WorldWideScience

Sample records for based radioactive decay

  1. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  2. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  3. Radioactive decay and labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter on radioactive decay and labeled compounds has numerous intext equations and worked, sample problems. Topics covered include the following: terms and mathematics of radioactive decay; examples of calculations; graphs of decay equations; radioactivity or activity; activity measurements; activity decay; half-life determinations; labeled compounds. A 20 problem set is also included. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Is Radioactive Decay Really Exponential?

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12,550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3,000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in ...

  5. The law of radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyrie, G

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with the law of radioactive decay (Rutherford-Sody's law) and the way to explain it to high-school or grammar-school students. The mathematical content of the law is recalled and its experimental validation is proposed through the study of the decay of a population of radon-220 atoms. The analysis of the experimental data is made easier by using software such as Generis, Regressi or even Excel

  6. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models

  7. JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This work deals with the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data and is divided into four tables. The first table presents the origin of the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data and subsequent modifications. The second one is a summary of the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data file. The third one describes the JEF-2.2 fission products and the main decay and fission yield data. The last one consists of the main decay parameters from the JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI and JNDC-2.0 libraries. (O.L.). 100 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Progress and Validation of Geant4 Based Radioactive Decay Simulation Using the Examples of Simbol-X and IXO

    CERN Document Server

    Hauf, S; Pia, M G; Bell, Z; Briel, U; Chipaux, R; Hoffmann, D H H; Kendziorra, E; Laurent, P; Strüder, L; Tenzer, C; Weidenspointer, G; Zoglauer, A

    2009-01-01

    The anticipated high sensitivity and the science goals of the next generation X-ray space missions, like the International X-ray Observatory or Simbol-X, rely on a low instrumental background, which in turn requires optimized shielding concepts. We present Geant4 based simulation results on the IXO Wide Field Imager cosmic ray proton induced background in comparison with previous results obtained for the Simbol-X LED and HED focal plane detectors. Our results show that an improvement in mean differential background flux compared to actually operating X-ray observatories may be feasible with detectors based on DEPFET technology. In addition we present preliminary results concerning the validation of Geant4 based radioactive decay simulation in space applications as a part of the Nano5 project.

  9. Precise Calculation of Complex Radioactive Decay Chains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harr, Logan J

    2007-01-01

    ...). An application of the exponential moments function is used with a transmutation matrix in the calculation of complex radioactive decay chains to achieve greater precision than can be attained through current methods...

  10. Simplifying the Mathematical Treatment of Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Derivation of the law of radioactive decay is considered without prior knowledge of calculus or the exponential series. Calculus notation and exponential functions are used because ultimately they cannot be avoided, but they are introduced in a simple way and explained as needed. (Contains 10 figures, 1 box, and 1 table.)

  11. Generating cryptographic keys by radioactive decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grupen, Claus; Maurer, Ingo; Schmidt, Dieter; Smolik, Ludek

    2001-01-01

    We are presenting a new method for the generation of statistically genuine random bitstream with very high frequency which can be employed for cryptographic purposes. The method uses the feature of statistically unpredictable radioactive decays as the source of randomness. The measured quantity is the time distance between the responses of a small ionisation chamber due to the recording of ionising decay products. This time measurement is converted into states representing 0o r 1. The data generated in our experiment successfully passed FIPS PUB 140-1 and die hard statistical tests. For the simulation of systematic effects Monte Carlo techniques were used

  12. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The most important aspect of the wind-up of UNISOR-based research is completion of student theses. Analysis is proceeding on extensive studies in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes with N 50 open shell region and shape coexistence in the N ∼ 104, Z ≤ 82 region, respectively. The main ongoing topics are shape coexistence in nuclei and the microscopic structure of collective motion in nuclei from a phenomenological point of view. New topics this year focus on the structure of nuclei near the N = Z line. Two topics have been chosen for detailed study: shape coexistence and electric monopole transition strengths

  13. Nuclide radioactive decay data uncertainties library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanova, D S; Zherdev, G M

    2017-01-01

    The results of the developing the library of uncertainties of radioactive decay data in the ABBN data library format are described. Different evaluations of uncertainties were compared and their effects on the results of calculations of residual energy release were determined using the test problems and experiment. Tables were generated in the ABBN format with the data obtained on the basis of libraries in ENDF-6 format. 3821 isotopes from the ENDF/B-7 data library, 3852 isotopes from the JEFF-3.11 data library and 1264 isotopes from the JENDL-4.0 data library were processed. It was revealed that the differences in the evaluations accepted in different decay data libraries are not so big, although they sometimes exceed the uncertainties assigned to the data in the ENDF/B-7 and JEFF-3.11 libraries, which as a rule, they agree with each other. On the basis of developed method it is supposed to create a library of data uncertainties for radioactive decay within the constant data system in FSUE RFNC-VNIIEF with its further connection with CRYSTAL module. (paper)

