. Expression of the Antryp1-driven reporter in transgenic A. stephensi lines was low, undetectable by northern blot analysis, and failed to fully match the induction kinetics of the endogenous Antryp1 gene in A. gambiae. This incomplete conservation of expression suggests either subtle differences in the transcriptional machinery between A. stephensi and A. gambiae or that the upstream region chosen lacked all the control elements. In contrast, the G12 upstream region was able to faithfully reproduce the expression profile of the endogenous A. gambiae gene, showing female midgut specificity in the adult mosquito and massive induction PBM, peaking at 24

  1. Stable high-level transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using gene silencing mutants and matrix attachment regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butaye, Katleen M J; Goderis, Inge J W M; Wouters, Piet F J; Pues, Jonathan M-T G; Delauré, Stijn L; Broekaert, Willem F; Depicker, Ann; Cammue, Bruno P A; De Bolle, Miguel F C

    2004-08-01

    Basic and applied research involving transgenic plants often requires consistent high-level expression of transgenes. However, high inter-transformant variability of transgene expression caused by various phenomena, including gene silencing, is frequently observed. Here, we show that stable, high-level transgene expression is obtained using Arabidopsis thaliana post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) sgs2 and sgs3 mutants. In populations of first generation (T1) A. thaliana plants transformed with a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA) driven by the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter (p35S), the incidence of highly expressing transformants shifted from 20% in wild type background to 100% in sgs2 and sgs3 backgrounds. Likewise, when sgs2 mutants were transformed with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 6 gene under control of p35S, all transformants showed a clear phenotype typified by serrated leaves, whereas such phenotype was only observed in about one of five wild type transformants. p35S-driven uidA expression remained high and steady in T2 sgs2 and sgs3 transformants, in marked contrast to the variable expression patterns observed in wild type T2 populations. We further show that T-DNA constructs flanked by matrix attachment regions of the chicken lysozyme gene (chiMARs) cause a boost in GUS activity by fivefold in sgs2 and 12-fold in sgs3 plants, reaching up to 10% of the total soluble proteins, whereas no such boost is observed in the wild type background. MAR-based plant transformation vectors used in a PTGS mutant background might be of high value for efficient high-throughput screening of transgene-based phenotypes as well as for obtaining extremely high transgene expression in plants.

  2. Stability of single copy transgene expression in CHOK1 cells is affected by histone modifications but not by DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Shawal; Gugliotta, Agustina; Koenitzer, Jennifer; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2015-02-10

    Intraclonal heterogeneity of genetically modified mammalian cells has been observed as a phenomenon that has a strong impact on overall transgene expression levels and that limits the predictability of transgene expression in genetically modified cells, thereby hampering single cell based screening approaches. The underlying mechanism(s) leading to this variance are poorly understood. To study the dynamics and mechanisms of heterogeneity of early stage silencing we analyzed the expression in more than 100 independent clones of CHOK1 cells that harbour genetically stable integrates of single copy reporter cassettes driven by EF1α and CMV promoters. Single cell analysis showed intraclonal variability with heterogeneity in expression in genetically uniform populations. DNA methylation is a well known mechanism responsible for silencing of gene expression. Interestingly, loss of expression was not associated with DNA methylation of the CMV promoter. However, in most of the clonal populations expression could be increased by inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDACi) suggesting that heterogeneity of transgene expression is crucially governed by histone modifications. Further, to determine if the epigenetic status of transgene expression is governed by the chromosomal integration locus we targeted heterologous expression cassettes into two chromosomal sites using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). The expression status of a particular clone was faithfully re-established when the same promoter used. In this way the problem of early stage cell clone instability can be bypassed. However, upon introduction of an unrelated promoter methylation-independent silencing was observed. Together, these results suggest that histone modifications are the relevant mechanisms by which epigenetic modulation of transgene expression cassettes is governed in the early phase of clone generation.

  3. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

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    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  4. Characterization of mercury bioremediation by transgenic bacteria expressing metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Ruiz Gloriene; Alvarez Derry; Ruiz Oscar N; Torres Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of transgenic bacteria has been proposed as a suitable alternative for mercury remediation. Ideally, mercury would be sequestered by metal-scavenging agents inside transgenic bacteria for subsequent retrieval. So far, this approach has produced limited protection and accumulation. We report here the development of a transgenic system that effectively expresses metallothionein (mt-1) and polyphosphate kinase (ppk) genes in bacteria in order to provide high mercury r...

  5. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    OpenAIRE

    Luchakivska Yu. S.; Komarnytskii I. K.; Kurchenko I. M.; Yurieva O. M.; Zhytkevich N. V.; Kuchuk M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the sali...

  6. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons.

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    Stefanie Besser

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65. TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type.

  7. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  8. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

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    Kohn Aimee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  9. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

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    Dismuke Adria D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  10. Expression of recombinant human lysozyme in the milk of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhengquan; FAN Baoliang; DAI Yunping; ZHENG Ming; NIU Huiling; WANG Meili; WANG Lili; FEI Jing; LI Ning

    2003-01-01

    Human lysozyme is a 130-aa (amino acid) alkaline polypeptide, and has both anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties which make it an important component of human natural immunity system. As a first step toward the ultimate goal ofimproving the anti-bacterial properties of bovine and ovine milk, a transgenic mouse that contains the genomic DNA sequence of the human lysozme gene has been generated for the first time. From 83 mice generated by microinjection, a total of 6 positive transgenic mice were identified by PCR and Southern blot. F1 mice positive for transgene in lines were also detected by PCR. This shows that transgene could be transmitted from founder transgenic mice to their offspring. Recombinant human lysozyme (rHlys) was found in the whey of 3 female positive transgenic mice by Western blot. The highest concentration of rHlys for transgenic micewas 0.2 mg/mL. The antibacterial activity of the whey for transgenic mice was highly enhanced up to 0.4 times as much as that of human, while that of non-transgenic mouse was very low. Although the lysozyme activity of transgenic mice is still lower than that of human, the rHlys exhibits the same specific activity as that of human lysozyme. It provides a strong basis for further studies into the possible application of rHlys express in mammary gland.

  11. Characterization of mercury bioremediation by transgenic bacteria expressing metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase

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    Gonzalez-Ruiz Gloriene

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of transgenic bacteria has been proposed as a suitable alternative for mercury remediation. Ideally, mercury would be sequestered by metal-scavenging agents inside transgenic bacteria for subsequent retrieval. So far, this approach has produced limited protection and accumulation. We report here the development of a transgenic system that effectively expresses metallothionein (mt-1 and polyphosphate kinase (ppk genes in bacteria in order to provide high mercury resistance and accumulation. Results In this study, bacterial transformation with transcriptional and translational enhanced vectors designed for the expression of metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase provided high transgene transcript levels independent of the gene being expressed. Expression of polyphosphate kinase and metallothionein in transgenic bacteria provided high resistance to mercury, up to 80 μM and 120 μM, respectively. Here we show for the first time that metallothionein can be efficiently expressed in bacteria without being fused to a carrier protein to enhance mercury bioremediation. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry analyzes revealed that the mt-1 transgenic bacteria accumulated up to 100.2 ± 17.6 μM of mercury from media containing 120 μM Hg. The extent of mercury remediation was such that the contaminated media remediated by the mt-1 transgenic bacteria supported the growth of untransformed bacteria. Cell aggregation, precipitation and color changes were visually observed in mt-1 and ppk transgenic bacteria when these cells were grown in high mercury concentrations. Conclusion The transgenic bacterial system described in this study presents a viable technology for mercury bioremediation from liquid matrices because it provides high mercury resistance and accumulation while inhibiting elemental mercury volatilization. This is the first report that shows that metallothionein expression provides mercury resistance and

  12. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, Gloria [New York, NY; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A [Santiago, CL; Nero, Damion C [Woodside, NY

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  13. Expression of viral EPS-depolymerase reduces fire blight susceptibility in transgenic pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnoy, Mickaël; Faize, Mohamed; Venisse, Jean-Stéphane; Geider, Klaus; Chevreau, Elisabeth

    2005-02-01

    Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight of Maloideae. One of the main pathogenicity factors of this bacterium is the exopolysaccharide (EPS) of its capsule. In this paper, we used genetic transformation tools to constitutively express an EPS-depolymerase transgene in the pear (Pyrus communis L.) cv. Passe Crassane with the aim of decreasing its high susceptibility to fire blight. Expression of the depolymerase gene in 15 independent transgenic clones led, on average, to low depolymerase activity, although relatively high expression was observed at the transcriptional and translational levels. Only two of the transgenic clones (9X and 10M) consistently showed a decrease in fire blight susceptibility in vitro and in the greenhouse. These clones were also among the highest expressers of depolymerase at the RNA and enzyme activity levels. The correlation observed among all transgenic clones between depolymerase expression and fire blight resistance suggested the potential of this strategy.

  14. Stable transgene expression in primitive human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Holt, Nathalia G; Hollis, Roger P; Ge, Shundi; Cannon, Paula M; Crooks, Gay M; Kohn, Donald B

    2009-12-01

    types with eGFP expression. More importantly, secondary transplantation studies demonstrated that the integrated transgene was stably expressed in more primitive CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term repopulating capability. This study demonstrates that an improved HSB gene transfer system can stably integrate genes into primitive human HSCs while maintaining the pluripotency of the stem cells, which shows promise for further advancement of non-virus-based gene therapy using hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchakivska Yu. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the salinity and osmotic stress tolerance by plant survival test in presence of NaCl and PEG in different concentrations. Results. Transgenic plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II gene (transcription proved for 60–100 % were obtained by agrobacterial transformation. The transgenic carrot plant extracts inhibited the growth of the studied phytopathogenic bacteria strains but exhibited no antifungal activity. Survival level of transgenic plants under the salinity and osmotic stress effect was definitely higher comparing to the untransgenic ones. The analysis of the photosynthetic pigment content in the transgenic carrot plants showed no significant difference of this parameter under salinity stress that may indicate a possible protective activity of the recombinant protein. Conclusions. The obtained in our study transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express the recombinant thaumatin II gene were characterized by antibacterial activity and increased tolerance to salinity and osmotic stress factors.

  16. Overexpression of several Arabidopsis histone genes increases agrobacterium-mediated transformation and transgene expression in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenea, Gabriela N; Spantzel, Joerg; Lee, Lan-Ying; Zhu, Yanmin; Lin, Kui; Johnson, Susan J; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2009-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana histone H2A-1 is important for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation. Mutation of HTA1, the gene encoding histone H2A-1, results in decreased T-DNA integration into the genome of Arabidopsis roots, whereas overexpression of HTA1 increases transformation frequency. To understand the mechanism by which HTA1 enhances transformation, we investigated the effects of overexpression of numerous Arabidopsis histones on transformation and transgene expression. Transgenic Arabidopsis containing cDNAs encoding histone H2A (HTA), histone H4 (HFO), and histone H3-11 (HTR11) displayed increased transformation susceptibility, whereas histone H2B (HTB) and most histone H3 (HTR) cDNAs did not increase transformation. A parallel increase in transient gene expression was observed when histone HTA, HFO, or HTR11 overexpression constructs were cotransfected with double- or single-stranded forms of a gusA gene into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts. However, these cDNAs did not increase expression of a previously integrated transgene. We identified the N-terminal 39 amino acids of H2A-1 as sufficient to increase transient transgene expression in plants. After transfection, transgene DNA accumulates more rapidly in the presence of HTA1 than with a control construction. Our results suggest that certain histones enhance transgene expression, protect incoming transgene DNA during the initial stages of transformation, and subsequently increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  17. Efficient and transgene-free genome editing in wheat through transient expression of CRISPR/Cas9 DNA or RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Zong, Yuan; Wang, Yanpeng; Liu, Jinxing; Chen, Kunling; Qiu, Jin-Long; Gao, Caixia

    2016-08-25

    Editing plant genomes is technically challenging in hard-to-transform plants and usually involves transgenic intermediates, which causes regulatory concerns. Here we report two simple and efficient genome-editing methods in which plants are regenerated from callus cells transiently expressing CRISPR/Cas9 introduced as DNA or RNA. This transient expression-based genome-editing system is highly efficient and specific for producing transgene-free and homozygous wheat mutants in the T0 generation. We demonstrate our protocol to edit genes in hexaploid bread wheat and tetraploid durum wheat, and show that we are able to generate mutants with no detectable transgenes. Our methods may be applicable to other plant species, thus offering the potential to accelerate basic and applied plant genome-engineering research.

  18. Transgene expression in microalgae – from tools to applications

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    Lior eDoron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide

  19. Recurrent selection for transgene expression levels in maize results in proxy selection for a native gene with the same promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    High expression levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High expression levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurre...

  20. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  1. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Ulrike; Dipt, Shubham; Barth, Jonas; Singh, Priyanka; Jauch, Mandy; Thum, Andreas S; Fiala, André; Riemensperger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity, and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells). A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function.

  2. Dexamethasone-Inducible Green Fluorescent Protein Gene Expression in Transgenic Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Hilary Collver; Katherine Kinken

    2004-01-01

    Genomic research has made a large number of sequences of novel genes or expressed sequence tags available. To investigate functions of these genes, a system for conditional control of gene expression would be a useful tool. Inducible transgene expression that uses green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter gene has been investigated in transgenic cell lines of cotton (COT; Gossypium hirsutum L.), Fraser fir [FRA; Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir], Nordmann fir (NOR; Abies nordmanniana Lk.), and rice (RIC; Oryza sativa L. Cv. Radon). Transgenic cell lines were used to test the function of the chemical inducer dexamethasone. Inducible transgene expression was observed with fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and was confirmed by northern blot analyses. Dexamethasone at 5 mg/L induced gfp expression to the nearly highest level 48 h after treatment in COT, FRA, NOR, and RIC. Dexamethasone at 10 mg/L inhibited the growth of transgenic cells in FRA and NOR, but not COT and RIC. These results demonstrated that concentrations of inducer for optimum inducible gene expression system varied among transgenic cell lines. The inducible gene expression system described here was very effective and could be valuable in evaluating the function of novel gene.

  3. Expression of snowdrop lectin (GNA) in transgenic rice plants confers resistance to rice brown planthopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K V; Rathore, K S; Hodges, T K; Fu, X; Stoger, E; Sudhakar, D; Williams, S; Christou, P; Bharathi, M; Bown, D P; Powell, K S; Spence, J; Gatehouse, A M; Gatehouse, J A

    1998-08-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) has been shown previously to be toxic towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens; BPH) when administered in artificial diet. BPH feeds by phloem abstraction, and causes 'hopper burn', as well as being an important virus vector. To evaluate the potential of the gna gene to confer resistance towards BPH, transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were produced, containing the gna gene in constructs where its expression was driven by a phloem-specific promoter (from the rice sucrose synthase RSs1 gene) and by a constitutive promoter (from the maize ubiquitin ubi1 gene). PCR and Southern analyses on DNA from these plants confirmed their transgenic status, and that the transgenes were transmitted to progeny after self-fertilization. Western blot analyses revealed expression of GNA at levels of up to 2.0% of total protein in some of the transgenic plants. GNA expression driven by the RSs1 promoter was tissue-specific, as shown by immunohistochemical localization of the protein in the non-lignified vascular tissue of transgenic plants. Insect bioassays and feeding studies showed that GNA expressed in the transgenic rice plants decreased survival and overall fecundity (production of offspring) of the insects, retarded insect development, and had a deterrent effect on BPH feeding. gna is the first transgene to exhibit insecticidal activity towards sap-sucking insects in an important cereal crop plant.

  4. Generating a transgenic mouse line stably expressing human MHC surface antigen from a HAC carrying multiple genomic BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Junpei; Nakayama, Manabu; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tuneko; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Ikeno, Masashi; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector is a promising tool to improve the problematic suppression and position effects of transgene expression frequently seen in transgenic cells and animals produced by conventional plasmid or viral vectors. We generated transgenic mice maintaining a single HAC vector carrying two genomic bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from human HLA-DR loci (DRA and DRB1). Both transgenes on the HAC in transgenic mice exhibited tissue-specific expression in kidney, liver, lung, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and thymus cells in RT-PCR analysis. Stable functional expression of a cell surface HLA-DR marker from both transgenes, DRA and DRB1 on the HAC, was detected by flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes and maintained through at least eight filial generations. These results indicate that the de novo HAC system can allow us to manipulate multiple BAC transgenes with coordinated expression as a surface antigen through the generation of transgenic animals.

  5. Production of transgenic pigs over-expressing the antiviral gene Mx1

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The myxovirus resistance gene (Mx1) has a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. It is therefore an interesting candidate gene to improve disease resistance in farm animals. In this study, we report the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic pigs over-expressing the Mx1 gene. These transgenic pigs express approximately 15–25 times more Mx1 mRNA than non-transgenic pigs, and the protein level of Mx1 was also markedly enhanced. We challenged fibroblast cells isolated...

  6. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic.

  7. Transgenic rice plants expressing cry1Ia5 gene are resistant to stem borer (Chilo agamemnon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaieb, Reda E A

    2010-01-01

    The stem borer, Chilo agamemnon Bles., is the most serious insect pest in rice fields of the Egyptian Nile Delta. To induce rice plant resistance to Chilo agamemnon, the cry1Ia5 gene was introduced to rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). The integration of the cry1Ia5 gene into the plant genome was confirmed using PCR and Southern blot analyses. The obtained plantlets were transferred to the greenhouse until seeds were collected. Northern blot analysis of the T1 plants confirmed the expression of the cry1Ia5 gene. The insecticidal activity of the transgenic plants against the rice stem borer Chilo agamemnon were tested. The third larval instars were fed on stem cuts from three transgenic lines (L1, L2 and L3) as well as cuts from the control (gfp-transgenic) plants for one week and the mortality percentage was daily recorded. Transgenic line-3 showed the highest mortality percentage after one day (50%) followed by L2 (25%) then L1 (0%). Two days post treatment the mortality percentage increased to 70, 45 and 25% for transgenic lines 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Mortality of 100% was recorded four days post treatment, while those fed on the gfp-transgenic rice (control) showed 0% mortality. Thus, transgenic plants showed high resistance to stem borers and can serve as a novel genetic resource in breeding programs. Transgenic plants expressing BT protein were normal in phenotype with as good seed setting as the nontransgenic control plants.

  8. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  9. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests. PMID:27708374

  10. Improved transgene expression in doxycycline-inducible embryonic stem cells by repeated chemical selection or cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renáta Bencsik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transgene-mediated programming is a preeminent strategy to direct cellular identity. To facilitate cell fate switching, lineage regulating genes must be efficiently and uniformly induced. However, gene expression is often heterogeneous in transgenic systems. Consistent with this notion, a non-uniform reporter gene expression was detected in our doxycycline (DOX-regulated, murine embryonic stem (ES cell clones. Interestingly, a significant fraction of cells within each clone failed to produce any reporter signals upon DOX treatment. We found that the majority of these non-responsive cells neither carry reporter transgene nor geneticin/G418 resistance. This observation suggested that our ES cell clones contained non-recombined cells that survived the G418 selection which was carried out during the establishment of these clones. We successfully eliminated most of these corrupted cells with repeated chemical (G418 selection, however, even after prolonged G418 treatments, a few cells remained non-responsive due to epigenetic silencing. We found that cell sorting has been the most efficient approach to select those cells which can uniformly and stably induce the integrated transgene in this ES cell based platform. Together, our data revealed that post-cloning chemical re-selection or cell sorting strongly facilitate the production of ES cell lines with a uniform transgene induction capacity.

  11. Increase of Expression Levels of Reporter Gene in Transgenic Tobaccos by Matrix Attachment Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix attachment region (MAR) located downstream of Plastocyanin gene was isolated from the genome of pea. To study the effect of MARs on foreign gene expression in transgenic plants, T-DNA vector was constructed in which MARs flanked bothβ-glucuronidase(GUS) gene and selectable marker neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT-II) gene. The plant expression vectors were transferred into leaf discs via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure. The result of GUS measurement showed that pea MAR could increase transgene expression level. The mean expression levels of GUS gene expression in population containing MARs could be increased twofold when compared with that of population without MARs.

  12. Diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) as a model crop to study transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna; Pietrusinska, Aleksandra; Binka-Wyrwa, Agnieszka; Kuc, Dominik; Orczyk, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for two diploid breeding lines of potato, and gives a detailed analysis of reporter gene expression. In our lab, these lines were also used to obtain tetraploid somatic hybrids. We tested four newly prepared constructs based on the pGreen vector system containing the selection gene nptII or bar under the 35S or nos promoter. All these vectors carried gus under 35S. We also tested the pDM805 vector, with the bar and gus genes respectively under the Ubi1 and Act1 promoters, which are strong for monocots. The selection efficiency (about 17%) was highest in the stem and leaf explants after transformation with pGreen where nptII was under 35S. About half of the selected plants were confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis to be transgenic and, depending on the combination, 0 to 100% showed GUS expression. GUS expression was strongest in multi-copy transgenic plants where gus was under Act1. The same potato lines carrying multi-copy bar under Ubi1 were also highly resistant to the herbicide Basta. The suggestion of using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of diploid lines of potato as a model crop is discussed herein.

  13. Gene expression profile of cervical and skin tissues from human papillomavirus type 16 E6 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert PF

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although K14E6 transgenic mice develop spontaneous tumors of the skin epithelium, no spontaneous reproductive tract malignancies arise, unless the transgenic mice were treated chronically with 17β-estradiol. These findings suggest that E6 performs critical functions in normal adult cervix and skin, highlighting the need to define E6-controlled transcriptional programs in these tissues. Methods We evaluated the expression profile of 14,000 genes in skin or cervix from young K14E6 transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic. To identify differentially expressed genes a linear model was implemented using R and the LIMMA package. Two criteria were used to select the set of relevant genes. First a set of genes with a Log-odds ≥ 3 were selected. Then, a hierarchical search of genes was based on Log Fold Changes. Results Microarray analysis identified a total of 676 and 1154 genes that were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively, in skin from K14E6 transgenic mice. On the other hand, in the cervix from K14E6 transgenic mice we found that only 97 and 252 genes were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively. One of the most affected processes in the skin from K14E6 transgenic mice was the cell cycle. We also found that skin from transgenic mice showed down-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes and genes related to the immune response. In the cervix of K14E6 transgenic mice, we could not find affected any gene related to the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways but did observe alterations in the expression of immune response genes. Pathways such as angiogenesis, cell junction and epidermis development, also were altered in their gene expression profiles in both tissues. Conclusion Expression of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein in our model alters expression of genes that fell into several functional groups providing insights into pathways by which E6 deregulate cell cycle progression, apoptosis, the host resistance to infection

  14. Signal Peptide of Potato PinⅡ Enhances the Expression of Cry1Ac in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Jun LIU; Yuan YUAN; Jun ZHENG; Ya-Zhong TAO; Zhi-Gang DONG; Jian-Hua WANG; Guo-Ying WANG

    2004-01-01

    The modified Cry1Ac was expressed in transgenic tobacco plants.To allow secretion of the Cry1Ac protein into the intercellular space,the signal peptide sequence of potato proteinase inhibitor Ⅱ(pinⅡ)was N-terminally fused to the CrylAc encoding region.Expression of Cry1Ac in transgenic tobacco plants was assayed with ELISA.The results showed that pinⅡ signal peptide sequence enhanced the expression of Cry 1 Ac protein and led to the secretion of the Cry 1Ac protein in transgenic tobacco plants.GFP gene was also fused to the signal peptide sequence and transformed to tobacco.The results of fluorescent detection showed that GFP had localized in the apoplast of transgenic plants.

  15. Transgenic expression in Arabidopsis of a polyprotein construct leading to production of two different antimicrobial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Isabelle E J A; De Bolle, Miguel F C; Dwyer, Geoff; Goderis, Inge J W M; Woutors, Piet F J; Verhaert, Peter D; Proost, Paul; Schaaper, Wim M M; Cammue, Bruno P A; Broekaert, Willem F

    2002-04-01

    We developed a method for expression in Arabidopsis of a transgene encoding a cleavable chimeric polyprotein. The polyprotein precursor consists of a leader peptide and two different antimicrobial proteins (AMPs), DmAMP1 originating from Dahlia merckii seeds and RsAFP2 originating from Raphanus sativus seeds, which are linked by an intervening sequence ("linker peptide") originating from a natural polyprotein occurring in seed of Impatiens balsamina. The chimeric polyprotein was found to be cleaved in transgenic Arabidopsis plants and the individual AMPs were secreted into the extracellular space. Both AMPs were found to exert antifungal activity in vitro. It is surprising that the amount of AMPs produced in plants transformed with some of the polyprotein transgene constructs was significantly higher compared with the amount in plants transformed with a transgene encoding a single AMP, indicating that the polyprotein expression strategy may be a way to boost expression levels of small proteins.

  16. Efficient production of transgenic chickens using self-inactive HIV-based lentiviral vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiyong XU; Yan SUN; Hongmei DING; Meng WANG; Yafei CAI; Jie CHEN; Honglin LIU

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated the simple and effective production of transgenic chickens, in which the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was expressed by using third-generation self-inactive HIV-based lentiviral vectors. In our experiments, lentiviruses were injected into 204 fertilized eggs, from which 30 ( 15% ) chickens were hatched. The exogenous gene was detected in the genomes of 16 out of 30 (53%) chickens. The green fluorescence signal was observed directly in various body parts, and was particularly significant in the testes. The transgenes were also found in the offspring of these chickens. The results indicate that HIV-based lentivirul vectors can be used to generate transgenic birds economically and effectively [Current Zoology 55 (5): 383 - 387,2009].

  17. Oral immunization of animals with transgenic cherry tomatillo expressing HBsAg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Yina Ma; Mei Li; Tonq Chenq; Shao-Wei Li; Jun Zhang; Ning-Shao Xia

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of recombinant HBsAg (rHBsAg) in transgenic cherry tomatillo in order to explore the feasibility of producing HBV oral vaccine with cherry tomatillo by animal immune tests.METHODS: The recombinant plant expression vector containing HBsAg gene was constructed. Mediated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, HBsAg gene was transferred into cotyledons of cherry tomatillo. Transformed cherry tomatillos were obtained through hygromycin delay-selection. Integrated DNA in transgenic cherry tomatillo was confirmed by hygromycin resistance selection, Gus detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blotting analysis. Antigenicity of rHBsAg was examined by ELISA and the immunogenicity of rHBsAg derived from transgenic cherry tomatillo tissues was confirmed by oral feed of transformed tissues to BALB/c mice primed with commercial HBV vaccines. Specific antibody titers in mice's serum were examined by ELISA every week.RESULTS: By far, 10 positive lines of transgenic cherry tomatillos containing HBsAg gene were obtained. Among different organs of the same transgenic cherry tomatillo,level of rHBsAg expressed in leaves was the highest with the yield up to 300ng/g fresh weight. And the rHBsAg expression level in fruits was about 10 ng/g fresh weight.In animal immune tests, oral delivery with transgenic tissues to mice primed with commercial vaccine instead of naive mice resulted in significant immune response.CONCLUSION: The result of this animal immune test indicated the rHBsAg derived from transgenic cherry tomatillo possessed normal immunogenicity. This work demonstrated the feasibility to generate oral immunogenic rHBsAg in transgenic cherry tomatillo, and would provide some experimental approach for the production of low-cost oral vaccines using transgenic cherry tomatillo in large scale.

  18. Tetracycline-controlled transcriptional regulation systems:countermeasures to eliminate basal transgene leaks in Tet-based systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Dong; SUN Yan; GU Weiwang; CHEN Xigu

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the function of any given transgene(s) accurately in transgenic mice, and to produce credible transgenic animal models of various human diseases (precisely and realistically mimicking disease states), it is critical to be able to control gene expression in the animals conditionally. The ability to switch gene expression "on" or "off" in the restricted cells or tissue(s) at specific time(s)allows unprecedented flexibility for exploring gene function(s) in both the health and the disease. Pioneering work on inducible transgene expression has led to the development of a wide variety of controlled gene expression systems that meet this criterion. Among them, the tetracycline-inducible systems (e. g. Tet-off and Tet-on) have been widely, frequently and successfully employed in vitro and in vivo.These systems, however, are not always tight but leaky; sometimes the leakage is significant. In some circumstances, the resulting leak is acceptable, but in others, it is more problematic. Though these systems face this disadvantage, i.e. basal transgene leakage in vitro and in vivo, several approaches, including using improved versions (e. g. rtTA2S-M2 and rtTA2S-S2) of rtTA, tetracycline-controlled transcriptional silencer (tTS), an "ideal" minimal promoter in responsive components or combinations thereof, have been developed to avoid this limitation effectively. In this review we discuss the countermeasures available to eliminate basal transgene leakage from Tet-based systems.

  19. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy.

  20. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoma eIhemere

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe(III chelate reductase activity and gene expression levels consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in FEA1 transgenic plants. We also show that genes involved in iron homeostasis in cassava have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in transgenic plants. Steady state transcript levels of the metal-chelate transporter MeYSL1, and the iron storage proteins, MeFER2 and MeFER6, were elevated in various tissues of FEA1 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. These results suggest that these gene products play a role in iron translocation and homeostasis in FEA1 transgenic cassava plants. These results are discussed in terms of enhanced strategies for the iron biofortification of plants.

  1. Expression of human apolipoprotein B and assembly of lipoprotein(a) in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callow, M.J.; Stoltzfus, L.J.; Rubin, E.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lawn, R.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-03-15

    The atherogenic macromolecule lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has resisted in vivo analyses partly because it is found in a limited number of experimental animals. Although transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] have previously been described, they failed to assemble Lp(a) particles because of the inability of human apo(a) to associate with mouse apolipoprotein B (apoB). The authors isolated a 90-kilobase P1 phagemid containing the human apoB gene and with this DNA generated 13 lines of transgenic mice of which 11 expressed human apoB. The human apoB transcript was expressed and edited in the liver of the transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of human apoB, as well as low density lipoprotein (LDL), were related to transgene copy number; the transgenic line with the most copies of human apoB had a >4-fold increase in LDL cholesterol compared with nontransgenics and a lipoprotein profile similar to that of humans. When human apoB and apo(a) transgenic mice were bred together, plasma apo(a) in mice expressing both human proteins was tightly associated with lipoproteins in the LDL density region. These studies demonstrate the successful expression of human apoB and the efficient assembly of Lp(a) in mice.

  2. Environmental and transgene expression effects on the barley seed proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Steenholdt, T.; Noguera, O.R.;

    2004-01-01

    The barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar Golden Promise is no longer widely used for malting, but is amenable to transformation and is therefore a valuable experimental cultivar. Its characteristics include high salt tolerance, however it is also susceptible to several fungal pathogens. Proteome....... Eleven of these were identified by mass spectrometric peptide mass mapping, including an abundant chitinase implicated in defence against fungal pathogens and a small heat-shock protein. To enable a comparison with transgenic seed protein patterns, differences in spot patterns between field...... with extra nitrogen. Finally, the fate of transgene products in barley seeds was followed. Spots containing two green fluorescent protein constructs and the herbicide resistance marker phosphinothricin acetyltransferase were observed in 2D-gel patterns of transgenic seeds and identified by mass spectrometry...

  3. Fitness of Transgenic Anopheles stephensi Mosquitoes Expressing the SM1 Peptide under the Control of a Vitellogenin Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaoyang; Marrelli, Mauro T.; Yan, Guiyun; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Three transgenic Anopheles stephensi lines were established that strongly inhibit transmission of the mouse malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. Fitness of the transgenic mosquitoes was assessed based on life table analysis and competition experiments between transgenic and wild-type mosquitoes. Life table analysis indicated low fitness load for the 2 single-insertion transgenic mosquito lines VD35 and VD26 and no load for the double-insertion transgenic mosquito line VD9. However, in cage ex...

  4. Supplemental control of lepidopterous pests on Bt transgenic sweet corn with biologically-based spray treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Robert R; Shepard, B Merle; Shapiro, Martin; Hassell, Richard L; Schaffer, Mark L; Smith, Chad M

    2009-01-01

    Biologically-based spray treatments, including nucleopolyhedroviruses, neem, and spinosad, were evaluated as supplemental controls for the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on transgenic sweet corn, Zea mays (L.) (Poales: Poaceae), expressing a Cry1Ab toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) (Bt). Overall, transgenic corn supported lower densities of both pests than did nontransgenic corn. Control of the fall armyworm was improved in both whorl-stage and tassel-stage corn by the use of either a nucleopolyhedrovirus or neem, but the greatest improvement was seen with spinosad. Only spinosad consistently reduced damage to ears, which was caused by both pest species. In general, efficacy of the spray materials did not differ greatly between transgenic and nontransgenic corn.

  5. Transgenic Tobacco Expressing a Modified VP6 Gene Protects Mice Against Rotavirus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Li DONG; Bo ZHOU; Gang SHENG; Tao WANG

    2005-01-01

    Elevated expression of the rotavirus VP6 antigen in transgenic plants is a critical factor in the development of a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine. Using codon optimization, a gene that encodes the inner capsid protein VP6 of the human group A rotavirus was synthesized (sVP6). The VP6 and sVp6genes were transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression level of the sVP6 gene in transgenic plants was 3.8-34-fold higher than that of controls containing the non-modified VP6 gene, accounting for up to 0.34% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Then, BALB/c female mice that had been gavaged weekly with 10 mg TSP containing 34 μg VP6 protein, in which VP6-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibodies were investigated. The severity and duration of diarrhea caused by simian rotavirus SA-11 challenge were reduced significantly in passively immunized pups, which indicates that anti-VP6 antibodies generated in orally immunized female mice can be passed onto pups and provide heterotypic protection. An edible vaccine based on the VP6 of human rotavirus group A could provide a means to protect children and young animals from severe acute diarrhea.

  6. Targeting gene expression to the female larval fat body of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totten, D C; Vuong, M; Litvinova, O V; Jinwal, U K; Gulia-Nuss, M; Harrell, R A; Beneš, H

    2013-02-01

    As the fat body is a critical tissue for mosquito development, metamorphosis, immune and reproductive system function, the characterization of regulatory modules targeting gene expression to the female mosquito fat body at distinct life stages is much needed for multiple, varied strategies for controlling vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. The hexameric storage protein, Hexamerin-1.2, of the mosquito Aedes atropalpus is female-specific and uniquely expressed in the fat body of fourth instar larvae and young adults. We have identified in the Hex-1.2 gene, a short regulatory module that directs female-, tissue-, and stage-specific lacZ reporter gene expression using a heterologous promoter in transgenic lines of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Male transgenic larvae and pupae of one line expressed no Escherichia coli β-galactosidase or transgene product; in two other lines reporter gene activity was highly female-biased. All transgenic lines expressed the reporter only in the fat body; however, lacZ mRNA levels were no different in males and females at any stage examined, suggesting that the gene regulatory module drives female-specific expression by post-transcriptional regulation in the heterologous mosquito. This regulatory element from the Hex-1.2 gene thus provides a new molecular tool for transgenic mosquito control as well as functional genetic analysis in aedine mosquitoes.

  7. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants.

  8. Transgenic Expression of the Anti-parasitic Factor TEP1 in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Saenger, Mélanie; Soichot, Julien; Scholze, Heidi; Boch, Jens; Blandin, Stéphanie A.; Marois, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes genetically engineered to be resistant to Plasmodium parasites represent a promising novel approach in the fight against malaria. The insect immune system itself is a source of anti-parasitic genes potentially exploitable for transgenic designs. The Anopheles gambiae thioester containing protein 1 (TEP1) is a potent anti-parasitic protein. TEP1 is secreted and circulates in the mosquito hemolymph, where its activated cleaved form binds and eliminates malaria parasites. Here we investigated whether TEP1 can be used to create malaria resistant mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter transgene, we determined that the fat body is the main site of TEP1 expression. We generated transgenic mosquitoes that express TEP1r, a potent refractory allele of TEP1, in the fat body and examined the activity of the transgenic protein in wild-type or TEP1 mutant genetic backgrounds. Transgenic TEP1r rescued loss-of-function mutations, but did not increase parasite resistance in the presence of a wild-type susceptible allele. Consistent with previous reports, TEP1 protein expressed from the transgene in the fat body was taken up by hemocytes upon a challenge with injected bacteria. Furthermore, although maturation of transgenic TEP1 into the cleaved form was impaired in one of the TEP1 mutant lines, it was still sufficient to reduce parasite numbers and induce parasite melanization. We also report here the first use of Transcription Activator Like Effectors (TALEs) in Anopheles gambiae to stimulate expression of endogenous TEP1. We found that artificial elevation of TEP1 expression remains moderate in vivo and that enhancement of endogenous TEP1 expression did not result in increased resistance to Plasmodium. Taken together, our results reveal the difficulty of artificially influencing TEP1-mediated Plasmodium resistance, and contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying mosquito resistance to Plasmodium parasites. PMID:28095489

  9. The formation of brown adipose tissue induced by transgenic over-expression of PPARγ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Yang, Jinzeng; Huang, Jinliang; Li, Ting; Xu, Dequan; Zuo, Bo; Hou, Liming; Wu, Wangjun; Zhang, Lin; Xia, Xiaoliang; Ma, Zhiyuan; Ren, Zhuqing; Xiong, Yuanzhu

    2014-04-18

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized to dissipate energy as heat, therefore reducing fat deposition and counteracting obesity. Brown adipocytes arise from myoblastic progenitors during embryonic development by the action of transcription regulator PRDM16 binding to PPARγ, which promotes BAT-like phenotype in white adipose tissue. To investigate the capability of converting white adipose tissue to BAT or browning by PPARγ in vivo, we generated transgenic mice with over-expressed PPARγ2. The transgenic mice showed strong brown fat features in subcutaneous fat in morphology and histology. To provide molecular evidences on browning characteristics of the adipose tissue, we employed quantitative real-time PCR to determine BAT-specific gene expressions. The transgenic mice had remarkably elevated mRNA level of UCP1, Elovl3, PGC1α and Cebpα in subcutaneous fat. Compared with wild-type mice, UCP1 protein levels were increased significantly in transgenic mice. ATP concentration was slightly decreased in the subcutaneous fat of transgenic mice. Western blotting analysis also confirmed that phosphorylated AMPK and ACC proteins were significantly (P<0.01) increased in the transgenic mice. Therefore, this study demonstrated that over-expression of PPARγ2 in skeletal muscle can promote conversion of subcutaneous fat to brown fat formation, which can have beneficial effects on increasing energy metabolisms and combating obesity.

  10. Reduction of malaria transmission by transgenic mosquitoes expressing an antisporozoite antibody in their salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, M; Kasashima, K; Yamamoto, D S; Yagi, K; Yuda, M; Matsuoka, H; Yoshida, S

    2013-02-01

    We have previously developed a robust salivary gland-specific expression system in transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. To establish transgenic mosquito lines refractory to Plasmodium falciparum using this system, we generated a transgenic mosquito harbouring the gene encoding an anti-P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) single-chain antibody (scFv) fused to DsRed in a secretory form (mDsRed-2A10 scFv). Fluorescence microscopy showed that the mDsRed-2A10 scFv was localized in the secretory cavities and ducts of the salivary glands in a secreted form. To evaluate P. falciparum transmission-blocking in a rodent malaria model, a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line expressing PfCSP in place of PbCSP (PfCSP/Pb) was constructed. The PfCSP/Pb parasites were able to bind to the mDsRed-2A10 scFv in the salivary glands of the transgenic mosquitoes. Importantly, the infectivity of the transgenic mosquitoes to mice was strongly impaired, indicating that the parasites had been inactivated. These results suggest that salivary gland-specific expression of antisporozoite molecules could be a promising strategy for blocking malaria transmission to humans.

  11. A 28 nt long synthetic 5′UTR (synJ as an enhancer of transgene expression in dicotyledonous plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanoria Shaveta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high level of transgene expression is required, in several applications of transgenic technology. While use of strong promoters has been the main focus in such instances, 5′UTRs have also been shown to enhance transgene expression. Here, we present a 28 nt long synthetic 5′UTR (synJ, which enhances gene expression in tobacco and cotton. Results The influence of synJ on transgene expression was studied in callus cultures of cotton and different tissues of transgenic tobacco plants. The study was based on comparing the expression of reporter gene gus and gfp, with and without synJ as its 5′UTR. Mutations in synJ were also analyzed to identify the region important for enhancement. synJ, enhances gene expression by 10 to 50 fold in tobacco and cotton depending upon the tissue studied. This finding is based on the experiments comparing the expression of gus gene, encoding the synJ as 5′UTR under the control of 35S promoter with expression cassettes based on vectors like pBI121 or pRT100. Further, the enhancement was in most cases equivalent to that observed with the viral leader sequences known to enhance translation like Ω and AMV. In case of transformed cotton callus as well as in the roots of tobacco transgenic plants, the up-regulation mediated by synJ was much higher than that observed in the presence of both Ω as well as AMV. The enhancement mediated by synJ was found to be at the post-transcriptional level. The study also demonstrates the importance of a 5′UTR in realizing the full potential of the promoter strength. synJ has been utilized to design four cloning vectors: pGEN01, pBGEN02, pBGEN02-hpt and pBGEN02-ALSdm each of which can be used for cloning the desired transgene and achieving high level of expression in the resulting transgenic plants. Conclusions synJ, a synthetic 5′UTR, can enhance transgene expression under a strong promoter like 35S as well as under a weak promoter like nos in

  12. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  13. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  14. Regeneration of transgenic loblolly pine expressing genes for salt tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Salinity stress is one of the most serious factors limiting the distribution and productivity of crops and forest trees. The detrimental effects of salt on plants are a consequence of both a water deficit resulting in osmotic stress and the effects of excess sodium ions on critical biochemical process. A novel approach to improve salt tolerance has been established by using the technology of plant genetic transformation and using loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) as a model plant. Mature zygotic embryos of loblolly pine were infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA 4404 harbouring the plasmid pBIGM which carrying the mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (Mt1D) and glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GutD). Organogenic transgenic calli and transgenic regenerated plantlets were produced on selection medium containing 15mg/L kanamycin and confirmed by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Salt tolerance assays demonstrated that the salt tolerance of transgenic calli and regenerated plantlets were increased. These results suggested that an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol for stable integration of foreign genes into loblolly pine has been developed and this could be useful for the future studies on engineering breeding of conifers.

  15. RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 regulates transgene expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Huang, Yi-Chun; Poulton, John S; Leake, Nicholas; Palmer, William H; Vera, Daniel; Xie, Gengqiang; Klusza, Stephen; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-04-01

    Belle (Bel), the Drosophila homolog of the yeast DEAD-box RNA helicase DED1 and human DDX3, has been shown to be required for oogenesis and female fertility. Here we report a novel role of Bel in regulating the expression of transgenes. Abrogation of Bel by mutations or RNAi induces silencing of a variety of P-element-derived transgenes. This silencing effect depends on downregulation of their RNA levels. Our genetic studies have revealed that the RNA helicase Spindle-E (Spn-E), a nuage RNA helicase that plays a crucial role in regulating RNA processing and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis in germline cells, is required for loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Conversely, Bel abrogation alleviates the nuage-protein mislocalization phenotype in spn-E mutants, suggesting a competitive relationship between these two RNA helicases. Additionally, disruption of the chromatin remodeling factor Mod(mdg4) or the microRNA biogenesis enzyme Dicer-1 (Dcr-1) also alleviates the transgene-silencing phenotypes in bel mutants, suggesting the involvement of chromatin remodeling and microRNA biogenesis in loss-of-bel-induced transgene silencing. Finally we show that genetic inhibition of Bel function leads to de novo generation of piRNAs from the transgene region inserted in the genome, suggesting a potential piRNA-dependent mechanism that may mediate transgene silencing as Bel function is inhibited.