  14. User's manual for the radioactive decay and accumulation code RADAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Ashline, R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The RADAC computer code calculates radioactive decay and accumulation of decayed products using an algorithm based on the direct use of the Bateman equations and referred to here as the yield factor method. This report explains the yield factor method, gives an overview of the various modules in the RADAC code system, and describes the decay and accumulation code in detail. The RADAC code has capacity for two waste types and can accommodate up to 60 years of annual waste inputs. Decay times as high as 1 million years can be calculated. The user supplies the undecayed composition and radioactivity of the waste placed in storage each year. The code calculates the decayed composition, radioactivity, and thermal power of the accumulated waste at the end of each year and gives the results in terms of grams and curies of individual radionuclides. Calculations can be made for up to 19 waste storage sites in a single run. For each site and each waste type, calculations can be made by 1-year steps up to 60 years, by 10-year steps to 160 years, and by 6 discrete steps to 1 million years. Detailed outputs can be printed for each waste site and each time step by individual radionuclides. Summarized outputs are also available. Excluding data-preparation time, RADAC requires about 2 min to run 19 waste sites with two types of transuranic waste at each site, using a 486 DX computer with a clock speed of 33 MHz. Because RADAC uses a preselected set of decay times and does not make in-reactor calculations, it should not be viewed as a substitute for ORIGEN2. RADAC is intended for use in applications in which accumulations at the decay times provided by the code are sufficient for the user's purposes

  15. Limitations of Poisson statistics in describing radioactive decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna M

    2015-12-01

    The assumption that nuclear decays are governed by Poisson statistics is an approximation. This approximation becomes unjustified when data acquisition times longer than or even comparable with the half-lives of the radioisotope in the sample are considered. In this work, the limits of the Poisson-statistics approximation are investigated. The formalism for the statistics of radioactive decay based on binomial distribution is derived. The theoretical factor describing the deviation of variance of the number of decays predicated by the Poisson distribution from the true variance is defined and investigated for several commonly used radiotracers such as (18)F, (15)O, (82)Rb, (13)N, (99m)Tc, (123)I, and (201)Tl. The variance of the number of decays estimated using the Poisson distribution is significantly different than the true variance for a 5-minute observation time of (11)C, (15)O, (13)N, and (82)Rb. Durations of nuclear medicine studies often are relatively long; they may be even a few times longer than the half-lives of some short-lived radiotracers. Our study shows that in such situations the Poisson statistics is unsuitable and should not be applied to describe the statistics of the number of decays in radioactive samples. However, the above statement does not directly apply to counting statistics at the level of event detection. Low sensitivities of detectors which are used in imaging studies make the Poisson approximation near perfect. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Explicit solutions for exit-only radioactive decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Ding; Kernan, Warnick

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we extended Bateman's [Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 15, 423 (1910)] original work for solving radioactive decay chains and explicitly derived analytic solutions for generic exit-only radioactive decay problems under given initial conditions. Instead of using the conventional Laplace transform for solving Bateman's equations, we used a much simpler algebraic approach. Finally, we discuss methods of breaking down certain classes of large decay chains into collections of simpler chains for easy handling

  17. Moderation of the 119mSn isomer radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godovikov, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    The evaluation of the constant of the braked 119m Sn nuclei decay in the Moessbauer source, being for a long time in contact with a resonance shield, is carried out. The high stability of these nuclei relative to decay is established. The 119m Sn subjected to prolonged impact of the standing electromagnetic wave field become resistant to radioactive decay [ru

  18. Radioactive-nuclide decay data in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.; Helmer, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The scope of ENDF/B has recently been expanded to include radioactive-nuclide decay data. In this paper, the content and organization of the decay data which are included in ENDF/B are presented and discussed. The application of decay data in a wide variety of nuclear-related activities is illustrated by a number of examples. Two items pointed up by the ENDF/B decay-data compilation effort are treated: the identification of deficiencies in the data; and the importance of a radioactive-nuclide metrology effort oriented toward supplying these needs in a systematic fashion. 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. Radioactive-nuclide decay data in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.; Helmer, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The scope of ENDF/B has recently been expanded to include radioactive-nuclide decay data. In this paper, the content and organization of the decay data which are included in ENDF/B are presented and discussed. The application of decay data in a wide variety of nuclear-related activities is illustrated by a number of examples. Two items pointed up by the ENDF/B decay-data compilation effort are treated: the identification of deficiencies in the data; and the importance of a radioactive-nuclide metrology effort oriented toward supplying these needs in a systematic fashion. (3 figures, 1 table)

  20. Experimental investigation of statistical density function of decaying radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1991-01-01

    The validity of the Poisson and the λ P(k) modified Poisson statistical density functions of observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally in radioactive decay detection for various measuring times. The experiments to measure radioactive decay were performed with 89m Y, using a multichannel analyzer. According to the results, Poisson statistics adequately describes the counting experiment for short measuring times. (author) 13 refs.; 4 figs