  16. The elicitor-inducible alfalfa isoflavone reductase promoter confers different patterns of developmental expression in homologous and heterologous transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, A; Dixon, R A; Paiva, N L

    1994-01-01

    In legumes, the synthesis of infection- and elicitor-inducible antimicrobial phytoalexins occurs via the isoflavonoid branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study transcriptional regulation of isoflavonoid pathway-specific genes, we have isolated the gene encoding isoflavone reductase (IFR), which is the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of the phytoalexin medicarpin in alfalfa. Chimeric gene fusions were constructed between 765- and 436-bp promoter fragments of the IFR gene and the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to alfalfa and tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Both promoter fragments conferred elicitor-mediated expression in cell suspension cultures derived from transgenic plants of both species and fungal infection-mediated expression in leaves of transgenic alfalfa. Developmental expression directed by both promoter fragments in transgenic alfalfa was observed only in the root meristem, cortex, and nodules, which is consistent with the accumulation of endogenous IFR transcripts. However, in transgenic tobacco, expression from the 765-bp promoter was observed in vegetative tissues (root meristem and cortex, inner vascular tissue of stems and petioles, leaf tips, and stem peripheries adjacent to petioles) and in reproductive tissues (stigma, placenta, base of the ovary, receptacle, seed, tapetal layer, and pollen grains), whereas the 436-bp promoter was expressed only in fruits, seed, and pollen. These data indicate that infection/elicitor inducibility of the IFR promoter in both species and developmental expression in alfalfa are determined by sequences downstream of position -436, whereas sequences between -436 and -765 confer a complex pattern of strong ectopic developmental expression in the heterologous species that lacks the isoflavonoid pathway. PMID:7866024

  17. A BAC transgenic Hes1-EGFP reporter reveals novel expression domains in mouse embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinck, Rasmus; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas;

    2011-01-01

    of progenitor cells, but increasing evidence also points to Notch independent regulation of Hes1 expression. Here we use high resolution confocal scanning of EGFP in a novel BAC transgenic mouse reporter line, Tg(Hes1-EGFP)(1Hri), to analyse Hes1 expression from embryonic day 7.0 (e7.0). Our data recapitulates...

  18. Construction of a new plant expression vector containing two insect resistant genes and its expression in transgenic tobacco plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new plant expression vector (pBS29K-BA) containing two insect resistant genes, a synthetic chimeric gene BtS29K encoding the activated insecticidal protein Cry1Ac and a gene API-BA encoding the arrowhead (Sagittaria sagittifolia L.) proteinase inhibitor (API) A and B, is constructed. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these two genes are obtained through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco leaf discs. The average expression levels of Cry1Ac and API-BA proteins in transgenic plants are of 3.2 μg and 4.9 μg per gram fresh leaf respectively. The results of insecticidal assay of transgenic plants indicate that the pBS29K-BA transformed plants are more resistant to insect damage than the plants expressing the Cry1Ac gene or API-BA gene alone.

  19. The temporal expression pattern of alpha-synuclein modulates olfactory neurogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian R Schreglmann

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis mirrors the brain´s endogenous capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In the subventricular zone/ olfactory bulb system adult neurogenesis is linked to physiological olfactory function and has been shown to be impaired in murine models of neuronal alpha-Synuclein overexpression. We analyzed the degree and temporo-spatial dynamics of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis in transgenic mice expressing human wild-type alpha-Synuclein (WTS under the murine Thy1 (mThy1 promoter, a model known to have a particularly high tg expression associated with impaired olfaction.Survival of newly generated neurons (NeuN-positive in the olfactory bulb was unchanged in mThy1 transgenic animals. Due to decreased dopaminergic differentiation a reduction in new dopaminergic neurons within the olfactory bulb glomerular layer was present. This is in contrast to our previously published data on transgenic animals that express WTS under the control of the human platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGF promoter, that display a widespread decrease in survival of newly generated neurons in regions of adult neurogenesis, resulting in a much more pronounced neurogenesis deficit. Temporal and quantitative expression analysis using immunofluorescence co-localization analysis and Western blots revealed that in comparison to PDGF transgenic animals, in mThy1 transgenic animals WTS is expressed from later stages of neuronal maturation only but at significantly higher levels both in the olfactory bulb and cortex.The dissociation between higher absolute expression levels of alpha-Synuclein but less severe impact on adult olfactory neurogenesis in mThy1 transgenic mice highlights the importance of temporal expression characteristics of alpha-Synuclein on the maturation of newborn neurons.

  20. Low levels of the reverse transactivator fail to induce target transgene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikenza Viceconte

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time.

  1. Over-Expression of ICE1 Gene in Transgenic Rice Improves Cold Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Dian-jun; HU Xiang-yang; ZHANG Yu; YIN Kui-de

    2008-01-01

    ICE1, an Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor gene, was cloned by RT-PCR and successfully transformed into rice variety Kenjiandao 10 by the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis indicated that ICE1 had been integrated into rice genome. Compared with the non-transgenic plants, the transgenic plants exhibited high resistance to hygromycin B and were consistent with the Mendelian inheritance of a single copy of the transgenic ICE1. Under the low temperature stress, the transgenic plants showed the lower mortality rate and the increased proline content. These results suggest that the Arabidopsis ICE1 is functional in rice and the over-expression of ICE1 improves the tolerance to cold stress in rice.

  2. Enhanced tolerance and remediation of anthracene by transgenic tobacco plants expressing a fungal glutathione transferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Sherkhane, Pramod D.; Kale, Sharad P. [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Eapen, Susan, E-mail: eapenhome@yahoo.com [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Transgenic plants expressing a TvGST gene were tested for tolerance, uptake and degradation of anthracene. {yields} Transgenic plants were more tolerant to anthracene and take up more anthracene from soil and solutions compared to control plants. {yields} Using in vitro T{sub 1} seedlings, we showed that anthracene-a three fused benzene ring compound was phytodegraded to naphthalene derivatives, having two benzene rings. {yields} This is the first time that a transgenic plant was shown to have the potential to phytodegrade anthracene. - Abstract: Plants can be used for remediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be a major concern for human health. Metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in plants occurs in three phases and glutathione transferases (GST) mediate phase II of xenobiotic transformation. Plants, although have GSTs, they are not very efficient for degradation of exogenous recalcitrant xenobiotics including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hence, heterologous expression of efficient GSTs in plants may improve their remediation and degradation potential of xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the potential of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST for tolerance, remediation and degradation of anthracene-a recalcitrant polyaromatic hydrocarbon. Transgenic plants with fungal GST showed enhanced tolerance to anthracene compared to control plants. Remediation of {sup 14}C uniformly labeled anthracene from solutions and soil by transgenic tobacco plants was higher compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants (T{sub 0} and T{sub 1}) degraded anthracene to naphthalene derivatives, while no such degradation was observed in wild-type plants. The present work has shown that in planta expression of a fungal GST in tobacco imparted enhanced tolerance as well as higher remediation potential of anthracene compared to wild-type plants.

  3. Reduction of lesion growth rate of late blight plant disease in transgenic potato expressing harpin protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李汝刚; 范云六

    1999-01-01

    Using harpin protein gene from apple fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylavora and potato prp1-1 promoter as main DNA elements, the feasibility of using pathogen infection-induced hypersensitive response was explored as a new strategy of engineering fungal disease resistance. Three plant transformation vectors were constructed and 68 transgenic potato plants were produced through Agrobacterium mediated transformation method. Southern, Northern and Western blot analysis demonstrated the insertion, transcription and protein expression of harpin protein gene in transgenic plants. Disease resistance test using a complex race of Phytophthora infestans as challenging pathogen showed that both constitutive and pathogen infection-induced expression of harpin protein gene in transgenic potato reduced the lesion growth rate of fungus. Among plants where harpin protein gene expression was induced only by fungus infection, two plants were found to be highly resistant to P. infestans infection. Fungal hyphae were not pr

  4. Transgenic maize plants expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein, KP4, are highly resistant to corn smut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Aron; Islamovic, Emir; Kaur, Jagdeep; Gold, Scott; Shah, Dilip; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-10-01

    The corn smut fungus, Ustilago maydis, is a global pathogen responsible for extensive agricultural losses. Control of corn smut using traditional breeding has met with limited success because natural resistance to U. maydis is organ specific and involves numerous maize genes. Here, we present a transgenic approach by constitutively expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein KP4, in maize. Transgenic maize plants expressed high levels of KP4 with no apparent negative impact on plant development and displayed robust resistance to U. maydis challenges to both the stem and ear tissues in the greenhouse. More broadly, these results demonstrate that a high level of organ independent fungal resistance can be afforded by transgenic expression of this family of antifungal proteins.

  5. Characterization of three loci for homologous gene targeting and transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyquem, Justin; Poirot, Laurent; Galetto, Roman; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Smith, Julianne

    2013-08-01

    Integrative gene transfer is widely used for bioproduction, drug screening, and therapeutic applications but usual viral methods lead to random and multicopy insertions, contribute to unstable transgene expression and can disturb endogenous gene expression. Homologous targeting of an expression cassette using rare-cutting endonucleases is a potential solution; however the number of studied loci remains limited. Furthermore, the behavior and performance of various types of gene cassettes following gene targeting is poorly defined. Here we have evaluated three loci for gene targeting, including one locus compatible with the proposed Safe Harbor criteria for human translational applications. Using optimized conditions for homologous gene targeting, reporter genes under the control of different promoters were efficiently inserted at each locus in both sense and antisense orientations. Sustainable expression was achieved at all three loci without detectable disturbance of flanking gene expression. However, the promoter, the integration locus and the cassette orientation have a strong impact on transgene expression. Finally, single targeted integrations exhibited greatly improved transgene expression stability versus multicopy or random integration. Taken together, our data suggest a potential set of loci for site-specific transgene integration, suitable for a variety of biotechnological applications.

  6. Expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in aging of transgenic mouse liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is related to the aging of many organs, but few data are available on the change of TIMP-1 in liver aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression and role of TIMP-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in the process of natural aging in the livers of normal and transgenic mice, and to detect the effects of TIMP-1 on oxidative level and anti-oxidative ability of the livers of transgenic young mice.Methods Normal and transgenic mice were divided into 3 groups according to their age: 3-month-old group (n=5), 12-month-old group (n=5) and 24-month-old group (n=5). Histopathological changes of the liver were observed after HE and Masson staining. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of TIMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction; protein expression was measured by Western blot in the livers of normal and transgenic mice of various ages. Changes in levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), monoamine oxidase (MAO), malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as oxidative and anti-oxidative ability were measured.Results Histologically, more fatty degeneration and collagen deposition were found in the aging livers of transgenic mice than in those of the normal mice as their age of months increased. The mRNA and protein expressions of TIMP-1 were significantly high in the oldest animals. The histopathological changes, mRNA and protein expressions of TIMP-1 increased significantly in the liver of transgenic mice as compared with normal mice. The expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed a minor change in the process of aging. Liver change and collagen deposition were not observed in young mice, but the activity of SOD decreased (P<0.05), and the activity of MAO (P<0.01) and the content of MDA increased in the liver of transgenic mice (P<0.01).Conclusions The expression of TIMP-1 is significantly high in the liver of transgenic mouse in the

  7. Use of the viral 2A peptide for bicistronic expression in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trichas Georgios

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals are widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology. Multicistronic constructs, in which several proteins are encoded by a single messenger RNA, are commonly used in genetically engineered animals. This is currently done by using an internal ribosomal entry site to separate the different coding regions. 2A peptides result in the co-translational 'cleavage' of proteins and are an attractive alternative to the internal ribosomal entry site. They are more reliable than the internal ribosomal entry site and lead to expression of multiple cistrons at equimolar levels. They work in a wide variety of eukaryotic cells, but to date have not been demonstrated to function in transgenic mice in an inheritable manner. Results To test 2A function in transgenic mice and uncover any possible toxicity of widespread expression of the 2A peptide, we made a bicistronic reporter construct containing the coding sequence for a membrane localised red fluorescent protein (Myr-TdTomato and a nuclear localised green fluorescent protein (H2B-GFP, separated by a 2A sequence. When this reporter is transfected into HeLa cells, the two fluorescent proteins correctly localise to mutually exclusive cellular compartments, demonstrating that the bicistronic construct is a reliable readout of 2A function. The two fluorescent proteins also correctly localise when the reporter is electroporated into chick neural tube cells. We made two independent transgenic mouse lines that express the bicistronic reporter ubiquitously. For both lines, transgenic mice are born in Mendelian frequencies and are found to be healthy and fertile. Myr-TdTomato and H2B-GFP segregate to mutually exclusive cellular compartments in all tissues examined from a broad range of developmental stages, ranging from embryo to adult. One transgenic line shows X-linked inheritance of the transgene and mosaic expression in females but uniform expression in males, indicating

  8. EXPRESSION OF CHITINASE GENE IN TRANSGENIC RAPE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Longdou

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypocotyl and cotyledon of Brassica napus L. H165 and Brassica juncea DB3 were transformed with chitinase gene and herbicide-resistance gene by co-culture with Agrobacterium tumefacients LBA4404, and rape plants were obtained which could grow on the medium containing herbicide. The PCR result showed that exotic genes were integrated in the genome of the rape. Further study was performed to determine the impact of temperature on the transgenic rate and the differentiation of explants.

  9. Immunoglobulin gene expression and regulation of rearrangement in kappa transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transgenic mice were produced by microinjection of the functionally rearranged immunoglobulin kappa gene from the myeloma MOPC-21 into the male pronucleus of fertilized mouse eggs, and implantation of the microinjected embryos into foster mothers. Mice that integrated the injected gene were detected by hybridizing tail DNA dots with radioactively labelled pBR322 plasmid DNA, which detects pBR322 sequences left as a tag on the microinjected DNA. Mice that integrated the injected gene (six males) were mated and the DNA, RNA and serum kappa chains of their offspring were analyzed. A rabbit anti-mouse kappa chain antiserum was also produced for use in detection of mouse kappa chains on protein blots. Hybridomas were produced from the spleen cells of these kappa transgenic mice to immortalize representative B cells and to investigate expression of the transgenic kappa gene, its effect on allelic exclusion, and its effect on the control of light chain gene rearrangement and expression. The results show that the microinjected DNA is integrated as concatamers in unique single or, rarely, two separate sites in the genome. The concatamers are composed of several copies (16 to 64) of injected DNA arranged in a head to tail fashion. The transgene is expressed into protein normally and in a tissue specific fashion. For the first time in these transgenic mice, all tissues contain a functionally rearranged and potentially expressible immunoglobulin gene. The transgene is expressed only in B cells and not in hepatocytes, for example. This indicates that rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes is necessary but not sufficient for the tissue specific expression of these genes by B cells.

  10. Increased IKKα expression in the basal layer of the epidermis of transgenic mice enhances the malignant potential of skin tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa P Alameda

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. In this study we demonstrate that elevated IKKα expression in murine epidermis increases the malignancy potential of skin tumors. We describe the generation of transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the basal, proliferative layer of the epidermis and in the outer root sheath of hair follicles. The epidermis of K5-IKKα transgenic animals shows several alterations such as hyperproliferation, mislocalized expression of integrin-α6 and downregulation of the tumor suppressor maspin. Treatment of the back skin of mice with the mitogenic agent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate causes in transgenic mice the appearance of different preneoplastic changes such as epidermal atypia with loss of cell polarity and altered epidermal tissue architecture, while in wild type littermates this treatment only leads to the development of benign epidermal hyperplasia. Moreover, in skin carcinogenesis assays, transgenic mice carrying active Ha-ras (K5-IKKα-Tg.AC mice develop invasive tumors, instead of the benign papillomas arising in wild type-Tg-AC mice also bearing an active Ha-ras. Therefore we provide evidence for a tumor promoter role of IKKα in skin cancer, similarly to what occurs in other neoplasias, including hepatocarcinomas and breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. The altered expression of cyclin D1, maspin and integrin-α6 in skin of transgenic mice provides, at least in part, the molecular bases for the increased malignant potential found in the K5-IKKα skin tumors.

  11. The expression of tga1a gene from tobacco affects the expression of exogenous gene in transgenic plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路子显; 常团结; 李旭刚; 徐军望; 李慧芬; 陈宛新; 冯德江; 肖桂芳; 朱祯

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein TGA1a of tobacco can specially interact with the enhancer sequence as-1 (-83 to -63) of CaMV35S promoter and show the function of transcriptional activation. In order to study the expression of exogenous gene affected by TGA1a, a trans-actingregulation system was formed by tandem connecting tga1a under the control of the phloem-specific promoter rolC with reporter gene under the control of CaMV35S. Then, the system abovewas utilized to construct a plant expression vector. Moreover, two plant expression vectors wereconstructed with the report gene controlled by CaMV35S and rolC promoter respectively as positive controls. Tobacco leaf disc transformed by Agrobacterium-mediated method and transgenic plants were regenerated. It was proved that the reporter gene existed in the genome of transgenic plants by Southern hybridization. The results of GUS activity indicated that the expression of tga1a controlled by rolC remarkably increased the expression of the reporter gene controlled by CaMV35S. GUS activity of transgenic plants containing trans-acting regulation system was higher than that of transgenic plants containing the reporter gene under the control of CaMV35S and rolC respectively, with the highest GUS activity of about tenfolds of two positive controls. Histochemical method demonstrated that GUS staining amassed mainly in phloem tissue of transgenic plantscontaining the trans-acting regulation system. A new model for arising the expression level and tissue-specific expression of exogenous gene in transgenic plant was established in this study.

  12. Transgenic cotton expressing Cry10Aa toxin confers high resistance to the cotton boll weevil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Arraes, Fabricio Barbosa Monteiro; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela Tristan; Silva, Marilia Santos; Lisei-de-Sá, Maria Eugênia; Lucena, Wagner Alexandre; Macedo, Leonardo Lima Pepino; Lima, Janaina Nascimento; Santos Amorim, Regina Maria; Artico, Sinara; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Mattar Silva, Maria Cristina; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2017-01-12

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton plants that effectively control cotton boll weevil (CBW), which is the most destructive cotton insect pest in South America, are reported here for the first time. This work presents the successful development of a new GM cotton with high resistance to CBW conferred by Cry10Aa toxin, a protein encoded by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene. The plant transformation vector harbouring cry10Aa gene driven by the cotton ubiquitination-related promoter uceA1.7 was introduced into a Brazilian cotton cultivar by biolistic transformation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays revealed high transcription levels of cry10Aa in both T0 GM cotton leaf and flower bud tissues. Southern blot and qPCR-based 2(-ΔΔCt) analyses revealed that T0 GM plants had either one or two transgene copies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of Cry10Aa protein expression showed variable protein expression levels in both flower buds and leaves tissues of T0 GM cotton plants, ranging from approximately 3.0 to 14.0 μg g(-1) fresh tissue. CBW susceptibility bioassays, performed by feeding adults and larvae with T0 GM cotton leaves and flower buds, respectively, demonstrated a significant entomotoxic effect and a high level of CBW mortality (up to 100%). Molecular analysis revealed that transgene stability and entomotoxic effect to CBW were maintained in T1 generation as the Cry10Aa toxin expression levels remained high in both tissues, ranging from 4.05 to 19.57 μg g(-1) fresh tissue, and the CBW mortality rate remained around 100%. In conclusion, these Cry10Aa GM cotton plants represent a great advance in the control of the devastating CBW insect pest and can substantially impact cotton agribusiness.

  13. Expression of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit in transgenic tobacco plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-li; ZHANG Zheng; LI Wen-sheng; ZHENG Jing; KONG Ling-hong; WANG Yi-li; SI Lü-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct plant transformation vector containing Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LT-B) gene and generate LT-B transgenic tobacco plants. Methods: The LT-B coding sequence was amplified from pMMB68 by PCR, subcloned into middle vector pUCmT and binary vector pBI121 to obtain plant expression vector pBI-LTB, in which LT-B expression was controlled under the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. The tobacco plants (Nicotiana tobacum L. Cuttivar Xanthi) were transformed by co-cultivating leaf discs method via Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the plant expression vector. The regenerated transgenic tobacco plants were selected by kanamycin and confirmed by PCR, Southern blot, Western blot and ELISA. Results: LT-B gene integrated in the tobacco genomic DNA and were expressed in 9 strains of transgenic tobacco plants. The yield was varied from 3.36-10.56 ng/mg total soluble tobacco leaf protein. Conclusion: The plant binary expression vector pBILTB was constructed successfully, and transgenic LT-B tobacco plants was generated, and confirmed by Southern blot. The protein LT-B expressed by engineered plants was identified by Western blot analysis and had the expected molecular weight of LT-B pentamer protein. This result is an important step close to developing an edible vaccine and supplying a mucasal immunoajuvant, which will contribute to the prevention of mucosa-route evading pathogen.

  14. Characterization of bioactive recombinant human lysozyme expressed in milk of cloned transgenic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is great potential for using transgenic technology to improve the quality of cow milk and to produce biopharmaceuticals within the mammary gland. Lysozyme, a bactericidal protein that protects human infants from microbial infections, is highly expressed in human milk but is found in only trace amounts in cow milk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced 17 healthy cloned cattle expressing recombinant human lysozyme using somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, we just focus on four transgenic cattle which were natural lactation. The expression level of the recombinant lysozyme was up to 25.96 mg/L, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Purified recombinant human lysozyme showed the same physicochemical properties, such as molecular mass and bacterial lysis, as its natural counterpart. Moreover, both recombinant and natural lysozyme had similar conditions for reactivity as well as for pH and temperature stability during in vitro simulations. The gross composition of transgenic and non-transgenic milk, including levels of lactose, total protein, total fat, and total solids were not found significant differences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, our study not only describes transgenic cattle whose milk offers the similar nutritional benefits as human milk but also reports techniques that could be further refined for production of active human lysozyme on a large scale.

  15. Herbicide resistance of transgenic rice plants expressing human CYP1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) metabolize herbicides to produce mainly non-phytotoxic metabolites. Although rice plants endogenously express multiple P450 enzymes, transgenic plants expressing other P450 isoforms might show improved herbicide resistance or reduce herbicide residues. Mammalian P450s metabolizing xenobiotics are reported to show a broad and overlapping substrate specificity towards lipophilic foreign chemicals, including herbicides. These P450s are ideal for enhancing xenobiotic metabolism in plants. A human P450, CYP1A1, metabolizes various herbicides with different structures and modes of herbicide action. We introduced human CYP1A1 into rice plants, and the transgenic rice plants showed broad cross-resistance towards various herbicides and metabolized them. The introduced CYP1A1 enhanced the metabolism of chlorotoluron and norflurazon. The herbicides were metabolized more rapidly in the transgenic rice plants than in non-transgenic controls. Transgenic rice plants expressing P450 might be useful for reducing concentrations of various chemicals in the environment.

  16. The Upregulation of NtAN2 Expression at Low Temperature is Required for Anthocyanin Accumulation in Juvenile Leaves of Lc-transgenic Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-An Huang; Ting Zhao; Hua-Jie Fan; Ning Wang; Shu-Song Zheng; Hong-Qing Ling

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanins often accumulate in plants subjected to environmental stress,including low temperature.However,the molecular regulatory mechanism of anthocyanin biosynthesis at low temperature is largely unknown.Here,tobacco was transformed with a maize anthocyanin regulatory gene Lc driven by AtSPX3 promoter to investigate the effect of Lc upon the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway.We found that the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway could not be activated in wild type,while Lc-transgenic tobacco lines exhibited purple pigmentation in juvenile leaves at low temperature.Accordingly,the total anthocyanin contents increased specifically in juvenilc leaves in Lc-transgenic lines.Transcriptional analysis showed that NtCHS and NtCHI were induced by low temperature in leaves of wild type and transgenic lines.NtDFR was uniquely expressed in Lc-transgenic lines,but its transcript was not detected in wild type,implying that NtDFR expression in tobacco leaves was dependent on Lc.Furthermore,the expression of NtAN2 (regulatory gene) and NtANS (anthocyanidin synthase gene) was coordinately upregulated in Lc-transgenic lines under low temperature,suggesting that both Lc and NtAN2 might activate the expression of NtANS,Based on our findings and previous reports,we postulated that Lc interacted with NtAN2 induced by low-temperature stress and consequently stimulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in juvenile leaves of Lc-transgenic tobacco lines.

  17. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  18. Neoplastic transformation of T lymphocytes through transgenic expression of a virus host modification protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Cristina Paiva Almeida

    Full Text Available Virus host evasion genes are ready-made tools for gene manipulation and therapy. In this work we have assessed the impact in vivo of the evasion gene A238L of the African Swine Fever Virus, a gene which inhibits transcription mediated by both NF-κB and NFAT. The A238L gene has been selectively expressed in mouse T lymphocytes using tissue specific promoter, enhancer and locus control region sequences for CD2. The resulting two independently derived transgenic mice expressed the transgene and developed a metastasic, angiogenic and transplantable CD4(+CD8(+CD69(- lymphoma. The CD4(+CD8(+CD69(- cells also grew vigorously in vitro. The absence of CD69 from the tumour cells suggests that they were derived from T cells at a stage prior to positive selection. In contrast, transgenic mice similarly expressing a mutant A238L, solely inhibiting transcription mediated by NF-κB, were indistinguishable from wild type mice. Expression of Rag1, Rag2, TCRβ-V8.2, CD25, FoxP3, Bcl3, Bcl2 l14, Myc, IL-2, NFAT1 and Itk, by purified CD4(+CD8(+CD69(- thymocytes from A238L transgenic mice was consistent with the phenotype. Similarly evaluated expression profiles of CD4(+CD8(+ CD69(- thymocytes from the mutant A238L transgenic mice were comparable to those of wild type mice. These features, together with the demonstration of (mono-oligoclonality, suggest a transgene-NFAT-dependent transformation yielding a lymphoma with a phenotype reminiscent of some acute lymphoblastic lymphomas.

  19. Analysis of cell-specificity and variegation of transgene expression driven by salmon prolactin promoter in stable lines of transgenic rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzbekova, Svetlana; Amoros, Claire; Cauty, Chantale; Mambrini, Muriel; Perrot, Elizabeth; Hew, Choy L; Chourrout, Daniel; Prunet, Patrick

    2003-04-01

    In order to identify the specificity and functionality of salmon prolactin (sPRL) promoter, transgenic rainbow trout carrying a construct comprising the 2.4 kb fragment of the 5' flanking region of Atlantic Chinook sPRL gene fused either to the reporter genes cat (sPRL-cat) or lacZ (sPRL-lacZ) were produced. sPRL-cat in transgenic F0 fish expressed strongly CAT only in the pituitary gland. Transgenic in F1-F4 lines harbouring sPRL-lacZ expressed beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) only in the follicular PRL-producing cells of the adenohypophysis. We observed heterocellular, mosaic distribution of beta-gal within PRL cell population and enormous variation of lacZ expression level between the littermates in the same transgenic line. Regardless of the transgene copy number, age or sex of transgenic fish, beta-gal expression was lactotroph-specific but variegated in all the nine F2 hemizygous lines analysed. One line harbouring a multicopy integration was followed up to F4 generation: the transgene was transmitted without modifications. Analysis of genomic DNA from pituitaries showed that lacZ sequences were highly methylated. LacZ expression was low and its transcripts, analysed by in situ hybridisation, showed a mosaic distribution within the pituitary gland. These data suggest that variegated expression of lacZ can occur at the transcription level owing to the silencing effect of lacZ gene. After proving the tissue-specific expression of reporter genes driven by the sPRL promoter, we tried to obtain the genetic ablation of PRL-producing cells,by transferring the same construct comprising diphtheria toxin DT-A gene (tox). However, the high mortality rate of sPRL-tox transformed embryos has embedded this study and no transgenic fish expressing tox were produced. The appropriateness of using transgenic strategies to analyse gene function in Salmonids is discussed, especially the implications of the multicopy integration patterns and of the variegated transgene expression.

  20. Evaluation and Application of Two High-Iron Transgenic Rice Lines Expressing a Pea Ferritin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Hong-xai; LI Mei; Guo Ze-jian; Shu Qing-yao; xu Xiao-hui; BAO Jin-song; SHEN Sheng-quan

    2008-01-01

    A totaI of 105 transgenic rice lines independently transformed with a pea ferritin gene (Fer)were previously obtained.After seven generations of selfing and β-glucuronidase(GUS)assisted selection,82 transgenic lines with stable agronomic traits were got.Among the 82 transgenic lines,two high-iron transgenic rice lines Fer34 and Fer65,with the iron contents in the milled rice being 4.82 and 3.46 times of that of the wild type Xiushui 11,respectively were identified.In the two transgenic lines,the exogenous Fer gene was highly expressed,and inherited as a single locus.The transgene had no negative effect on the agronomic traits of rice plant,other mineral nutritional components,appearance quailty and eating quailty of the milled rice,indicating that these two lines were elite high-iron breeding lines.Furthermore,the practical application and further studies facilitating utilization of the two elite breeding lines were discussed.

  1. Bovine PrP expression levels in transgenic mice influence transmission characteristics of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Hart, Patricia; Piccardo, Pedro; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Baron, Thierry; Barron, Rona M

    2012-05-01

    Until recently, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) disease in cattle was thought to be caused by a single agent strain, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) (classical BSE or BSE-C). However, due to the initiation of a large-scale surveillance programme throughout Europe, two atypical BSE strains, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, also named BSE-L) and BSE-H have since been discovered. These atypical BSE isolates have been previously transmitted to a range of transgenic mouse models overexpressing PrP from different species at different levels, on a variety of genetic backgrounds. To control for genetic background and expression level in the analysis of these isolates, we performed here a comprehensive comparison of the neuropathological and molecular properties of all three BSE agents (BASE, BSE-C and BSE-H) upon transmission into the same gene-targeted transgenic mouse line expressing the bovine prion protein (Bov6) and a wild-type control of the same genetic background. Significantly, upon challenge with these BSE agents, we found that BASE did not produce shorter survival times in these mice compared with BSE-C, contrary to previous studies using overexpressing bovine transgenic mice. Amyloid plaques were only present in mice challenged with atypical BSE and neuropathological features, including intensity of PrP deposition in the brain and severity of vacuolar degeneration were less pronounced in BASE compared with BSE-C-challenged mice.

  2. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species.

  3. Development of transgenic minipigs with expression of antimorphic human cryptochrome 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    Full Text Available Minipigs have become important biomedical models for human ailments due to similarities in organ anatomy, physiology, and circadian rhythms relative to humans. The homeostasis of circadian rhythms in both central and peripheral tissues is pivotal for numerous biological processes. Hence, biological rhythm disorders may contribute to the onset of cancers and metabolic disorders including obesity and type II diabetes, amongst others. A tight regulation of circadian clock effectors ensures a rhythmic expression profile of output genes which, depending on cell type, constitute about 3-20% of the transcribed mammalian genome. Central to this system is the negative regulator protein Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1 of which the dysfunction or absence has been linked to the pathogenesis of rhythm disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic Bama-minipigs featuring expression of the Cys414-Ala antimorphic human Cryptochrome 1 mutant (hCRY1(AP. Using transgenic donor fibroblasts as nuclear donors, the method of handmade cloning (HMC was used to produce reconstructed embryos, subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. A total of 23 viable piglets were delivered. All were transgenic and seemingly healthy. However, two pigs with high transgene expression succumbed during the first two months. Molecular analyzes in epidermal fibroblasts demonstrated disturbances to the expression profile of core circadian clock genes and elevated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, known to be risk factors in cancer and metabolic disorders.

  4. Expression and purification of recombinant human serum albumin from selectively terminable transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Feng-zhen; Shen, Zhi-cheng

    2013-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is widely utilized for medical purposes and biochemical research. Transgenic rice has proved to be an attractive bioreactor for mass production of recombinant HSA (rHSA). However, transgene spread is a major environmental and food safety concern for transgenic rice expressing proteins of medical value. This study aimed to develop a selectively terminable transgenic rice line expressing HSA in rice seeds, and a simple process for recovery and purification of rHSA for economical manufacture. An HSA expression cassette was inserted into a T-DNA vector encoding an RNA interference (RNAi) cassette suppressing the CYP81A6 gene. This gene detoxifies the herbicide bentazon and is linked to the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) cassette which confers glyphosate tolerance. ANX Sepharose Fast Flow (ANX FF) anion exchange chromatography coupled with Butyl Sepharose High Performance (Butyl HP) hydrophobic interaction chromatography was used to purify rHSA. A transgenic rice line, HSA-84, was obtained with stable expression of rHSA of up to 0.72% of the total dry weight of the dehusked rice seeds. This line also demonstrated high sensitivity to bentazon, and thus could be killed selectively by a spray of bentazon. A two-step chromatography purification scheme was established to purify the rHSA from rice seeds to a purity of 99% with a recovery of 62.4%. Results from mass spectrometry and N-terminus sequencing suggested that the purified rHSA was identical to natural plasma-derived HSA. This study provides an alternative strategy for large-scale production of HSA with a built-in transgene safety control mechanism.

  5. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins.

  6. Expression of complement system components during aging and amyloid deposition in APP transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold Karl-Heinz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A causal role of the complement system in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis has been postulated based on the identification of different activated components up to the membrane attack complex at amyloid plaques in brain. However, histological studies of amyloid plaque bearing APP transgenic mice provided only evidence for an activation of the early parts of the complement cascade. To better understand the contribution of normal aging and amyloid deposition to the increase in complement activation we performed a detailed characterization of the expression of the major mouse complement components. Methods APP23 mice expressing human APP751 with the Swedish double mutation as well as C57BL/6 mice were used at different ages. mRNA was quantified by Realtime PCR and the age- as well as amyloid induced changes determined. The protein levels of complement C1q and C3 were analysed by Western blotting. Histology was done to test for amyloid plaque association and activation of the complement cascade. Results High mRNA levels were detected for C1q and some inhibitory complement components. The expression of most activating components starting at C3 was low. Expression of C1q, C3, C4, C5 and factor B mRNA increased with age in control C57BL/6 mice. C1q and C3 mRNA showed a substantial additional elevation during amyloid formation in APP23 mice. This increase was confirmed on the protein level using Western blotting, whereas immunohistology indicated a recruitment of complement to amyloid plaques up to the C3 convertase. Conclusion Early but not late components of the mouse complement system show an age-dependent increase in expression. The response to amyloid deposition is comparatively smaller. The low expression of C3 and C5 and failure to upregulate C5 and downstream components differs from human AD brain and likely contributes to the lack of full complement activation in APP transgenic mice.

  7. Collagenlα1 promoter drives the expression of Cre recombinase in osteoblasts of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblasts participate in bone formation,bone mineralization,osteoclast differentiation and many pathological processes.To study the function of genes in osteoblasts using Cre-LoxP system,we generated a mouse line expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the rat Collagenlal (Coilal) promoter(Coilatl-Cre).Two founders were identified by genomic PCR from 16 offsprings.and the integration efficiency is 12.5%.In order tO determine the tissue distribution and the activity of Cre rccombinase in the transgenic mice,the Collal-Cre transgenic mice were bred with the ROSA26 reporter strain and a mouse strain that carries Smad4 conditional alleles (Smad4co/co).Multiple tissue PCR of Collal-Cre;Smad4co/+mice revealed the restricted Cre activity in bone tissues containing osteoblasts and tendon.LacZ staining in the Coilal-Cre;ROSA26 double transgenic mice revealed that the Cre recombinase began to express in the osteoblasts of calvaria at E14.5.Cre activity was observed in the osteoblasts and osteocytes of P10 double transgenic mice.All these data indicated that the Collal-Cre transgenic mice could Serve as a valuabletool for osteoblast lineage analysis and conditional gene knockout in osteoblasts.

  8. Creation of Transgenic Bananas Expressing Human Lysozyme Gene for Panama Wilt Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Wu PEI; Shi-Kai CHEN; Rui-Ming WEN; Shang YE; Jia-Qin HUANG; Yong-Qiang ZHANG; Bing-Shan WANG; Zhi-Xing WANG; Shi-Rong JIA

    2005-01-01

    Human lysozyme (HL) inhibits Fusarium oxysporum (FocR4) growth in vitro. To obtaintransgenic bananas (Musa spp.) that are resistant to Panama wilt (F. oxysporum), we introduced an HL genethat is driven by a constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter into the banana via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PCR confirmed that 51 transgenic plants were obtained. The development ofPanama wilt symptoms were examined after the plants had been grown in pots. The non-transgenic plantsdeveloped typical fusarium symptoms 60 d after FocR4 inoculation, whereas 24 of 51 transgenic plants remained healthy. The transgenic banana plants that showed resistance to FocR4 in the pots were then planted in a field that was heavily infected with FocR4 for further investigation. Eleven of 24 plants developed symptoms before bud emergence; another 11 plants showed symptoms after bud emergence and the remaining two plants, H-67 and H-144, remained healthy and were able to fruit. Northern blotting analysisdemonstrated that H-67 and H-144, bearing the strongest resistance to Panama wilt, had the highest level ofHL expression and that the expression of HL was well correlated with the FocR4 resistance of transgenicplants. We conclude that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, with the assistance of particlebombardment, is a powerful approach for banana transformation and that a transgenic HL gene can causeresistance of the crop to FocR4 in the field.

  9. Expression of a begomoviral DNAβ gene in transgenic Nicotiana plants induced abnormal cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiao-feng; LI Yun-qin; HU Dong-wei; ZHOU Xue-ping

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of monopartite begomoviruses are being identified that a satellite molecule (DNAβ) is required to induce typical symptoms in host plants. DNAβ encodes a single gene (termed βC1) encoded in the complementary-sense. We have produced transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum plants expressing theβC1 gene of a DNAβ associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic plants expressing βC1 showed severe developmental abnormalities in both species. Microscopic analysis of sections of both transgenic and non-transgenic N. tabacum leaves showed abnormal outgrowths of transgenic N. tabacum to be due to disorganized cell division (hyperplasia) of spongy and palisade parenchyma. Immuno-gold labeling of sections with a polyclonal antibody against the βC1 protein showed that the βC1 protein accumulated in the nuclei of cells. The possible biological function of the βC1 protein was discussed.

  10. Expression of SV40 T antigen under control of rabbit uteroglobin promoter in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMayo, F J; Finegold, M J; Hansen, T N; Stanley, L A; Smith, B; Bullock, D W

    1991-08-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in the lungs and reproductive tracts of male and female rabbits. To examine whether the promoter region of the uteroglobin gene could be used to target a heterologous gene to the lungs of transgenic mice, a fusion gene consisting of 3.3 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the rabbit uteroglobin gene and the large T antigen gene of the SV40 virus was constructed and microinjected into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. Eleven founder transgenic mice (5 female and 6 male) were generated. Seven of these mice developed bronchioalveolar neoplasms. Four of the founder males also developed primitive undifferentiated urogenital tract tumors. One founder female and one female offspring of a founder male developed glandular paraovarian tumors. Northern analysis revealed that the predominant site of expression of the transgene was the lung. Immunohistochemical staining showed T antigen predominantly in epithelial cells lining the bronchioles, the submucosal glands of the trachea, and the neoplasms. There appeared to be a high level of mosaicism for the transgene in the founder mice, with poor transmission of the transgene to subsequent generations. This suggests that, under the control of the uteroglobin promoter, the T antigen gene may be lethal to the fetus.

  11. Transgenic expression of CD95 ligand on thyroid follicular cells confers immune privilege upon thyroid allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourneur, L; Malassagne, B; Batteux, F; Fabre, M; Mistou, S; Lallemand, E; Lores, P; Chiocchia, G

    2001-08-01

    Constitutive Fas ligand (FasL) expression by specialized cells in the body participates in the immune privilege status of tissues containing these cells. This property has been used to prevent rejection of allogeneic grafts. Nevertheless, the mechanism responsible for such protection has not been fully elucidated. Unfortunately, grafting of FasL transgenic (TG) tissues has been unsuccessful. We have generated TG mice expressing FasL (soluble + membrane bound) on thyroid follicular cells (TFC), and used them to show that ectopic FasL expression prevents thyroid allograft rejection. FasL expression on TFC led to markedly decreased anti-allogeneic, cytotoxic, and helper T lymphocyte activities. The alloantibody response in TG thyroid recipients was either completely inhibited or switched toward a T2-Ab response. Surprisingly, the beneficial effect of FasL on TG thyroid grafts was abolished by host CD4(+) T cell depletion. Host CD8(+) T cell depletion improved nontransgenic (NTG), but not TG graft survival. Altogether, our results suggest that FasL-induced tolerance is concomitant with a move away from a T1 type response, and a CD4 T cell-mediated regulation of the allocytotoxic T cell response. These results were dependent upon the level of FasL expression on TFC, in that low expression of FasL led to a less marked effect compared with the effect observed with high expression of FasL. These results provide some insight into the role of FasL in regulating destructive alloimmune responses in the case of whole organ grafting, and they have important implications for the development of FasL-based immunotherapy in organ transplantation.

  12. Functional imaging of interleukin 1 beta expression in inflammatory process using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhihui

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β plays an important role in a number of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. To understand the role of IL-1β in disease processes and develop an in vivo screening system for anti-inflammatory drugs, a transgenic mouse line was generated which incorporated the transgene firefly luciferase gene driven by a 4.5-kb fragment of the human IL-1β gene promoter. Luciferase gene expression was monitored in live mice under anesthesia using bioluminescence imaging in a number of inflammatory disease models. Results In a LPS-induced sepsis model, dramatic increase in luciferase activity was observed in the mice. This transgene induction was time dependent and correlated with an increase of endogenous IL-1β mRNA and pro-IL-1β protein levels in the mice. In a zymosan-induced arthritis model and an oxazolone-induced skin hypersensitivity reaction model, luciferase expression was locally induced in the zymosan injected knee joint and in the ear with oxazolone application, respectively. Dexamethasone suppressed the expression of luciferase gene both in the acute sepsis model and in the acute arthritis model. Conclusion Our data suggest that the transgenic mice model could be used to study transcriptional regulation of the IL-1β gene expression in the inflammatory process and evaluation the effect of anti-inflammatory drug in vivo.

  13. Transgenic expression of lactoferrin imparts enhanced resistance to head blight of wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jigang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Using the tools of plant genetic engineering, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial gene was tested for resistance against head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L. that reduces both grain yield and quality. Results A construct containing a bovine lactoferrin cDNA was used to transform wheat using an Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer system to express this antimicrobial protein in transgenic wheat. Transformants were analyzed by Northern and Western blots to determine lactoferrin gene expression levels and were inoculated with the head blight disease fungus F. graminearum. Transgenic wheat showed a significant reduction of disease incidence caused by F. graminearum compared to control wheat plants. The level of resistance in the highly susceptible wheat cultivar Bobwhite was significantly higher in transgenic plants compared to control Bobwhite and two untransformed commercial wheat cultivars, susceptible Wheaton and tolerant ND 2710. Quantification of the expressed lactoferrin protein by ELISA in transgenic wheat indicated a positive correlation between the lactoferrin gene expression levels and the levels of disease resistance. Conclusions Introgression of the lactoferrin gene into elite commercial wheat, barley and other susceptible cereals may enhance resistance to F. graminearum.

  14. Expression of the Arabidopsis vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase gene (AVP1) improves the shoot biomass of transgenic barley and increases grain yield in a saline field

    KAUST Repository

    Schilling, Rhiannon K.

    2013-11-22

    Cereal varieties with improved salinity tolerance are needed to achieve profitable grain yields in saline soils. The expression of AVP1, an Arabidopsis gene encoding a vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase), has been shown to improve the salinity tolerance of transgenic plants in greenhouse conditions. However, the potential for this gene to improve the grain yield of cereal crops in a saline field has yet to be evaluated. Recent advances in high-throughput nondestructive phenotyping technologies also offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the growth of transgenic plants under abiotic stress through time. In this study, the growth of transgenic barley expressing AVP1 was evaluated under saline conditions in a pot experiment using nondestructive plant imaging and in a saline field trial. Greenhouse-grown transgenic barley expressing AVP1 produced a larger shoot biomass compared to segregants, as determined by an increase in projected shoot area, when grown in soil with 150 mm NaCl. This increase in shoot biomass of transgenic AVP1 barley occurred from an early growth stage and also in nonsaline conditions. In a saline field, the transgenic barley expressing AVP1 also showed an increase in shoot biomass and, importantly, produced a greater grain yield per plant compared to wild-type plants. Interestingly, the expression of AVP1 did not alter barley leaf sodium concentrations in either greenhouse- or field-grown plants. This study validates our greenhouse-based experiments and indicates that transgenic barley expressing AVP1 is a promising option for increasing cereal crop productivity in saline fields. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  16. Bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice have major alterations in hepatic expression of metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Bob; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Brusehed, Ola; Isaksson, Olle G P; Ahrén, Bo; Olofsson, Sven-Olof; Oscarsson, Jan; Törnell, Jan

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) have been extensively used to study the chronic effects of elevated serum levels of GH. GH is known to have many acute effects in the liver, but little is known about the chronic effects of GH overexpression on hepatic gene expression. Therefore, we used DNA microarray to compare gene expression in livers from bovine GH (bGH)-transgenic mice and littermates. Hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and genes involved in fatty acid activation, peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and production of ketone bodies was decreased. In line with this expression profile, bGH-transgenic mice had a reduced ability to form ketone bodies in both the fed and fasted states. Although the bGH mice were hyperinsulinemic, the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 and most lipogenic enzymes regulated by SREBP-1 was reduced, indicating that these mice are different from other insulin-resistant models with respect to expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream genes. This study also provides several candidate genes for the well-known association between elevated GH levels and cardiovascular disease, e.g., decreased expression of scavenger receptor class B type I, hepatic lipase, and serum paraoxonase and increased expression of serum amyloid A-3 protein. We conclude that bGH-transgenic mice display marked changes in hepatic genes coding for metabolic enzymes and suggest that GH directly or indirectly regulates many of these hepatic genes via decreased expression of PPARalpha and SREBP-1.

  17. Polyplex-induced cytosolic nuclease activation leads to differential transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Rahul; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wu, Gordon S-H; Shakya, Anisha; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-08-01

    Cytosolic nucleases have been proposed to play an important role in limiting the effectiveness of polyplex-based gene delivery agents. In order to explore the effect of cell membrane disruption on nuclease activation, nuclease activity upon polyplex uptake and localization, and nuclease activity upon gene expression, we employed an oligonucleotide molecular beacon (MB). The MB was incorporated as an integral part of the polymer/DNA polyplex, and two-color flow cytometry experiments were performed to explore the relationship of MB cleavage with propidium iodide (PI) uptake, protein expression, and polyplex uptake. In addition, confocal fluorescence microcopy was performed to examine both polyplex and cleaved MB localization. The impact of cell membrane disruption was also probed using whole-cell patch clamp measurement of the plasma membrane's electrical conductance. Differential activation of cytosolic nuclease was observed with substantial activity for B-PEI and G5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5), less cleavage for jetPEI, and little activity for L-PEI. jetPEI and L-PEI exhibited substantially greater transgene expression, consistent with the lower amounts of MB oligonucleotide cleavage observed. Cytosolic nuclease activity, although dependent on the choice of polymer employed, was not related to the degree of cell plasma membrane disruption that occurred as measured by PI uptake or whole-cell patch clamp.

  18. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes. PMID:28216629

  19. Expression of a complete soybean leghemoglobin gene in root nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stougaard, J; Petersen, T E; Marcker, K A

    1987-08-01

    The complete soybean leghemoglobin lbc(3) gene was transferred into the legume Lotus corniculatus using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes vector system. Organ-specific expression of the soybean gene was observed in root nodules formed on regenerated transgenic plants after infection with Rhizobium loti. The primary transcript was processed in the same way as in soybean nodules and the resulting mRNA was translated into Lbc(3) protein. Quantitative determination of the Lbc(3) protein in nodules of transgenic plants indicated that the steady-state level of the soybean protein is comparable to that of endogenous Lotus leghemoglobin.

  20. The influence of matrix attachment regions on transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and gene silencing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Miguel F C; Butaye, Katleen M J; Goderis, Inge J W M; Wouters, Piet F J; Jacobs, Anni; Delauré, Stijn L; Depicker, Ann; Cammue, Bruno P A

    2007-03-01

    Many studies in both animal and plant systems have shown that matrix attachment regions (MARs) can increase the expression of flanking transgenes. However, our previous studies revealed no effect of the chicken lysozyme MARs (chiMARs) on transgene expression in the first generation transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants transformed with a beta-glucuronidase gene (uidA) unless gene silencing mutants were used as genetic background for transformation. In the present study, we investigated why chiMARs do not influence transgene expression in transgenic wild-type Arabidopsis plants. We first studied the effect of chiMARs on transgene expression in the progeny of primary transformants harboring chiMAR-flanked T-DNAs. Our data indicate that chiMARs do not affect transgene expression in consecutive generations of wild-type A. thaliana plants. Next, we examined whether these observed results in A. thaliana transformants are influenced by the applied transformation method. The results from in vitro transformed A. thaliana plants are in accordance with those from in planta transformed A. thaliana plants and again reveal no influence of chiMARs on transgene expression in A. thaliana wild-type transformants. The effect of chi-MARs on transgene expression is also examined in in vitro transformed Nicotiana tabacum plants, but as for A. thaliana, the transgene expression in tobacco transformants is not altered by the presence of chi-MARs. Taken together, our results show that the applied method or the plant species used for transformation does not influence whether and how chiMARs have an effect on transgene expression. Finally, we studied the effect of MARs (tabMARs) of plant origin (tobacco) on the transgene expression in A. thaliana wild-type plants and suppressed gene silencing (sgs2) mutants. Our results clearly show that similar to chiMARs, the tobacco-derived MARs do not enhance transgene expression in a wild-type background but can be used to enhance transgene expression

  1. Effect of CRC::etr1-1 transgene expression on ethylene production, sex expression, fruit set and fruit ripening in transgenic melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzenberg, Jessica A; Beaudry, Randy M; Grumet, Rebecca

    2015-06-01

    Ethylene is a key factor regulating sex expression in cucurbits. Commercial melons (Cucumis melo L.) are typically andromonoecious, producing male and bisexual flowers. Our prior greenhouse studies of transgenic melon plants expressing the dominant negative ethylene perception mutant gene, etr1-1, under control of the carpel- and nectary-primordia targeted CRAB'S CLAW (CRC) promoter showed increased number and earlier appearance of carpel-bearing flowers. To further investigate this phenomenon which could be potentially useful for earlier fruit production, we observed CRC::etr1-1 plants in the field for sex expression, fruit set, fruit development, and ripening. CRC::etr1-1 melon plants showed increased number of carpel-bearing open flowers on the main stem and earlier onset by 7-10 nodes. Additional phenotypes observed in the greenhouse and field were conversion of approximately 50% of bisexual buds to female, and elongated ovaries and fruits. Earlier and greater fruit set occurred on the transgenic plants. However, CRC::etr1-1 plants had greater abscission of young fruit, and smaller fruit, so that final yield (kg/plot) was equivalent to wild type. Earlier fruit set in line M5 was accompanied by earlier appearance of ripe fruit. Fruit from line M15 frequently did not exhibit external ripening processes of rind color change and abscission, but when cut open, the majority showed a ripe or overripe interior accompanied by elevated internal ethylene. The non-ripening external phenotype in M15 fruit corresponded with elevated etr1-1 transgene expression in the exocarp. These results provide insight into the role of ethylene perception in carpel-bearing flower production, fruit set, and ripening.

  2. Expression of the yeast FRE genes in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, A I; Martin, R C; Mok, D W; Mok, M C

    1998-09-01

    Two yeast genes, FRE1 and FRE2 (encoding Fe(III) reductases) were placed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Homozygous lines containing FRE1, FRE2, or FRE1 plus FRE2 were generated. Northern-blot analyses revealed mRNA of two different sizes in FRE1 lines, whereas all FRE2 lines had mRNA only of the expected length. Fe(III) reduction, chlorophyll contents, and Fe levels were determined in transgenic and control plants under Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions. In a normal growth environment, the highest root Fe(III) reduction, 4-fold higher than in controls, occurred in the double transformant (FRE1 + FRE2). Elevated Fe(III) reduction was also observed in all FRE2 and some FRE1 lines. The increased Fe(III) reduction occurred along the entire length of the roots and on shoot sections. FRE2 and double transformants were more tolerant to Fe deficiency in hydroponic culture, as shown by higher chlorophyll and Fe concentrations in younger leaves, whereas FRE1 transformants did not differ from the controls. Overall, the beneficial effects of FRE2 were consistent, suggesting that FRE2 may be used to improve Fe efficiency in crop plants.

  3. Production and characterization of transgenic mice systemically expressing endo-beta-galactosidase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Misawa, Masako; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Sakurai, Takayuki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Yokomine, Taka-Aki; Sato, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1-3Gal) is a sugar structure expressed on the cell surface of almost all organisms except humans and old-world-monkeys, which express natural anti-alphaGal antibodies. The presence of these antibodies elicits a hyper acute rejection (HAR) upon xenotransplantation of cellular materials, such as from pigs to human beings. Endo-beta-galactosidase C (EndoGalC), an enzyme isolated from Clostridium perfringens, removes the alphaGal epitope by cleaving the Galbeta1-4GlcNAc linkage in the Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc sequence. To explore the possibility that cells or organs from transgenic pigs systemically expressing EndoGalC might be suitable for xenotransplantation, we first introduced the EndoGalC transgene into the mouse genome via pronuclear injection. The progeny of the resulting transgenics expressed EndoGalC mRNA and protein. Flow cytometry and histochemical analyses revealed a dramatic reduction in the expression of the alphaGal epitope in these mice. They also exhibited abnormal phenotypes, such as occasional death immediately after birth, growth retardation, and transient skin lesions. Interestingly, the phenotypic abnormalities seen in these transgenics were similar to those observed in beta1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (beta4GalT-1) knockout (KO) mice. Most probably, these phenotypes were caused by exposure of the internal N-acetylglucosamine residue at the end of the sugar chain on the cell surface. The present findings also provide some basis for evaluating possible application of the transgenic approach for xenotranplantation.

  4. Inheritance and Expression of Potato Proteinase Inhibitor Gene Ⅱ (pinⅡ) in Transgenic Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhong-yi; XUE Qing-zhong

    2003-01-01

    The inheritance and expression of bar gene and pinⅡ gene were studied in three transgenic ricelines and their F2 hybrid populations, which were created through hybridization with a PGMS line, ZAU11S.By Basta painting, PCR analysis and determining of the inhibitory trypsin activity, the results show that bargene and pinⅡ gene in rice F2 population fit the simple Mendel's low of inheritance and close linkage, but afew plants in F2 have not sufficiently expressed. The wound inducible pin Ⅱ gene has an expression regulatedspatially and temporally, and the signal transduction pathway is not only upward, but also downward. The in-ducible expression of pinⅡ in different rice transgenic lines is not completely coincident.

  5. Expression of cloned genes of transgenic microorganisms introduced into man-made ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, E. E.; Popova, L. Yu.

    Modeling of transgenic microorganism introduction into small man-made ecosystems can help forecast changes in expression of cloned genes under different conditions of existence. Introduction of the E. coli Z905/pPHL7 strain containing a plasmid with luminescent system genes of luminous bacteria led to changes in cell and colony morphology, reduction in metabolic activity of cells, and, as a result, a lower level of expression of cloned gene. A low concentration of nutrients has been shown to favor greatly the phenotypic change of cells of the recombinant strain. Expression of cloned genes changed due to: a lower concentration of plasmid DNA, a change in regulation of cloned genes, and a change in cells of biosynthesis of substrates needed for expression of luminescent genes. The conducted investigations can provide a basis for the use of marker transgenic microorganisms in closed ecosystems of different types.

  6. Regulation of human clotting factor IX cDNA expression in transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡以平; 邱信芳; 薛京伦; 刘祖洞

    1995-01-01

    To study the expression of human dotting factor IX cDNA in transgenic mice,Which is an es-sential work on gene therapy for hemophilia B,3 recombinant constructions containing different lengths ofhuman dotting factor IX cDNA have been introduced into the cultured cells.All of the recombinant constructionswere found to he expressed well in vitro.They were then microinjected into the male pronudei of the fertilizedmouse eggs respectively for generating trahsgenic mice.Unfortunately,none of them was expressed in any transgenicmice.These results show that the expression of the human clotting factor IX cDNA in the transgenic mice canbe determined by cis regulatory element(s).As compared With the results from other related works,it is sug-gested that the cis regulatory element(s)is resided in the 5’-end non-coding region.

  7. EXPRESSION OF PORPHYRA YEZOENSIS TPS GENE IN TRANSGENIC RICE ENHANCED THE SALT TOLENRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tai Guo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene of Porphyra yezoensis (PyTPS was isolated and cloned into a plant gene expression vector pCAMBIA2300-35S-OCS, and the resulting construct pCAMBIA2300-PyTPS was transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens strain AGL1. Genetic transformation of rice variety TP309 was performed with the A. tumefaciens containing pCAMBIA2300-PyTPS. After antibiotic G418 screening and PCR analysis, one hundred T0 transgenic plants were seclected and transplanted into the trial field in the greenhouse and used for further study. Ninety-five of these 100 T0 transgenic cultivaries produced their seeds, which were harvested and stored separately. All of the 95 potential T1 transgenic lines were re-identified by PCR analysis, and their salt-tolerance was tested with 3‰ and 5‰ NaCl solutions. Results indicated that 78 of the 95 T1 transgenic lines were PCR- positive and resistant to 5‰ NaCl solution. Salt-tolerance of these 78 T1 transgenic lines was further tested with higher concentration of NaCl solutions. Of which, three lines (H155, H191 and Y308 showed resistance to 8‰ NaCl in the test. These 3 lines were comprehensively analyzed by PCR, Southern hybridization, northern hybridization and RT-PCR analyses. In addition, trehalose content measurement and preliminary yield evaluation were carried out, results indicated that the PyTPS gene was integrated into the genomic DNA sequences of these 3 transgenic lines and expressed indeed in the transgenic plants. Detection of the transformed PyTPS gene in these 3 transgenic lines was performed in plants from T1 to T6 generations; results indicated that the transformed PyTPS gene was present in transgenic plants from T1 to T6 generations.

  8. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in l...

  9. Expression of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene and salinity tolerance in rice transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭岩; 张莉; 肖岗; 曹守云; 谷冬梅; 田文忠; 陈受宜

    1997-01-01

    Betaine as one of osmolytes plays an important role in osmoregulation of most high plants. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase C BADH) is the second enzyme involved in betaine biosynthesis. The BADH gene from a halophite, Atriplex hortensis, was transformed into rice cultivars by bombarment method. Totally 192 transgenic rice plants were obtained and most of them had higher salt tolerance than controls. Among transgenic plants transplanted in the saline pool containing 0.5% NaCl in a greenhouse, 22 survived, 13 of which set seeds, and the frequency of seed setting was very low, only 10% . But the controls could not grow under the same condition. The results of BADH ac-tivity assay and Northern blot showed that the BADH gene was integrated into chromosomes of transgenic plants and expressed.

  10. Co-suppression in transgenic Petunia hybrida expressing chalcone synthase A (chsA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳; 惠有为; 张仲凯; 黄兴奇; 李毅

    2001-01-01

    Chalcone synthase A is a key enzyme in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. Expression of chsA gene in transgenic Petunia hybrida resulted in flower color alterations and co-suppression of transgenes and endogenous genes. We fused the β-glucuronidase (uidA) gene to the C-terminal of chsA gene, and transferred the fusion gene into Petunia hybrida via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. GUS histochemical staining analysis showed that co-suppression occurred specifically during the development of flowers and co-suppression required the mutual interaction of endogenous genes and transgenes. RNA in situ hybridization analysis suggested that co-suppression occurred in the entire plant, and RNA degradation occurred in the cytoplasm.

  11. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease.

  12. Expression of human coagulation Factor IX in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Lingxia; Chen, Yuhui; Cui, Lijie; Ren, Weiwei; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, a plant binary expression vector PG-pRD12-hFIX (where PG is polygalacturonase) harbouring the hFIX (human coagulation Factor IX) gene was constructed and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After kanamycin selection, 32 putative independent transgenic tomato plants were regenerated. PCR and Southern-blot analyses confirmed the transgenic status of some plants. RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analysis for the expression of the introduced gene (hFIX) demonstrated that the hFIX gene was expressed specifically in fruits of the tomato. Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of a 56 kDa band specific to hFIX in the transformed tomatoes. ELISA results showed that the expression of hFIX protein reached a maximum of 15.84 ng/g fresh weight in mature fruit. A blood-clotting assay demonstrated the clotting activity of the expressed hFIX protein in transgenic tomato fruits. This is the first report on the expression of hFIX in plants, and our research provides potentially valuable knowledge for further development of the plant-derived therapeutic proteins.

  13. Directed engineering of a high-expression chimeric transgene as a strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-07-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved.

  14. Optimization of TaDREB3 gene expression in transgenic barley using cold-inducible promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Jia, Wei; Eini, Omid; Morran, Sarah; Pyvovarenko, Tatiana; Fletcher, Stephen; Bazanova, Natalia; Harris, John; Beck-Oldach, Kontanze; Shavrukov, Yuri; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy

    2013-08-01

    Constitutive over-expression of the TaDREB3 gene in barley improved frost tolerance of transgenic plants at the vegetative stage of plant development, but leads to stunted phenotypes and 3- to 6-week delays in flowering compared to control plants. In this work, two cold-inducible promoters with contrasting properties, the WRKY71 gene promoter from rice and the Cor39 gene promoter from durum wheat, were applied to optimize expression of TaDREB3. The aim of the work was to increase plant frost tolerance and to decrease or prevent negative developmental phenotypes observed during constitutive expression of TaDREB3. The OsWRKY71 and TdCor39 promoters had low-to-moderate basal activity and were activated by cold treatment in leaves, stems and developing spikes of transgenic barley and rice. Expression of the TaDREB3 gene, driven by either of the tested promoters, led to a significant improvement in frost tolerance. The presence of the functional TaDREB3 protein in transgenic plants was confirmed by the detection of strong up-regulation of cold-responsive target genes. The OsWRKY71 promoter-driven TaDREB3 provides stronger activation of the same target genes than the TdCor39 promoter. Analysis of the development of transgenic plants in the absence of stress revealed small or no differences in plant characteristics and grain yield compared with wild-type plants. The WRKY71-TaDREB3 promoter-transgene combination appears to be a promising tool for the enhancement of cold and frost tolerance in crop plants but field evaluation will be needed to confirm that negative development phenotypes have been controlled.

  15. Production of pigs expressing a transgene under the control of a tetracycline-inducible system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xun Jin

    Full Text Available Pigs are anatomically and physiologically closer to humans than other laboratory animals. Transgenic (TG pigs are widely used as models of human diseases. The aim of this study was to produce pigs expressing a tetracycline (Tet-inducible transgene. The Tet-on system was first tested in infected donor cells. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were infected with a universal doxycycline-inducible vector containing the target gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. At 1 day after treatment with 1 µg/ml doxycycline, the fluorescence intensity of these cells was increased. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT was then performed using these donor cells. The Tet-on system was then tested in the generated porcine SCNT-TG embryos. Of 4,951 porcine SCNT-TG embryos generated, 850 were cultured in the presence of 1 µg/ml doxycycline in vitro. All of these embryos expressed eGFP and 15 embryos developed to blastocyst stage. The remaining 4,101 embryos were transferred to thirty three surrogate pigs from which thirty eight cloned TG piglets were obtained. PCR analysis showed that the transgene was inserted into the genome of each of these piglets. Two TG fibroblast cell lines were established from these TG piglets, and these cells were used as donor cells for re-cloning. The re-cloned SCNT embryos expressed the eGFP transgene under the control of doxycycline. These data show that the expression of transgenes in cloned TG pigs can be regulated by the Tet-on/off systems.

  16. [Creation of transgenic sugar beet lines expressing insect pest resistance genes cry1C and cry2A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, D I; Sivura, V V; Kurilo, V V; Oleneva, V D; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2014-01-01

    Impact of insect pests makes a significant limitation of the sugar beet crop yield. Integration of cry-genes of Bacillus thuringiensis into plant genome is one of the promising strategies to ensure plant resistance. The aim of this work was to obtain sugar beet lines (based on the MM 1/2 line) transformed with cry2A and cry1Cgenes. We have optimized transformation protocol and direct plant let regeneration protocol from leaf explants using 1 mg/l benzylaminopurine as well as 0,25 mg/l benzylaminopurine and 0,1 mg/l indole-butyric acid. Consequently, transgenic sugar beet lines transformed with vector constructs pRD400-cry1C and pRD400-cry2A have been obtained. PCR analysis revealed integration of cry2A and cry1C into genome of transgenic lines and expression of these genes in leaf tissues was shown by reverse transcription PCR.

  17. Transgenic rice plants expressing the snowdrop lectin gene (gna) exhibit high-level resistance to the whitebacked planthopper (Sogatella furcifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagadhara, D; Ramesh, S; Pasalu, I C; Rao, Y Kondala; Sarma, N P; Reddy, V D; Rao, K V

    2004-11-01

    Transgenic rice plants, expressing snowdrop lectin [Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)], obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, were evaluated for resistance against the insect, the whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). The transgene gna was driven by the phloem-specific, rice-sucrose synthase promoter RSs1, and the bar was driven by the CaMV 35S promoter. In our previous study, the transgenic status of these lines was confirmed by Southern, Northern and Western blot analyses. Both the transgenes, gna and bar, were stably inherited and co-segregated into progenies in T1 to T5 generations. Insect bioassays on transgenic plants revealed the potent entomotoxic effects of GNA on the WBPH. Also, significant decreases were observed in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects fed on transgenic plants. Furthermore, intact GNA was detected in the total proteins of WBPHs fed on these plants. Western blot analysis revealed stable and consistent expression of GNA throughout the growth and development of transgenic plants. Transgenic lines expressing GNA exhibited high-level resistance against the WBPH. As reported earlier, these transgenics also showed substantial resistance against the brown planthopper and green leafhopper.

  18. Sustained transgene expression using non-viral enzymatic systems for stable chromosomal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzoli, Fabien; Carnus, Elodie; Wells, Dominic J; Bigot, Yves

    2008-10-01

    Gene delivery technologies have been developed for various biotechnology applications. In gene therapy, they are promising for the treatment of several inherited and acquired human diseases. When therapies require the transfection of a transgene, the vector integration is one of the solutions that is used for maintaining and sustaining expression. On the basis of their origin, vectorisation technologies are currently divided in two fields, gathering on one hand viral vectors and, on the other hand, non-viral approaches. In the case of the non-viral therapies, three main sub-fields are in progress to integrate transgenes. The first uses oligonucleotides to stimulate targeted gene repair by homologous recombination. The second is based on site-specific endonucleases for which the cleavage activity is used to stimulate the host recombination mechanisms in the presence of a DNA vector. The third one is developed from phage and transposon enzymatic systems. The two lasts sub-fields use non-viral enzymes and are the scope of this review. Here, our objective was to overview the main non-viral enzymatic systems able to integrate DNA cassettes. Their molecular and functional characteristics are summarized, and their properties and limits in the current state of the art highlighted. An overview of the safety and quality issues is also presented and discussed, taking into account the solutions that might circumvent problems, intellectual property and economic status for each system. As a conclusion, we propose projections of the future technological developments in the context of the different interests for public and private bodies.

  19. A transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding biosensor reveals the effects of Bisphenol A on estrogen receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Thillai V.; Foygel, Kira; Massoud, Tarik F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) plays an important role in normal and abnormal physiology of the human reproductive system by interacting with the endogenous ligand estradiol (E2). However, other ligands, either analogous or dissimilar to E2, also bind to ERα. This may create unintentional activation of ER signaling in reproductive tissues that can lead to cancer development. We developed a transgenic mouse model that constitutively expresses a firefly luciferase (FLuc) split reporter complementation biosensor (NFLuc-ER-LBDG521T-CFLuc) to simultaneously evaluate the dynamics and potency of ligands that bind to ERα. We first validated this model using various ER ligands, including Raloxifene, Diethylstilbestrol, E2, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, by employing FLuc-based optical bioluminescence imaging of living mice. We then used the model to investigate the carcinogenic property of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, by long-term exposure at full and half environmental doses. We showed significant carcinogenic effects on female animals while revealing activated downstream ER signaling as measured by bioluminescence imaging. BPA induced tumor-like outgrowths in female transgenic mice, histopathologically confirmed to be neoplastic and epithelial in origin. This transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding-biosensor is useful in evaluation of estrogenic ligands and their downstream effects, and in studying environmental estrogen induced carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:27721470

  20. Functional expression of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in transgenic lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Cui, Min-Long; Ma, Biao; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-23

    Taste-modifying proteins are a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners and flavor enhancers and have been used in some cultures for centuries. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of being able to modify a sour taste into a sweet taste. Here, we report the use of a plant expression system for the production of miraculin. A synthetic gene encoding miraculin was placed under the control of constitutive promoters and transferred to lettuce. Expression of this gene in transgenic lettuce resulted in the accumulation of significant amounts of miraculin protein in the leaves. The miraculin expressed in transgenic lettuce possessed sweetness-inducing activity. These results demonstrate that the production of miraculin in edible plants can be a good alternative strategy to enhance the availability of this protein.

  1. Function of resveratrol de- rived from transgenic plant expressing resveratrol synthase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two genes from grapevine coding for resveratrol synthase, named RS1 and RS2, were cloned by RT-PCR. An Escherichia coli expression vector was constructed by insertion of RS1 into pBV221. A specific protein with the same molecular weight (42 ku) as the resveratrol synthase was expressed and used to prepare the rabbit antiserum. A plant expression vector was constructed by inserting the RS1 gene into pBin438 downstream of the doubled CaMV 35S promoter and TMV-W fragment. PCR-positive transgenic tobacco plants were obtained after transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the plant expression vector. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the foreign gene was integrated into the tobacco genome. The results of RT-PCR and Western blot indicated that the RS1 gene was transcribed and expressed. Formation of resvera-trol in transgenic tobacco was further determined by thin-layer chromatography of silica gel and HPLC. Increased accumulation of human breast adenocarcinoma cells in G0 and G1 phases of cell cycle was observed in cells treated with resveratrol purified from transgenic tobacco as compared to the untreated cells.

  2. High-toughness silk produced by a transgenic silkworm expressing spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline silk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, Yoshihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Tamada, Yasushi; Kojima, Katsura

    2014-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a natural fiber that has excellent tensile properties; however, it is difficult to produce artificially as a long, strong fiber. Here, the spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline protein gene was cloned and a transgenic silkworm was generated, that expressed the fusion protein of the fibroin heavy chain and spider dragline protein in cocoon silk. The spider silk protein content ranged from 0.37 to 0.61% w/w (1.4-2.4 mol%) native silkworm fibroin. Using a good silk-producing strain, C515, as the transgenic silkworm can make the raw silk from its cocoons for the first time. The tensile characteristics (toughness) of the raw silk improved by 53% after the introduction of spider dragline silk protein; the improvement depended on the quantity of the expressed spider dragline protein. To demonstrate the commercial feasibility for machine reeling, weaving, and sewing, we used the transgenic spider silk to weave a vest and scarf; this was the first application of spider silk fibers from transgenic silkworms.

  3. High-toughness silk produced by a transgenic silkworm expressing spider (Araneus ventricosus dragline silk protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Kuwana

    Full Text Available Spider dragline silk is a natural fiber that has excellent tensile properties; however, it is difficult to produce artificially as a long, strong fiber. Here, the spider (Araneus ventricosus dragline protein gene was cloned and a transgenic silkworm was generated, that expressed the fusion protein of the fibroin heavy chain and spider dragline protein in cocoon silk. The spider silk protein content ranged from 0.37 to 0.61% w/w (1.4-2.4 mol% native silkworm fibroin. Using a good silk-producing strain, C515, as the transgenic silkworm can make the raw silk from its cocoons for the first time. The tensile characteristics (toughness of the raw silk improved by 53% after the introduction of spider dragline silk protein; the improvement depended on the quantity of the expressed spider dragline protein. To demonstrate the commercial feasibility for machine reeling, weaving, and sewing, we used the transgenic spider silk to weave a vest and scarf; this was the first application of spider silk fibers from transgenic silkworms.

  4. Augmentation of transgenic expression by ultrasound‑mediated liposome microbubble destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Sun, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Jian-Qiao; Si-Tu, Bing; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Liang, Kun; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Wei-Xiang; Zhou, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive, efficient and tissue-specific transgenic technologies could be valuable in gene therapy. Although non-viral carriers may be safer and cheaper, they have a much lower transfection efficiency than viral gene carriers. The present study was designed to test the transgenic expression and safety of red fluorescent protein (RFP) in HeLa cells in vitro and in transplanted tumors of nude mice in vivo under ultrasound-mediated liposome microbubble destruction (UMLMD) conditions. Plasmids containing RFP were gently mixed with liposome microbubbles (LMs). The mixture was added to HeLa cells or injected into BALB/c mice by the tail vein under various ultrasound exposure and LM parameters, and then the transfection efficiencies were examined. The results in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that, following a comparison of the plasmid group, the ultrasound + plasmid group and the LM + plasmid group, UMLMD significantly increased the transgenic expression (P<0.01) without causing any apparent detrimental effect. From the study, we concluded that UMLMD could be a non-invasive, effective and promising non-viral technique for gene therapy and transgenic research.

  5. Enhanced drought tolerance of transgenic rice plants expressing a pea manganese superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Zheng; Wang, Qing-Bin; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Su, Wei-Ai

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the role that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), an important antioxidant enzyme, may play in the drought tolerance of rice. MnSOD from pea (Pisum sativum) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter was introduced into chloroplasts of rice (Oryza sativa) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to develop drought-tolerant rice plants. Functional expression of the pea MnSOD in transgenic rice plants (T1) was revealed under drought stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. After PEG treatment the transgenic leaf slices showed reduced electrolyte leakage compared to wild type (WT) leaf slices, whether they were exposed to methyl viologen (MV) or not, suggesting that transgenic plants were more resistant to MV- or PEG-induced oxidative stress. Transgenic plants also exhibited less injury, measured by net photosynthetic rate, when treated with PEG. Our data suggest that SOD is a critical component of the ROS scavenging system in plant chloroplasts and that the expression of MnSOD can improve drought tolerance in rice.

  6. High levan accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banguela, Alexander; Arrieta, Juan G; Rodríguez, Raisa; Trujillo, Luis E; Menéndez, Carmen; Hernández, Lázaro

    2011-06-10

    Bacterial levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) converts sucrose into non-linear levan consisting of long β(2,6)-linked fructosyl chains with β(2,1) branches. Bacterial levan has wide food and non-food applications, but its production in industrial reactors is costly and low yielding. Here, we report the constitutive expression of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase (LsdA) fused to the vacuolar targeting pre-pro-peptide of onion sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) in tobacco, a crop that does not naturally produce fructans. In the transgenic plants, levan with degree of polymerization above 10(4) fructosyl units was detected in leaves, stem, root, and flowers, but not in seeds. High levan accumulation in leaves led to gradual phenotypic alterations that increased with plant age through the flowering stage. In the transgenic lines, the fructan content in mature leaves varied from 10 to 70% of total dry weight. No oligofructans were stored in the plant organs, although the in vitro reaction of transgenic LsdA with sucrose yielded β(2,1)-linked FOS and levan. Transgenic lines with levan representing up to 30mgg(-1) of fresh leaf weight produced viable seeds and the polymer accumulation remained stable in the tested T1 and T2 progenies. The lsdA-expressing tobacco represents an alternative source of highly polymerized levan.

  7. Pulmonary malformation in transgenic mice expressing human keratinocyte growth factor in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, W S; DeRose, M L; Bucay, N; Nguyen, H Q; Wert, S E; Zhou, L; Ulich, T R; Thomason, A; Danilenko, D M; Whitsett, J A

    1995-01-01

    Expression of human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF-7) was directed to epithelial cells of the developing embryonic lung of transgenic mice disrupting normal pulmonary morphogenesis during the pseudoglandular stage of development. By embryonic day 15.5(E15.5), lungs of transgenic surfactant protein C (SP-C)-KGF mice resembled those of humans with pulmonary cystadenoma. Lungs were cystic, filling the thoracic cavity, and were composed of numerous dilated saccules lined with glycogen-containing columnar epithelial cells. The normal distribution of SP-C proprotein in the distal regions of respiratory tubules was disrupted. Columnar epithelial cells lining the papillary structures stained variably and weakly for this distal respiratory cell marker. Mesenchymal components were preserved in the transgenic mouse lungs, yet the architectural relationship of the epithelium to the mesenchyme was altered. SP-C-KGF transgenic mice failed to survive gestation to term, dying before E17.5. Culturing mouse fetal lung explants in the presence of recombinant human KGF also disrupted branching morphogenesis and resulted in similar cystic malformation of the lung. Thus, it appears that precise temporal and spatial expression of KGF is likely to play a crucial role in the control of branching morphogenesis during fetal lung development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618921

  8. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  9. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV movement protein (MP gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV replication protein (Rep gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58 immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32 immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃ did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection.

  10. Transgenic mosquitoes expressing a phospholipase A(2 gene have a fitness advantage when fed Plasmodium falciparum-infected blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetically modified mosquitoes have been proposed as an alternative strategy to reduce the heavy burden of malaria. In recent years, several proof-of-principle experiments have been performed that validate the idea that mosquitoes can be genetically modified to become refractory to malaria parasite development. RESULTS: We have created two transgenic lines of Anophelesstephensi, a natural vector of Plasmodium falciparum, which constitutively secrete a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 (mPLA2 into the midgut lumen to interfere with Plasmodium ookinete invasion. Our experiments show that both transgenic lines expressing mPLA2 significantly impair the development of rodent malaria parasites, but only one line impairs the development of human malaria parasites. In addition, when fed on malaria-infected blood, mosquitoes from both transgenic lines are more fecund than non-transgenic mosquitoes. Consistent with these observations, cage experiments with mixed populations of transgenic and non-transgenic mosquitoes show that the percentage of transgenic mosquitoes increases when maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the expression of an anti-Plasmodium effector gene gives transgenic mosquitoes a fitness advantage when fed malaria-infected blood. These findings have important implications for future applications of transgenic mosquito technology in malaria control.

  11. Comparison of Different MARs(Matrix Attachment Regions)Effect on Transgene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jin; LIU Shu-jun; YANG Wei; HU Yuan-lei; LIN Zhong-ping

    2004-01-01

    Three MARs(matrix attachment regions)fragments were cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)(MAR1),yeast(Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (MAR3)and kidney bean(Phaseolus vulgaris) (MAR5)which ranged 984,822 and 782 bp,respectively.Sequence analysis showed that all the fragments had fairly high A/T content (73,62 and 75%,respectively),harbored different number and different type of some characteristic motifs of MARs,such as A-box and T-box,etc.The results of in vitro binding assay showed that the three MARs fragments derived from different organisms could bind specifically to the matrix extracted from the tobacco nuclei with different strength,which also demonstrated that these MARs fragments are functionally conserved during evolution.By using these MARs fragments to flank the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and bialaphos resistance(bar) selectable marker gene,and then introducing the resulting plant expression vectors containing MARs-uidA-barMARs into tobacco through Agrobacteriummediated procedures,the effects of MARs sequences on the expression of transgenes in tobacco were investigated and compared.The GUS activity in individual transformants showed that,comparing to the controls without additional MARs,the overall transgene expression level in transformants with MARs had been greatly increased while the variations in transgene expression among transformants were decreased in different degrees.In accordance with the results of sequence analysis and in vitro binding assay in which MAR1 fragment showed the strongest binding strength,this MARs fragment also showed the greatest effect in increasing transgene overall expression level.

  12. Sequential monitoring of transgene expression following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Toki, Seiichi

    2012-11-01

    Although Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology is now used widely in rice, many varieties of indica-type rice are still recalcitrant to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. It was reported recently that T-DNA integration into the rice genome could be the limiting step in this method. Here, we attempted to establish an efficient sequential monitoring system for stable transformation events by visualizing stable transgene expression using a non-destructive and highly sensitive visible marker. Our results demonstrate that click beetle luciferase (ELuc) is an excellent marker allowing the observation of transformed cells in rice callus, exhibiting a sensitivity >30-fold higher than that of firefly luciferase. Since we have previously shown that green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful visual marker with which to follow transient and/or stable expression of transgenes in rice, we constructed an enhancer trap vector using both the gfbsd2 (GFP fused to the N-terminus of blasticidin S deaminase) and eluc genes. In this vector, the eluc gene is under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S minimal promoter, while the gfbsd2 gene is under the control of the full-length rice elongation factor gene promoter. Observation of transformed callus under a dissecting microscope demonstrated that the level of ELuc luminescence reflected exclusively stable transgene expression, and that both transient and stable expression could be monitored by the level of GFP fluorescence. Moreover, we show that our system enables sequential quantification of transgene expression via differential measurement of ELuc luminescence and GFP fluorescence.

  13. Transgene expression in Penaeus monodon cells: evaluation of recombinant baculoviral vectors with shrimp specific hybrid promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-08-01

    It has been realized that shrimp cell immortalization may not be accomplished without in vitro transformation by expressing immortalizing gene in cells. In this process, efficiency of transgene expression is confined to the ability of vectors to transmit gene of interests to the genome. Over the years, unavailability of such vectors has been hampering application of such a strategy in shrimp cells. We report the use of recombinant baculovirus mediated transduction using hybrid promoter system for transgene expression in lymphoid cells of Penaeus monodon. Two recombinant baculovirus vectors with shrimp viral promoters (WSSV-Ie1 and IHHNV-P2) were constructed (BacIe1-GFP and BacP2-GFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as the transgene. The GFP expression in cells under the control of hybrid promoters, PH-Ie1 or PH-P2, were analyzed and confirmed in shrimp cells. The results indicate that the recombinant baculovirus with shrimp specific viral promoters (hybrid) can be employed for delivery of foreign genes to shrimp cells for in vitro transformation.

  14. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-02-06

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study.

  15. Expression of the intact C4 type pepc gene cloned from maize in transgenic winter wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xuqing; ZHANG Xiaodong; LIANG Rongqi; ZHANG Liquan; YANG Fengping; CAO Mingqing

    2004-01-01

    Maize intact C4-pepc gene was amplified through LA-PCR and successfully sub-cloned into modified vector pGreen0029 to form a stable expression construct named as Pbac214 (12 kb), which contains CaMV 35S promoter driven bar gene as selection marker. Comparing the cloned DNA sequences (6.7 kb) with published maize C4-pepc gene (GenBank accession E17154) sequences, the identity of DNA sequence alignment is 98.96%. There are only 49 differences between these two intact DNA sequences, of which 13 occur in the region of promoter, 18 in introns, and 18 in exons. The homology of Mrna sequence alignment is 99.38%, and the putative amino acids sequence identity is 99.38%. There are only 15 differences between these two Mrna, and these differences bring 4 sites mutant on the putative amino acids of PEPC protein. Through biolistic bombardment of PDS1000/He system, expression vector Pbac214 has been transformed into winter wheat. Southern blotting results show that the intact C4-pepc gene has been integrated into genome of winter wheat. SDS-PAGE analysis of leaf soluble protein in transgenic wheat showed that the intact C4-pepc gene was well transcribed, spliced and translated as in maize. The enzyme activity of leaf PEPC in transgenic wheat has been detected. The activities of leaf PEPC increased over 3-5 times in some transgenic plants. The data of photosynthesis rate and transpiration rate of transgenic wheat flag leaves showed that the C4-pepc gene can increase the photosynthesis rate and transpiration rate of transgenic wheat.

  16. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway.

  17. Transgenic Paulownia Expressing shiva-1 Gene Has Increased Resistance to Paulownia Witches' Broom Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao DU; Yao WANG; Qin-Xue HU; Jie CHEN; Sheng LIU; Wen-Jin HUANG; Mu-Lan LIN

    2005-01-01

    Stem segments from diseased Paulownia tomentosa×P. fortunei and leaves from healthy control were transformed with the expression vector p438PRSI via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The p438PRSI vector contained shiva-1 gene, which encodes an antibacterial peptide under the control of a CaMV35S promoter. The regenerated plants from transformed explants were planted in a greenhouse and nursery. PCR and Southern blotting analysis showed that the shiva-1 gene was successfully integrated into the Paulownia genome. Transcription of the integrated shiva-1 gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. Bioassay in the green house and phytoplasma DNA-dot blotting demonstrated that resistance to Paulownia witch's broom disease (PWB) increased significantly in shiva-1-transgenic Paulownia. Further investigations indicated that higher Shiva-1 expression correlated with fewer phytoplasma and less symptoms in diseased transgenic Paulownia. Together, our findings strongly suggest that breeding shiva-1-Paulownia is an effective strategy to control PWB disease.

  18. GmACP expression is decreased in GmNORK knockdown transgenic soybean roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Wang; Lingwei Deng

    2016-01-01

    NORK and soybean acyl carrier protein (ACP) both play important roles in nodulation. However, the relationship between Nod factor signaling and fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis during symbiotic development is unknown. In this study, an RNAi plasmid of GmNORK was constructed and transformed into soybean roots by Agrobacterium rhizogene-mediated hairy-root transformation. The nodule number decreased substantially in GmNORK knock-down soybean transgenic roots. To investigate the relationship between GmACP and Nod factor signaling, we measured GmACP expression levels in GmNORK RNAi soybean transgenic roots and found that rhizobia inoculation led to substantially reduced GmACP expression. Thus, FA biosynthesis was affected by Nod factor signaling during nodule development in soybean, a finding that provides valuable information that improves our understanding of the functions of GmNORK and GmACP in symbiotic signaling and nodule development.

  19. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  20. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Miao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin (MSTN, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph, and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24. In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky, which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4 were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  1. Transgenic plants over-expressing insect-specific microRNA acquire insecticidal activity against Helicoverpa armigera: an alternative to Bt-toxin technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aditi; Rajamani, Vijayalakshmi; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2015-10-01

    The success of Bt transgenics in controlling predation of crops has been tempered by sporadic emergence of resistance in targeted insect larvae. Such emerging threats have prompted the search for novel insecticidal molecules that are specific and could be expressed through plants. We have resorted to small RNA-based technology for an investigative search and focused our attention to an insect-specific miRNA that interferes with the insect molting process resulting in the death of the larvae. In this study, we report the designing of a vector that produces artificial microRNA (amiR), namely amiR-24, which targets the chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera. This vector was used as transgene in tobacco. Northern blot and real-time analysis revealed the high level expression of amiR-24 in transgenic tobacco plants. Larvae feeding on the transgenic plants ceased to molt further and eventually died. Our results demonstrate that transgenic tobacco plants can express amiR-24 insectice specific to H. armigera.

  2. Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 L1 Protein in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Li LIU; Wen-Sheng LI; Ting LEI; Jing ZHENG; Zheng ZHANG; Xiao-Fei YAN; Zhe-Zhi WANG; Yi-Li WANG; Lü-Sheng SI

    2005-01-01

    To develop a plant expression system for the production of the human papillomavirus type 16(HPV16) vaccine, we investigated whether the HPV16 L1 protein can be expressed in tobacco plants and whether it can be used as the cheapest form of edible vaccine. The HPV16 L1 coding sequence was amplified by PCR using specific primers from the plasmid pGEM-T-HPV16 containing the template sequence, and subcloned into the intermediate vector pUCmT and binary vector pBI121 consecutively to obtain the plant expression plasmid pBI-L1. The T-DNA regions of the pBI-L1 binary vector contained the constitutive Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and the neomycin phosphotransferase npt Ⅱ gene, which allowed the selection of transformed plants using kanamycin. The tobacco plants were transformed by cocultivating them, using the leaf disc method, with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, which harbored the plant expression plasmid. The regenerated transgenic tobacco plants were selected using kanamycin, and confirmed by PCR. The results of the Southern blot assay also showed that the HPV16 L1 gene was integrated stably into the genome of the transformed tobacco plants. The Western blot analysis showed that the transformed tobacco leaves could express the HPV16 L1 protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated by ELISA assay that the expressed protein accounted for 0.034%-0.076% of the total soluble leaf protein, was able to form 55 nm virus-like particles compatible with HPV virus-like particle (VLP), and induced mouse erythrocyte hemagglutination in vitro. The present results indicate that the HPV16 L1 protein can be expressed in transgenic tobacco plants and the expressed protein possesses the natural features of the HPV 16L1 protein, implying that the HPV16 L1 transgenic plants can be potentially used as an edible vaccine.

  3. Over-expression of an Arabidopsis δ-OAT gene enhances salt and drought tolerance in transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liangqi; FAN Zhanmin; GUO Lei; LI Yongqing; ZHANG Wenjing; QU Li-Jia; CHEN Zhangliang

    2003-01-01

    δ-OAT, ornithine-δ-aminotransferase, is the key enzyme involved in proline biosynthesis. In this study the Arabidopsisδ-OAT gene was transferred into rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp japonica cv. Zhongzuo 321), whose successful integration was demonstrated by PCR and Southern blot analysis. The over-expression of the gene in transgenic rice was also confirmed. Biochemical analysis showed that, under salt or drought stress conditions, proline contents in the leaves and roots in transgenic rice plants were 5- to 15-fold of those in non-transgenic controls. Under stress conditions, germinating rate of transgenic lines is higher than that of controls. Although the growth of rice plants tested were more and more retarded with the increasing of NaCl concentration, the transgenic plants grow faster compared to the controls under the same stress condition. Meanwhile, the resistance to KCl and MgSO4 stresses was also found enhanced in transgenic rice. Furthermore, the over-expression ofδ-OAT also improved the yield of transgenic plants under stress conditions. The average yield per plant of transgenic lines increases about 12%-41% more than that of control lines under 0.1 mol/L NaCl stress. These data indicated that the over-expression of δ-OAT, with the accumulation of proline, resulted in the enhancement of salt and drought tolerance and an increase of rice yield, which is of significance in agriculture.

  4. Inheritance and expression of multiple disease and insect re- sistance genes in transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    2-3 anti-fungal disease genes are coinserted with hygromycin phosphotransferase in the same vector. Two insecticidal genes and PPT acetyl transferase genes are placed in another one. The vectors are co-delivered to rice embryonic cellus tissue at a molar ratio of 1︰1 using the particle gun method. 55 independent regenerated lines have been obtained through screening for hygromycin resistance. Of these, 70% transgenic plants harbor 6-7 foreign genes. The genes on the same vectors are always co-delivered to rice plant. Northern blot analysis has indicated that the multiple foreign genes give stable expression. In the 6 transgenic plan-ts carrying 6-7 foreign genes, multiple foreign genes tend to integrate in 1 or 2 genetic loci. Progeny segregation is consis-tent with Mendel's 3︰1 segregation law. 8 homozygous R1 transgenic plants harboring 2-3 anti-fungal and 2 insectici-dal genes are selected from large number of transgenic progeny screening for hygromycin and Basta resistance.

  5. Transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 display gender-dependent differences in exploration and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Ugo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein kinases, MAPKs for short, constitute cascades of signalling pathways involved in the regulation of several cellular processes that include cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. They also intervene in neurological processes like fear conditioning and memory. Since little remains known about the MAPK-Activated Protein Kinase, MAPKAPK5, we constructed the first MAPKAPK knockin mouse model, using a constitutive active variant of MAPKAPK5 and analyzed the resulting mice for changes in anxiety-related behaviour. Methods We performed primary SHIRPA observations during background breeding into the C57BL/6 background and assessed the behaviour of the background-bred animals on the elevated plus maze and in the light-dark test. Our results were analyzed using Chi-square tests and homo- and heteroscedatic T-tests. Results Female transgenic mice displayed increased amounts of head dips and open arm time on the maze, compared to littermate controls. In addition, they also explored further into the open arm on the elevated plus maze and were less active in the closed arm compared to littermate controls. Male transgenic mice displayed no differences in anxiety, but their locomotor activity increased compared to non-transgenic littermates. Conclusion Our results revealed anxiety-related traits and locomotor differences between transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 and control littermates.

  6. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of differentially expressed genes in transgenic melatonin biosynthesis ovine HIOMT gene in switchgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin serves pleiotropic functions in prompting plant growth and resistance to various stresses. The accurate biosynthetic pathway of melatonin remains elusive in plant species, while the N-acetyltransferase and O-methyltransferase were considered to be the last two key enzymes during its biosynthesis. To investigate the biosynthesis and metabolic pathway of melatonin in plants, the RNA-seq profile of overexpression of the ovine HIOMT was analyzed and compared with the previous transcriptome of transgenic oAANAT gene in switchgrass, a model plant for cellulosic ethanol production. A total of 946, 405 and 807 differentially expressed unigenes were observed in AANAT vs. control, HIOMT vs. control, and AANAT vs. HIOMT, respectively. The significantly upregulated (F-box/kelch-repeat protein, zinc finger BED domain-containing protein-3 genes were consistent with enhanced phenotypes of shoot, stem and root growth in transgenic oHIOMT switchgrass. Early flowering in overexpression of oHIOMT switchgrass involved in the regulation of flowering-time genes (APETALA2. Several stress resistant related genes (SPX domain-containing membrane protein, copper transporter 1, late blight resistance protein homolog R1A-6 OS etc. were specifically and significantly upregulated in transgenic oHIOMT only, while metabolism-related genes (phenylalanine-4-hydroxylase, tyrosine decarboxylase 1, protein disulfide-isomerase and galactinol synthase 2 etc. were significantly upregulated in transgenic oAANAT only. These results provide new sights into the biosynthetic and physiological functional networks of melatonin in plants.

  7. Rapid transcriptional pulsing dynamics of high expressing retroviral transgenes in embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Y M Lo

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells.

  8. Effect of UTRs from TMV-RNA on the expression of foreign gene in transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the effects of 5′ and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) on expression of foreign genes, four plant-expression vectors pBG437, pBG438, pBG440 and pBG440△NOS containing expression cassettes of GUS-NOS; Ω-GUS-NOS, Ω-GUS-3′UTR-NOS and Ω-GUS-3′UTR downstream of CaMV 35S promoter with double enhancer sequences respectively have been constructed. Results from a large number of transgenic tobacco plants show that the GUS activity of pBG440 transformed plants is the highest, being 5-fold that of pBG437 and 1.6-fold that of pBG438. Similar results have been obtained in transient expression by injection of Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring these constructs into N. benthamiana leaves. These results obtained at the whole plant level confirm the conclusion drawn from the transient expression studies in protoplast system that TMV-Ω fragment can be a translation enhancer and the 3′UTR has a coordinate effect with Ω fragment to enhance foreign gene expression, but unlike the situation in transient expression in protoplast system, the 3′UTR of TMV cannot act as a poly(A) tail nor as a transcription terminator in transgenic plants. The coordinate effect of 3′ UTR with Ω fragment needs the presence of a normal plant transcriptional terminator.

  9. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  10. Robust and regulatory expression of defensin A gene driven by vitellogenin promoter in transgenic Anopheles stephensi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XiaoGuang; ZHANG YaJing; ZHENG XueLi; WANG ChunMei

    2007-01-01

    The use of genetically modified mosquitoes to reduce or replace field populations is a new strategy to control mosquito-borne diseases. The precondition of the implementation of this strategy is the ability to manipulate the genome of mosquitoes and to induce specific expression of the effector molecules driven by a suitable promoter. The objective of this study is to evaluate the expression of defensin A gene of Anopheles sinensis under the control of a vitellogenin promoter in transgenic Anopheles stephensi. The regulatory region of Anopheles gambiae vitellogenin was cloned and subcloned into transfer vector pSLFa consisting of an expression cassette with defensin A coding sequence. Then, the expression cassette was transferred into transformation vector pBac[3xP3-DsRedafm] using Asc I digestion. The recombinant plasmid DNA of pBac[3xP3DsRed-AgVgT2-DefA] and helper plasmid DNA of phsp-pBac were micro-injected into embryos of An. stephensi. The positive transgenic mosquitoes were screened by observing specific red fluorescence in the eyes of G1 larvae. Southern blot analysis showed that a single-copy transgene integrated into the genome of An. stephensi. RT-PCR analysis showed that the defensin A gene expressed specifically in fat bodies of female mosquitoes after a blood meal. Interestingly, the mRNA of defensin A is more stable compared with that of the endogenous vitellogenin gene. After multiple blood meals, the expression of defensin A appeared as a reducible and non-cycling type, a crucial feature for its anti-pathogen effect. From data above, we concluded that the regulatory function of the Vg promoter and the expression of defensin A gene were relatively conserved in different species of anopheles mosquitoes. These molecules could be used as candidates in the development of genetically modified mosquitoes.

  11. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  12. HIV-1 transgene expression in rats causes oxidant stress and alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk for acute and chronic airway disease even though there is no evidence that the virus can infect the lung epithelium. Although HIV-related proteins including gp120 and Tat can directly cause oxidant stress and cellular dysfunction, their effects in the lung are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of HIV-1 transgene expression in rats on alveolar epithelial barrier function. Alveolar epithelial barrier function was assessed by determining lung liquid clearance in vivo and alveolar epithelial monolayer permeability in vitro. Oxidant stress in the alveolar space was determined by measuring the glutathione redox couple by high performance liquid chromatography, and the expression and membrane localization of key tight junction proteins were assessed. Finally, the direct effects of the HIV-related proteins gp120 and Tat on alveolar epithelial barrier formation and tight junction protein expression were determined. Results HIV-1 transgene expression caused oxidant stress within the alveolar space and impaired epithelial barrier function even though there was no evidence of overt inflammation within the airways. The expression and membrane localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin were decreased in alveolar epithelial cells from HIV-1 transgenic rats. Further, treating alveolar epithelial monolayers from wild type rats in vitro with recombinant gp120 or Tat for 24 hours reproduced many of the effects on zonula occludens-1 and occludin expression and membrane localization. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-related proteins cause oxidant stress and alter the expression of critical tight junction proteins in the alveolar epithelium, resulting in barrier dysfunction.

  13. Effects of Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing ACA Gene from Amaranthus caudatus on the Population Development of Myzus persicae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOHong-Nian; JIAYan-Tao; ZHOUYong-Gang; ZHANGZhen-Shan; OUYANGQing; JIANGYing; TIANYing-Chuan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible function of the agglutinin from Amaranthus caudatus L. (ACA) in plant defending against insect pests, ACA cDNA was cloned by RT-PCR and the 5' and 3' sequences were confirmed by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The phloem-specific expression vector of ACA gene, pBCACAc, was constructed based on the plant binary vector pBC438 and transfered into tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. Results from PCR and Southern blotting analysis showed that AOA gene was integrated into the genomes of transformed plants and the transgene integration varied from one to four estimated copies per genome. Western blotting analysis indicated that ACA gene was transcribed and translated in the transgenic plants. The bioassay of Myzus persicae Sulzer on detached leaves demonstrated that the 78% transgenic tobacco plants displayed an average aphid-resistant rate of more than 75%. Some apterous progeny of M. persicae were found dead on the resistant plants. These results indicate that ACA gene should be an effective aphid-resistant gene and could be valuable for application in crop breeding for aphid resistance.

  14. Transgenic sexing system for Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on female-specific embryonic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaugwu, Christian E; Schetelig, Marc F; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2013-01-01

    Fruit fly pest species have been successfully controlled and managed via the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), a control strategy that uses infertile matings of sterile males to wild females to reduce pest populations. Biological efficiency in the field is higher if only sterile males are released in SIT programs and production costs are also reduced. Sexing strains developed in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (medfly) through classical genetics are immensely beneficial to medfly SIT programs but exhibit reduced fertility and fitness. Moreover, transfer of such classical genetic systems to other tephritid species is difficult. Transgenic approaches can overcome this limitation of classical genetic sexing strains (GSSs), but had resulted so far in transgenic sexing strains (TSSs) with dominant lethality at late larval and pupal stages. Here we present a transgene-based female-specific lethality system for early embryonic sexing in medfly. The system utilizes the sex-specifically spliced transformer intron to restrict ectopic mRNA translation of the pro-apoptotic gene hid(Ala5) to females only. The expression of this lethal effector gene is driven by a tetracycline-repressible transactivator gene tTA that is under the control of promoters/enhancers of early-acting cellularization genes. Despite observed position effects on the sex-specific splicing, we could effectively establish this early-acting transgenic sexing system in the medfly C. capitata. After satisfactory performance in large scale tests, TSSs based on this system will offer cost-effective sexing once introduced into SIT programs. Moreover, this approach is straight forward to be developed also for other insect pest and vector species.

  15. Establishment of La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice and expression in their mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢一凡; 田靫; 邓继先; 程萱; 黄培堂

    1999-01-01

    Expression vectors of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSG) and long acting tissue plasminogen activator (La-tPA) in mammary gland were constructed using promoters of mouse whey acid protein gene (WAP) and sheep β-lactoglobulin gene (BLG) with sizes of 2.6 and 5 kb respectively. Two kinds of transgenic mice of G-CSF and La-tPA were produced with microinjection. The expression of G-CSF and La-tPA was achieved in mammary glands of transgenic mice, respectively. In order to establish dual transgenic mice of La-tPA/G-CSF, transgenic mice carrying G-CSF and La-tPA gene characterized with specific expression in mammary gland were mated. La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice were screened out from the hybrid offspring by Once-PCR. The co-expression of La-tPA and G-CSF in mammary gland of the dual transgenic mice was confirmed by the milk assayed and Northern blot analysis. Some parameters about the dual transgenic mice indicated that there were fewer litters than that of normal mice. The ratio of du

  16. Expression of Recombinant Human Alpha-Lactalbumin in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Using a Hybrid Pomoter/Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve nutrient content of goat milk, we describe the construction of a vector (pBLAC containing a hybrid goat β-lactoglobulin (BLG promoter/cytomegalovirus (CMV enhancer. We also describe the generation of transgenic goats expressing rhLA by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Of 334 one-cell stage embryos derived from three transgenic cell lines and 99 embryos derived from non-transgenic (NT cells surgically transferred to the oviducts of 37 recipients, two recipients delivered two kids (2% from the non-transfected line and five recipients delivered six kids (1.8% from transgenic cell lines, three of which died within 2 days. Compared to the NT donor cells, transfection of donor cells does not negatively affect the development of nuclear transfer embryos into viable transgenic offspring. However, the clone efficiency in cell line number 1 was lower than that in numbers 2 and 3, and in the NT lines (0.9% versus 1.9% 2.4% and 2%; P<0.05. Two transgenic cloned goats expressed rhLA in the milk at 0.1–0.9 mg/mL. The mammary gland-specific expression vector pBLAC with hybrid BLG/CMV can drive the hLA gene to express in vitro and in vivo. These data establish the basis for use of a hybrid promoter/enhancer strategy to produce rhLA transgenic goats.

  17. Differential gene expression in ADAM10 and mutant ADAM10 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postina Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD, cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP by the α-secretase ADAM10 prevented amyloid plaque formation, and alleviated cognitive deficits. Furthermore, ADAM10 overexpression increased the cortical synaptogenesis. These results suggest that upregulation of ADAM10 in the brain has beneficial effects on AD pathology. Results To assess the influence of ADAM10 on the gene expression profile in the brain, we performed a microarray analysis using RNA isolated from brains of five months old mice overexpressing either the α-secretase ADAM10, or a dominant-negative mutant (dn of this enzyme. As compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice, in ADAM10 transgenic mice 355 genes, and in dnADAM10 mice 143 genes were found to be differentially expressed. A higher number of genes was differentially regulated in double-transgenic mouse strains additionally expressing the human APP[V717I] mutant. Overexpression of proteolytically active ADAM10 affected several physiological pathways, such as cell communication, nervous system development, neuron projection as well as synaptic transmission. Although ADAM10 has been implicated in Notch and β-catenin signaling, no significant changes in the respective target genes were observed in adult ADAM10 transgenic mice. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed a downregulation of genes coding for the inflammation-associated proteins S100a8 and S100a9 induced by moderate ADAM10 overexpression. Overexpression of the dominant-negative form dnADAM10 led to a significant increase in the expression of the fatty acid-binding protein Fabp7, which also has been found in higher amounts in brains of Down syndrome patients. Conclusion In general, there was only a moderate alteration of gene expression in ADAM10 overexpressing mice. Genes coding for pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic proteins were not over-represented among differentially regulated genes. Even a decrease of

  18. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E., E-mail: bstrauss@usp.br

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  19. bcl-xl over-expression in transgenic mice reduces cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furong Wang; Yongsheng Jiang; Yan Liu; Wenwu Xiao; Suming Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Basal cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xl) can inhibit neuronal apoptosis by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane and suppressing cytochrome C release into the cytoplasm. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to further investigate the cascade reaction pathway of cellular apoptosis. We established an ischemia/dreperfusion model by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in transgenic and wild-type mice, and observed changes in the number and distribution of apoptotic neural cells, differences in cerebral infarct volume, in neurological function score, and in cytochrome C expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex, at different time points, DESIGN AND SETTING: The present gene engineering and cell biology experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Biology, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences and at the Laboratory of Immunology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. MATERIALS: Male bcl-xl over-expression Kunming mice aged 8 weeks and age-matched male wild-type mice were used for this study. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) kits were purchased from Boliman, France. Cytochrome C antibody and Bcl-x immunohistochemical kit were purchased from PharMingen, USA and Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA, respectively. METHODS: Following MCAO and reperfusion, apoptosis in the ischemic cerebral cortex was detected by the TUNEL assay. Prior to MCAO and 3 hours after reperfusion, the Bcl-xl protein level in the ischemic cerebral cortex was measured by immunohistochemistry. At 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours after reperfusion, the level of cytochrome C in the ischemic cerebral cortex was examined by western blot analysis. Subsequent to MCAO, cerebral infarct volume measurement and neurological examination were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neural cell apoptosis and cytochrome C expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex; cerebral infarct volume and neurological function score. RESULTS: Twenty-four hours after

  20. [Transgenic Belarussian-bred potato plants expressing genes for antimicrobial peptides of the cecropin-melittin type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutto, N L; Gapeeva, T A; Pundik, A N; Tret'iakova, T G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2010-12-01

    Binary vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation were constructed to express the genes for antimicrobial peptides (APs) of the cectropin-melittin type under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter in plants. It was shown with Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells that the cassettes could be cloned in pB1121-based vectors with deletion of the 3-D-glycuronidase gene only in the orientation opposite to that of the original vector. Transgenic potato plants were obtained using the Belarussian varieties Odyssey, Vetraz, and Scarb. Their cells expressed the MsrA1 or CEMA peptides of the cecropin-melittin type. The expression was shown to confer higher resistance to bacterial (Erwinia carotovora) infection and extremely high resistance to fungal (Phytophtora infestans and Alternarla solani) infections.

  1. Synergistic Induction of Potential Warburg Effect in Zebrafish Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Co-Transgenic Expression of Myc and xmrk Oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available Previously we have generated inducible liver tumor models by transgenic expression of Myc or xmrk (activated EGFR homolog oncogenes in zebrafish. To investigate the interaction of the two oncogenes, we crossed the two transgenic lines and observed more severe and faster hepatocarcinogenesis in Myc/xmrk double transgenic zebrafish than either single transgenic fish. RNA-Seq analyses revealed distinct changes in many molecular pathways among the three types of liver tumors. In particular, we found dramatic alteration of cancer metabolism based on the uniquely enriched pathways in the Myc/xmrk tumors. Critical glycolytic genes including hk2, pkm and ldha were significantly up-regulated in Myc/xmrk tumors but not in either single oncogene-induced tumors, suggesting a potential Warburg effect. In RT-qPCR analyses, the specific pkm2 isoformin Warburg effect was found to be highly enriched in the Myc/xmrk tumors but not in Myc or xmrk tumors, consistent with the observations in many human cancers with Warburg effect. Moreover, the splicing factor genes (hnrnpa1, ptbp1a, ptbp1b and sfrs3b responsible for generating the pkm isoform were also greatly up-regulated in the Myc/xmrk tumors. As Pkm2 isoform is generally inactive and causes incomplete glycolysis to favor anabolism and tumor growth, by treatment with a Pkm2-specific activator, TEPP-46, we further demonstrated that activation of Pkm2 suppressed the growth of oncogenic liver as well as proliferation of liver cells. Collectively, our Myc/xmrk zebrafish model suggests synergetic effect of EGFR and MYC in triggering Warburg effect in the HCC formation and may provide a promising in vivo model for Warburg effect.

  2. Gonadotrope-specific expression and regulation of ovine follicle stimulating hormone Beta: transgenic and adenoviral approaches using primary murine gonadotropes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Jia

    Full Text Available The beta subunit of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHB is expressed specifically in pituitary gonadotropes in vertebrates. Transgenic mouse studies have shown that enhancers in the proximal promoter between -172/-1 bp of the ovine FSHB gene are required for gonadotrope expression of ovine FSHB. These enhancers are associated with regulation by activins and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH. Additional distal promoter sequence between -4741/-750 bp is also required for expression. New transgenic studies presented here focus on this distal region and narrow it to 1116 bp between -1866/-750 bp. In addition, adenoviral constructs were produced to identify these critical distal sequences using purified primary mouse gonadotropes as an in vitro model system. The adenoviral constructs contained -2871 bp, -750 bp or -232 bp of the ovine FSHB promoter. They all showed gonadotrope-specific regulation since they were induced only in purified primary gonadotropes by activin A (50 ng/ml and inhibited by GnRH (100 nM in the presence of activin (except -232FSHBLuc. However, basal expression of all three viral constructs (in the presence of follistatin to block cellular induction by activin was relatively high in pituitary non-gonadotropes as well as gonadotropes. Thus, gonadotrope-specific regulation associated with the proximal promoter was observed as expected, but the model was blind to distal promoter elements between -2871/-750 necessary for gonadotrope-specific expression of ovine FSHB in vivo. The new adenoviral-based in vitro technique did detect, however, a novel GnRH response element between -750 bp and -232 bp of the ovine FSHB promoter. We conclude that adenoviral-based studies in primary gonadotropes can adequately recognize regulatory elements on the ovine FSHB promoter associated with gonadotrope-specific regulation/expression, but that more physiologically based techniques, such as transgenic studies, will be needed to identify sequences

  3. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Ito

    Full Text Available Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering.

  4. Expression of recombinant antibody (single chain antibody fragment) in transgenic plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobhal, S; Chaudhary, V K; Singh, A; Pandey, D; Kumar, A; Agrawal, S

    2013-12-01

    Plants offer an alternative inexpensive and convenient technology for large scale production of recombinant proteins especially recombinant antibodies (plantibodies). In this paper, we describe the expression of a model single chain antibody fragment (B6scFv) in transgenic tobacco. Four different gene constructs of B6scFv with different target signals for expression in different compartments of a tobacco plant cell with and without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal were used. Agrobacterium mediated plant transformation of B6scFv gene was performed with tobacco leaf explants and the gene in regenerated plants was detected using histochemical GUS assay and PCR. The expression of B6scFv gene was detected by western blotting and the recombinant protein was purified from putative transgenic tobacco plants using metal affinity chromatography. The expression level of recombinant protein was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest accumulation of protein was found up to 3.28 % of the total soluble protein (TSP) in plants expressing B6scFv 1003 targeted to the ER, and subsequently expression of 2.9 % of TSP in plants expressing B6scFv 1004 (with target to apoplast with ER retention signal). In contrast, lower expression of 0.78 and 0.58 % of TSP was found in plants expressing antibody fragment in cytosol and apoplast, without ER retention signal. The described method/system could be used in the future for diverse applications including expression of other recombinant molecules in plants for immunomodulation, obtaining pathogen resistance against plant pathogens, altering metabolic pathways and also for the expression of different antibodies of therapeutic and diagnostic uses.

  5. Duration and level of transgene expression after gene electrotransfer to skin in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Eriksen, Jens Ole; Hojman, P;

    2010-01-01

    . Level and duration of transgene expression after gene electrotransfer to skin is essential and here we present data from two independent quantitative studies. Using in vivo bioimaging of a far-red fluorescent molecule, Katushka, allowing for continuous monitoring of local gene expression, compared...... is a suitable time frame for vaccinations and is applicable, for example, in gene therapy for wound healing or treatment of cancer.......In development of novel vaccines, attention is drawn to DNA vaccinations. They are heat stable and can be easily produced. Gene electrotransfer is a simple and nonviral means of transferring DNA to cells and tissues and is attracting increasing interest. One very interesting perspective with gene...

  6. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene...

  7. Isolation of yellow catfish β-actin promoter and generation of transgenic yellow catfish expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jiachun; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Song, Wei; Bao, Jie; Liang, Dong; Li, Junbo; Li, Kui; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Muzi; Cai, Yongxiang; Yang, Jiaxin; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2012-10-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco Richardson) is one of the most important freshwater farmed species in China. However, its small size and slow growth rate limit its commercial value. Because genetic engineering has been a powerful tool to develop and improve fish traits for aquaculture, we performed transgenic research on yellow catfish in order to increase its size and growth rate. Performing PCR with degenerate primers, we cloned a genomic fragment comprising 5'-flanking sequence upstream of the initiation codon of β-actin gene in yellow catfish. The sequence is 1,017 bp long, containing the core sequence of proximal promoter including CAAT box, CArG motif and TATA box. Microinjecting the transgene construct Tg(beta-actin:eYFP) of the proximal promoter fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) reporter gene into zebrafish and yellow catfish embryos, we found the promoter could drive the reporter to express transiently in both embryos at early development. Screening the offspring of five transgenic zebrafish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry) or 19 yellow catfish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(beta-actin:eYFP), we obtained three lines of transgenic zebrafish and one transgenic yellow catfish, respectively. Analyzing the expression patterns of the reporter genes in transgenic zebrafish (Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry)nju8/+) and transgenic yellow catfish (Tg(beta-actin:eYFP)nju11/+), we found the reporters were broadly expressed in both animals. In summary, we have established a platform to make transgenic yellow catfish using the proximal promoter of its own β-actin gene. The results will help us to create transgenic yellow catfish using "all yellow catfish" transgene constructs.

  8. Rapid expression of transgenes driven by seed-specific constructs in leaf tissue: DHA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xue-Rong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic engineering of seed biosynthetic pathways to diversify and improve crop product quality is a highly active research area. The validation of genes driven by seed-specific promoters is time-consuming since the transformed plants must be grown to maturity before the gene function can be analysed. Results In this study we demonstrate that genes driven by seed-specific promoters contained within complex constructs can be transiently-expressed in the Nicotiana benthamiana leaf-assay system by co-infiltrating the Arabidopsis thaliana LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2 gene. A real-world case study is described in which we first assembled an efficient transgenic DHA synthesis pathway using a traditional N. benthamiana Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV 35S-driven leaf assay before using the LEC2-extended assay to rapidly validate a complex seed-specific construct containing the same genes before stable transformation in Arabidopsis. Conclusions The LEC2-extended N. benthamiana assay allows the transient activation of seed-specific promoters in leaf tissue. In this study we have used the assay as a rapid preliminary screen of a complex seed-specific transgenic construct prior to stable transformation, a feature that will become increasingly useful as genetic engineering moves from the manipulation of single genes to the engineering of complex pathways. We propose that the assay will prove useful for other applications wherein rapid expression of transgenes driven by seed-specific constructs in leaf tissue are sought.

  9. Expression of a Modified Crylle Gene in E.Coli and in Transgenic Tobacco Confers Resistance to Corn Borer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Jun LIU; Fu-Ping SONG; Kang-Lai HE; Yuan YUAN; Xiao-Xia ZHANG; Peng GAO; Jian-Hua WANG; Guo-Ying WANG

    2004-01-01

    The wild-type Crylle gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was modified for its efficient expression in transgenic plants. Modified Cry1 Ie gene (designated as Cry1 Iem) was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET28b and its expression in E. coli was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. Bioassays using crude expression products in E. coli revealed that Cry1 Iem protein had a similar toxicity to corn borer as wild-type Cry1 Ie. Cry1 Iem gene was then inserted downstream of the maize ubiquitin-1 promoter in plant expression vector p3301. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying Cry1 Iem showed insecticidal activity against com borer.

  10. Enduring toxicity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing mosquito larvicidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, Robert; Otieno-Ayayo, Zachariah Ngalo; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Miaskovsky, Rina; Boussiba, Sammy; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2003-10-01

    Persistence of biological control agents against mosquito larvae was tested under simulated field conditions. Mosquito larvicidal activity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing cry4Aa, cry11Aa and p20 from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis was greater than B. thuringiensis ssp. israelensis primary powder (fun 89C06D) or wettable powder (WP) (Bactimos products) when either mixed with silt or exposed to sunlight outdoors. Reduction of Bactimos primary powder toxicity was at least 10-fold higher than Anabaena's after mixing with silt. In outdoors experiments, Bactimos WP remained toxic (over 30% mortality of 3rd instar Aedes aegypti larvae) for 2-4 days only, while transgenic Anabaena's toxicity endured 8-21 days.

  11. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  12. Transgenic expression of BRCA1 disturbs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells quiescence and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lin; Shi, Guiying; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Lianfeng, E-mail: zhanglf@cnilas.org

    2013-10-15

    The balance between quiescence and proliferation of HSCs is an important regulator of hematopoiesis. Loss of quiescence frequently results in HSCs exhaustion, which underscores the importance of tight regulation of proliferation in these cells. Studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinases are involved in the regulation of quiescence in HSCs. BRCA1 plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks, cell cycle, apoptosis and transcription. BRCA1 is expressed in the bone marrow. However, the function of BRCA1 in HSCs is unknown. In our study, we generated BRCA1 transgenic mice to investigate the effects of BRCA1 on the mechanisms of quiescence and differentiation in HSCs. The results demonstrate that over-expression of BRCA1 in the bone marrow impairs the development of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, BRCA1 induced an increase in the number of LSKs, LT-HSCs, ST-HSCs and MPPs. A competitive transplantation assay found that BRCA1 transgenic mice failed to reconstitute hematopoiesis. Moreover, BRCA1 regulates the expression of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}, which results in a loss of quiescence in LSKs. Together, over-expression of BRCA1 in bone marrow disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs, and disrupted differentiation of the HSCs, which acts through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}. - Highlights: • Over-expression of BRCA1 results in impaired B lymphocyte development. • BRCA1 transgenic mice disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs. • BRCA1 impairs the function of HSCs through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1/cip1} and p57{sup kip2}.

  13. Transgenic overexpression of BAFF regulates the expression of immune-related genes in zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LI ZHANG; CHAO LIU; XIN ZHOU; YING XIE; LIBO SU; QI GENG; BINGHUI LIU; SHUFENG LIU

    2016-12-01

    The B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily that specifically regulates B lymphocyte proliferation and survival. Excess BAFF leads to overproduction of antibodies for secretion, anti-dsDNA antibodies and a lupus-like syndrome in mice. To investigate whether transgenic overexpression of the zebrafish BAFF leads to immunoglobulin changes and/or early maturing of the immune system, a Tol2-GFP-2A-BAFF/His recombinant plasmid was constructed by inserting a 2A peptide between the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and BAFF sequences. Functional GFP and BAFF proteins were expressed separately and confirmed in HeLa cells. The relative expression of immune-related genes (IgLC-1, IgLC-2, IgLC-3, IgD, IgM and IL-4), early lymphoid markers (Ikaros, Rag-1 and TCRAC), and the protooncogene Bcl-2 were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in F0 founder of transgenic zebrafish juveniles and adults. Ectopic expression of BAFF in adults was confirmed using Western blots and was shown to upregulate IgLC-1, IgLC- 2, IgD, IgM, IgZ/T, Ikaros, Rag-1, TCRAC, IL-4 and Bcl-2 expression in juveniles on day 21 and IgLC-1, IgLC-2, IgD, IgM, IgZ/T, Rag-1, TCRAC and Bcl-2 expression in zebrafish three months postfertilization. The relative titers of specific IgM against Edwardsiella tarda WED were assessed using modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the whole body homogenate of zebrafish and demonstrated a significant increase in BAFF-transgenic group. Therefore, our findings provided novel insight into further exploration of modulating adaptive immunity and studying autoimmune diseases caused by regulating BAFF.

  14. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Feng; Qiang Sun; Cheng Gao; Juan Dong; Xiao-Luan Wei; Hua Xing; Hou-Da Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the gene expression changes in pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model and to provide information about the prevention,clinical diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Using the pBC-SV40Tag transgenic mice model of pancreatic cystic neoplasm, we studied the gene expression changes by applying high-density microarrays. Validation of part gene expression profiling data was performed using real-time PCR.RESULTS: By using high-density oligonucleotide microarray, of 14113 genes, 453 were increased and 760 decreased in pancreatic cystic neoplasm, including oncogenes, cell-cycle-related genes, signal transduction-related genes, skeleton-related genes and metabolism-related genes. Among these, we confirmed the changes in Igf, Shh and Wnt signal pathways with real-time PCR.The results of real-time PCR showed similar expression changes in gene chip.CONCLUSION: all the altered expression genes are associated with cell cycle, DNA damage and repair, signal pathway, and metabolism. SV40Tag may cooperate with several proteins in promoting tumorigenesis.

  15. Characterization of Fam20C expression in odontogenesis and osteogenesis using transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Er-Xia Du; Xiao-Fang Wang; Wu-Chen Yang; Deborah Kaback; Siu-Pok Yee; Chun-Lin Qin; Anne George; Jian-Jun Hao

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Fam20C promotes differentiation and mineralization of odontoblasts, ameloblasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes during tooth and bone development. Ablation of the Fam20C gene inhibits bone and tooth growth by increasing fibroblast growth factor 23 in serum and causing hypophosphatemia in conditional knockout mice. However, control and regulation of the expression of Fam20C are still unknown. In this study, we generated a transgenic reporter model which expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) driven by the Fam20C promoter. Recombineering was used to insert a 16 kb fragment of the mouse Fam20C gene (containing the 15 kb promoter and 1.1 kb of exon 1) into a pBluescript SK vector with the topaz variant of GFP and a bovine growth hormone polyadenylation sequence. GFP expression was subsequently evaluated by histomorphometry on cryosections from E14 to adult mice. Fluorescence was evident in the bone and teeth as early as E17.5. The GFP signal was maintained stably in odontoblasts and osteoblasts until 4 weeks after birth. The expression of GFP was significantly reduced in teeth, alveolar bone and muscle by 8 weeks of age. We also observed colocalization of the GFP signal with the Fam20C antibody in postnatal 1-and 7-day-old animals. Successful generation of Fam20C-GFP transgenic mice will provide a unique model for studying Fam20C gene expression and the biological function of this gene during odontogenesis and osteogenesis.

  16. Expression of Cry3Bb1 in transgenic corn MON88017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hang Thu; Jehle, Johannes A

    2009-11-11

    To evaluate the effects of transgenic expression of Coleopteran-specific Bt protein Cry3Bb1 on target and nontarget insects in fields with Bt crops, it is necessary to quantify the Cry3Bb1 contents in the plants. Here, we describe the optimization and validation of the quantitative detection of Cry3Bb1 by adapting the commercially available qualitative PathoScreen double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) for quantitative measurements. The optimized method had an average accuracy of 84-109% and was used to quantify the Cry3Bb1 contents of different tissues of Bt corn MON88017 at four developmental stages during three years (2005-2007) in a field trial in Germany. The Cry3Bb1 contents were determined based on both dry weight and fresh weight. Cry3Bb1 expression was highest in young leaves (228.4 microg/g dw and 35.5 microg/g fw) and lowest in pollen (3.8 microg/g fw). In root tissues, the Cry3Bb1 content declined during the growing season from 130 to 40 microg/g dw. A significant decline of Cry3Bb1 contents was also observed during the growing season in other plant tissues. The Cry3Bb1 contents of different plant tissues strongly correlated to each other. On the basis of the total corn biomass produced on 1 hectare, it was estimated that up to 905 g of Cry3Bb1 is produced per hectare Bt corn MON88017.

  17. INFLUENCE OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTANTS AND CYTOKINES ON GROWTH AND TRANSGENE EXPRESSION OF BONE MARROW CELLS FROM MT/P210bcr-ab1 TRANSGENIC MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hanchun; Andrew Pierce; Tony Whetton

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of chemotherapeutic agents and cytokines on growth of bone marrow cells from MT/p210 bcr-ab1 transgenic mice.Methods: The bone marrow cells of transgenic chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model mice carrying metallothionein (MT) promoter/enhancer, bcr-abl (p210)cDNA and SV40 splicing/poly (A) signal sequences were cultured in liquid and soft agar with hydroxyurea (Hu),5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), mouse stem cell factor (mSCF)and mouse interleukin-3 (mIL-3) independently or collectively. The cells and colonies were counted. The levels of transgene expression were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: The cell proliferation, colony formation and transgene expression of the bone marrow cells were stimulated with mSCF and mIL-3, but there was little growth without any growth factors, or when mSCF,mIL-3 and Hu or 5-Fu were added. Conclusion: The combined utilization of chemotherapeutants and cytokines is a potentially effective strategy of clinical treatment for CML.

  18. Inheritance and Expression of Copies of Transgenes 1Dx5 and 1Ax1 in Elite Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Varieties Transferred from Transgenic Wheat through Conventional Crossing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanhe LI; Ju LI; Nali WANG; Yuesheng WANG; Guangxiao YANG; Jingye FANG; Guangyuan HE

    2007-01-01

    To study the inheritance and expression of multiple copies of transgenes from transgenic wheat lines, three crosses between transgenic wheat lines B72-8-11b and B102-1-2 and Chinese elite wheat varieties Chuan89-107 and Emai 18 were carried out. Chuan89-107×B72-8-11b, Chuan89-107×B102-1-2 and Emai18×B72-8-11b, and F1 plants were selfed or backcrossed to obtain different generation populations.Protein analysis in grains of F1 and F2 and backcross progenies of BC1F1, BC1F2, BC1F3, BC2F1, BC2F2 and BC2F3 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the transgenes 1Dx5 and 1Ax1 were expressed and segregated in the target wheat according to Mendelian laws. A range of 1Dx5 expression levels were observed in the progenies of Chuan89-107×B72-8-11b and Emai18×B72-8-11b, but the expression levels of 1Ax1 in progenies of Chuan89-107×B102-1-2 rarely changed. It suggested that the two foreign genes had different mechanisms of expression in the cross progeny, even though they were produced in the same way and the foreign 1Dx5 gene of 5-10 copies had the more complicated expression mechanism than the 1Ax1 gene of 4-5 copies.

  19. Transgenic mice for a tamoxifen-induced, conditional expression of the Cre recombinase in osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Arantzazu Sanchez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, have remained limited due to the lack of transgenic mice allowing the conditional knockout of genes in osteoclasts at any time during development or adulthood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We report here on the generation of transgenic mice which specifically express a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase in osteoclasts. These mice, generated on C57BL/6 and FVB background, express a fusion Cre recombinase-ERT2 protein whose expression is driven by the promoter of cathepsin K (CtsK, a gene highly expressed in osteoclasts. We tested the cellular specificity of Cre activity in CtsKCreERT2 strains by breeding with Rosa26LacZ reporter mice. PCR and histological analyses of the CtsKCreERT2LacZ positive adult mice and E17.5 embryos show that Cre activity is restricted largely to bone tissue. In vitro, primary osteoclasts derived from the bone marrow of CtsKCreERT2+/-LacZ+/- adult mice show a Cre-dependent β-galactosidase activity after tamoxifen stimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have generated transgenic lines that enable the tamoxifen-induced, conditional deletion of loxP-flanked genes in osteoclasts, thus circumventing embryonic and postnatal gene lethality and avoiding gene deletion in other cell types. Such CtsKCreERT2 mice provide a convenient tool to study in vivo the different facets of osteoclast function in bone physiology during different developmental stages and adulthood of mice.

  20. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants.

  1. Consumption of milk from transgenic goats expressing human lysozyme in the mammary gland results in the modulation of intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Elizabeth A; Walker, Richard L; Anderson, Gary B; Murray, James D

    2006-08-01

    Lysozyme is a key antimicrobial component of human milk that has several health-promoting functions including the development of a healthy intestinal tract. However, levels of lysozyme in the milk of dairy animals are negligible. We have generated transgenic dairy goats that express human lysozyme (HLZ) in their milk in an attempt to deliver the benefits of human milk in a continual fashion. To test the feasibility of this transgenic approach to achieve a biological impact at the level of the intestine, feeding trials were conducted in two animal models. Pasteurized milk from HLZ transgenic animals was fed to both kid goats (ruminant model) and young pigs (human model), and the numbers of total coliforms and Escherichia coli present in the small intestine were determined. Data from this proof-of-principle study demonstrate that milk from transgenic animals was capable of modulating the bacterial population of the gut in both animal models. Pigs that consumed pasteurized milk from HLZ transgenic goats had fewer numbers of coliforms and E. coli in their intestine than did those receiving milk from non-transgenic control animals. The opposite effect was seen in goats. Milk from these transgenic animals not only represent one of the first transgenic food products with the potential of benefiting human health, but are also a unique model to study the development and role of intestinal microflora on health, well-being and resistance to disease.

  2. The Lgr5 transgene is expressed specifically in glycinergic amacrine cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdeo, Kumar; Koch, Catherine E; Miller, Tyler E; Zhou, Hannah; Rivera, Maricruz; Yan, Kenneth; Cepko, Constance L; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy N

    2014-02-01

    Retinal amacrine cells are a diverse set of interneurons within the inner nuclear layer. The canonical Wnt pathway is highly active within mature amacrine cells, but its role remains unclear. Leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a newly identified component of the Wnt receptor complex that potentiates beta-catenin signaling. In multiple epithelial organs Lgr5 marks adult tissue stem cells. We investigated the expression of this gene using Lgr5-eGFP-IRES-CreER transgenic reporter mice. In the eye, Lgr5 was exclusively expressed in glycinergic amacrine cells in adult mice. Amacrine cells are post-mitotic and represent the first neuronal and non-stem cell lineage to express Lgr5. We further interrogated the spatiotemporal labeling of individual amacrine cells with controlled fluorophore expression. This "fluorofilling" technique provides a tool to study amacrine morphology and dissect neural networks.

  3. Expression of multiple transgenes from a single construct using viral 2A peptides in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Daniels

    Full Text Available Expression of multiple reporter or effector transgenes in the same cell from a single construct is increasingly necessary in various experimental paradigms. The discovery of short, virus-derived peptide sequences that mediate a ribosome-skipping event enables generation of multiple separate peptide products from one mRNA. Here we describe methods and vectors to facilitate easy production of polycistronic-like sequences utilizing these 2A peptides tailored for expression in Drosophila both in vitro and in vivo. We tested the separation efficiency of different viral 2A peptides in cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo and found that the 2A peptides from porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A and Thosea asigna virus (T2A worked best. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we used the P2A peptide to co-express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato and the genetically-encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G in larval motorneurons. This technique enabled ratiometric calcium imaging with motion correction allowing us to record synaptic activity at the neuromuscular junction in an intact larval preparation through the cuticle. The tools presented here should greatly facilitate the generation of 2A peptide-mediated expression of multiple transgenes in Drosophila.

  4. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

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    Nidhi Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi, thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  5. Pathogen-induced expression of a cecropin A-melittin antimicrobial peptide gene confers antifungal resistance in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevtushenko, Dmytro P; Romero, Rafael; Forward, Benjamin S; Hancock, Robert E; Kay, William W; Misra, Santosh

    2005-06-01

    Expression of defensive genes from a promoter that is specifically activated in response to pathogen invasion is highly desirable for engineering disease-resistant plants. A plant transformation vector was constructed with transcriptional fusion between the pathogen-responsive win3.12T promoter from poplar and the gene encoding the novel cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide (CEMA) with strong antimicrobial activity. This promoter-transgene combination was evaluated in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) for enhanced plant resistance against a highly virulent pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani. Transgene expression in leaves was strongly increased after fungal infection or mechanical wounding, and the accumulation of CEMA transcripts was found to be systemic and positively correlated with the number of transgene insertions. A simple and efficient in vitro regeneration bioassay for preliminary screening of transgenic lines against pathogenic fungi was developed. CEMA had strong antifungal activity in vitro, inhibiting conidia germination at concentrations that were non-toxic to tobacco protoplasts. Most importantly, the expression level of the CEMA peptide in vivo, regulated by the win3.12T promoter, was sufficient to confer resistance against F. solani in transgenic tobacco. The antifungal resistance of plants with high CEMA expression was strong and reproducible. In addition, leaf tissue extracts from transgenic plants significantly reduced the number of fungal colonies arising from germinated conidia. Accumulation of CEMA peptide in transgenic tobacco had no deleterious effect on plant growth and development. This is the first report showing the application of a heterologous pathogen-inducible promoter to direct the expression of an antimicrobial peptide in plants, and the feasibility of this approach to provide disease resistance in tobacco and, possibly, other crops.

  6. Transgenic expression of CYP7A1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocks diet-induced hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Eric P; Gutierrez, Alejandra; Davis, Roger A

    2006-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a cholesterol-7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) transgene in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocked the ability of a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase plasma levels of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. LDL receptor-deficient mice expressing the CYP7A1 transgene exhibited complete resistance to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and to the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of liver X receptor-inducible ABCG5 and ABCG8 was decreased in CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. Thus, increased biliary cholesterol excretion could not account for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited decreased jejunal Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) mRNA expression, an important mediator of intestinal cholesterol absorption. A taurocholate-enriched diet also decreased NPC1L1 mRNA expression in a farnesoid X receptor-independent manner. Reduced expression of NPC1L1 mRNA was associated with decreased cholesterol absorption ( approximately 20%; P CYP7A1 transgenic LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet. The combined data show that enhanced expression of CYP7A1 is an effective means to prevent the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and of atherogenic apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in plasma.

  7. New resistance mechanism in Helicoverpa armigera threatens transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Robin V; Dang, Ho T; Kemp, Fred C; Nicholson, Ian C; Moores, Graham D

    2005-05-01

    In Australia, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, has a long history of resistance to conventional insecticides. Transgenic cotton (expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac) has been grown for H. armigera control since 1996. It is demonstrated here that a population of Australian H. armigera has developed resistance to Cry1Ac toxin (275-fold). Some 70% of resistant H. armigera larvae were able to survive on Cry1Ac transgenic cotton (Ingard) The resistance phenotype is inherited as an autosomal semidominant trait. Resistance was associated with elevated esterase levels, which cosegregated with resistance. In vitro studies employing surface plasmon resonance technology and other biochemical techniques demonstrated that resistant strain esterase could bind to Cry1Ac protoxin and activated toxin. In vivo studies showed that Cry1Ac-resistant larvae fed Cy1Ac transgenic cotton or Cry1Ac-treated artificial diet had lower esterase activity than non-Cry1Ac-fed larvae. A resistance mechanism in which esterase sequesters Cry1Ac is proposed.

  8. Lysostaphin expression in mammary glands confers protection against staphylococcal infection in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, D E; Plaut, K; Bramley, A J; Williamson, C M; Lax, A J; Moore, K; Wells, K D; Wall, R J

    2001-01-01

    Infection of the mammary gland, in addition to causing animal distress, is a major economic burden of the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is the major contagious mastitis pathogen, accounting for approximately 15-30% of infections, and has proved difficult to control using standard management practices. As a first step toward enhancing mastitis resistance of dairy animals, we report the generation of transgenic mice that secrete a potent anti-staphylococcal protein into milk. The protein, lysostaphin, is a peptidoglycan hydrolase normally produced by Staphylococcus simulans. When the native form is secreted by transfected eukaryotic cells it becomes glycosylated and inactive. However, removal of two glycosylation motifs through engineering asparagine to glutamine codon substitutions enables secretion of Gln(125,232)-lysostaphin, a bioactive variant. Three lines of transgenic mice, in which the 5'-flanking region of the ovine beta-lactoglobulin gene directed the secretion of Gln(125,232)-lysostaphin into milk, exhibit substantial resistance to an intramammary challenge of 104 colony-forming units (c.f.u.) of S. aureus, with the highest expressing line being completely resistant. Milk protein content and profiles of transgenic and nontransgenic mice are similar. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of genetic engineering to combat the most prevalent disease of dairy cattle.

  9. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  10. Oral immunogenicity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus antigen expressed in transgenic banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Chia, Min-Yuan; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a persistent threat of economically significant influence to the swine industry worldwide. Recombinant DNA technology coupled with tissue culture technology is a viable alternative for the inexpensive production of heterologous proteins in planta. Embryogenic cells of banana cv. 'Pei chiao' (AAA) have been transformed with the ORF5 gene of PRRSV envelope glycoprotein (GP5) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and have been confirmed. Recombinant GP5 protein levels in the transgenic banana leaves were detected and ranged from 0.021%-0.037% of total soluble protein. Pigs were immunized with recombinant GP5 protein by orally feeding transgenic banana leaves for three consecutive doses at a 2-week interval and challenged with PRRSV at 7 weeks postinitial immunization. A vaccination-dependent gradational increase in the elicitation of serum and saliva anti-PRRSV IgG and IgA was observed. Furthermore, significantly lower viraemia and tissue viral load were recorded when compared with the pigs fed with untransformed banana leaves. The results suggest that transgenic banana leaves expressing recombinant GP5 protein can be an effective strategy for oral delivery of recombinant subunit vaccines in pigs and can open new avenues for the production of vaccines against PRRSV.

  11. Effect of HIV-1-related protein expression on cardiac and skeletal muscles from transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidot David M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and the consequent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has protean manifestations, including muscle wasting and cardiomyopathy, which contribute to its high morbidity. The pathogenesis of these myopathies remains partially understood, and may include nutritional deficiencies, biochemical abnormalities, inflammation, and other mechanisms due to viral infection and replication. Growing evidence has suggested that HIV-1-related proteins expressed by the host in response to viral infection, including Tat and gp120, may also be involved in the pathophysiology of AIDS, particularly in cells or tissues that are not directly infected with HIV-1. To explore the potentially independent effects of HIV-1-related proteins on heart and skeletal muscles, we used a transgenic rat model that expresses several HIV-1-related proteins (e.g., Tat, gp120, and Nef. Outcome measures included basic heart and skeletal muscle morphology, glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress, and gene expressions of atrogin-1, muscle ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1 and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGFβ1, three factors associated with muscle catabolism. Results Consistent with HIV-1 associated myopathies in humans, HIV-1 transgenic rats had increased relative heart masses, decreased relative masses of soleus, plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles, and decreased total and myosin heavy chain type-specific plantaris muscle fiber areas. In both tissues, the levels of cystine (Cyss, the oxidized form of the anti-oxidant cysteine (Cys, and Cyss:Cys ratios were significantly elevated, and cardiac tissue from HIV-1 transgenic rats had altered glutathione metabolism, all reflective of significant oxidative stress. In HIV-1 transgenic rat hearts, MuRF-1 gene expression was increased. Further, HIV-1-related protein expression also increased atrogin-1 (~14- and ~3-fold and TGFβ1 (~5-fold and ~3-fold in heart and

  12. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-12-10

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes.

  13. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants.

  14. Immune-mediated loss of transgene expression from virally transduced brain cells is irreversible, mediated by IFNγ, perforin, and TNFα, and due to the elimination of transduced cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirger, Jeffrey M; Puntel, Mariana; Bergeron, Josee; Wibowo, Mia; Moridzadeh, Rameen; Bondale, Niyati; Barcia, Carlos; Kroeger, Kurt M; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2012-04-01

    The adaptive immune response to viral vectors reduces vector-mediated transgene expression from the brain. It is unknown, however, whether this loss is caused by functional downregulation of transgene expression or death of transduced cells. Herein, we demonstrate that during the elimination of transgene expression, the brain becomes infiltrated with CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and that these T cells are necessary for transgene elimination. Further, the loss of transgene-expressing brain cells fails to occur in the absence of IFNγ, perforin, and TNFα receptor. Two methods to induce severe immune suppression in immunized animals also fail to restitute transgene expression, demonstrating the irreversibility of this process. The need for cytotoxic molecules and the irreversibility of the reduction in transgene expression suggested to us that elimination of transduced cells is responsible for the loss of transgene expression. A new experimental paradigm that discriminates between downregulation of transgene expression and the elimination of transduced cells demonstrates that transduced cells are lost from the brain upon the induction of a specific antiviral immune response. We conclude that the anti-adenoviral immune response reduces transgene expression in the brain through loss of transduced cells.

  15. Improved protein quality in transgenic soybean expressing a de novo synthetic protein, MB-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfang; Schernthaner, Johann; Labbé, Natalie; Hefford, Mary A; Zhao, Jiping; Simmonds, Daina H

    2014-06-01

    To improve soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed nutritional quality, a synthetic gene, MB-16 was introduced into the soybean genome to boost seed methionine content. MB-16, an 11 kDa de novo protein enriched in the essential amino acids (EAAs) methionine, threonine, lysine and leucine, was originally developed for expression in rumen bacteria. For efficient seed expression, constructs were designed using the soybean codon bias, with and without the KDEL ER retention sequence, and β-conglycinin or cruciferin seed specific protein storage promoters. Homozygous lines, with single locus integrations, were identified for several transgenic events. Transgene transmission and MB-16 protein expression were confirmed to the T5 and T7 generations, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of developing seed showed that the transcript peaked in growing seed, 5-6 mm long, remained at this peak level to the full-sized green seed and then was significantly reduced in maturing yellow seed. Transformed events carrying constructs with the rumen bacteria codon preference showed the same transcription pattern as those with the soybean codon preference, but the transcript levels were lower at each developmental stage. MB-16 protein levels, as determined by immunoblots, were highest in full-sized green seed but the protein virtually disappeared in mature seed. However, amino acid analysis of mature seed, in the best transgenic line, showed a significant increase of 16.2 and 65.9 % in methionine and cysteine, respectively, as compared to the parent. This indicates that MB-16 elevated the sulfur amino acids, improved the EAA seed profile and confirms that a de novo synthetic gene can enhance the nutritional quality of soybean.

  16. Enhancing lignan biosynthesis by over-expressing pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayella, Allan K; Trick, Harold N; Wang, Weiqun

    2007-12-01

    Lignans are phenylpropane dimers that are biosynthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway, in which pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase (PLR) catalyzes the last steps of lignan production. Our previous studies demonstrated that the contents of lignans in various wheat cultivars were significantly associated with anti-tumor activities in APC(Min) mice. To enhance lignan biosynthesis, this study was conducted to transform wheat cultivars ('Bobwhite', 'Madison', and 'Fielder', respectively) with the Forsythia intermedia PLR gene under the regulatory control of maize ubiquitin promoter. Of 24 putative transgenic wheat lines, we successfully obtained 3 transformants with the inserted ubiquitin-PLR gene as screened by PCR. Southern blot analysis further demonstrated that different copies of the PLR gene up to 5 were carried out in their genomes. Furthermore, a real-time PCR indicated approximately 17% increase of PLR gene expression over the control in 2 of the 3 positive transformants at T(0) generation. The levels of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside, a prominent lignan in wheat as determined by HPLC-MS, were found to be 2.2-times higher in one of the three positive transgenic sub-lines at T(2 )than that in the wild-type (117.9 +/- 4.5 vs. 52.9 +/- 19.8 mug/g, p <0.005). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that elevated lignan levels in a transgenic wheat line has been successfully achieved through genetic engineering of over-expressed PLR gene. Although future studies are needed for a stably expression and more efficient transformants, the new wheat line with significantly higher SDG contents obtained from this study may have potential application in providing additive health benefits for cancer prevention.

  17. Ammonia-regulated expression of a soybean gene encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, G H; Hirel, B; Marsolier, M C; Ridge, R W; Verma, D P

    1991-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS), expressed in roots and root nodules of soybean, was isolated by direct complementation of an Escherichia coli gln A- mutant. This sequence is induced in roots by the availability of ammonia. A 3.5-kilobase promoter fragment of a genomic clone (lambda GS15) corresponding to this cDNA was isolated and fused with a reporter [beta-glucuronidase (GUS)] gene. The GS-GUS fusion was introduced into a legume (Lotus corniculatus) and a nonlegume (tobacco) plant by way of Agrobacterium-mediated transformations. This chimeric gene was found to be expressed in a root-specific manner in both tobacco and L. corniculatus, the expression being restricted to the growing root apices and the vascular bundles of the mature root. Treatment with ammonia increased the expression of this chimeric gene in the legume background (i.e., L. corniculatus); however, no induction was observed in tobacco roots. Histochemical localization of GUS activity in ammonia-treated transgenic L. corniculatus roots showed a uniform distribution across all cell types. These data suggest that the tissue specificity of the soybean cytosolic GS gene is conserved in both tobacco and L. corniculatus; however, in the latter case, this gene is ammonia inducible. Furthermore, the ammonia-enhanced GS gene expression in L. corniculatus is due to an increase in transcription. That this gene is directly regulated by externally supplied or symbiotically fixed nitrogen is also evident from the expression of GS-GUS in the infection zone, including the uninfected cells, and the inner cortex of transgenic L. corniculatus nodules, where a flux of ammonia is encountered by this tissue. The lack of expression of GS-GUS in the outer cortex of the nodules suggests that ammonia may not be able to diffuse outside the endodermis.

  18. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruewer, Ashlee R; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant), self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant) and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain with these

  19. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee R Bruewer

    Full Text Available Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F capsid mutant, self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain

  20. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadal Anna

    2012-09-01

    plants expressing, for example, BP100 based on inverted repeats, have adequate agronomic performance and resistant phenotypes as a result of a complex equilibrium between bp100der toxicity to plant cells, antimicrobial activity and transgene-derived plant stress response. It is likely that these results can be extended to other peptides with similar characteristics.

  1. Expression of a defence-related intercellular barley peroxidase in transgenic tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.K.; Brandt, J.; Bojsen, K.

    1997-01-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana benthamiana L.) have been transformed with a T-DNA vector construct carrying the cDNA pBH6-301, encoding the major pathogen induced leaf peroxidase (Prx8) of barley, under control of an enhanced CaMV 35S promoter. Progeny from three independent transformants were analyzed...... genetically, phenotypically and biochemically. The T-DNA was steadily inherited through three generations. The barley peroxidase is expressed and sorted to the intercellular space in the transgenic tobacco plants. The peroxidase can be extracted from the intercellular space in two molecular forms from both...

  2. Expression activity of the CpTI gene in transgenic rice plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Plant harboured protease inhibitor is a part of the natural plant defense system against insect predation. Plants transformed with foreign plant protease inhibitor genes can enhance resistance to insect pests. So far, at least 20 kinds of plants, including tobacco, rice, tomato, cotton et al., have been transformed with various plant protease inhibitor genes. We have transformed rice with CpTI (cowpea trypsin inhibitor) gene. To assess the range and stability of expression of the CpTI gene, CpTI protein activities were determined in various tissues and at different development stages of transgenic inbred lines.

  3. Stable expression and phenotypic impact of attacin E transgene in orchard grown apple trees over a 12 year period

    OpenAIRE

    Aldwinckle Herb S; Norelli John L; Borejsza-Wysocka Ewa; Malnoy Mickael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic trees currently are being produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistics. The future use of transformed trees on a commercial basis depends upon thorough evaluation of the potential environmental and public health risk of the modified plants, transgene stability over a prolonged period of time and the effect of the gene on tree and fruit characteristics. We studied the stability of expression and the effect on resistance to the fire blight dise...

  4. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Andreeva, Kalina; Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies.

  5. MAR-Mediated transgene integration into permissive chromatin and increased expression by recombination pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Junier, Thomas; Regamey, Alexandre; Iseli, Christian; Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Bosshard, Sandra; Majocchi, Stefano; Le Fourn, Valérie; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Xenarios, Ioannis; Mermod, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Untargeted plasmid integration into mammalian cell genomes remains a poorly understood and inefficient process. The formation of plasmid concatemers and their genomic integration has been ascribed either to non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. However, a direct involvement of these pathways has remained unclear. Here, we show that the silencing of many HR factors enhanced plasmid concatemer formation and stable expression of the gene of interest in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, while the inhibition of NHEJ had no effect. However, genomic integration was decreased by the silencing of specific HR components, such as Rad51, and DNA synthesis-dependent microhomology-mediated end-joining (SD-MMEJ) activities. Genome-wide analysis of the integration loci and junction sequences validated the prevalent use of the SD-MMEJ pathway for transgene integration close to cellular genes, an effect shared with matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA elements that stimulate plasmid integration and expression. Overall, we conclude that SD-MMEJ is the main mechanism driving the illegitimate genomic integration of foreign DNA in CHO cells, and we provide a recombination engineering approach that increases transgene integration and recombinant protein expression in these cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 384-396. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hydrogel Macroporosity and the Prolongation of Transgene Expression and the Enhancement of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Virani, Farrukh R.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Gossett, Timothy D.; Shin, Seungjin; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of hydrogels for regenerative medicine can be improved through localized gene delivery to enhance their bioactivity. However, current systems typically lead to low-level transgene expression located in host tissue surrounding the implant. Herein, we investigated the inclusion of macropores into hydrogels to facilitate cell ingrowth and enhance gene delivery within the macropores in vivo. Macropores were created within PEG hydrogels by gelation around gelatin microspheres, with gelatin subsequently dissolved by incubation at 37°C. The macropores were interconnected, as evidenced by homogeneous cell seeding in vitro and complete cell infiltration in vivo. Lentivirus loaded within hydrogels following gelation retained its activity relative to the unencapsulated control virus. In vivo, macroporous PEG demonstrated sustained, elevated levels of transgene expression for 6 weeks, while hydrogels without macropores had transient expression. Transduced cells were located throughout the macroporous structure, while non-macroporous PEG hydrogels had transduction only in the adjacent host tissue. Delivery of lentivirus encoding for VEGF increased vascularization relative to the control, with vessels throughout the macropores of the hydrogel. The inclusion of macropores within the hydrogel to enhance cell infiltration enhances transduction and influences tissue development, which has implications for multiple regenerative medicine applications. PMID:22800542

  7. Expression of a novel piscine growth hormone gene results in growth enhancement in transgenic tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Mak, R; Ayad, H; Smith, A; Maclean, N

    1998-09-01

    Several lines of transgenic G1 and G2 tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus) have been produced following egg injection with gene constructs carrying growth hormone coding sequences of fish origin. Using a construct in which an ocean pout antifreeze promoter drives a chinook salmon growth hormone gene, dramatic growth enhancement has been demonstrated, in which the mean weight of the 7 month old G2 transgenic fish is more than three fold that of their non transgenic siblings. Somewhat surprisingly G1 fish transgenic for a construct consisting of a sockeye salmon metallothionein promoter spliced to a sockeye salmon growth hormone gene exhibited no growth enhancement, although salmon transgenic for this construct do show greatly enhanced growth. The growth enhanced transgenic lines were also strongly positive in a radio-immuno assay for the specific hormone in their serum, whereas the non growth enhanced lines were negative. Attempts to induce expression from the metallothionein promoter by exposing fish to increased levels of zinc were also unsuccessful. Homozygous transgenic fish have been produced from the ocean pout antifreeze/chinook salmon GH construct and preliminary trials suggest that their growth performance is similar to that of the hemizygous transgenics. No abnormalities were apparent in the growth enhanced fish, although minor changes to skull shape and reduced fertility were noted in some fish. There is also preliminary evidence for improved food conversion ratios when growth enhanced transgenic tilapia are compared to their non-transgenic siblings. The long term objective of this study is to produce lines of tilapia which are both growth enhanced and sterile, so offering improved strains of this important food fish for aquaculture.

  8. Expression of geminiviral AC2 RNA silencing suppressor changes sugar and jasmonate responsive gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soitamo Arto J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-silencing is a conserved gene regulation and surveillance machinery, which in plants, is also used as major defence mechanism against viruses. Various virus-specific dsRNA structures are recognized by the silencing machinery leading to degradation of the viral RNAs or, as in case of begomoviruses, to methylation of their DNA genomes. Viruses produce specific RNA silencing suppressor (RSS proteins to prevent these host defence mechanisms, and as these interfere with the silencing machinery they also disturb the endogenous silencing reactions. In this paper, we describe how expression of AC2 RSS, derived from African cassava mosaic geminivirus changes transcription profile in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum leaves and in flowers. Results Expression of AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants induced clear phenotypic changes both in leaves and in flowers. Transcriptomes of these plants were strongly altered, with total of 1118 and 251 differentially expressed genes in leaves and flowers, respectively. The three most up-regulated transcript groups were related to stress, cell wall modifications and signalling, whereas the three most down-regulated groups were related to translation, photosynthesis and transcription. It appears that many of the gene expression alterations appeared to be related to enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene, and consequent enhancement of the genes and pathways that are regulated by these hormones, or to the retrograde signalling caused by the reduced photosynthetic activity and sugar metabolism. Comparison of these results to a previous transcriptional profiling of HC-Pro RSS-expressing plants revealed that some of same genes were induced by both RSSs, but their expression levels were typically higher in AC2 than in HC-Pro RSS expressing plants. All in all, a large number of transcript alterations were found to be specific to each of the RSS expressing transgenic plants. Conclusions AC2 RSS in

  9. Expression of human erythropoietin directed by mWAP promoter in mammary gland of transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The present work has generated transgenic mice with a hybrid gene construct consisting of genomic sequences encoding human erythropoietin (hEPO) and governed by regulatory sequences of mouse whey acidic protein (mWAP). The construct proved effective by transient expression in lactating animal. After introducing hybrid gene construct into single-cell embryo via pronuclear microinjection, surviving embryo are reimplanted into pseudopregnant foster mother mouse. 58 mice of 86 generation zero mice obtained were identified to be positive by PCR-Southern blot and genomic DNA Southern blot methods. The integration rate is 67%. hEPO was expressed in the milk of 16 mice of 39 mice measured by hEPO ELISA kit .The expression level gets over 15 m g/mL.

  10. Duration and level of transgene expression after gene electrotransfer to skin in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Eriksen, Jens Ole; Hojman, P

    2010-01-01

    In development of novel vaccines, attention is drawn to DNA vaccinations. They are heat stable and can be easily produced. Gene electrotransfer is a simple and nonviral means of transferring DNA to cells and tissues and is attracting increasing interest. One very interesting perspective with gene...... is a suitable time frame for vaccinations and is applicable, for example, in gene therapy for wound healing or treatment of cancer.......In development of novel vaccines, attention is drawn to DNA vaccinations. They are heat stable and can be easily produced. Gene electrotransfer is a simple and nonviral means of transferring DNA to cells and tissues and is attracting increasing interest. One very interesting perspective with gene...... electrotransfer is that choice of tissue can determine the duration of transgene expression. With gene electrotransfer to muscle, long-term expression, that is beyond 1 year, can be obtained, whereas gene electrotransfer to skin gives short-term expression, which is desirable in, for example, DNA vaccinations...

  11. A soluble form of Siglec-9 provides an antitumor benefit against mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomioka, Yukiko, E-mail: ytomi@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Morimatsu, Masami, E-mail: mmorimat@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Laboratory of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nishijma@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Usui, Tatsufumi, E-mail: usutatsu@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Yamamoto, Sayo, E-mail: ysayo@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Suyama, Haruka, E-mail: sharuka@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ozaki, Kinuyo, E-mail: k-ozaki@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ito, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshiito@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Tumor-associated antigen MUC1 binds to Siglec-9. • Soluble Siglec-9 reduced proliferation of MUC1-positive tumor in transgenic mice. • Soluble Siglec-9 and MUC1 on tumor cells were colocalized in transgenic mice. • MUC1 expression on tumor cells were reduced in soluble Siglec-9 transgenic mice. - Abstract: Tumor-associated MUC1 binds to Siglec-9, which is expected to mediate tumor cell growth and negative immunomodulation. We hypothesized that a soluble form of Siglec-9 (sSiglec-9) competitively inhibits a binding of MUC1 to its receptor molecules like human Siglec-9, leading to provide antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor, and generated transgenic mouse lines expressing sSiglec-9 (sSiglec-9 Tg). When mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 were intraperitoneally transplanted into sSiglec-9 Tg, tumor proliferation was slower with the lower histological malignancy as compared with non-transgenic mice. The sSiglec-9 was detected in the ascites caused by the tumor in the sSiglec-9 Tg, and sSiglec-9 and MUC1 were often colocalized on surfaces of the tumor cells. PCNA immunohistochemistry also revealed the reduced proliferation of the tumor cells in sSiglec-9 Tg. In sSiglec-9 Tg with remarkable suppression of tumor proliferation, MUC1 expressions were tend to be reduced. In the ascites of sSiglec-9 Tg bearing the tumor, T cells were uniformly infiltrated, whereas aggregations of degenerative T cells were often observed in the non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that sSiglec-9 has an antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor in the transgenic mice, which may avoid the negative immunomodulation and/or suppress tumor-associated MUC1 downstream signal transduction, and subsequent tumor proliferation.

  12. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulatory T cells (Treg that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg or induced Treg (iTreg converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL and splenocytes (SPL in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA. Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ. B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment.

  13. A transgenic Plasmodium falciparum NF54 strain that expresses GFP-luciferase throughout the parasite life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Ashley M; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Camargo, Nelly; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Kennedy, Mark; Lindner, Scott E; Miller, Jessica L; Hume, Jen C C; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2012-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the pathogenic agent of the most lethal of human malarias. Transgenic P. falciparum parasites expressing luciferase have been created to study drug interventions of both asexual and sexual blood stages but luciferase-expressing mosquito stage and liver stage parasites have not been created which has prevented the easy quantification of mosquito stage development (e.g. for transmission blocking interventions) and liver stage development (for interventions that prevent infection). To overcome this obstacle, we have created a transgenic P. falciparum NF54 parasite that expresses a GFP-luciferase transgene throughout the life cycle. Luciferase expression is robust and measurable at all life cycle stages, including midgut oocyst, salivary gland sporozoites and liver stages, where in vivo development is easily measurable using humanized mouse infections in conjunction with an in vivo imaging system. This parasite reporter strain will accelerate testing of interventions against pre-erythrocytic life cycle stages.

  14. Transgenic overexpression of cdx1b induces metaplastic changes of gene expression in zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Hao; Liu, Xiuping; Zhang, Chengjin; Cole, Gregory J; Lee, Ju-Ahng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-06-01

    Cdx2 has been suggested to play an important role in Barrett's esophagus or intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the esophagus. To investigate whether transgenic overexpression of cdx1b, the functional equivalent of mammalian Cdx2 in zebrafish, may lead to IM of zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium, a transgenic zebrafish system was developed by expressing cdx1b gene under the control of zebrafish keratin 5 promoter (krt5p). Gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelium of wild-type and transgenic zebrafish was analyzed by Affymetrix microarray and confirmed by in situ hybridization. Morphology, mucin expression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by hematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) Alcian blue staining, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL assay as well. cdx1b was found to be overexpressed in the nuclei of esophageal squamous epithelial cells of the transgenic zebrafish. Ectopic expression of cdx1b disturbed the development of this epithelium in larval zebrafish and induced metaplastic changes in gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelial cells of adult zebrafish, that is, up-regulation of intestinal differentiation markers and down-regulation of squamous differentiation markers. However, cdx1b failed to induce histological IM, or to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis in the squamous epithelium of adult transgenic zebrafish.

  15. Transgene inheritance and quality improvement by expressing novel HMW glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) genes in winter wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The expression vector pBPC30, which carries the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 genes, was transferred into hexaploid winter wheat cv. Jinghua No. 1, Jing411 and Jingdong No. 6 explants of immature embryos and immature inflorescence by particle bombardment. A large number of resistant transgenic plants were obtained under the selection of herbicide bialaphos or phosphinothricin (PPT). Confirmed transgenic plants of T0 generation showed successful integration of HMW-GS genes and bar gene into the wheat genome. T1 generation of transgenic plants can resist 20-150 mg/L PPT. Protein analysis of T2 seed by SDS-PAGE showed that HMW-GS 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 genes were well expressed in offspring seed of transgenic lines by co-expression with or substitution of endogenous 1Dx2 or 1Dy10. In one transgenic line, TG3-74, a new protein band between endogenous protein subunits 7 and 8 (marked as 8*) of glutenin appeared, but endogenous subunit 8 (encoded by 1By8 gene) was absent. Analysis of gluten rheological quality on seed proteins of 102 T3 plants showed that the sedimentation value of 5 transgenic lines (44.2-49.0 mL) was remarkably improved, 59.6%-64.3% higher than that of wild type Jinghua No. 1 and Jingdong No. 6, similar to bread wheat Cheyenne (48.0 mL). Analysis of dough rheological properties of transgenic lines showed that the dough stable time of 5 transgenic lines range from 16 to 30 min, whereas the dough stable time of wild type was only between 3-7 min. Our research suggests that introducing novel HMW-GS genes into wheat is an efficient way to improve its bread-making quality.

  16. Modified expression of alternative oxidase in transgenic tomato and petunia affects the level of tomato spotted wilt virus resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV has a very wide host range, and is transmitted in a persistent manner by several species of thrips. These characteristics make this virus difficult to control. We show here that the over-expression of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX in tomato and petunia is related to TSWV resistance. Results The open reading frame and full-length sequence of the tomato AOX gene LeAox1au were cloned and introduced into tomato 'Healani' and petunia 'Sheer Madness' using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Highly expressed AOX transgenic tomato and petunia plants were selfed and transgenic R1 seedlings from 10 tomato lines and 12 petunia lines were used for bioassay. For each assayed line, 22 to 32 tomato R1 progeny in three replications and 39 to 128 petunia progeny in 13 replications were challenged with TSWV. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays showed that the TSWV levels in transgenic tomato line FKT4-1 was significantly lower than that of wild-type controls after challenge with TSWV. In addition, transgenic petunia line FKP10 showed significantly less lesion number and smaller lesion size than non-transgenic controls after inoculation by TSWV. Conclusion In all assayed transgenic tomato lines, a higher percentage of transgenic progeny had lower TSWV levels than non-transgenic plants after challenge with TSWV, and the significantly increased resistant levels of tomato and petunia lines identified in this study indicate that altered expression levels of AOX in tomato and petunia can affect the levels of TSWV resistance.

  17. Expression profiling in transgenic FVB/N embryonic stem cells overexpressing STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokota Takashi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor STAT3 is a downstream target of the LIF signalling cascade. LIF signalling or activation is sufficient to maintain embryonic stem (ES cells in an undifferentiated and pluripotent state. To further investigate the importance of STAT3 in the establishment of ES cells we have in a first step derived stable pluripotent embryonic stem cells from transgenic FVB mice expressing a conditional tamoxifen dependent STAT3-MER fusion protein. In a second step, STAT3-MER overexpressing cells were used to identify STAT3 pathway-related genes by expression profiling in order to identify new key-players involved in maintenance of pluripotency in ES cells. Results Transgenic STAT3-MER blastocysts yielded pluripotent germline-competent ES cells at a high frequency in the absence of LIF when established in tamoxifen-containing medium. Expression profiling of tamoxifen-induced transgenic FVB ES cell lines revealed a set of 26 genes that were markedly up- or down-regulated when compared with wild type cells. The expression of four of the up-regulated genes (Hexokinase II, Lefty2, Pramel7, PP1rs15B was shown to be restricted to the inner cell mass (ICM of the blastocysts. These differentially expressed genes represent potential candidates for the maintenance of pluripotency of ES cells. We finally overexpressed two candidate genes, Pem/Rhox5 and Pramel7, in ES cells and demonstrated that their overexpression is sufficient for the maintenance of expression of ES cell markers as well as of the typical morphology of pluripotent ES cells in absence of LIF. Conclusion Overexpression of STAT3-MER in the inner cell mass of blastocyst facilitates the establishment of ES cells and induces the upregulation of potential candidate genes involved in the maintenance of pluripotency. Two of them, Pem/Rhox5 and Pramel7, when overexpressed in ES cells are able to maintain the embryonic stem cells in a pluripotent state in a LIF independent

  18. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  19. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein selectively in neurons: modeling mitochondriopathy in excitotoxicity and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria have roles or appear to have roles in the pathogenesis of several chronic age-related and acute neurological disorders, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia, and could be critical targets for development of rational mechanism-based, disease-modifying therapeutics for treating these disorders effectively. A deeper understanding of neural tissue mitochondria pathobiologies as definitive mediators of neural injury, disease, and cell death merits further study, and the development of additional tools to study neural mitochondria will help achieve this unmet need. Results We created transgenic mice that express the coral (Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein DsRed2 specifically in mitochondria of neurons using a construct engineered with a Thy1 promoter, specific for neuron expression, to drive expression of a fusion protein of DsRed2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence. The biochemical and histological characterization of these mice shows the expression of mitochondrial-targeted DsRed2 to be specific for mitochondria and concentrated in distinct CNS regions, including cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and spinal cord. Red fluorescent mitochondria were visualized in cerebral cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ventrobasal thalamic neurons, subthalamic neurons, and spinal motor neurons. For the purpose of proof of principle application, these mice were used in excitotoxicity paradigms and double transgenic mice were generated by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice with transgenic mice expressing enhanced-GFP (eGFP under the control of the Hlxb9 promoter that drives eGFP expression specifically in motor neurons and by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mice expressing human mutant superoxide dismutase-1. Conclusions These novel transgenic mice will be a useful tool for better understanding

  20. Resistance to chronic wasting disease in transgenic mice expressing a naturally occurring allelic variant of deer prion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-White, K.; Race, B.; Trifilo, M.; Bossers, A.; Favara, C.; Lacasse, R.; Miller, M.; Williams, E.; Oldstone, M.; Race, R.; Chesebro, B.

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is a required factor for susceptibility to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion diseases. In transgenic mice, expression of prion protein (PrP) from another species often confers susceptibility to prion disease from that donor species. For example, expression of deer

  1. Metallothionein-I overexpression decreases brain pathology in transgenic mice with astrocyte-targeted expression of interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinero, Amalia; Penkowa, Milena; Hernández, Joaquín;

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the CNS under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter (GFAP-IL6 mice) causes significant damage and alters the expression of many genes, including a dramatic upregulation of metallothionein-I (MT-I). The findings in ...

  2. Effect of ploidy increase on transgene expression: example from Citrus diploid cybrid and allotetraploid somatic hybrid expressing the EGFP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Tan, Bin; Li, Ding-Li; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2011-07-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism for all eukaryotes, and it has profound impacts on biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as an effective marker to visually screen somatic hybrids at an early stage in protoplast fusion. We have previously reported that the intensity of GFP fluorescence of regenerated embryoids was also an early indicator of ploidy level. However, little is known concerning the effects of ploidy increase on the GFP expression in citrus somatic hybrids at the plant level. Herein, allotetraploid and diploid cybrid plants with enhanced GFP (EGFP) expression were regenerated from the fusion of embryogenic callus protoplasts from 'Murcott' tangor (Citrus reticulata Blanco × Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) and mesophyll protoplasts from transgenic 'Valencia' orange (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck) expressing the EGFP gene, via electrofusion. Subsequent simple sequence repeat (SSR), chloroplast simple sequence repeat and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis revealed that the two regenerated tetraploid plants were true allotetraploid somatic hybrids possessing nuclear genomic DNA of both parents and cytoplasmic DNA from the callus parent, while the five regenerated diploid plants were cybrids containing nuclear DNA of the leaf parent and with complex segregation of cytoplasmic DNA. Furthermore, EGFP expression was compared in cells and protoplasts from mature leaves of these diploid cybrids and allotetraploid somatic hybrids. Results showed that the intensity of GFP fluorescence per cell or protoplast in diploid was generally brighter than in allotetraploid. Moreover, same hybridization signal was detected on allotetraploid and diploid plants by Southern blot analysis. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, GFP expression level of the diploid cybrid was revealed significantly higher than that of the allotetraploid somatic hybrid. These results suggest that ploidy

  3. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Ohlrogge, J.B. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1[Delta][sup 6cis]), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the [Delta][sup 9]-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and [Delta][sup 4]-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Enhanced Cadmium Accumulation in Transgenic Tobacco Expressing the Phytochelatin Synthase Gene of Cynodon dactylon L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangchuan Li; Jiangbo Guo; Wenzhong Xu; Mi Ma

    2006-01-01

    Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. cv. Goldensun) is highly resistant to and accumulates large amounts of cadmium (Cd). A phytochelatin synthase (PCS) cDNA (CdPCS1) was isolated from this grass by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The putative CdPCS1 protein shared a high homology with PCS from other plants, with 79% homology at the N-terminal and 47% homology at the C-terminal. However, 16 Cys residues were found at the C-terminal of CdPCS1, and among these residues, three positions were different from other PCS proteins. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that Cd stress induced CdPCS1 expression in both roots and leaves in Bermudagrass. We verified that CdPCS1 plays an important role in Cd tolerance in yeast cells by expressing the gene in ABDE1, a Cd-sensitive mutant. CdPCS1 was then introduced into tobacco plants. The phytochelatin level in some transgenic tobacco lines increased 3.88-fold more than in wild type plants and Cd accumulation in these transgenic plants was enhanced 3.21-fold accordingly. The results suggested that CdPCS1 could be used as a gene element for phytoremediation in the future.

  5. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, E B; Shanklin, J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1992-12-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1 delta 6cis), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the delta 9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and delta 4-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase.

  6. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV, with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  7. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  8. Comparison of Expression Profiles of Metastatic versus Primary Mammary Tumors in MMTV-Wnt-1 and MMTV-Neu Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixia Huang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Distant metastases of human breast cancers have been suggested to be more different from each other than from their respective primary tumors, based on expression profiling. The mechanism behind this lack of similarity between individual metastases is not known. We used cDNA microarrays to determine the expression profiles of pulmonary metastases and primary mammary tumors in two distinct transgenic models expressing either the Neu or the Wnt-1 oncogene from the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR. We found that pulmonary metastases are similar to each other and to their primary tumors within the same line. However, metastases arising in one transgenic mouse line are very different from either metastases or primary tumors arising in the other line. In addition, we found that, like their primary tumors, lung metastases in Wnt-1 transgenic mice harbor both epithelial and myoepithelial tumor cells and cells that express the putative progenitor cell marker keratin 6. Our data suggest that both gene expression profiles and cellular heterogeneity are preserved after breast cancer has spread to distant sites, and that metastases are similar to each other when their primary tumors were induced by the same oncogene and from the same subset of mammary cells.

  9. Expression pattern conferred by a glutamic acid-rich protein gene promoter in field-grown transgenic cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, J; Prías, M; Al-Babili, S; Ladino, Y; López, D; Beyer, P; Chavarriaga, P; Tohme, J

    2010-05-01

    A major constraint for incorporating new traits into cassava using biotechnology is the limited list of known/tested promoters that encourage the expression of transgenes in the cassava's starchy roots. Based on a previous report on the glutamic-acid-rich protein Pt2L4, indicating a preferential expression in roots, we cloned the corresponding gene including promoter sequence. A promoter fragment (CP2; 731 bp) was evaluated for its potential to regulate the expression of the reporter gene GUSPlus in transgenic cassava plants grown in the field. Intense GUS staining was observed in storage roots and vascular stem tissues; less intense staining in leaves; and none in the pith. Consistent with determined mRNA levels of the GUSPlus gene, fluorometric analyses revealed equal activities in root pulp and stems, but 3.5 times less in leaves. In a second approach, the activity of a longer promoter fragment (CP1) including an intrinsic intron was evaluated in carrot plants. CP1 exhibited a pronounced tissue preference, conferring high expression in the secondary phloem and vascular cambium of roots, but six times lower expression levels in leaf vascular tissues. Thus, CP1 and CP2 may be useful tools to improve nutritional and agronomical traits of cassava by genetic engineering. To date, this is the first study presenting field data on the specificity and potential of promoters for transgenic cassava.

  10. Introduction of rol Genes into Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Genome and Effects of Transgene Expression on the Plant Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-yan; YANG Ye-hua; WU Zheng-bin; WANG Xue-kui; YAO Ming-jin

    2004-01-01

    The rol genes cloned from Agrobacterium rhizogenes were transferred to the cotton genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Molecular analyses and developmental identification of the putative transgenic plants were carried out by means of PCR, Southern blotting and field characterization. The results showed that the expression of rol genes greatly increased the rooting ability of the transgenic plants, and changed the plant development. Highly male-sterile plants with strong apical dominance and fertile plants with short internodes, stunted growth and improved economic characteristics were segregated from the T1 transgenic lines of wild rol B gene and the rol B gene driven by 35S promoter. The transgenic lines of rol ABC construct usually had normal boll setting and slow growth. Therefore we concluded that the rol genes, modified in suitable ways,could be used to create new cotton varieties with some highly valuable characteristics.

  11. Transcriptome sequencing of gene expression in the brain of the HIV-1 transgenic rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming D Li

    Full Text Available The noninfectious HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat was developed as a model of AIDs-related pathology and immune dysfunction by manipulation of a noninfectious HIV-1(gag-pol virus with a deleted 3-kb SphI-MscI fragment containing the 3' -region of gag and the 5' region of pol into F344 rats. Our previous studies revealed significant behavioral differences between HIV-1Tg and F344 control rats in their performance in the Morris water maze and responses to psychostimulants. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these behavioral differences remain largely unknown. The primary goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes and enriched pathways affected by the gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome. Using RNA deep sequencing, we sequenced RNA transcripts in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of HIV-1Tg and F344 rats. A total of 72 RNA samples were analyzed (i.e., 12 animals per group × 2 strains × 3 brain regions. Following deep-sequencing analysis of 50-bp paired-end reads of RNA-Seq, we used Bowtie/Tophat/Cufflinks suites to align these reads into transcripts based on the Rn4 rat reference genome and to measure the relative abundance of each transcript. Statistical analyses on each brain region in the two strains revealed that immune response- and neurotransmission-related pathways were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats, with brain region differences. Other neuronal survival-related pathways, including those encoding myelin proteins, growth factors, and translation regulators, were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats in a brain region-dependent manner. This study is the first deep-sequencing analysis of RNA transcripts associated the HIV-1Tg rat. Considering the functions of the pathways and brain regions examined in this study, our findings of abnormal gene expression patterns in HIV-1Tg rats suggest mechanisms underlying the deficits in learning and memory and vulnerability to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders

  12. [Construction of plant expression vectors harboring a peptide antibiotic-apidaecin gene and resistance analysis of the transgenic tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Sun, C; Peng, X X

    2001-07-01

    Two plant expression vectors(pBinPRHbI and pBinPRSIHbI) were constructed: Firstly, apidaecin gene were fused to the signal peptide coding sequencing of a PR-protein, and cloned into a binary vector pBin438 to form pBinPRHbI. Then, the cassette consisting of 35S promoter, PR signal peptide coding sequencing and apidaecin gene was cut off from pBinPRHbI and inserted into another plant expression vector pBinPRSI to produce a bivalent plant expression vector pBinPRSIHbI. pBinPRSI was constructed previously in our lab and contained PR signal peptide and Shiva-I fusion gene under control of 35S promoter. The three plant expression vectors were introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The positive rate of PCR was 95% in all putative transgenic plants. Results from Southern blot indicated that foreign genes were integrated into tobacco genome and RT-PCR analysis proved that the foreign gene was transcribed in transgenic tobacco. The transgenic tobacco showed higher resistance to P. syringae pv tabaci, the causal agent of tobacco wild fire disease, than their original cultivars. From the disease index, the transgenic plants carrying apidaecin and Shiva-I genes had highest resistance among three kinds of transgenic plants, and the plants carrying Shiva-I gene alone had lowest resistance.

  13. Stable expression and phenotypic impact of attacin E transgene in orchard grown apple trees over a 12 year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldwinckle Herb S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic trees currently are being produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistics. The future use of transformed trees on a commercial basis depends upon thorough evaluation of the potential environmental and public health risk of the modified plants, transgene stability over a prolonged period of time and the effect of the gene on tree and fruit characteristics. We studied the stability of expression and the effect on resistance to the fire blight disease of the lytic protein gene, attacin E, in the apple cultivar 'Galaxy' grown in the field for 12 years. Results Using Southern and western blot analysis, we compared transgene copy number and observed stability of expression of this gene in the leaves and fruit in several transformed lines during a 12 year period. No silenced transgenic plant was detected. Also the expression of this gene resulted in an increase in resistance to fire blight throughout 12 years of orchard trial and did not affect fruit shape, size, acidity, firmness, weight or sugar level, tree morphology, leaf shape or flower morphology or color compared to the control. Conclusion Overall, these results suggest that transgene expression in perennial species, such as fruit trees, remains stable in time and space, over extended periods and in different organs. This report shows that it is possible to improve a desirable trait in apple, such as the resistance to a pathogen, through genetic engineering, without adverse alteration of fruit characteristics and tree shape.

  14. Specimen block counter-staining for localization of GUS expression in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. K.; Choi, J-W; Jeon, J-H; Franceschi, V. R.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    2002-01-01

    A simple counter-staining procedure has been developed for comparative beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression and anatomical localization in transgenic herbaceous arabidopsis and tobacco. This protocol provides good anatomical visualization for monitoring chimeric gene expression at both the organ and tissue levels. It can be used with different histochemical stains and can be extended to the study of woody species. The specimens are paraffin-embedded, the block is trimmed to reveal internal structure, safranin-O staining solution is briefly applied to the surface of the block, then washed off and, after drying, a drop of immersion oil is placed on the stained surface for subsequent photographic work. This gives tissue counter-staining with good structural preservation without loss of GUS staining product; moreover, sample observation is rapid and efficient compared to existing procedures.

  15. Expression of Human Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Gene in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉乐; 王晋芳; 邱并生; 赵淑珍; 田波

    1994-01-01

    Expression of Human hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) gene in plant was reported for the first time. The recombinant plasmid pRoKⅡ-HBsAg was constructed by inserting HBsAg gene into the downstream of CaMV 35S promoter of binary vector pRoKⅡ and then introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404. The kanamycin-resistant plants were obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system. It was shown that HBsAg gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco plants and their progenies by ELISA. The spherical particles of ψ 22 nm in the leaf extract of trangenic tobacco were observed by immunosorbent electron microscopy.

  16. Expression of plant sweet protein brazzein in the milk of transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Yan

    Full Text Available Sugar, the most popular sweetener, is essential in daily food. However, excessive sugar intake has been associated with several lifestyle-related diseases. Finding healthier and more economical alternatives to sugars and artificial sweeteners has received increasing attention to fulfill the growing demand. Brazzein, which comes from the pulp of the edible fruit of the African plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baill, is a protein that is 2,000 times sweeter than sucrose by weight. Here we report the production of transgenic mice that carry the optimized brazzein gene driven by the goat Beta-casein promoter, which specifically directs gene expression in the mammary glands. Using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that brazzein could be efficiently expressed in mammalian milk, while retaining its sweetness. This study presents the possibility of producing plant protein-sweetened milk from large animals such as cattle and goats.

  17. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  18. Over-expression of OsHsfA7 enhanced salt and drought tolerance in transgenic rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ling Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins play an important role in plant stresstolerance and are mainly regulated by heat shock transcriptionfactors (Hsfs. In this study, we generated transgenic riceover-expressing OsHsfA7 and carried out morphologicalobservation and stress tolerance assays. Transgenic plantsexhibited less, shorter lateral roots and root hair. Under salttreatment, over-expressing OsHsfA7 rice showed alleviativeappearance of damage symptoms and higher survival rate, leafelectrical conductivity and malondialdehyde content of transgenicplants were lower than those of wild type plants. Meanwhile,transgenic rice seedlings restored normal growth but wild typeplants could not be rescued after drought and re-wateringtreatment. These findings indicate that over-expression ofOsHsfA7 gene can increase tolerance to salt and drought stressesin rice seedlings. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1: 31-36

  19. Transgenic mice designed to express human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase in combination of human DAF and CD59 to avoid xenograft rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU BingQian; CHENG ChuanYu; WU YuDong; WEI JinXing; LI GuangSan; MA TengXiang

    2008-01-01

    The expression of human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) or complement regulatory proteins has been proved as an strategy to overcome hypercute rejection in discordant xenogeneic organ transplantation.In this study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from polytransgenic mice expressing the human HT, and complement regulatory proteins (DAF and CD59), can provide more effective protection against xenograft rejection. Transgenic mice were produced by co-injection of gene constructs for human HT, DAF and/or CD59. Flow Cytometry (FCM) was used to screen the positive transgenic mice. PBMCs from transgenic mice were incubated with 15% human serum to evaluate natural antibody binding, complement activation and expression of adhesion molecules.Three transgenes were strongly expressed in PBMCs of transgenic mice, and HT expression significantly reduced expression of the major xenoepitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal). Functional studies with PBMCs showed that co-expression of HT and DAF or CD59 markedly increased their resistance to human serum-mediated cytolysis when compared with single transgenic PBMCs. Moreover,the combined expression of triple transgenes in PBMCs led to the greatest protection against human serum-mediated cytolyais, avoided hyperacute rejection and reduced expression of adhesion molecules. Strong co-expression of triple transgenes was completely protected from xenograft hyperacute rejection and partially inhibited acute vascular rejection. The studies suggest that engineering mice to express triple molecules represents an critical step toward prolonging xenograft survival and might be more suitable for xenotransplantation.

  20. Transgenic mice designed to express human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase in combination of human DAF and CD59 to avoid xenograft rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The expression of human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) or complement regulatory proteins has been proved as an strategy to overcome hypercute rejection in discordant xenogeneic organ transplantation. In this study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from polytransgenic mice expressing the human HT, and complement regulatory proteins (DAF and CD59), can provide more effective protection against xenograft rejection. Transgenic mice were produced by co-injection of gene constructs for human HT, DAF and/or CD59. Flow Cytometry (FCM) was used to screen the positive transgenic mice. PBMCs from transgenic mice were incubated with 15% human serum to evaluate natural antibody binding, complement activation and expression of adhesion molecules. Three transgenes were strongly expressed in PBMCs of transgenic mice, and HT expression signifi- cantly reduced expression of the major xenoepitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal). Functional studies with PBMCs showed that co-expression of HT and DAF or CD59 markedly increased their re- sistance to human serum-mediated cytolysis when compared with single transgenic PBMCs. Moreover, the combined expression of triple transgenes in PBMCs led to the greatest protection against human serum-mediated cytolysis, avoided hyperacute rejection and reduced expression of adhesion mole- cules. Strong co-expression of triple transgenes was completely protected from xenograft hyperacute rejection and partially inhibited acute vascular rejection. The studies suggest that engineering mice to express triple molecules represents an critical step toward prolonging xenograft survival and might be more suitable for xenotransplantation.

  1. Transgenic tomatoes express an antigenic polypeptide containing epitopes of the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins, encoded by a synthetic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Márquez-Mercado, Crisóforo; López-Revilla, Rubén; Castillo-Collazo, Rosalba; Alpuche-Solís, Angel Gabriel

    2007-07-01

    A current priority of vaccinology is the development of multicomponent vaccines that protect against several pathogens. The diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine prevents the symptoms of three serious and often fatal diseases due to the exotoxins produced by Corynebacterium diphteriae, Bordetella pertussis and Clostridium tetani. We are attempting to develop an edible DPT multicomponent vaccine in plants, based on the fusion of protective exotoxin epitopes encoded by synthetic genes. By means of Agrobacterium mediated transformation we generated transgenic tomatoes with a plant-optimised synthetic gene encoding a novel polypeptide containing two adjuvant and six DPT immunoprotective exotoxin epitopes joined by peptide linkers. In transformed tomato plants, integration of the synthetic DPT (sDPT) gene detected by PCR was confirmed by Southern blot, and specific transcripts of the expected molecular size were detected by RT-PCR. Expression of the putative polypeptide encoded by the sDPT gene was detected by immunoassay with specific antibodies to the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins. The sDPT gene is therefore integrated, transcribed and translated as the expected recombinant sDPT multiepitope polypeptide in transgenic tomatoes that constitute a potential edible vaccine.

  2. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Yoshida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50 of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  3. Recombination with coat protein transgene in a complemen-tation system based on Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the feasibility of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) as an expression vector, the full-length cDNA of RNA 3 from strain SD was cloned and the sequence around the start codon of the coat protein (CP) gene was modified to create an NsiⅠ site for insertion of foreign genes. The CP gene was replaced by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The cDNAs of Fny RNAs 1 and 2 and the chimeric SD RNA 3 were cloned between the modified 35S promoter and terminator. Tobacco protoplasts were transfected with a mixture of the viral cDNAs containing 35S promoter and terminator as a replacement vector and expressed GFP. A complementation system was established when the replacement vector was inoculated onto the transgenic tobacco plants ex-pressing SD-CMV CP. GFP was detected in the inoculated leaves in 5 of 18 tested plants and in the first upper systemic leaf of one of the 5 plants ten days after inoculation. However, no GFP could be detected in all the plants one month after inoculation. Recombination between the CMV vector and the CP transgene was proved by retro-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and verified by DNA sequencing. Our results argue against the feasibility of the CMV-based replace-ment vector trans-complemented by the CP transgene, and at the same time, enlighten ways to improve the CMV-based expression vector and the biosafety of CMV CP-mediated virus resistant transgenic plants.

  4. Detrimental effect of expression ofBt endotoxin Cry1Ac on in vitro regeneration, in vivo growth and development of tobacco and cotton transgenics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Rawat; Amarjeet Kumar Singh; Krishna Ray; Bhupendra Chaudhary; Sanjeev Kumar; Taru Gautam; Shaveta Kanoria; Gurpreet Kaur; Paritosh Kumar; Deepak Pental; Pradeep Kumar Burma

    2011-06-01

    High levels of expression of the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis cannot be routinely achieved in transgenic plants despite modifications made in the gene to improve its expression. This has been attributed to the instability of the transcript in a few reports. In the present study, based on the genetic transformation of cotton and tobacco, we show that the expression of the Cry1Ac endotoxin has detrimental effects on both the in vitro and in vivo growth and development of transgenic plants. A number of experiments on developing transgenics in cotton with different versions of cry1Ac gene showed that the majority of the plants did not express any Cry1Ac protein. Based on Southern blot analysis, it was also observed that a substantial number of lines did not contain the cry1Ac gene cassette although they contained the marker gene nptII. More significantly, all the lines that showed appreciable levels of expression were found to be phenotypically abnormal. Experiments on transformation of tobacco with different constructs expressing the cry1Ac gene showed that in vitro regeneration was inhibited by the encoded protein. Further, out of a total of 145 independent events generated with the different cry1Ac gene constructs in tobacco, only 21 showed expression of the Cry1Ac protein, confirming observations made in cotton that regenerants that express high levels of the Cry1Ac protein are selected against during regeneration of transformed events. This problem was circumvented by targeting the Cry1Ac protein to the chloroplast, which also significantly improved the expression of the protein.

  5. Detrimental effect of expression of Bt endotoxin Cry1Ac on in vitro regeneration, in vivo growth and development of tobacco and cotton transgenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Preeti; Singh, Amarjeet Kumar; Ray, Krishna; Chaudhary, Bhupendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gautam, Taru; Kanoria, Shaveta; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Paritosh; Pental, Deepak; Burma, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-06-01

    High levels of expression of the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis cannot be routinely achieved in transgenic plants despite modifications made in the gene to improve its expression. This has been attributed to the instability of the transcript in a few reports. In the present study, based on the genetic transformation of cotton and tobacco, we show that the expression of the Cry1Ac endotoxin has detrimental effects on both the in vitro and in vivo growth and development of transgenic plants. A number of experiments on developing transgenics in cotton with different versions of cry1Ac gene showed that the majority of the plants did not express any Cry1Ac protein. Based on Southern blot analysis, it was also observed that a substantial number of lines did not contain the cry1Ac gene cassette although they contained the marker gene nptII. More significantly, all the lines that showed appreciable levels of expression were found to be phenotypically abnormal. Experiments on transformation of tobacco with different constructs expressing the cry1Ac gene showed that in vitro regeneration was inhibited by the encoded protein. Further, out of a total of 145 independent events generated with the different cry1Ac gene constructs in tobacco, only 21 showed expression of the Cry1Ac protein, confirming observations made in cotton that regenerants that express high levels of the Cry1Ac protein are selected against during regeneration of transformed events. This problem was circumvented by targeting the Cry1Ac protein to the chloroplast, which also significantly improved the expression of the protein.

  6. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  7. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  8. Generation of transgenic cattle expressing human β-defensin 3 as an approach to reducing susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Guanghui; Ru, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Wu, Yongyan; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis results from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis family. Worldwide, M. bovis infections result in economic losses in the livestock industry; cattle production is especially hard-hit by this disease. Generating M. bovis-resistant cattle may potentially mitigate the impact of this disease by reducing M. bovis infections. In this study, we used transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cattle expressing the gene encoding human β-defensin 3 (HBD3), which confers resistance to mycobacteria in vitro. We first generated alveolar epithelial cells expressing HBD3 under the control of the bovine MUC1 promoter, and confirmed that these cells secreted HBD3 and possessed anti-mycobacterial capacity. We then generated and identified transgenic cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of genetically modified embryos provided evidence that monoclonal transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells have an integral reprogramming ability that is similar to that of normal cells. Five genetically modified cows were generated, and their anti-mycobacterial capacities were evaluated. Alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages from these cattle expressed higher levels of HBD3 protein compared with non-transgenic cells and possessed effective anti-mycobacterial capacity. These results suggest that the overall risk of M. bovis infection in transgenic cattle is efficiently reduced, and support the development of genetically modified animals as an effective tool to reduce M. bovis infection.

  9. The impact of transgenic wheat expressing GNA (snowdrop lectin) on the aphids Sitobion avenae, Schizaphis graminum, and Rhopalosiphum padi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jin; Wu, Yuqing; Xu, Weigang; Hu, Lin; Yu, Zhenxing; Xu, Qiongfang

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the impact of transgenic wheat expressing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), commonly known as snowdrop lectin, on three wheat aphids: Sitobion avenae (F.), Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), and Rhopalosiphum padi (L.). We compared the feeding behavior and the life-table parameters of aphids reared on GNA transgenic wheat (test group) and those aphids reared on untransformed wheat (control group). The results showed that the feeding behaviors of S. avenae and S. graminum on GNA transgenic wheat were affected. Compared with the control group, they had shorter initial probing period, longer total nonprobing period, shorter initial and total phloem sap ingestion phase (waveform E2), shorter duration of sustained ingestion (E (pd) > 10 min), and lower percentage of phloem phase of the total observation time. Moreover, S. graminum made more probes and had a longer total duration of extracellular stylet pathway (waveform C). The fecundity and intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) of S. avenae and S. graminum on the transgenic wheat were lowered in the first and second generations, however, the survival and lifespan were not affected. The effects of the GNA expressing wheat on S. graminum and S. avenae were not significant in the third generation, suggesting rapid adaptation by the two aphid species. Despite the impact we found on S. avenae and S. graminum, transgenic GNA expressing wheat did not have any effects on R. padi.

  10. Transgenic organisms expressing genes from Bacillus thuringiensis to combat insect pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Borovsky, Dov; Boussiba, Sammy; Einav, Monica; Gindin, Galina; Horowitz, A Rami; Kolot, Mikhail; Melnikov, Olga; Mendel, Zvi; Yagil, Ezra

    2010-01-01

    Various subspecies (ssp.) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are considered the best agents known so far to control insects, being highly specific and safe, easily mass produced and with long shelf life.1 The para-crystalline body that is produced during sporulation in the exosporium includes polypeptides named δ-endotoxins, each killing a specific set of insects. The different entomopathogenic toxins of various Bt ssp. can be manipulated genetically in an educated way to construct more efficient transgenic bacteria or plants that express combinations of toxin genes to control pests.2 Joint research projects in our respective laboratories during the last decade demonstrate what can be done by implementing certain ideas using molecular biology with Bt ssp. israelensis (Bti) as a model system. Here, we describe our progress achieved with Gram-negative bacterial species, including cyanobacteria, and some preliminary experiments to form transgenic plants, mainly to control mosquitoes (Diptera), but also a particular Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pest species. In addition, a system is described by which environment-damaging genes can be removed from the recombinants thus alleviating procedures for obtaining permits to release them in nature.

  11. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  12. 23. Establishment of two transgenic cells stable expression of human cytochrome P450 2C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To clone the human cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and CYP2C18 cDNA and establish two transgenic CHL cell line stable expressing human CYP2C9 and CYP2C18. METHODS:Extracting total RNA from human liver tissue, the human CYP2C9 and CYP2C18 cDNA was amplified with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-T. The cDNA segment was identified by DNA sequencing and subcloned into a mammalian expression vector pREP9. Two transgenic cell line were established by transfecting the recombinant vectors of pREP9-CYP2C9 and pREP9-CYP2C18 to Chinese hamster lung cell CHL. The enzyme activity of CYP2C9 and CYP2C18 catalyze tolbutamide to 4-hydroxy tolbutamide in S9 protein of the cells were determinated by HPLC. RESULTS: The sequence of the two cDNA segments cloned, which were 1540 bp and 1671 bp in length, were identical to those reported by Romkes et al(GenBank accession number: M61855, M61856, J05326) in coding amino acids. The S9 fraction of the established cell lines can metabolize tolbutamide to 4-hydroxy tolbutamide, the tolbutamide-4-hydroxylase activity was found to be 0.465±0.109 and 0.509±0.052 nmol*min-1*(mg S9 protein)-1 (n=3), but was not detectable in parental CHL cell. CONCLUSION: The cDNA of CYP2C9 and CYP2C18 were successfolly cloned and cell lines of CHL-CYP2C9 and CHL-CYP2C18 which efficiently expressed the protein of CYP2C9 and CYP2C18 were established.

  13. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing AtNDPK2 exhibit increased growth and tolerance to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Li, Hongbing; Ke, Qingbo; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xi-Ping; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we generated and evaluated transgenic alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L. cv. Xinjiang Daye) expressing the Arabidopsis nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (AtNDPK2) gene under the control of the oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SN plants) to develop plants with enhanced tolerance to various abiotic stresses. We selected two SN plants (SN4 and SN7) according to the expression levels of AtNDPK2 and the enzyme activity of NDPK in response to methyl viologen (MV)-mediated oxidative stress treatment using leaf discs for further characterization. SN plants showed enhanced tolerance to high temperature, NaCl, and drought stress on the whole-plant level. When the plants were subjected to high temperature treatment (42 °C for 24 h), the non-transgenic (NT) plants were severely wilted, whereas the SN plants were not affected because they maintained high relative water and chlorophyll contents. The SN plants also showed significantly higher tolerance to 250 mM NaCl and water stress treatment than the NT plants. In addition, the SN plants exhibited better plant growth through increased expression of auxin-related indole acetic acid (IAA) genes (MsIAA3, MsIAA5, MsIAA6, MsIAA7, and MsIAA16) under normal growth conditions compared to NT plants. The results suggest that induced overexpression of AtNDPK2 in alfalfa will be useful for increasing biomass production under various abiotic stress conditions.

  14. Co-suppression in transgenic Petunia hybrida expressing chalcone synthase A (chsA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yan; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Napoli, C., Lemieux, C., Jorgensen, R., Introduction of a chimeric chalone synthase gene into petunia results in reversible cosuppession of homologous genes in trans, The Plant Cell, 1990, 2: 279-289.[2]Van der Krol, A.R., Mur, L.A., Beld, M. M. et al., Flavonnoid genes in petunia: addition of a limited number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene expression, The Plant Cell, 1990, 2: 291-299.[3]Manika, P.B., Bhadra, U., Birchler, J., Cosuppression in Drosophila: gene silencing of Alcohol dehydrogenase by White-Adh transgene is Polycomb dependent, Cell, 1997, 90: 479-498.[4]de Carvalho Niebel, F., Frendo, P., Van Montagu, M. et al., Post-transcriptional cosuppression of ?-1,3-glucanase transgene expression in homozygous plants, EMBO J., 1992, 11: 2595-2602.[5]Van Blokland, R., Van der Geest, N., Mol, J. N. M. et al., Transgene-mediated suppression of chalcone synthase expression in Petunia hybrida results from an increase in RNA turnover, The Plant Cell, 1994, 6: 861-877.[6]Stam, M., Mol, J. N. M., Kooter, J. M., The silence of genes in transgenic plants, Annals of Bot., 1997, 79: 3-12.[7]Vaucheret, H., Beclin, C., Elmayan, T. et al., Transgene-induced gene silencing in plants, Plant J., 1998, 16(6): 651-659.[8]Shao, L., Li, Y., Yang, M. Z. et al., Transformation of Petunia hybrida with chalcone synthase A (chsA) resulting flower colour alteration and male sterility, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese), 1996, 38(7): 517-524.[9]Koes, R. E., Spelt, C. E., Mol, J. N. M., The chalcone synthase multigene family of Petunia hybrida (V30): differential, light-regulated expression during flower development and UV light induction, Plant Mol. Biol., 1989, 12: 213-225.[10]Drews, G. N., Beals, T. P., Bul, A. Q. et al., Regional and cell-specific expression patterns during petal development, The Plant Cell, 1992, 4: 1383-1404.[11]Martin, C., Gerats, T., Control of pigment biosynthesis genes during petal development, The

  15. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing BoRS1 gene from Brassica oleracea var. acephala show enhanced tolerance to water stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dongqin Tang; Hongmei Qian; Lingxia Zhao; Danfeng Huang; Kexuan Tang

    2005-12-01

    Water stress is by far the leading environmental stress limiting crop yields worldwide. Genetic engineering techniques hold great promise for developing crop cultivars with high tolerance to water stress. In this study, the Brassica oleracea var. acephala BoRS1 gene was transferred into tobacco through Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc transformation. The transgenic status and transgene expression of the transgenic plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, Southern hybridization and semi-quantitative one step RT-PCR analysis respectively. Subsequently, the growth status under water stress, and physiological responses to water stress of transgenic tobacco were studied. The results showed that the transgenic plants exhibited better growth status under water stress condition compared to the untransformed control plants. In physiological assessment of water tolerance, transgenic plants showed more dry matter accumulation and maintained significantly higher levels of leaf chlorophyll content along with increasing levels of water stress than the untransformed control plants. This study shows that BoRS1 is a candidate gene in the engineering of crops for enhanced water stress tolerance.

  16. Genetic transformation and expression of transgenic lines of Populus x euramericana with insect-resistance and salt-tolerance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R L; Wang, A X; Zhang, J; Dong, Y; Yang, M S; Wang, J M

    2016-04-29

    We characterized new transgenic varieties of poplar with multiple insect-resistant and salt stress tolerant genes. Two insect-resistant Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes, Cry1Ac and Cry3A, and a salt-tolerant gene, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) were inserted into a vector, p209-Cry1Ac-Cry3A-BADH. The clone of Populus x euramericana was transformed by the vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated method. Three transgenic lines were assessed using genetic detection and resistance expression analysis. PCR revealed that exogenous genes Cry1Ac, Cry3A, BADH and selective marker gene NPTII were present in three transgenic lines. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed significant differences in the transcriptional abundance of three exogenous genes in different lines. Results of assays for Bt toxic proteins showed that the Cry1Ac and Cry3A toxic protein content of each line was 12.83-26.32 and 2108.91-2724.79 ng/g, respectively. The Cry1Ac toxic protein content of different lines was significantly different; the Cry3A toxic protein content was about 100 times higher than that of the Cry1Ac toxic protein. The insect-resistance test revealed the mortality rate of transgenic lines to Hyphantria cunea L1 larvae varied by 42.2-66.7%, which was significantly higher than non-transgenic lines. The mortality rate of L1 and L2 Plagiodera versicolora larvae was 100%. The insecticidal effect of transgenic lines to P. versicolora larvae was higher than that to H. cunea larvae. NaCl stress tolerance of three transgenic lines under 3-6% NaCl concentration was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic lines.

  17. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  18. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  19. Expression of a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene results in {gamma}-linolenic acid production in transgenic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.S.; Thomas, T.L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a nutritionally important fatty acid in human and animal diets, is not produced in oil seed crops. Many oil seed plants, however, produce significant quantities of linoleic acid, a fatty acid that could be converted to GLA by the enzyme {del}{sup 6}-desaturase if it were present. As a first step to producing GLA in oil seed crops, we have cloned a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene. Expression of this gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in GLA accumulation. Octadecatetraenoic acid, a highly unsaturated, industrially important fatty acid, was also found in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase. This is the first example of engineering the production of `novel` polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic plants. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Tissue-specific posttranscriptional downregulation of expression of the S100A4(mts1) gene in transgenic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambartsumian, N; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grigorian, M

    1998-01-01

    The S100A4(mts1) is a gene associated with generation of metastatic disease. In order to analyze the consequences of alteration of the pattern of expression of the S100A4(mts1) gene we obtained strains of transgenic mice bearing the S100A4(mts1) gene under the control of a ubiquitous...... and constitutive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) gene promoter. In transgenic animals the expression of the transgene RNA was detected in all organs, but only some of the organs showed elevated levels of the protein. Expression of the S100A4(Mts1) protein was downregulated in the organs...... that normally do not express the gene in the wild-type animal. The transgene RNA is detected in the polysomes indicating that it could be translated into the S100A4(Mts1) protein. The specificity of the S100A4(Mts1) protein expression is determined by a complex mechanism including regulation of translation and...

  1. In Vivo Recognition of Ovalbumin Expressed by Transgenic Leishmania Is Determined by Its Subcellular Localization1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Sara; Gray, Peter M.; Colpitts, Sara L.; Scott, Phillip; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the site of Ag localization within microbial pathogens for the effective generation of CD8+ T cells has been studied extensively, generally supporting the view that Ag secretion within infected target cells is required for optimal MHC class I-restricted Ag presentation. In contrast, relatively little is known about the importance of pathogen Ag localization for the activation of MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells, despite their clear importance for host protection. We have used the N-terminal targeting sequence of Leishmania major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B to generate stable transgenic lines expressing physiologically relevant levels of full-length OVA on the surface of metacyclic promastigotes and amastigotes. In addition, we have mutated the hydrophilic acylated surface protein B N-terminal acylation sequence to generate control transgenic lines in which OVA expression is restricted to the parasite cytosol. In vitro, splenic dendritic cells are able to present membrane-localized, but not cytosolic, OVA to OVA-specific DO.11 T cells. Strikingly and unexpectedly, surface localization of OVA is also a strict requirement for recognition by OVA-specific T cells (DO.11 and OT-II) and for the development of OVA-specific Ab responses in vivo. However, recognition of cytosolic OVA could be observed with increasing doses of infection. These data suggest that, even under in vivo conditions, where varied pathways of Ag processing are likely to operate, the site of Leishmania Ag localization is an important determinant of immunogenicity and hence an important factor when considering the likely candidacy of vaccine Ags for inducing CD4+ T cell-dependent immunity. PMID:16585577

  2. The expression of a bean PGIP in transgenic wheat confers increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janni, Michela; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; Blechl, Ann E; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2008-02-01

    A possible strategy to control plant pathogens is the improvement of natural plant defense mechanisms against the tools that pathogens commonly use to penetrate and colonize the host tissue. One of these mechanisms is represented by the host plant's ability to inhibit the pathogen's capacity to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIP) are plant defense cell wall glycoproteins that inhibit the activity of fungal endopolygalacturonases (endo-PGs). To assess the effectiveness of these proteins in protecting wheat from fungal pathogens, we produced a number of transgenic wheat lines expressing a bean PGIP (PvPGIP2) having a wide spectrum of specificities against fungal PGs. Three independent transgenic lines were characterized in detail, including determination of the levels of PvPGIP2 accumulation and its subcellular localization and inhibitory activity. Results show that the transgene-encoded protein is correctly secreted into the apoplast, maintains its characteristic recognition specificities, and endows the transgenic wheat with new PG recognition capabilities. As a consequence, transgenic wheat tissue showed increased resistance to digestion by the PG of Fusarium moniliforme. These new properties also were confirmed at the plant level during interactions with the fungal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana. All three lines showed significant reductions in symptom progression (46 to 50%) through the leaves following infection with this pathogen. Our results illustrate the feasibility of improving wheat's defenses against pathogens by expression of proteins with new capabilities to counteract those produced by the pathogens.

  3. Field-Evolved Resistance in Corn Earworm to Cry Proteins Expressed by Transgenic Sweet Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dively, Galen P.; Finkenbinder, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Background Transgenic corn engineered with genes expressing insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) are now a major tool in insect pest management. With its widespread use, insect resistance is a major threat to the sustainability of the Bt transgenic technology. For all Bt corn expressing Cry toxins, the high dose requirement for resistance management is not achieved for corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), which is more tolerant to the Bt toxins. Methodology/Major Findings We present field monitoring data using Cry1Ab (1996–2016) and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2 (2010–2016) expressing sweet corn hybrids as in-field screens to measure changes in field efficacy and Cry toxin susceptibility to H. zea. Larvae successfully damaged an increasing proportion of ears, consumed more kernel area, and reached later developmental stages (4th - 6th instars) in both types of Bt hybrids (Cry1Ab—event Bt11, and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2—event MON89034) since their commercial introduction. Yearly patterns of H. zea population abundance were unrelated to reductions in control efficacy. There was no evidence of field efficacy or tissue toxicity differences among different Cry1Ab hybrids that could contribute to the decline in control efficacy. Supportive data from laboratory bioassays demonstrate significant differences in weight gain and fitness characteristics between the Maryland H. zea strain and a susceptible strain. In bioassays with Cry1Ab expressing green leaf tissue, Maryland H. zea strain gained more weight than the susceptible strain at all concentrations tested. Fitness of the Maryland H. zea strain was significantly lower than that of the susceptible strain as indicated by lower hatch rate, longer time to adult eclosion, lower pupal weight, and reduced survival to adulthood. Conclusions/Significance After ruling out possible contributing factors, the rapid change in field efficacy in recent years and decreased susceptibility of H. zea to Bt

  4. PERSPECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUCOSAL VACCINES AGAINST DANGEROUS INFECTIONS ON THE BASE OF TRANSGENIC PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Tretyakova

    2012-08-01

    target gene HPV16 L1 and the nos terminator. The target gene HPV16 L1 of the most oncogenic type 16 of human papillomavirus was choosen as the object. Different procedures of the plant transformation were elaborated and the transgenic plants synthesizing the antigenic protein L1 of human papillomavirus of type 16 were obtained. The insertion and the expression of the target gene were controlled by northern blotting, the synthesis of antigenic protein HPV16 L1 was determined by ELISA and western blot. The antigenic protein of HPV16 L1 was synthesized in amount of 20 – 50 ng/mg of total soluble proteins in tomato transgenic plants. The results of the examination of the immunogenicity of the vaccine obtained by means of the peroral immunization of mice were showed in the report. Therefore it was demonstrated the principal opportunity of the creation of mucosal vaccines on the base of transgenic plants against several dangerous diseases.

  5. [Quantitative criteria for the estimation of the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in natural and transgenic luminescent bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A A; Kargatova, T V; Medvedeva, S E; Popova, L Iu

    2008-01-01

    Computation coefficients for estimating the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in natural luminescent bacteria P. leiognathi 54 and transgenic strain E. coli Z905/pPHL7 bearing lux-operon in multicopy plasmid are suggested, and their use on the molecular, cell, and population levels was considered. It was shown that, on the population level, all transgenic variants got the better of natural variants of P. leiognathi 54 irrespective of the type of lux-operon regulation. On the cell level, in the bright and dim variants of the transgenic strain, the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression increases by several orders. On the level of one lux-operon, the effectiveness of expression of the bright variant of transgenic strain is substantially higher than in the natural bright variant; in dim variants, the efficiency values are similar, and the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in the dark variant of E. coli Z905-2 /pPHL7 is by two orders lower than that in the dark variant of P. leiognathi 54.

  6. Expression of a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase genes in transgenic potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moravcikova, J.; Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Bauer, M.; Mlynarova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding for a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase were co-introduced into Slovak potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding line 116/86 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. For both transgenes the number of integrated copies and level of RNA expression wer

  7. Transgenic Leucaena leucocephala expressing the Rhizobium gene pydA encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase shows reduced mimosine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jube, Sandro L R; Borthakur, Dulal

    2010-04-01

    The use of the tree-legume Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena), which contains high levels of proteins in its foliage, is limited due to the presence of the toxic free amino acid mimosine. The goal of this research was to develop transgenic leucaena with reduced mimosine content. Two genes, pydA and pydB, encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.2) and a pyruvate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.6), respectively, from the mimosine-degrading leucaena symbiont Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145, were used to transform leucaena. These bacterial genes were sequence-optimized for expression in leucaena and cloned into the plant binary vector pCAMBIA3201 for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Using immature zygotic embryos as the start explant material, six pydA and three pydB transgenic lines were developed. The presence and expression of the bacterial genes in the transgenic lines were verified by PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and Southern analyses. HPLC analyses of the transgenic plants determined that the mimosine contents of the pydA-expressing lines were reduced up to 22.5% in comparison to the wild-type. No significant reduction in mimosine content was observed in the pydB-expressing lines. This is the first example of using a gene from a bacterial symbiont to reduce the toxicity of a tree-legume.

  8. Expression of a transgene encoding mutant p193/CUL7 preserves cardiac function and limits infarct expansion after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, R. J.; Nakajima, H.; Nakajima, H. O.; Doevendans, P. A.; Field, L. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transgenic mice expressing the dominant interfering p193 protein in cardiomyocytes (MHC-1152stop mice) exhibit an induction of cell cycle activity and altered remodelling after experimental myocardial infarction (MI). Objective: To determine whether the altered remodelling results in imp

  9. Expression of accessory colonization factor subunit A (ACFA) of Vibrio cholerae and ACFA fused to cholera toxin B subunit in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Jani, Dewal; Thungapathra, M; Gautam, J K; Meena, L S; Singh, Yogendra; Ghosh, Amit; Tyagi, Akhilesh Kumar; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2008-05-20

    In earlier study from our group, cholera toxin B subunit had been expressed in tomato for developing a plant-based vaccine against cholera. In the present investigation, gene for accessory colonization factor (acf) subunit A, earlier reported to be essential for efficient colonization in the intestine, has been expressed in Escherichia coli as well as tomato plants. Gene encoding for a chimeric protein having a fusion of cholera toxin B subunit and accessory colonization factor A was also expressed in tomato to generate more potent combinatorial antigen. CaMV35S promoter with a duplicated enhancer sequence was used for expression of these genes in tomato. Integration of transgenes into tomato genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern hybridization. Expression of the genes was confirmed at transcript and protein levels. Accessory colonization factor A and cholera toxin B subunit fused to this protein accumulated up to 0.25% and 0.08% of total soluble protein, respectively, in the fruits of transgenic plants. Whereas protein purified from E. coli, in combination with cholera toxin B subunit can be used for development of conventional subunit vaccine, tomato fruits expressing these proteins can be used together with tomato plants expressing cholera toxin B subunit for development of oral vaccine against cholera.

  10. Neonatal Death and Heart Failure in Mouse with Transgenic HSP60 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial heat shock proteins, such as HSP60, are chaperones responsible for the folding, transport, and quality control of mitochondrial matrix proteins and are essential for maintaining life. Both prosurvival and proapoptotic roles have been proposed for HSP60, and HSP60 is reportedly involved in the initiation of autoimmune, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases. The role of HSP60 in pathogenesis of these diseases remains unclear, partly because of the lack of mouse models expressing HSP60. In this study we generated HSP60 conditional transgenic mice suitable for investigating in vivo outcomes by expressing HSP60 at the targeted organ in disease models. Ubiquitous HSP60 induction in the embryonic stage caused neonatal death in mice at postnatal day 1. A high incidence of atrial septal defects was observed in HSP60-expressing mice, with increased apoptosis and myocyte degeneration that possibly contributed to massive hemorrhage and sponge-like cardiac muscles. Our results showed that neonatal heart failure through HSP60 induction likely involves developmental defects and excessive apoptosis. The conditional HSP60 mouse model is useful for studying crucial biological questions concerning HSP60.

  11. Novel recombinant adeno-associated viruses for Cre activated and inactivated transgene expression in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpiar eSaunders

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the organization of the nervous system requires methods for dissecting the contributions of each component cell type to circuit function. One widely used approach combines genetic targeting of Cre recombinase to specific cell populations with infection of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs whose transgene expression is activated by Cre (Cre-On. Distinguishing how the Cre-expressing neurons differ functionally from neighboring Cre-negative neurons requires rAAVs that are inactivated by Cre (Cre-Off and can be used in tandem with Cre-On viruses. Here we introduce two rAAV vectors that are inactivated by Cre and carry different fluorophore and optogenetic constructs. We demonstrate single and dual rAAV systems to achieve Cre-On and Cre-Off expression in spatially-intermingled cell populations of the striatum. Using these systems, we uncovered cryptic genomic interactions that occur between multiple Cre-sensitive rAAVs or between Cre-sensitive rAAVs and somatic Cre-conditional alleles and devised methods to avoid these interactions. Our data highlight both important experimental caveats associated with Cre-dependent rAAV use as well as opportunities for the development of improved rAAVs for gene delivery.

  12. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the sweetpotato Orange gene exhibit enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2 promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants, three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8 selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  13. Significant reduction of fungal disease symptoms in transgenic lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) expressing the anti-apoptotic baculovirus gene p35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanto, Teguh; Barker, Susan J; Wylie, Stephen J; Gilchrist, David G; Cowling, Wallace A

    2009-10-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (NLL; Lupinus angustifolius) is a recently domesticated but anciently propagated crop with significant value in rotation with cereals in Mediterranean climates. However, several fungal pathogens, traditionally termed necrotrophs, severely affect broad-acre production and there is limited genetic resistance in the NLL germplasm pool. Symptoms of many of these diseases appear as localized areas of dead cells exhibiting markers of programmed cell death. Based on our previous research, we hypothesized that engineered expression of the baculovirus anti-apoptotic p35 gene might reduce symptoms of these diseases. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of a cultivar highly susceptible to several pathogens, 14 independent NLL lines containing both the p35 and bar genes were obtained (p35-NLL). Integration and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), progeny testing, Southern blot, Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses. Fecundity and nodulation were not altered in these lines. Third or fourth generation p35-NLL lines were challenged with necrotrophic fungal pathogens (anthracnose in stem and leaf, and Pleiochaeta root rot and leaf brown spot) in controlled environment conditions. Several p35-NLL lines had significantly reduced disease symptoms. Interestingly, as with natural resistance, no single line was improved for all three diseases which possibly reflecting spatial variation of p35 expression in planta. These data support an alternative molecular definition for 'necrotrophic disease' in plants and suggest new routes for achieving resistance against a range of pathogens.

  14. Prox1 expression in the endolymphatic sac revealed by whole-mount fluorescent imaging of Prox1-GFP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2015-01-30

    This study describes a technical breakthrough in endolymphatic sac research, made possible by the use of the recently generated Prox1-GFP transgenic mouse model. Whole-mount imaging techniques through the decalcified temporal bone and three-dimensional observations of Prox1-GFP mouse tissue revealed the positive labeling of the endolymphatic sac in adult stage, and allowed, for the first time, the GFP-based identification of endolymphatic sac epithelial cells. Prox1 expression was observed in all parts of the endolymphatic sac epithelia. In intermediate portion of the endolymphatic sac, mitochondria-rich cells did not express Prox1, although ribosome-rich cells showed strong GFP labeling. The anatomical relationship between the endolymphatic sac and the surrounding vasculature was directly observed. In the endolymphatic sac, expression of Prox1 may suggest progenitor cell-like pluripotency or developmental similarity to systemic lymphatic vessels in other organs. This whole-mount imaging technique of the endolymphatic sac can be combined with other conventional histological, sectioning, and labeling techniques and will be very useful for future endolymphatic sac research.

  15. Ectopic over-expression of the maize beta-glucosidase Zm-p60.1 perturbs cytokinin homeostasis in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Nagavalli S; Polanská, Lenka; Fohlerová, Radka; Mazura, Pavel; Válková, Martina; Smeral, Miloslav; Zouhar, Jan; Malbeck, Jirí; Dobrev, Petre I; Machácková, Ivana; Brzobohaty, Bretislav

    2006-01-01

    The activity of the phytohormone cytokinin depends on a complex interplay of factors such as its metabolism, transport, stability, and cellular/tissue localization. O-glucosides of zeatin-type cytokinins are postulated to be storage and/or transport forms, and are readily deglucosylated. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) plants were constructed over-expressing Zm-p60.1, a maize beta-glucosidase capable of releasing active cytokinins from O- and N3-glucosides, to analyse its potential to perturb zeatin metabolism in planta. Zm-p60.1 in chloroplasts isolated from transgenic leaves has an apparent K(m) more than 10-fold lower than the purified enzyme in vitro. Adult transgenic plants grown in the absence of exogenous zeatin were morphologically indistinguishable from the wild type although differences in phytohormone levels were observed. When grown on medium containing zeatin, inhibition of root elongation was apparent in all seedlings 14 d after sowing (DAS). Between 14 and 21 DAS, the transgenic seedlings accumulated fresh weight leading later (28-32 DAS) to ectopic growths at the base of the hypocotyl. The development of ectopic structures correlated with the presence of the enzyme as demonstrated by histochemical staining. Cytokinin quantification showed that transgenic seedlings grown on medium containing zeatin accumulate active metabolites like zeatin riboside and zeatin riboside phosphate and this might lead to the observed changes. The presence of the enzyme around the base of the hypocotyl and later, in the ectopic structures themselves, suggests that the development of these structures is due to the perturbance in zeatin metabolism caused by the ectopic presence of Zm-p60.1.

  16. Crohn's disease adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonize and induce strong gut inflammation in transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Frédéric A; Barnich, Nicolas; Sivignon, Adeline; Darcha, Claude; Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2009-09-28

    Abnormal expression of CEACAM6 is observed at the apical surface of the ileal epithelium in Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and CD ileal lesions are colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC). We investigated the ability of AIEC reference strain LF82 to colonize the intestinal mucosa and to induce inflammation in CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAMs. AIEC LF82 virulent bacteria, but not nonpathogenic E. coli K-12, were able to persist in the gut of CEABAC10 transgenic mice and to induce severe colitis with reduced survival rate, marked weight loss, increased rectal bleeding, presence of erosive lesions, mucosal inflammation, and increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. The colitis depended on type 1 pili expression by AIEC bacteria and on intestinal CEACAM expression because no sign of colitis was observed in transgenic mice infected with type 1 pili-negative LF82-Delta fimH isogenic mutant or in wild-type mice infected with AIEC LF82 bacteria. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that in CD patients having an abnormal intestinal expression of CEACAM6, AIEC bacteria via type 1 pili expression can colonize the intestinal mucosa and induce gut inflammation. Thus, targeting AIEC adhesion to gut mucosa represents a new strategy for clinicians to prevent and/or to treat ileal CD.

  17. Lymphatic dysfunction in transgenic mice expressing KSHV k-cyclin under the control of the VEGFR-3 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Makoto; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yang, Aparche; Starost, Matthew F; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Atkins, April M; Borris, Debra L; Hanan, Elisabeth A; Schimel, Daniel; Bryant, Mark A; Roberts, Nicole; Skobe, Mihaela; Staskus, Katherine A; Kaldis, Philipp; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2005-03-15

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infects endothelial cells within KS tumors, and these cells express the KSHV latent-cycle gene k-cyclin (kCYC) as well as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3), a marker for lymphatic endothelium. To further understand KSHV-mediated pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing kCYC under the control of the VEGFR-3 promoter. kCYC mRNA and functional protein expression within tissue correlated with VEGFR-3 expression and were most abundantly detected within lung tissue. Clinically, most transgenic mice died within 6 months of age secondary to progressive accumulation of chylous pleural fluid. In skin, edema was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and mice demonstrated persistent erythema of the ears following trauma. Histologically, erythematous skin showed extravasation of erythrocytes and accumulation of erythrocytes within lymphatic lumens. In addition, lymphatic drainage of injected contrast dyes was markedly impaired in transgenic mice. Karyomegaly, a feature observed in kCYC-expressing cells in vitro, was detected in many tissues, and selectively occurred within lymphatic endothelial cells expressing kCYC mRNA by in situ hybridization. In summary, kCYC expression within VEGFR-3+ cells of mice causes marked impairment of lymphatic function. kCYC may contribute to the development of certain clinical and histologic features of KS, including localized edema and retention of extravasated erythrocytes within KS tumors.

  18. Induction of body weight loss through RNAi-knockdown of APOBEC1 gene expression in transgenic rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Jolivet

    Full Text Available In the search of new strategies to fight against obesity, we targeted a gene pathway involved in energy uptake. We have thus investigated the APOB mRNA editing protein (APOBEC1 gene pathway that is involved in fat absorption in the intestine. The APOB gene encodes two proteins, APOB100 and APOB48, via the editing of a single nucleotide in the APOB mRNA by the APOBEC1 enzyme. The APOB48 protein is mandatory for the synthesis of chylomicrons by intestinal cells to transport dietary lipids and cholesterol. We produced transgenic rabbits expressing permanently and ubiquitously a small hairpin RNA targeting the rabbit APOBEC1 mRNA. These rabbits exhibited a moderately but significantly reduced level of APOBEC1 gene expression in the intestine, a reduced level of editing of the APOB mRNA, a reduced level of synthesis of chylomicrons after a food challenge, a reduced total mass of body lipids and finally presented a sustained lean phenotype without any obvious physiological disorder. Interestingly, no compensatory mechanism opposed to the phenotype. These lean transgenic rabbits were crossed with transgenic rabbits expressing in the intestine the human APOBEC1 gene. Double transgenic animals did not present any lean phenotype, thus proving that the intestinal expression of the human APOBEC1 transgene was able to counterbalance the reduction of the rabbit APOBEC1 gene expression. Thus, a moderate reduction of the APOBEC1 dependent editing induces a lean phenotype at least in the rabbit species. This suggests that the APOBEC1 gene might be a novel target for obesity treatment.

  19. Expression of endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) messenger (m) RNA in a GH-transgenic tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caelers, Antje; Maclean, Norman; Hwang, Gyulin; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    We have previously produced transgenic fish from crosses between a wild-type female tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and a G transgenic male. This line of growth-enhanced tilapia carries a single copy of a chinook salmon (s) growth hormone (GH) gene spliced to an ocean pout antifreeze promoter (OPA-FPcsGH) co-ligated to a carp beta-actin/lacZ reporter gene construct, integrated into the tilapia genome. Because little is known about the expression sites of transgenes, we have characterised the gene expression patterns of sGH and tilapia (t)GH in transgenic tilapia using a newly established real-time PCR to measure the absolute mRNA amounts of both hormones. The sGH gene, which was expected to be expressed mainly in liver, was also found to be expressed in other organs, such as gills, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, intestine and testes. However, in pituitary no sGH mRNA but only tGH mRNA was found. Tilapia GH mRNA in wild-type pituitary amounted to 226 +/- 30 pg/microg total RNA but in transgenics only to 187 +/- 43 pg/microg total RNA. Liver exhibited the highest level of sGH mRNA (8.3 +/- 2.5 pg/microg total RNA) but the extrahepatic sites expressed considerable amounts of sGH mRNA ranging from 4.1 +/- 2.0 pg/microg total RNA in gills to 0.2 +/- 0.08 pg/microg total RNA in kidney. The widespread expression of the sGH gene is assumed to be due to the tissue specificity of the type III AFP gene promoter. It is assumed that our transgenic experiments, which in contrast to some other approaches caused no obvious organ abnormalities, mimick the GH expression during ontogeny. Because sGH mRNA is expressed both in liver and in extrahepatic sites it may not only promote secretion and release of liver-derived (endocrine) IGF-I leading to an overall growth enhancement but also stimulate IGF-I expression within the different organs in a paracrine/autocrine manner and, thus, further promote organ growth.

  20. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops.

  1. Improvement of pest resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA of an insect-associated gene EcR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Qi Zhu

    Full Text Available The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield loss and pesticide utilization has been successful in the past three decades. Recently, transgenic plant expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA targeting pest genes emerges as a promising strategy for improving pest resistance in crops. The steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E, predominately controls insect molting via its nuclear receptor complex, EcR-USP. Here we report that pest resistance is improved in transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA of EcR from the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, a serious lepidopteran pest for a variety of crops. When H. armigera larvae were fed with the whole transgenic tobacco plants expressing EcR dsRNA, resistance to H. armigera was significantly improved in transgenic plants. Meanwhile, when H. armigera larvae were fed with leaves of transgenic tobacco plants expressing EcR dsRNA, its EcR mRNA level was dramatically decreased causing molting defects and larval lethality. In addition, the transgenic tobacco plants expressing H. armigera EcR dsRNA were also resistant to another lepidopteran pest, the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, due to the high similarity in the nucleotide sequences of their EcR genes. This study provides additional evidence that transgenic plant expressing dsRNA targeting insect-associated genes is able to improve pest resistance.

  2. Transgenic expression of an expanded (GCG)13 repeat PABPN1 leads to weakness and coordination defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Patrick; Shanmugam, Vijayalakshmi; Gaspar, Claudia; Messaed, Christiane; Meijer, Inge; Toulouse, André; Laganiere, Janet; Roussel, Julie; Rochefort, Daniel; Laganiere, Simon; Allen, Carol; Karpati, George; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Brais, Bernard; Rouleau, Guy A

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset disorder caused by a (GCG)n trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A) binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, which in turn leads to an expanded polyalanine tract in the protein. We generated transgenic mice expressing either the wild type or the expanded form of human PABPN1, and transgenic animals with the expanded form showed clear signs of abnormal limb clasping, muscle weakness, coordination deficits, and peripheral nerves alterations. Analysis of mitotic and postmitotic tissues in those transgenic animals revealed ubiquitinated PABPN1-positive intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in neuronal cells. This latter observation led us to test and confirm the presence of similar INIs in postmortem brain sections from an OPMD patient. Our results indicate that expanded PABPN1, presumably via the toxic effects of its polyalanine tract, can lead to inclusion formation and neurodegeneration in both the mouse and the human.

  3. Cadmium resistance in transgenic tobacco plants enhanced by expressing bean heavy metal-responsive gene PvSR2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI; Tuanyao; (柴团耀); CHEN; Qiong; (陈琼); ZHANG; Yuxiu; (张玉秀); DONG; Juan; (董娟); AN; Chengcai; (安成才)

    2003-01-01

    PvSR2 (Phaseolus vulgaris stress-related gene) has been cloned from French bean and shown to be expressed specifically upon heavy metal treatment. In order to investigate the role of PvSR2 in plant, PvSR2 gene under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was introduced into tobacco mediated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404. The regenerated plantlets were selected on medium with 100 mg/L kanamycin. PCR and Southern blot analysis showed PvSR2 gene was integrated in tobacco genome. Gus and Northern blot analysis indicated PvSR2 gene was expressed in transgenic seedling. The heavy metal resistance assay showed that the transgenic tobacco seedlings with the PvSR2 coding sequence exhibited higher tolerance to Cd compared with wild-type (WT) under Cd exposure. The Cd content accumulated in root between transgenic and WT seedlings had no obvious difference at lower Cd external concentration (0.05-0.075 mmol/L CdCl2), whereas transgenic plant showed a lower root Cd content than the control at higher external Cd concentration (0.1 mmol/L CdCl2). These results suggested that the expression of PvSR2 can enhance the Cd tolerance, and PvSR2 may be involved in Cd transportation and accumulation at the test concentration of 0.1 mmol/L Cd.

  4. Sustained and promoter dependent bone morphogenetic protein expression by rat mesenchymal stem cells after BMP-2 transgene electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ferreira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with electrotransferred bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 transgene is an attractive therapeutic modality for the treatment of large bone defects: it provides both stem cells with the ability to form bone and an effective bone inducer while avoiding viral gene transfer. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of the promoter driving the human BMP-2 gene on the level and duration of BMP-2 expression after transgene electrotransfer into rat MSCs. Cytomegalovirus, elongation factor-1α, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and beta-actin promoters resulted in a BMP-2 secretion rate increase of 11-, 78-, 66- and 36-fold over respective controls, respectively. In contrast, the osteocalcin promoter had predictable weak activity in undifferentiated MSCs but induced the strongest BMP-2 secretion rates in osteoblastically-differentiated MSCs. Regardless of the promoter driving the transgene, a plateau of maximal BMP-2 secretion persisted for at least 21 d after the hBMP-2 gene electrotransfer. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of gene electrotransfer for efficient BMP-2 transgene delivery into MSCs and for a three-week sustained BMP-2 expression. It also provides the first in vitro evidence for a safe alternative to viral methods that permit efficient BMP-2 gene delivery and expression in MSCs but raise safety concerns that are critical when considering clinical applications.

  5. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Mana; Wakasa, Yuhya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Hirota, Tomoya; Kondo, Yuya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the recognition of self proteins secluded in arthritic joints. We previously reported that altered peptide ligands (APLs) of type II collagen (CII256-271) suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we generated transgenic rice expressing CII256-271 and APL6 contained in fusion proteins with the rice storage protein glutelin in the seed endosperm. These transgene products successfully and stably accumulated at high levels (7-24 mg/g seeds) in protein storage vacuoles (PB-II) of mature seeds. We examined the efficacy of these transgenic rice seeds by performing oral administration of the seeds to CIA model mice that had been immunized with CII. Treatment with APL6 transgenic rice for 14 days significantly inhibited the development of arthritis (based on clinical score) and delayed disease onset during the early phase of arthritis. These effects were mediated by the induction of IL-10 from CD4(+ ) CD25(-) T cells against CII antigen in splenocytes and inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs), and treatment of APL had no effect on the production of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-2 or Foxp3(+) Treg cells. These findings suggest that abnormal immune suppressive mechanisms are involved in the therapeutic effect of rice-based oral vaccine expressing high levels of APLs of type II collagen on the autoimmune disease CIA, suggesting that the seed-based mucosal vaccine against CIA functions via a unique mechanism.

  6. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  7. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Hong; Wang, Yong; He, Hua-Gang; Li, Xue; Song, Wan; Du, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress. The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions, while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity. Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity. The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions, whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings. Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings, whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  8. Serotonin accumulation in transgenic rice by over-expressing tryptophan decarboxylase results in a dark brown phenotype and stunted growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanaphachoat, Parawee; Wei, Bi-Yin; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Wang, I-Wen; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Yu, Su-May; Yen, Ming-Liang; Chiu, Sheng-Hsien; Lai, Chien-Chen; Chen, Liang-Jwu

    2012-04-01

    A mutant M47286 with a stunted growth, low fertility and dark-brown phenotype was identified from a T-DNA-tagged rice mutant library. This mutant contained a copy of the T-DNA tag inserted at the location where the expression of two putative tryptophan decarboxylase genes, TDC-1 and TDC-3, were activated. Enzymatic assays of both recombinant proteins showed tryptophan decarboxylase activities that converted tryptophan to tryptamine, which could be converted to serotonin by a constitutively expressed tryptamine 5' hydroxylase (T5H) in rice plants. Over-expression of TDC-1 and TDC-3 in transgenic rice recapitulated the stunted growth, darkbrown phenotype and resulted in a low fertility similar to M47286. The degree of stunted growth and dark-brown color was proportional to the expression levels of TDC-1 and TDC-3. The levels of tryptamine and serotonin accumulation in these transgenic rice lines were also directly correlated with the expression levels of TDC-1 and TDC-3. A mass spectrometry assay demonstrated that the darkbrown leaves and hulls in the TDC-overexpressing transgenic rice were caused by the accumulation of serotonin dimer and that the stunted growth and low fertility were also caused by the accumulation of serotonin and serotonin dimer, but not tryptamine. These results represent the first evidence that over-expression of TDC results in stunted growth, low fertility and the accumulation of serotonin, which when converted to serotonin dimer, leads to a dark brown plant color.

  9. Novel oxytocin gene expression in the hindbrain is induced by alcohol exposure: transgenic zebrafish enable visualization of sensitive neurons.

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    Caitrín M Coffey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD are a collection of disorders resulting from fetal ethanol exposure, which causes a wide range of physical, neurological and behavioral deficits including heightened susceptibility for alcoholism and addictive disorders. While a number of mechanisms have been proposed for how ethanol exposure disrupts brain development, with selective groups of neurons undergoing reduced proliferation, dysfunction and death, the induction of a new neurotransmitter phenotype by ethanol exposure has not yet been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effects of embryonic and larval ethanol exposure on brain development were visually monitored using transgenic zebrafish expressing cell-specific green fluorescent protein (GFP marker genes. Specific subsets of GFP-expressing neurons were highly sensitive to ethanol exposure, but only during defined developmental windows. In the med12 mutant, which affects the Mediator co-activator complex component Med12, exposure to lower concentrations of ethanol was sufficient to reduce GFP expression in transgenic embryos. In transgenic embryos and larva containing GFP driven by an oxytocin-like (oxtl promoter, ethanol exposure dramatically up-regulated GFP expression in a small group of hindbrain neurons, while having no effect on expression in the neuroendocrine preoptic area. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol exposure during limited embryonic periods impedes the development of specific, identifiable groups of neurons, and the med12 mutation sensitizes these neurons to the deleterious effects of ethanol. In contrast, ethanol exposure induces oxtl expression in the hindbrain, a finding with profound implications for understanding alcoholism and other addictive disorders.

  10. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic Leymus chinensis plants with constitutively expressed wheat TaLEA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shuangyan; Liu, Gongshe

    2009-02-01

    Leymus chinensis is an important grassland perennial grass. However, its drought tolerance requires to be improved. LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) genes are believed to confer resistance to drought and water deficiency. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, a wheat LEA gene, TaLEA(3), was integrated into L. chinensis. The transgenic lines showed enhanced growth ability under drought stress during which transgenic lines had increased the relative water content, leaf water potential, relative average growth rate, but decreased the malondialdehyde content compared with the non-transgenic plant. Thus, transgenic breeding is an efficient approach to enhance drought tolerance in L. chinensis.

  11. mRNA Expression of Vimentin Gene in Lens of Transgenic Mouse and DNA Amplification in Human Cataracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanLi; XienpingLiu; 等

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate the role of vimentin gene in cataractogenesis.Methods:The12.7kb chicken vimentin genes were microinjected into the male pronuclei of 918 fertilized mice eggs.841injected embryos were transferred into oviducts of pseudopregnant recipient females.of which 12pregnant mice gave birth to 49offsping mice.The integration and expression of exogenous gene in the offsping were analysed by Southern and Northern blot byhridizations,In the human senile cataract,the lens vimentin gene was analyzed with the chicken vi-mentin gene probe.Results:It showed that four of F1offspring were transgenic mice in which the chicken vimenttin gene was integrated in their genomes.The transgenic band was12kb,similar to the12.7kb chicken vimentin fragment injected.One2kbvi-mentin mRNAwas visualized on E2 mouse lens blot.which revealed that the chicken vimentin gene was efficiently expressed in this transgenic mouse.In the humansenile cataract lens,12kb BamHI-restricted vimentin fragments displayed a stronger hybridization signal than that of the control lens in Southern blot anal-ysis,It implies that the Formation of human senile cataract may be associated with the amplification of vimentin gene.Conclusions:We have successfully developed four transgenic mice bearing chicken vimentin gene and having mRNA expression which can be used for further study.It is to be observed if the normal lens cell function is affected by the expressed product and cataract occurs in our transgenic mice.The cause of the gene ampli-fication in human ctaract remains for further investigation.Eye Science 1995;11:113-116.

  12. GFAP expression and social deficits in transgenic mice overexpressing human sAPPα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Antoinette R; Hou, Huayan; Song, Min; Obregon, Demian F; Portis, Samantha; Barger, Steven; Shytle, Doug; Stock, Saundra; Mori, Takashi; Sanberg, Paul G; Murphy, Tanya; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Autistic individuals display impaired social interactions and language, and restricted, stereotyped behaviors. Elevated levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), the product of α-secretase cleavage of APP, are found in the plasma of some individuals with autism. The sAPPα protein is neurotrophic and neuroprotective and recently showed a correlation to glial differentiation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) via the IL-6 pathway. Considering evidence of gliosis in postmortem autistic brains, we hypothesized that subsets of patients with autism would exhibit elevations in CNS sAPPα and mice generated to mimic this observation would display markers suggestive of gliosis and autism-like behavior. Elevations in sAPPα levels were observed in brains of autistic patients compared to controls. Transgenic mice engineered to overexpress human sAPPα (TgsAPPα mice) displayed hypoactivity, impaired sociability, increased brain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, and altered Notch1 and IL-6 levels. NSCs isolated from TgsAPPα mice, and those derived from wild-type mice treated with sAPPα, displayed suppressed β-tubulin III and elevated GFAP expression. These results suggest that elevations in brain sAPPα levels are observed in subsets of individuals with autism and TgsAPPα mice display signs suggestive of gliosis and behavioral impairment. PMID:23840007

  13. Disease-tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants expressing Ah-AMP gene of Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide gene from Amaranthus hypochondriacus, Ah-AMP, was amplified by PCR and cloned. Sequence analysis results revealed that this gene is 261 bp in length encoding a precursor polypeptide of 87 amino acid residues. Ah-AMP gene was inserted in the binary vector pBin438 to construct a plant expression vector pBinAH916. Leave explants of Nicotiana tabacum var. SR1 were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the above expression vector. Results from PCR, Southern and Northern blot analyses confirmed that the Ah-AMP gene had been integrated into the tobacco genome and was transcribed at mRNA level. Two bacterial-resistant transgenic plants were selected by inoculating the plants with Pseudomonas solanacearum and statistic analysis of two T1 lines showed that the resistance increased by 2.24 and 1.62 grade and the disease index decreased by 49.6% and 37.3% respectively when compared with the non-transformed control plants SR1. The results from challenging the plants with inoculums of Phytophthora parasitica showed that the symptom development was delayed and disease index was significantly reduced. These results suggest that Ah-AMP gene may be a potentially valuable gene for genetic engineering of plant for disease-resistance.

  14. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO XuDong; YANG DongShan; Ao XuDong; WU Xia; LI GuangPeng; WANG LingLing; BAO MingTao; XUE Lian; BOU ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal flbroblasta were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasta cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h.Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to Investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% va 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05).After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex-pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysta were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymeraee chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenlc somatic cell lines and positive trans-genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  15. Heterologous expression of a chloroplast outer envelope protein from Suaeda salsa confers oxidative stress tolerance and induces chloroplast aggregation in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Chun-Lin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhong, Nai-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Min; Han, Li-Bo; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2012-03-01

    Suaeda salsa is a euhalophytic plant that is tolerant to coastal seawater salinity. In this study, we cloned a cDNA encoding an 8.4 kDa chloroplast outer envelope protein (designated as SsOEP8) from S. salsa and characterized its cellular function. Steady-state transcript levels of SsOEP8 in S. salsa were up-regulated in response to oxidative stress. Consistently, ectopic expression of SsOEP8 conferred enhanced oxidative stress tolerance in transgenic Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) cells and Arabidopsis, in which H(2) O(2) content was reduced significantly in leaf cells. Further studies revealed that chloroplasts aggregated to the sides of mesophyll cells in transgenic Arabidopsis leaves, and this event was accompanied by inhibited expression of genes encoding proteins for chloroplast movements such as AtCHUP1, a protein involved in actin-based chloroplast positioning and movement. Moreover, organization of actin cytoskeleton was found to be altered in transgenic BY-2 cells. Together, these results suggest that SsOEP8 may play a critical role in oxidative stress tolerance by changing actin cytoskeleton-dependent chloroplast distribution, which may consequently lead to the suppressed production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts. One significantly novel aspect of this study is the finding that the small chloroplast envelope protein is involved in oxidative stress tolerance.

  16. The role of a retinoic acid response element in establishing the anterior neural expression border of Hoxd4 transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Christof; Amores, Angel; Nagy Kovács, Erzsébet; Postlethwait, John; Featherstone, Mark

    2003-03-01

    The zebrafish hoxd4a locus was compared to its murine ortholog, Hoxd4. The sequence of regulatory elements, including a DR5 type retinoic acid response element (RARE) required for Hoxd4 neural enhancer activity, are highly conserved. Additionally, zebrafish and mouse neural enhancers function identically in transgenic mouse embryos. We tested whether sequence conservation reflects functional importance by altering the spacing and sequence of the RARE in the Hoxd4 neural enhancer. Stabilizing receptor-DNA interactions did not anteriorize transgene expression. By contrast, conversion of the RARE from a DR5 to a DR2 type element decreased receptor-DNA stability and posteriorized expression. Hence, the setting of the Hox anterior expression border is not a simple function of the affinity of retinoid receptors for their cognate element.

  17. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

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    Vudem Dasavantha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice (Oryza sativa productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal, coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH, green leafhopper (GLH and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH. Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice

  18. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOU; ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO- Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%,P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex- pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neor genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive trans- genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  19. Expression of Autoactivated Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Glands of Transgenic Mice Leads to a Reactive Stroma During Early Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasset, N.; Lochter, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Lund, L.R.; Williams, D.R.; Behrendtsen, O.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-04-24

    Extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases play a key role in interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme during mammary gland development and disease. In patients with breast cancer, the mammary mesenchyme undergoes a stromal reaction, the etiology of which is unknown. We previously showed that targeting of an autoactivating mutant of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 to mammary epithelia of transgenic mice resulted in reduced mammary function during pregnancy and development of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Here we examine the cascade of alterations before breast tumor formation in the mammary gland stroma once the expression of the stromelysin-1 transgene commences. Beginning in postpubertal virgin animals, low levels of transgene expression in mammary epithelia led to increased expression of endogenous stromelysin-1 in stromal fibroblasts and up-regulation of other matrix metalloproteinases, without basement membrane disruption. These changes were accompanied by the progressive development of a compensatory reactive stroma, characterized by increased collagen content and vascularization in glands from virgin mice. This remodeling of the gland affected epithelial-mesenchymal communication as indicated by inappropriate expression of tenascin-C starting by day 6 of pregnancy. This, together with increased transgene expression, led to basement membrane disruption starting by day 15 of pregnancy. We propose that the highly reactive stroma provides a prelude to breast epithelial tumors observed in these animals. Epithelial development depends on an exquisite series of inductive and instructive interactions between the differentiating epithelium and the mesenchymal (stromal) compartment. The epithelium, which consists of luminal and myoepithelial cells, is separated from the stroma by a basement membrane (BM), which plays a central role in mammary gland homeostasis and gene expression. In vivo, stromal

  20. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongde; Polejaeva, Irina; Salgia, Ravi; Kao, Chien-Min; Chen, Chin-Tu; Chen, Guangchun; Chen, Liaohai

    2014-01-01

    Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF) cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D) was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency), hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  1. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Gong

    Full Text Available Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency, hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  2. Successful expression of a novel bacterial gene for pinoresinol reductase and its effect on lignan biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masayuki; Tsuji, Yukiko; Kusunose, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kamimura, Naofumi; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Fukuhara, Yuki; Hara, Hirofumi; Sato-Izawa, Kanna; Muranaka, Toshiya; Saito, Kazuki; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji; Kajita, Shinya

    2014-10-01

    Pinoresinol reductase and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase play important roles in an early step of lignan biosynthesis in plants. The activities of both enzymes have also been detected in bacteria. In this study, pinZ, which was first isolated as a gene for bacterial pinoresinol reductase, was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Higher reductive activity toward pinoresinol was detected in the resultant transgenic plants but not in wild-type plant. Principal component analysis of data from untargeted metabolome analyses of stem, root, and leaf extracts of the wild-type and two independent transgenic lines indicate that pinZ expression caused dynamic metabolic changes in stems, but not in roots and leaves. The metabolome data also suggest that expression of pinZ influenced the metabolisms of lignan and glucosinolates but not so much of neolignans such as guaiacylglycerol-8-O-4'-feruloyl ethers. In-depth quantitative analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated that amounts of pinoresinol and its glucoside form were markedly reduced in the transgenic plant, whereas the amounts of glucoside form of secoisolariciresinol in transgenic roots, leaves, and stems increased. The detected levels of lariciresinol in the transgenic plant following β-glucosidase treatment also tended to be higher than those in the wild-type plant. Our findings indicate that overexpression of pinZ induces change in lignan compositions and has a major effect not only on lignan biosynthesis but also on biosynthesis of other primary and secondary metabolites.

  3. A retinoic acid responsive Hoxa3 transgene expressed in embryonic pharyngeal endoderm, cardiac neural crest and a subdomain of the second heart field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Y S-G Diman

    Full Text Available A transgenic mouse line harbouring a β-galacdosidase reporter gene controlled by the proximal 2 kb promoter of Hoxa3 was previously generated to investigate the regulatory cues governing Hoxa3 expression in the mouse. Examination of transgenic embryos from embryonic day (E 8.0 to E15.5 revealed regionally restricted reporter activity in the developing heart. Indeed, transgene expression specifically delineated cells from three distinct lineages: a subpopulation of the second heart field contributing to outflow tract myocardium, the cardiac neural crest cells and the pharyngeal endoderm. Manipulation of the Retinoic Acid (RA signaling pathway showed that RA is required for correct expression of the transgene. Therefore, this transgenic line may serve as a cardiosensor line of particular interest for further analysis of outflow tract development.

  4. A Retinoic Acid Responsive Hoxa3 Transgene Expressed in Embryonic Pharyngeal Endoderm, Cardiac Neural Crest and a Subdomain of the Second Heart Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diman, Nata Y. S.-G.; Remacle, Sophie; Bertrand, Nicolas; Picard, Jacques J.; Zaffran, Stéphane; Rezsohazy, René

    2011-01-01

    A transgenic mouse line harbouring a β-galacdosidase reporter gene controlled by the proximal 2 kb promoter of Hoxa3 was previously generated to investigate the regulatory cues governing Hoxa3 expression in the mouse. Examination of transgenic embryos from embryonic day (E) 8.0 to E15.5 revealed regionally restricted reporter activity in the developing heart. Indeed, transgene expression specifically delineated cells from three distinct lineages: a subpopulation of the second heart field contributing to outflow tract myocardium, the cardiac neural crest cells and the pharyngeal endoderm. Manipulation of the Retinoic Acid (RA) signaling pathway showed that RA is required for correct expression of the transgene. Therefore, this transgenic line may serve as a cardiosensor line of particular interest for further analysis of outflow tract development. PMID:22110697

  5. A comparative expression analysis of gene transcripts in brain tissue of non-transgenic and GH-transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio using a DDRT-PCR approach

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    Fernanda A. Alves-Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of higher level of exogenous growth hormone (GH in transgenic animals could lead to several physiological alterations. A GH transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio line was compared to nontransgenic (NT samples of the species through a DDRT-PCR approach, with the goal of identifying candidate differentially expressed transcripts in brain tissues that could be involved in GH overexpression. Densitometric analyses of two selected amplification products, p300 and ADCY2, pointed to a significant lower gene expression in the transgenic zebrafish (104.02 ± 57.71; 224.10 ± 91.73 when compared to NT samples (249.75 ± 30.08; 342.95 ± 65.19. The present data indicate that p300 and ADCY2 are involved in a regulation system for GH when high circulating levels of this hormone are found in zebrafishes.A presença de níveis mais elevados do hormônio de crescimento (GH em animais transgênicos poderia levar a várias alterações fisiológicas. Uma linhagem transgênica de paulistinha (Danio rerio para o GH foi comparada com amostras não transgênicas (NT desta espécie, através de uma abordagem de DDRT-PCR, com o objetivo de identificar transcritos candidatos diferencialmente expressos em tecido cerebral que poderiam estar envolvidos na superexpressão de GH. Análises densitométricas de dois produtos de amplificação selecionados, p300 e ADCY2, apontaram uma expressão gênica significativamente menor nas amostras transgênicas de paulistinha (104.02 ± 57.71; 224.10 ± 91.73, quando comparadas com as amostras NT (249.75 ± 30.08; 342.95±65.19. Os presentes dados indicam que p300 e ADCY2 estão envolvidos em um sistema de regulação do GH, quando altos níveis circulantes desse hormônio são encontrados em paulistinha.

  6. Expression of a methionine-rich storage albumin from the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K., Lecythidaceae in transgenic bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aragão F.J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, an important component in the diet of people in developing countries, has low levels of the essential amino acid, methionine. We have attempted to correct this deficiency by introducing a transgene coding for a methionine-rich storage albumin from the Brazil nut via biolistic methods. The transgene's coding sequence was driven by a doubled 35S CaMV promoter and AMV enhancer sequences. The transgene was stable and correctly expressed in homozygous R2 to R5 seeds. In two of the five transgenic lines the methionine content was significantly increased (14 and 23% over the values found in untransformed plants.

  7. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Expression of antimicrobial peptides thanatin(S) in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingquan; Tang, Dingzhong; Chen, Weida; Huang, Hexun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yongfang

    2013-09-15

    Thanatin(S) is an analog of thanatin, an insect antimicrobial peptide possessing strong and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. In order to investigate if the thanatin could be used in engineering transgenic plants for increased resistance against phytopathogens, the synthetic thanatin(S) was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants. To increase the expression level of thanatin(S) in plants, the coding sequence was optimized by plant-preference codon. To avoid cellular protease degradation, signal peptide of rice Cht1 was fused to N terminal of thanatin(S) for secreting the expressed thanatin(S) into intercellular spaces. To evaluate the application value of thanatin(S) in plant disease control, the synthesized coding sequence of Cht1 signal peptide (Cht1SP)-thanatin(S) was ligated to plant gateway destination binary vectors pGWB11 (with FLAG tag). Meanwhile, in order to observe the subcellular localization of Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP, the sequences of Cht1SP-thanatin(S) and thanatin(S) were respectively linked to pGWB5 (with GFP tag). The constructs were transformed into Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 and mutant pad4-1 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformants with Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion gene were analyzed by genomic PCR, real-time PCR, and western blots and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants introduced respectively Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP and thanatin(S)-GFP were observed by confocal microscopy. Transgenic plants expressing Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-FLAG fusion protein showed antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and powdery mildew, as well as antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. And the results from confocal observation showed that the GFP signal from Cht1SP-thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic Arabidopsis plants occurred mainly in intercellular space, while that from thanatin(S)-GFP transgenic plants was mainly detected in the cytoplasm and that from empty vector transgenic plants was distributed

  9. Human lysozyme expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic dairy goats can inhibit the growth of bacteria that cause mastitis and the cold-spoilage of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Elizabeth A; Cullor, James S; Smith, Wayne; Anderson, Gary B; Murray, James D

    2006-01-01

    The addition of human milk components with intrinsic antimicrobial activity to livestock milk by genetic engineering has the potential to benefit milk safety and production as well as the health of the lactating animal. As a model for the dairy cow, we generated transgenic goats that expressed human lysozyme in their milk at 68% of the levels found in human milk. Milk from these transgenic animals had a bacteriostatic effect on both in vitro and in vivo growth of several microorganisms important to the dairy industry. In vitro, milk from transgenic animals was capable of slowing the growth of mastitis-causing strains of Escherichia coli (P transgenic animals. In vivo, milk from transgenic animals supported less bacterial growth than control milk. This transgenic model demonstrates the possibilities offered by genetic engineering to enhance the antimicrobial nature of milk and the udder.

  10. Targeted expression of human FSH receptor Asp567Gly mutant mRNA in testis of transgenic mice: role of human FSH receptor promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VerenaNordhoff; JorgGromoll; LucaFoppiani; C.MarcLuetjens; StefanSchlatt; ElenaKostova; IlpoHuhtaniemi; EberhardNieschlag; ManuelaSimoni

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To specifically express the Asp567Gly human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) under the control of its promoter to evaluate the phenotypic consequences in the presence of normal pituitary function.Methods:We produced transgenic mice overexpressing the Asp567Gly human FSHR under the control of a 1.5kb 5’-flanking region fragment of its promoter.Results: Mice were phenotypically normal and fertile.In males,mRNA could be detected in the testis and the brain, indicating that the 1.5kb promoter fragment drives expression not only in the gonads. The testis weight/body weight ratio and the testosterone levels in transgenic and non-transgenic littermates were similar. By in situ hybridisation we found that the transgenic FSHR was highly expressed in Sertoli cells,spermatocytes and round spermatids. However, a radioligand receptor assay failed to show a significant difference in total FSHR binding sites in testis homogenates of transgenic and wild type animals, suggesting that the transgenic FSHR is probably not translated into functional receptor protein. Conclusion: A 1.5kb 5"-region of the human FSHR drives mRNA expression of the transgene in the testis but leads to ectopic expression in germ cells and in the brain. No phenotypic consequences could be documented due to the lack of protein expression.

  11. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots.

  12. Cloning and expression of transgenes using linear vectors in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, María de Los Ángeles; Lorenzi, Hernán A; Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Souza, Renata T; Levin, Mariano J; Da Silveira, José Franco; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2014-06-01

    The identification of new targets for vaccine and drug development for the treatment of Chagas' disease is dependent on deepening our understanding of the parasite genome. Vectors for genetic manipulation in Trypanosoma cruzi basically include those that remain as circular episomes and those that integrate into the parasite's genome. Artificial chromosomes are alternative vectors to overcome problematic transgene expression often occurring with conventional vectors in this parasite. We have constructed a series of vectors named pTACs (Trypanosome Artificial Chromosomes), all of them carrying telomeric and subtelomeric sequences and genes conferring resistance to different selection drugs. In addition, one pTAC harbours a modified GFP gene (pTAC-gfp), and another one carries the ornithine decarboxilase gene from Crithidia fasciculata (pTAC-odc). We have encountered artificial chromosomes generated from pTACs in transformed T. cruzi epimastigotes for every version of the designed vectors. These extragenomic elements, in approximately 6-8 copies per cell, remained as linear episomes, contained telomeres and persisted after 150 and 60 generations with or without selection drugs, respectively. The linear molecules remained stable through the different T. cruzi developmental forms. Furthermore, derived artificial chromosomes from pTAC-odc could complement the auxotrophy of T. cruzi for polyamines. Our results show that pTACs constitute useful tools for reverse functional genetics in T. cruzi that will contribute to a better understanding of T. cruzi biology.

  13. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  14. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and neural stem cell (NSC lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Cerbini

    Full Text Available Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs. The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  15. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and neural stem cell (NSC) lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  16. Synaptophysin expression in motor neurons of transgenic mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Dawei Zang; Surindar Cheema

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Affected signal convection of synaptophysin on motor neurons may Cause injury of motor neurons and then induce neurodegeneration and cell death in the end.OBJECTTVE: To investigate the number and density of synaptophysin on motor neurons in the anterior horn of lumbar spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex of the transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS).DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTTNG: Brain Injury and Repair Group, HFI Institute of Melbourne University.MATERIALS: Transgenic mice expressing a mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1) were taken as ALS group (n =36), while those dedved from the B6SJL-TgN gene line were taken as control group (n =36),according to the difference of gender and three postnatal time points (postnatal 60, 90 and 120 days), twelve mice of either gender were allocated in each subgroup.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Brain Injury and Repair Group, HFI Institute of Melbourne University from November 2003 to June 2004. ① Fluorogold labeling was used for the motor neurons in the lumbar and sensorimotor cortex. ② Immunofluorescence was applied for the labeling of synaptophysin; positive control sections were represented by adding the synaptophysin antibody and the staining, showing a positive result. For negative controls, the synaptophysin antibody was omitted. ③ Stereological counting system was adopted in the statistical analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Fluorogold labeling of motor neurons; ② number of synaptophysin on the motor neurons.RESULTS: ① Fluorogold labeling of motor neurons: The motor neurons in the lumbar and sensorimotor cortex were clearly labeled by fluorogold under the detection of fluorescent microscope. ② The number of synaptophysin on the motor neurons: The number statistically decreased at the mid stage (postnatal 90 days)and late stage (postnatal 120 days) [motor neuron somas at lumbar spinal cord: (0.75±0.06), (0.59±0.09)/μm;motor neuron

  17. Borna disease virus accelerates inflammation and disease associated with transgenic expression of interleukin-12 in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freude, Susanna; Hausmann, Jürgen; Hofer, Markus; Pham-Mitchell, Ngan; Campbell, Iain L; Staeheli, Peter; Pagenstecher, Axel

    2002-12-01

    Targeted expression of biologically active interleukin-12 (IL-12) in astrocytes of the central nervous system (CNS) results in spontaneous neuroimmunological disease of aged mice. Borna disease virus (BDV) can readily multiply in the mouse CNS but does not trigger disease in most strains. Here we show that a large percentage of IL-12 transgenic mice developed severe ataxia within 5 to 10 weeks after infection with BDV. By contrast, no disease developed in mock-infected IL-12 transgenic and wild-type mice until 4 months of age. Neurological symptoms were rare in infected wild-type animals, and if they occurred, these were milder and appeared later. Histological analyses showed that the cerebellum of infected IL-12 transgenic mice, which is the brain region with strongest transgene expression, contained large numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as lower numbers of B cells, whereas other parts of the CNS showed only mild infiltration by lymphocytes. The cerebellum of diseased mice further showed severe astrogliosis, calcifications and signs of neurodegeneration. BDV antigen and nucleic acids were present in lower amounts in the inflamed cerebellum of infected transgenic mice than in the noninflamed cerebellum of infected wild-type littermates, suggesting that IL-12 or IL-12-induced cytokines exhibited antiviral activity. We propose that BDV infection accelerates the frequency by which immune cells such as lymphocytes and NK cells enter the CNS and then respond to IL-12 present in the local milieu causing disease. Our results illustrate that infection of the CNS with a virus that is benign in certain hosts can be harmful in such normally disease-resistant hosts if the tissue is unfavorably preconditioned by proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Construction of chimeric inducible promoters by elicitors of rice fungal blast pathogen and their expression in transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The promoter fragments of wheat GstA1 and potato Gst1 have been amplified by PCR, cloned and fused respectively to the minimal promoter sequence of rice actin gene (Act1)) and its 5′ untranslated leader sequence together with GUS. The constructs with 2 chimeric promoters (WGA and PGA) have been transferred into rice in order to analyze their inducibility patterns in transgenic rice plants. The results show that: WGA and PGA are both inducible by elicitors of Pyricularia oryzae in transgenic rice cells; the intronⅠ of rice Act1 gene is important for the heterogenic expression of monocot and dicot promoter elements in rice; and the Act1 minimal promoter and its 5′untranslated leader sequence produced low level background expression in rice.

  19. Cell-type-specific expression and regulation of a c-fos-NGF fusion gene in neurons and astrocytes of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onténiente, B; Horellou, P; Neveu, I; Makeh, I; Suzuki, F; Bourdet, C; Grimber, G; Colin, P; Brachet, P; Mallet, J

    1994-02-01

    A mouse line transgenic for nerve growth factor (NGF) was developed using the mouse prepro-NGF cDNA inserted within a plasmid containing the proximal region (-10 to -550 bp) of the c-fos promoter and the transcription termination and polyadenylation signals of the rabbit beta-globin gene. No significant modification of gross behavior or central nervous system anatomy was detected in adult animals as assessed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for NGF and choline acetyltransferase. The expression of the transgene and the possible regulation of its expression by agents acting on the promoter were investigated in vitro. Despite the presence of an additional pool of NGF mRNA specific to the transgene, basal levels of NGF in the supernatant of transgenic astrocytes were similar to normal ones. On the other hand, transgenic neurons spontaneously synthesized and released levels of NGF two to three times higher than normal neurons, while mRNA levels were barely detectable by conventional Northern blotting. The tissue-specificity of NGF expression was respected, with higher levels in hippocampal than neocortical neurons. Increases of NGF mRNA by agents acting on the promoter could be observed in normal and transgenic astrocytes only after inhibition of the protein synthesis by cycloheximide, suggesting a similar rapid turnover of normal and transgenic transcripts. Cyclic AMP agonists specifically increased the secretion of NGF protein by transgenic astrocytes and neurons, while activators of the protein kinase C had a similar effect on transgenic and normal cells. Differences between amounts of NGF secreted by neurons and astrocytes with regards to their respective content in mRNA suggest that transgenic transcripts are subject to normal cell- and tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulations. Agents acting on the c-fos promoter through the protein kinase C or cyclic AMP routes differentially increased the secretion of NGF by transgenic astrocytes or

  20. Expression of hIGF-I in the silk glands of transgenic silkworms and in transformed silkworm cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To express human insulin-like growth factor-I (hIGF-I) in transformed Bombyx mori cultured cells and silk glands, the transgenic vector pigA3GFP-hIGF-ie-neo was constructed with a neomycin resistance gene driven by the baculovirus ie-1 promoter, and with the hIGF-I gene under the control of the silkworm sericin promoter Ser-1. The stably transformed BmN cells expressing hIGF-I were selected by using the antibiotic G418 at a final concentration of 700-800 μg/mL after the BmN cells were transfected with the piggyBac vector and the helper plasmid. The specific band of hIGF-I was detected in the transformed cells by Western blot. The expression level of hIGF-I, determined by ELISA, was about 7800 pg in 5×105 cells. Analysis of the chromosomal insertion sites by inverse PCR showed that exogenous DNA could be inserted into the cell genome randomly or at TTAA target sequence specifically for piggyBac element transposition. The transgenic vector pigA3GFP-hIGF-ie-neo was transferred into the eggs using sperm-mediated gene transfer. Finally, two transgenic silkworms were obtained after screening for the neo and gfp genes and verified by PCR and dot hybridization. The expression level of hIGF-I determined by ELISA was about 2440 pg/g of silk gland of the transgenic silkworms of the G1 generation.

  1. Alteration of Methamphetamine-induced stereotypic behaviour in transgenic mice expressing HIV-1 envelope protein gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amanda J; Maung, Ricky; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Ake, Christopher; Kaul, Marcus

    2010-02-15

    The use of drugs for recreational purposes, in particular Methamphetamine, is associated with an increased risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. HIV-1 infection in turn can lead to HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND) that range from mild cognitive and motor impairment to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Interestingly, post mortem brain specimens from HAD patients and transgenic (tg) mice expressing the viral envelope protein gp120 in the central nervous system display similar neuropathological signs. In HIV patients, the use of Methamphetamine appears to aggravate neurocognitive alterations. In the present study, we injected HIV/gp120tg mice and non-transgenic littermate control animals with Methamphetamine dissolved in Saline or Saline vehicle and assessed locomotion and stereotyped behaviour. We found that HIVgp120-transgenic mice differ significantly from non-transgenic controls in certain domains of their behavioural response to Methamphetamine. Thus this experimental model system may be useful to further study the mechanistic interaction of both the viral envelope protein and the psychostimulant drug in behavioural alterations and neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Embryo-specific expression of soybean oleosin altered oil body morphogenesis and increased lipid content in transgenic rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen Xian; Liu, Hua Liang; Qu, Le Qing

    2013-09-01

    Oleosin is the most abundant protein in the oil bodies of plant seeds, playing an important role in regulating oil body formation and lipid accumulation. To investigate whether lipid accumulation in transgenic rice seeds depends on the expression level of oleosin, we introduced two soybean oleosin genes encoding 24 kDa proteins into rice under the control of an embryo-specific rice promoter REG-2. Overexpression of soybean oleosin in transgenic rice leads to an increase of seed lipid content up to 36.93 and 46.06 % higher than that of the non-transgenic control, respectively, while the overall fatty acid profiles of triacylglycerols remained unchanged. The overexpression of soybean oleosin in transgenic rice seeds resulted in more numerous and smaller oil bodies compared with wild type, suggesting that an inverse relationship exists between oil body size and the total oleosin level. The increase in lipid content is accompanied by a reduction in the accumulation of total seed protein. Our results suggest that it is possible to increase rice seed oil content for food use and for use as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel by overexpressing oleosin in rice seeds.

  3. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  4. Transgenic Expression of a Functional Fragment of Harpin Protein Hpa1 in Wheat Represses English Grain Aphid Infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Man-yu; ZHOU Ting; ZHAO Yan-ying; LI Jia-bao; XU Heng; DONG Han-song; ZHANG Chun-ling

    2014-01-01

    The harpin protein Hpa1 produced by the rice bacterial blight pathogen promotes plant growth and induces plant resistance to pathogens and insect pests. The region of 10-42 residues (Hpa110-42) in the Hpa1 sequence is critical as the isolated Hpa110-42 fragment is 1.3-7.5-fold more effective than the full length in inducing plant growth and resistance. Here we report that transgenic expression of Hpa110-42 in wheat induces resistance to English grain aphid, a dominant species of wheat aphids. Hpa110-42-induced resistance is effective to inhibit the aphid behavior in plant preference at the initial colonization stage and repress aphid performances in the reproduction, nymph growth, and instar development on transgenic plants. The resistance characters are correlated with enhanced expression of defense-regulatory genes (EIN2, PP2-A, and GSL10) and consistent with induced expression of defense response genes (Hel, PDF1.2, PR-1b, and PR-2b). As a result, aphid infestations are alleviated in transgenic plants. The level of Hpa110-42-induced resistance in regard to repression of aphid infestations is equivalent to the effect of chemical control provided by an insecticide. These results suggested that the defensive role of Hpa110-42 can be integrated into breeding germplasm of the agriculturally signiifcant crop with a great potential of the agricultural application.

  5. Dopaminergic neuronal loss, reduced neurite complexity and autophagic abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing G2019S mutant LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramonet

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD.

  6. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Geisler, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Safety and in vivo Expression of a GNE-Transgene: A Novel Treatment Approach for Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha P. Phadke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy-2 (HIBM2 is an adult-onset, muscular disease caused by mutations in the GNE gene. HIBM2-associated GNE mutations causing hyposialyation have been proposed to contribute to reduced muscle function in patients with HIBM2, though the exact cause of this disease is unknown. In the current studies we examined pre-clinical in vivo toxicity, and expression of the plasmid-based, CMV driven wild-type GNE plasmid vector. The plasmid vector was injected intramuscularly (IM or systemically (IV into BALB/c mice, following encapsulation in a cationic liposome (DOTAP:Cholesterol. Single IM injections of the GNE-lipoplex at 40 μg did not produce overt toxicity or deaths, indicating that the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL dose for IM injection was ≥40 μg. Single intravenous (IV infusion of GNE-lipoplex was lethal in 33% of animals at 100 μg dose, with a small proportion of animals in the 40 μg cohort demonstrating transient toxicity. Thus the NOAEL dose by the IV route was greater than 10 μg and less than or equal to 40 μg. Real-time RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated recombinant human GNE mRNA expression in 100% of muscle tissues that received IM injection of 40 μg GNE-lipoplex, at 2 weeks. These results indicate that GNE-lipoplex gene transfer is safe and can produce durable transgene expression in treated muscles. Our findings support future exploration of the clinical efficacy of GNE-lipoplex for experimental gene therapy of HIBM2.

  8. Safety and in vivo Expression of a GNE-Transgene: A Novel Treatment Approach for Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha P. Phadke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy-2 (HIBM2 is an adult-onset, muscular disease caused by mutations in the GNE gene. HIBM2-associated GNE mutations causing hyposialyation have been proposed to contribute to reduced muscle function in patients with HIBM2, though the exact cause of this disease is unknown. In the current studies we examined pre-clinical in vivo toxicity, and expression of the plasmid-based, CMV driven wild-type GNE plasmid vector. The plasmid vector was injected intramuscularly (IM or systemically (IV into BALB/c mice, following encapsulation in a cationic liposome (DOTAP:Cholesterol. Single IM injections of the GNE-lipoplex at 40 μg did not produce overt toxicity or deaths, indicating that the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL dose for IM injection was ≥40 μg. Single intravenous (IV infusion of GNE-lipoplex was lethal in 33% of animals at 100 μg dose, with a small proportion of animals in the 40 μg cohort demonstrating transient toxicity. Thus the NOAEL dose by the IV route was greater than 10 μg and less than or equal to 40 μg. Real-time RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated recombinant human GNE mRNA expression in 100% of muscle tissues that received IM injection of 40 μg GNE-lipoplex, at 2 weeks. These results indicate that GNE-lipoplex gene transfer is safe and can produce durable transgene expression in treated muscles. Our findings support future exploration of the clinical efficacy of GNE-lipoplex for experimental gene therapy of HIBM2.

  9. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells expressing the Shh transgene promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yijia; Wu, Dou; Zhang, Ruiping; Shuang, Weibing; Sun, Jiping; Hao, Haihu; An, Qijun; Liu, Qiang

    2014-06-24

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most disabling diseases. Cell-based gene therapy is becoming a major focus for the treatment of SCI. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a promising stem cell type useful for repairing SCI. However, the effects of BMSCs transplants are likely limited because of low transplant survival after SCI. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a multifunctional growth factor which can facilitate neuronal and BMSCs survival, promote axonal growth, prevent activation of the astrocyte lineage, and enhance the delivery of neurotrophic factors in BMSCs. However, treatment of SCI with Shh alone also has limited effects on recovery, because the protein is cleared quickly. In this study, we investigated the use of BMSCs overexpressing the Shh transgene (Shh-BMSCs) in the treatment of rats with SCI, which could stably secrete Shh and thereby enhance the effects of BMSCs, in an attempt to combine the advantages of Shh and BMSCs and so to promote functional recovery. After Shh-BMSCs treatment of SCI via the subarachnoid, we detected significantly greater damage recovery compared with that seen in rats treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and BMSCs. Use of Shh-BMSCs increased the expression and secretion of Shh, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), improved the behavioral function, enhanced the BMSCs survival, promoted the expression level of neurofilament 200 (NF200), and reduced the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Thus, our results indicated that Shh-BMSCs enhanced recovery of neurological function after SCI in rats and could be a potential valuable therapeutic intervention for SCI in humans.

  10. A new powerful method for site-specific transgene stabilization based on chromosomal double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Tkachuk

    Full Text Available Transgenic insects are a promising tool in sterile insect techniques and population replacement strategies. Such transgenic insects can be created using nonautonomous transposons, which cannot be transferred without a transposase source. In biocontrol procedures where large numbers of insects are released, there is increased risk of transgene remobilization caused by external transposase sources that can alter the characteristics of the transgenic organisms lead horizontal transgene transfer to other species. Here we describe a novel, effective method for transgene stabilization based on the introduction of directed double-strand breaks (DSB into a genome-integrated sequence and their subsequent repair by the single-strand annealing (SSA pathway. Due to the construct's organization, the repair pathway is predictable, such that all transposon and marker sequences can be deleted, while preserving integration of exogenous DNA in the genome. The exceptional conservation of DNA repair pathways makes this method suitable for a broad range of organisms.

  11. A New Powerful Method for Site-Specific Transgene Stabilization Based on Chromosomal Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Oksana; Savitsky, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic insects are a promising tool in sterile insect techniques and population replacement strategies. Such transgenic insects can be created using nonautonomous transposons, which cannot be transferred without a transposase source. In biocontrol procedures where large numbers of insects are released, there is increased risk of transgene remobilization caused by external transposase sources that can alter the characteristics of the transgenic organisms lead horizontal transgene transfer to other species. Here we describe a novel, effective method for transgene stabilization based on the introduction of directed double-strand breaks (DSB) into a genome-integrated sequence and their subsequent repair by the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Due to the construct's organization, the repair pathway is predictable, such that all transposon and marker sequences can be deleted, while preserving integration of exogenous DNA in the genome. The exceptional conservation of DNA repair pathways makes this method suitable for a broad range of organisms. PMID:22022613

  12. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa.

  13. Expression of flowering locus T2 transgene from Pyrus communis L. delays dormancy and leaf senescence in Malus×domestica Borkh, and causes early flowering in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiman, Aviad; Golobovitch, Sara; Yablovitz, Zeev; Belausov, Eduard; Dahan, Yardena; Peer, Reut; Avraham, Lior; Freiman, Zohar; Evenor, Dalia; Reuveni, Moshe; Sobolev, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Shahak, Yosepha; Samach, Alon; Flaishman, Moshe A

    2015-12-01

    Annual and perennial plants represent two different evolutionary strategies based on differential synchronization of their reproductive development. The mobile signal protein FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) plays a central role in mediating the onset of reproduction in both plant types. Two novel FT-like genes from pear (Pyrus communis)-PcFT1 and PcFT2-were isolated, and their expression profiles were determined for one annual cycle. The effects of PcFT2 on flowering were investigated in annual (tobacco) and perennial (apple) plants by means of grafting and generating transgenic plants. Long-distance graft transmission of PcFT2 in both annual and perennial plants was confirmed using a 35S::PcFT2-YFP construct. Ectopic overexpression of PcFT2 caused early flowering in tobacco but not in apple. Transgenic apples were less sensitive to short-day-induced dormancy, and this phenotype was also observed in wild-type apples grafted onto the transgenic plants. Comparison of PcFT2 protein structure to the paralogous FT proteins from apple and pear showed alterations that could influence protein structure and thus the florigen-activation complex. PcFT2 protein seems to function by promoting flowering as all other FT proteins in the annual plant tobacco while in the perennial plant apple PcFT2 does not promote flowering but delays senescence. This observation may hint to a modified function of FT2 in perennial plants.

  14. Chronic active hepatitis in transgenic mice expressing interferon-gamma in the liver.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Interferon-gamma may play an important role in the immune response and in inflammatory diseases, including chronic active hepatitis. To understand the role of interferon-gamma in the regulation of inflammation and to establish a mouse model of chronic active hepatitis, we produced transgenic mice in which the mouse interferon-gamma gene was regulated by a liver-specific promoter, the serum amyloid P component gene promoter. Four transgenic mouse lines were generated, and two of these lines ex...

  15. Transgenic poplar expressing Arabidopsis YUCCA6 exhibits auxin-overproduction phenotypes and increased tolerance to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Qingbo; Wang, Zhi; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-09-01

    YUCCA6, a member of the YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, is involved in the tryptophan-dependent IAA biosynthesis pathway and responses to environmental cues in Arabidopsis. However, little is known about the role of the YUCCA pathway in auxin biosynthesis in poplar. Here, we generated transgenic poplar (Populus alba × P. glandulosa) expressing the Arabidopsis YUCCA6 gene under the control of the oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SY plants). Three SY lines (SY7, SY12 and SY20) were selected based on the levels of AtYUCCA6 transcript. SY plants displayed auxin-overproduction morphological phenotypes, such as rapid shoot growth and retarded main root development with increased root hair formation. In addition, SY plants had higher levels of free IAA and early auxin-response gene transcripts. SY plants exhibited tolerance to drought stress, which was associated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, SY plants showed delayed hormone- and dark-induced senescence in detached leaves due to higher photosystem II efficiency and less membrane permeability. These results suggest that the conserved IAA biosynthesis pathway mediated by YUCCA family members exists in poplar.

  16. Induction of systemic IFITM3 expression does not effectively control foot-and-mouth disease viral infection in transgenic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Zheng, Haixue; Qian, Ping; Xu, Jinfang; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, and can cause severe economic loss. Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins constitute a family of viral restriction factors that can inhibit the replication of several types of viruses. Our previous study showed that overexpression of swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) impeded replication of the FMD virus (FMDV) in BHK-21 cells and mice. In this study, sIFITM3-transgenic (TG) pigs were produced by handmade cloning. Results showed that sIFITM3 was highly overexpressed in many organs of sIFITM3-TG pigs compared to wild-type pigs. After a virulent FMDV strain (O/ES/2001) was intramuscularly inoculated, the sIFITM3-TG pigs showed slightly higher susceptibility to FMDV infection than wild-type pigs. Both groups displayed comparable degrees of clinical symptoms throughout the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the induction of systemic sIFITM3 expression does not protect pigs against FMDV infection. Based on these observations, we propose that a combination of interferons and vaccines be used to control FMDV infections and subsequent FMD outbreaks.

  17. Renal HIV expression is unaffected by serum LPS levels in an HIV transgenic mouse model of LPS induced kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Leventhal

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with increased rates of mortality. For unknown reasons, HIV infected individuals have a higher risk of AKI than uninfected persons. We tested our hypothesis that increased circulating LPS increases renal expression of HIV and that HIV transgenic (Tg26 mice have increased susceptibility to AKI. Tg26 mice harbor an HIV transgene encoding all HIV genes except gag and pol, and develop a phenotype analogous to HIVAN. Mice were used at 4-6 weeks of age before the onset of gross renal disease. Mice were injected i.p. with LPS or sterile saline. Renal function, tubular injury, cytokine expression, and HIV transcription were evaluated in Tg26 and wild type (WT mice. LPS injection induced a median 60.1-fold increase in HIV expression in spleen but no change in kidney. There was no significant difference in renal function, cytokine expression, or tubular injury scores at baseline or 24 hours after LPS injection. HIV transcription was also analyzed in vitro using a human renal tubular epithelial cell (RTEC line. HIV transcription increased minimally in human RTEC, by 1.47 fold, 48 hours after LPS exposure. We conclude that Tg26 mice do not increase HIV expression or have increased susceptibility to LPS induced AKI. The increased risk of AKI in HIV infected patients is not mediated via increased renal expression of HIV in the setting of sepsis. Moreover, renal regulation of HIV transcription is different to that in the spleen.

  18. Temporal expression of a V(H) promoter-Cmu transgene linked to the IgH HS1,2 enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, T; Furebring, C; Borrebaeck, C A; Pettersson, S

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene expression is guided by cis-regulatory elements which direct correct temporal and spatial expression in B lineage cells. One of these cis-acting elements is the IgH HS1,2 enhancer and previous studies in transgenic mice have revealed a temporally restricted activity of an HS1,2 enhancer-linked human beta-globin reporter gene in B lineage cells. To assess whether this enhancer can impose strict temporal regulation onto a V(H)-promoter-Cmu reporter gene, transgenic mice were generated. These mice expressed high serum levels of protein from the transgene. Moreover, high levels of transgene expression were observed in spleen and thymus, while lower expression was found in heart and kidney and no expression was detected in liver and brain. Interestingly, transgene expression was confined to large, activated B cells and peritoneal B cells but not observed in small, resting splenic B cells or activated T cells. However, upon mitogenic stimulation of resting B cells with LPS, high levels of transgene expression was induced. Our data demonstrate that the HS1,2 enhancer can interact with a natural V(H) promoter in a strict temporal fashion and when provided with an appropriate activation signal, this V(H) promoter/enhancer construct can induce transgene expression in resting B, but not T lineage cells. Our data are compatible with a model whereby the regulation of IgH gene expression may be subject to regulation by distinct subsets of cis-regulatory elements acting at different stages of B lymphocyte development. Thus, Ig gene expression may be regulated via an interaction between the V(H) promoter and 3' enhancer elements (here typified by the HS1,2 enhancer) in terminally differentiated B lineage cells.

  19. Transgenic Rescue of Adipocyte Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor Expression Restores High Fat Diet-induced Body Weight Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugleholdt, Randi; Pedersen, Jens; Bassi, Maria Rosaria

    2011-01-01

    that was similar between the groups. In contrast, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide-mediated insulin secretion does not seem to be important for regulation of body weight after high fat feeding. The study supports a role of the adipocyte GIPr in nutrient-dependent regulation of body weight and lean mass...... and the direct effects on adipose tissue, we generated transgenic mice with targeted expression of the human GIPr to white adipose tissue or beta-cells, respectively. These mice were then cross-bred with the GIPr knock-out strain. The central findings of the study are that mice with GIPr expression targeted...

  20. A transgenic Neospora caninum strain based on mutations of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luiz Miguel; Baroni, Luciana; Yatsuda, Ana Patrícia

    2014-03-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite related to abortion and losses of fertility in cattle. The amenability of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium to genetic manipulation offers several tools to determine the invasion and replication processes, which support posterior strategies related to the combat of these diseases. For Plasmodium the use of pyrimethamine as an auxiliary drug on malaria treatment has been affected by the rise of resistant strains and the analyses on Dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene indicated several point mutations. In this work we developed a method for stable insertion of genes based on resistance to pyrimethamine. For that, the coding sequence of NcDHFR-TS (Dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase) was point mutated in two amino acids, generating DHFRM2M3. The DHFRM2M3 flanked by the promoter and 3'UTR of Ncdhfr-ts (Ncdhfr-DHFRM2M3) conferred resistance to pyrimethamine after transfection. For illustration of stability and expression, the cassette Ncdhfr-DHFRM2M3 was ligated to the reporter gene Lac-Z (β-galactosidase enzyme) controlled by the N. caninum tubulin promoter and was transfected and selected in N. caninum. The cassette was integrated into the genome and the selected tachyzoites expressed Lac-Z, allowing the detection of tachyzoites by the CPRG reaction and X-gal precipitation. The obtainment of transgenic N. caninum resistant to pyrimethamine confirms the effects on DHFR-TS among the Apicomplexa members and will support future approaches on pholate inhibitors for N. caninum prophylaxis. The construction of stable tachyzoites based on vectors with N. caninum promoters initiates the molecular manipulation of this parasite independently of T. gondii.

  1. Expression of chimeric P450 genes encoding flavonoid-3', 5'-hydroxylase in transgenic tobacco and petunia plants(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Y; Nakano-Shimada, R; Ohbayashi, M; Okinaka, Y; Kiyokawa, S; Kikuchi, Y

    1999-11-19

    Flavonoid-3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), a member of the cytochrome P450 family, is the key enzyme in the synthesis of 3', 5'-hydroxylated anthocyanins, which are generally required for blue or purple flowers. A full-length cDNA, TG1, was isolated from prairie gentian by heterologous hybridization with a petunia cDNA, AK14, which encodes F3'5'H. To investigate the in vivo function of TG1 and AK14, they were subcloned into a plant expression vector and expressed under the control of the CaMV35S promoter in transgenic tobacco or petunia, both of which originally lack the enzyme. Transgenic petunia plants had a dramatic change in flower color from pink to magenta with a high content of 3',5'-hydroxylated anthocyanins. In contrast, transgenic tobacco plants had minimal color change with at most 35% 3',5'-hydroxylated anthocyanin content. These results indicate that the products of TG1 and AK14 have F3'5'H activity in planta and that interspecific gene transfer alters anthocyanin pigment synthesis. The difference in apparent F3'5'H activity between tobacco and petunia is discussed.

  2. Mapping of fluorescent protein-expressing neurons and axon pathways in adult and developing Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, Cesar; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Avendaño, Carlos; Clascá, Francisco

    2010-07-23

    Transgenic mouse lines in which a fluorescent protein is constitutively expressed under the Thy1 gene promoter have become important models in cell biology and pathology studies of specific neuronal populations. As a result of positional insertion and/or copy number effects on the transgene, the populations expressing the fluorescent protein (eYFP+) vary markedly among the different mice lines. However, identification of the eYFP+ subpopulations has remained sketchy and fragmentary even for the most widely used lines such as Thy1-eYFP-H mice (Feng, G., Mellor, R.H., Bernstein, M., Keller-Peck, C., Nguyen, Q.T., Wallace, M., Nerbonne, J.M., Lichtman and J.W., Sanes. J.R. 2000. Imaging neuronal subsets in transgenic mice expressing multiple spectral variants of GFP. Neuron 28, 41-51). Here, we provide a comprehensive mapping of labeled cell types throughout the central nervous system in adult and postnatal (P0-P30) Thy1-eYFP-H mice. Cell type identification was based on somatodendritic morphology, axon trajectories, and, for cortical cells, retrograde labeling with Fast Blue to distinguish between subpopulations with different axonal targets. In the neocortex, eYFP+ cells are layers 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons, whose abundance and sublaminar distribution varies markedly between areas. Labeling is particularly prevalent in the corticospinal cells; as a result, the pyramidal pathway axons are conspicuously labeled down to the spinal cord. Large populations of hippocampal, subicular and amygdaloid projection neurons are eYFP+ as well. Additional eYFP+ cell groups are located in specific brainstem nuclei. Present results provide a comprehensive reference dataset for adult and developmental studies using the Thy1-eYFP-H mice strain, and show that this animal model may be particularly suitable for studies on the cell biology of corticospinal neurons.

  3. Expression of mutant TDP-43 induces neuronal dysfunction in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson Dennis W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal distribution, modification and aggregation of transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 are the hallmarks of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Researchers have identified 44 mutations in the TARDBP gene that encode TDP-43 as causative for cases of sporadic and familial ALS http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/FTDMutations/. Certain mutant forms of TDP-43, such as M337V, are associated with increased low molecular weight (LMW fragments compared to wild-type (WT TDP-43 and cause neuronal apoptosis and developmental delay in chick embryos. Such findings support a direct link between altered TDP-43 function and neurodegeneration. Results To explore the pathogenic properties of the M337V mutation, we generated and characterized two mouse lines expressing human TDP-43 (hTDP-43M337V carrying this mutation. hTDP-43M337V was expressed primarily in the nuclei of neurons in the brain and spinal cord, and intranuclear and cytoplasmic phosphorylated TDP-43 aggregates were frequently detected. The levels of TDP-43 LMW products of ~25 kDa and ~35 kDa species were also increased in the transgenic mice. Moreover, overexpression of hTDP-43M337V dramatically down regulated the levels of mouse TDP-43 (mTDP-43 protein and RNA, indicating TDP-43 levels are tightly controlled in mammalian systems. TDP-43M337V mice displayed reactive gliosis, widespread ubiquitination, chromatolysis, gait abnormalities, and early lethality. Abnormal cytoplasmic mitochondrial aggregates and abnormal phosphorylated tau were also detected in the mice. Conclusion Our novel TDP-43M337V mouse model indicates that overexpression of hTDP-43M337V alone is toxic in vivo. Because overexpression of hTDP-43 in wild-type TDP-43 and TDP-43M337V mouse models produces similar phenotypes, the mechanisms causing pathogenesis in the mutant

  4. A self-inactivating retrovector incorporating the IL-2 promoter for activation-induced transgene expression in genetically engineered T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejeune Laurence

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cell activation leads to signaling pathways that ultimately result in induction of gene transcription from the interleukin-2 (IL-2 promoter. We hypothesized that the IL-2 promoter or its synthetic derivatives can lead to T-cell specific, activation-induced transgene expression. Our objective was to develop a retroviral vector for stable and activation-induced transgene expression in T-lymphocytes. Results First, we compared the transcriptional potency of the full-length IL-2 promoter with that of a synthetic promoter composed of 3 repeats of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells (NFAT element following activation of transfected Jurkat T-cells expressing the large SV40 T antigen (Jurkat TAg. Although the NFAT3 promoter resulted in a stronger induction of luciferase reporter expression post stimulation, the basal levels of the IL-2 promoter-driven reporter expression were much lower indicating that the IL-2 promoter can serve as a more stringent activation-dependent promoter in T-cells. Based on this data, we generated a self-inactivating retroviral vector with the full-length human IL-2 promoter, namely SINIL-2pr that incorporated the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP fused to herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase as a reporter/suicide "bifunctional" gene. Subsequently, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-G Protein pseudotyped retroparticles were generated for SINIL-2pr and used to transduce the Jurkat T-cell line and the ZAP-70-deficient P116 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that EGFP expression was markedly enhanced post co-stimulation of the gene-modified cells with 1 μM ionomycin and 10 ng/ml phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. This activation-induced expression was abrogated when the cells were pretreated with 300 nM cyclosporin A. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the SINIL-2pr retrovector leads to activation-inducible transgene expression in Jurkat T-cell lines. We propose that this design can be

  5. Simultaneous tracking of movement and gene expression in multiple Drosophila melanogaster flies using GFP and DsRED fluorescent reporter transgenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent proteins such as GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein and DsRED (Discosoma sp.Red Fluorescent Protein are often used as reporter molecules for transgene expression in Drosophila and other species. We have recently reported methods that allow simultaneous tracking of animal movement and GFP expression in real time, however the assay was limited to single animals and a single transgene. Numerous studies would be facilitated by methods that allow for assay of multiple animals and multiple transgenes. Findings Here we report an improved fly video tracking system that allows multiple transgenic flies to be tracked simultaneously using visible light, GFP fluorescence and DsRED fluorescence. The movement of multiple flies could be accurately tracked at real time rates, while simultaneously assaying the expression level of two different transgenes marked with GFP and DsRED. The individual flies could be accurately tracked and distinguished even during periods when transgene fluorescence was undetected. For example, characteristic patterns of hsp70 and hsp22 transgene induction could be simultaneously quantified and correlated with animal movement in aging flies, and as groups of flies died due to dessication/starvation. Conclusion The improved methods allow for more efficient assay of the correlation between gene expression, behavior, aging and mortality: multiple animals can be assayed with simultaneous quantification of multiple transgenes using GFP and DsRED fluorescence. These methods should allow for increased flexibility in experimental designs. For example, in the future it should be possible to use gene expression levels to predict remaining life span more accurately, and to quantify gene expression changes caused by interactions between animals in real time.

  6. Molecular Identification of Transgenic Tomato in Iran by P35S PromoterBased PCR

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    Parastoo Khanmohammad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increasing population of the world, we should face food shortages in the near future. In this regard, agriculture of transgenic crops becomes very important. However, ensuring of GM products labeling is of great importance. Tomato is one of the most important food crops and for this reason it has undergone many genetic changes. This study aims to introduce a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method to identify non-labeled transgenic tomatoes in Iran market. Results: In this study, after optimization of PCR test based on P35S promoter, the amplicon was cloned in the plasmid PTZ57R in Escherichia coli JM107 to confirm and make positive control. After optimized PCR test of 50 tomatoes it was found that 4% of the Iranian markets’ tomatoes contain P35S promoter and are probably transgenic while none of the samples have been labeled in this regard. Conclusion: PCR technique is a suitable, available, fast and accurate method for screening transgenic products such as tomatoes.

  7. Transgenic silencing of neurons in the mammalian brain by expression of the allatostatin receptor (AlstR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, M; Hostick, U; Kyweriga, M; Tan, A; Weible, A P; Wu, H; Wu, W; Callaway, E M; Kentros, C

    2009-10-01

    The mammalian brain is an enormously complex set of circuits composed of interconnected neuronal cell types. The analysis of central neural circuits will be greatly served by the ability to turn off specific neuronal cell types while recording from others in intact brains. Because drug delivery cannot be restricted to specific cell types, this can only be achieved by putting "silencer" transgenes under the control of neuron-specific promoters. Towards this end we have created a line of transgenic mice putting the Drosophila allatostatin (AL) neuropeptide receptor (AlstR) under the control of the tetO element, thus enabling its inducible expression when crossed to tet-transactivator lines. Mammals have no endogenous AL or AlstR, but activation of exogenously expressed AlstR in mammalian neurons leads to membrane hyperpolarization via endogenous G-protein-coupled inward rectifier K(+) channels, making the neurons much less likely to fire action potentials. Here we show that this tetO/AlstR line is capable of broadly expressing AlstR mRNA in principal neurons throughout the forebrain when crossed to a commercially-available transactivator line. We electrophysiologically characterize this cross in hippocampal slices, demonstrating that bath application of AL leads to hyperpolarization of CA1 pyramidal neurons, making them refractory to the induction of action potentials by injected current. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of AL application to silence the sound-evoked spiking responses of auditory cortical neurons in intact brains of AlstR/tetO transgenic mice. When crossed to other transactivator lines expressing in defined neuronal cell types, this AlstR/tetO line should prove a very useful tool for the analysis of intact central neural circuits.

  8. Transgenic Silencing of Neurons in the Mammalian Brain by Expression of the Allatostatin Receptor (AlstR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, M.; Hostick, U.; Kyweriga, M.; Tan, A.; Weible, A. P.; Wu, H.; Wu, W.; Callaway, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain is an enormously complex set of circuits composed of interconnected neuronal cell types. The analysis of central neural circuits will be greatly served by the ability to turn off specific neuronal cell types while recording from others in intact brains. Because drug delivery cannot be restricted to specific cell types, this can only be achieved by putting “silencer” transgenes under the control of neuron-specific promoters. Towards this end we have created a line of transgenic mice putting the Drosophila allatostatin (AL) neuropeptide receptor (AlstR) under the control of the tetO element, thus enabling its inducible expression when crossed to tet-transactivator lines. Mammals have no endogenous AL or AlstR, but activation of exogenously expressed AlstR in mammalian neurons leads to membrane hyperpolarization via endogenous G-protein-coupled inward rectifier K+ channels, making the neurons much less likely to fire action potentials. Here we show that this tetO/AlstR line is capable of broadly expressing AlstR mRNA in principal neurons throughout the forebrain when crossed to a commercially-available transactivator line. We electrophysiologically characterize this cross in hippocampal slices, demonstrating that bath application of AL leads to hyperpolarization of CA1 pyramidal neurons, making them refractory to the induction of action potentials by injected current. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of AL application to silence the sound-evoked spiking responses of auditory cortical neurons in intact brains of AlstR/tetO transgenic mice. When crossed to other transactivator lines expressing in defined neuronal cell types, this AlstR/tetO line should prove a very useful tool for the analysis of intact central neural circuits. PMID:19692509

  9. Wnt Signaling Alteration in the Spinal Cord of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice: Special Focus on Frizzled-5 Cellular Expression Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Fernández

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons by unknown causes. Recent evidence shows that Wnt signaling is involved in neurodegenerative processes, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. However, to date, little is known regarding the expression of Wnt signaling components in this fatal condition. In the present study we used transgenic SOD1G93A mice to evaluate the expression of several Wnt signaling components, with special focus on Frizzled-5 cellular expression alteration along disease progression.Based on previous studies demonstrating the expression of Wnts and their transcriptional regulation during Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis development, we have analyzed the mRNA expression of several Wnt signaling components in the spinal cord of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at different stages of the disease by using real time quantitative PCR analysis. Strikingly, one of the molecules that seemed not to be altered at mRNA level, Frizzled-5, showed a clear up-regulation at late stages in neurons, as evidenced by immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, increased Frizzled-5 appears to correlate with a decrease in NeuN signal in these cells, suggesting a correlation between neuronal affectation and the increased expression of this receptor.Our data suggest the involvement of Wnt signaling pathways in the pathophysiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and, more specifically, the implication of Frizzled-5 receptor in the response of neuronal cells against neurodegeneration. Nevertheless, further experimental studies are needed to shed light on the specific role of Frizzled-5 and the emerging but increasing Wnt family of proteins research field as a potential target for this neuropathology.

  10. Generation of transgenic pigs by cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac transposase-based pmGENIE-3 plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zicong; Zeng, Fang; Meng, Fanming; Xu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Xianwei; Huang, Xiaoling; Tang, Fei; Gao, Wenchao; Shi, Junsong; He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Dewu; Wang, Chong; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2014-05-01

    The process of transgenesis involves the introduction of a foreign gene, the transgene, into the genome of an animal. Gene transfer by pronuclear microinjection (PNI) is the predominant method used to produce transgenic animals. However, this technique does not always result in germline transgenic offspring and has a low success rate for livestock. Alternate approaches, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer using transgenic fibroblasts, do not show an increase in efficiency compared to PNI, while viral-based transgenesis is hampered by issues regarding transgene size and biosafety considerations. We have recently described highly successful transgenesis experiments with mice using a piggyBac transposase-based vector, pmhyGENIE-3. This construct, a single and self-inactivating plasmid, contains all the transpositional elements necessary for successful gene transfer. In this series of experiments, our laboratories have implemented cytoplasmic injection (CTI) of pmGENIE-3 for transgene delivery into in vivo-fertilized pig zygotes. More than 8.00% of the injected embryos developed into transgenic animals containing monogenic and often single transgenes in their genome. However, the CTI technique was unsuccessful during the injection of in vitro-fertilized pig zygotes. In summary, here we have described a method that is not only easy to implement, but also demonstrated the highest efficiency rate for nonviral livestock transgenesis.

  11. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and assessment of factors influencing transgene expression in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation reports a protocol for transfer and expression of foreign chimeric genes in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Transformation was achieved by co-cultivation of mature zygotic embryos with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 which harbored a binary vector (pBI121) including genes for 3-glucuronidase (GUS) and neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTI1). Factors influencing transgene expression including seed sources of loblolly pine, concentration of bacteria, and the wounding procedures of target explants were investigated. The expression of foreign gene was confirmed by the ability of mature zygotic embryos to produce calli in the presence of kanamycin, by histochemical assays of GUS activity, by PCR analysis, and by Southern blot. The successful expression of the GUS gene in different families of loblolly pine suggests that this transformation system is probably useful for the production of the genetically modified conifers.

  12. Regional gene expression of LOX-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 in aorta of HIV-1 transgenic rats.

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    Anne Mette Fisker Hag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients has been observed. The cause of this accelerated atherosclerosis is a matter of controversy. As clinical studies are complicated by a multiplicity of risk-factors and a low incidence of hard endpoints, studies in animal models could be attractive alternatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated gene expression of lectin-like oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rats; these genes are all thought to play important roles in early atherogenesis. Furthermore, the plasma level of sICAM-1 was measured. We found that gene expressions of LOX-1 and VCAM-1 were higher in the aortic arch of HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls. Also, the level of sICAM-1 was elevated in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls, but the ICAM-1 gene expression profile did not show any differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1Tg rats have gene expression patterns indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in aorta, suggesting that HIV-infection per se may cause atherosclerosis. This transgenic rat model may be a very promising model for further studies of the pathophysiology behind HIV-associated cardiovascular disease.

  13. Production of a transgenic mosquito expressing circumsporozoite protein, a malarial protein, in the salivary gland of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Ikezawa, Tsunetaka; Hirai, Makoto

    2010-08-01

    We are producing a transgenic mosquito, a flying syringe, to deliver a vaccine protein to human beings via the saliva the mosquito deposits in the skin while biting. The mosquito produces a vaccine protein in the salivary gland (SG) and deposits the protein into the host's skin when it takes the host's blood. We chose circumsporozoite protein (CSP), currently the most promising malaria vaccine candidate, to be expressed in the SG of Anopheles stephensi. To transform the mosquitoes, plasmid containing the CSP gene under the promoter of female SG-specific gene, as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under the promoter of 3xP3 as a selection marker in the eyes, was injected into more than 400 eggs. As a result, five strains of GFP-expressing mosquitoes were established, and successful CSP expression in the SG was confirmed in one strain. The estimated amount of CSP in the SG of the strain was 40 ng per mosquito. We allowed the CSP-expressing mosquitoes to feed on mice to induce the production of anti-CSP antibody. However, the mice did not develop anti-CSP antibody even after transgenic mosquitoes had bitten them several times. We consider that CSP in the SG was not secreted properly into the saliva. Further techniques and trials are required in order to realize vaccine-delivering mosquitoes.

  14. Strong seed-specific protein expression from the Vigna radiata storage protein 8SGα promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo-Xian; Zheng, Shu-Xiao; Yang, Yue-Ning; Xu, Chao; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong; Chye, Mee-Len; Li, Hong-Ye

    2014-03-20

    Vigna radiata (mung bean) is an important crop plant and is a major protein source in developing countries. Mung bean 8S globulins constitute nearly 90% of total seed storage protein and consist of three subunits designated as 8SGα, 8SGα' and 8SGβ. The 5'-flanking sequences of 8SGα' has been reported to confer high expression in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. In this study, a 472-bp 5'-flanking sequence of 8SGα was identified by genome walking. Computational analysis subsequently revealed the presence of numerous putative seed-specific cis-elements within. The 8SGα promoter was then fused to the gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) to create a reporter construct for Arabidopsis thaliana transformation. The spatial and temporal expression of 8SGα∷GUS, as investigated using GUS histochemical assays, showed GUS expression exclusively in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Quantitative GUS assays revealed that the 8SGα promoter showed 2- to 4-fold higher activity than the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. This study has identified a seed-specific promoter of high promoter strength, which is potentially useful for directing foreign protein expression in seed bioreactors.

  15. Inhibition of brome mosaic virus (BMV) amplification in protoplasts from transgenic tobacco plants expressing replicable BMV RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, M; Mori, M; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1995-11-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants (V123 plants) expressing a set of full-length brome mosaic virus (BMV) genomic RNAs from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were produced. The accumulation level of BMV RNAs in V123 plant cells was approximately 1% of that in nontransgenic tobacco protoplasts inoculated with BMV RNAs. The level of BMV RNA in V123 protoplasts did not increase after inoculating the protoplasts with BMV RNAs, whereas V123 protoplasts supported the accumulation of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNAs to a level similar to that in non-transgenic tobacco protoplasts after inoculation with CMV RNA. Such BMV-specific resistance was also observed in protoplasts from V12 plants expressing full-length BMV RNA1 and RNA2, both of which are required and sufficient for BMV RNA replication. On the other hand, protoplasts from M12 plants, expressing truncated BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in which the 3' 200 nucleotides required for BMV RNA replication were deleted, exhibited weaker resistance to infection with BMV RNA than V12 protop