  1. R and D on the Geant4 radioactive decay physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Lang, Philipp M.; Hoffmann, Dieter H.H. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Pia, Maria Grazia [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); INFN, Genua (Italy); Bell, Zane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States); Weidenspointner, Georg [MPI HLL, Muenchen (Germany); MPE, Garching (Germany); Zoglauer, Andreas [SSL, Berkeley (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The anticipated high sensitivity of the next generation X-ray space missions, like the International X-ray Observatory, rely on a low instrumental background, which in turn requires optimized shielding concepts for the instruments. Most state-of-the-art approaches estimate the prompt cosmic ray, solar proton and the cosmic X-ray induced background with simulations using the Geant4 Monte Carlo tool-kit whose electromagnetic and hadronic physics models have extensively been verified with space and ground based experiments. In contrast measurements to verify the radioactive decay implementation in Geant4 have been rare or have only been tested on a limited set of isotopes, which are not necessarily those used in satellite construction. We present first results of two experiments aimed to verify Geant4 activation and decay physics for materials significant for low background X-ray detectors in space.

  2. Radioactive decays at limits of nuclear stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfützner, M.; Karny, M.; Grigorenko, L. V.

    2012-01-01

    , and their relative probabilities. When approaching limits of nuclear stability, new decay modes set in. First, beta decays are accompanied by emission of nucleons from highly excited states of daughter nuclei. Second, when the nucleon separation energy becomes negative, nucleons start being emitted from the ground...

  3. General decay law for emission of charged particles and exotic cluster radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Basudeb; Paira, Ramkrishna; Rath, Biswanath

    2013-01-01

    For the emission of charged particles from metastable nuclei, a general decay formula is developed based on the basic phenomenon of resonances occurring in quantum scattering process under Coulomb-nuclear potential. It relates the half-lives of monopole radioactive decays with the Q-values of the outgoing elements in different angular momentum states as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. The relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger–Nuttall law in α radioactivity and it explains well all known emission of charged particles including clusters, alpha and proton carrying angular momenta

  4. Method for removal of decay heat of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesky, H.; Wunderer, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this process, the decay heat from radioactive substances is removed by means of a liquid carried in the coolant loop. The liquid is partially evaporated by the decay heat. The steam is used to drive the liquid through the loop. When a static pressure level equivalent to the pressure drop in the loop is exceeded, the steam is separated from the liquid, condensed, and the condensate is reunited with the return flow of liquid for partial evaporation. (orig.) [de

  5. Noncharacteristic half-lives in radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corral, Alvaro; Font, Francesc; Camacho, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Half-lives of radionuclides span more than 50 orders of magnitude. We characterize the probability distribution of this broad-range data set at the same time that we explore a method for fitting power laws and testing goodness-of-fit. It is found that the procedure proposed recently by Clauset et al.[SIAM Rev. 51, 661 (2009)] does not perform well as it rejects the power-law hypothesis even for power-law synthetic data. In contrast, we establish the existence of a power-law exponent with a value around 1.1 for the half-life density, which can be explained by the sharp relationship between decay rate and released energy, for different disintegration types. For the case of alpha emission, this relationship constitutes an original mechanism of power-law generation.

  6. Radioactive decay of 223Ra by 14C emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashita, S.; Gregorich, K.; Ghiorso, A.

    1985-01-01

    Recently H.J. Rose and G.A. Jones at the University of Oxford reported the very difficult observation of an exotic radioactive decay mode in 233 Ra, its spontaneous disintegration by the emission of 14 C particles. The authors have confirmed their somewhat surprising discovery by an independent method. Within the present experimental accuracy the magnetic rigidity, energy and branching ratio support the assignment of 14 C emission from 223 Ra as proposed by the Oxford experiment

  7. Agency practice and future policy in decay storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.

    2002-01-01

    The Environment Agency issues authorisations under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 for the accumulation of radioactive waste at non-nuclear sites prior to disposal. Radioactive decay during the accumulation period reduces the radioactive content of waste packages and provides a waste management option that has become known as decay-in-storage or decay storage. The project brief excluded nuclear licensed sites. A database of information in authorisations and application forms has been constructed. This information has been used alongside a literature review, international contacts, input from the Small Users Liaison Group and a dose assessment to look at the practice of decay storage. The basic principles behind decay storage are presented with specific sections on general safety, waste characterisation and segregation, storage containers, waste stores, and waste treatment and conditioning. The regulatory approach in seven other countries is described. The information collected from Agency public registers is summarised with particular attention given to storage periods of greater than 60 days and the corresponding information available from application forms. Operational experiences are presented. IAEA recommendations are compared with current practice based on the conditions found in authorisations, on the information from application forms and details provided by the Small Users Liaison Group

  8. Catalog of gamma-rays unplaced in radioactive decay schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke.

    1991-03-01

    A catalog is made for gamma-rays emitted in decay of radioactive nuclides but not placed in their decay schemes. It consists of two tables. In Table 1, the number of these unplaced gamma-ray components by a nuclide is given together with the fraction of total intensity of these gamma-rays to that of all observed gamma-rays. In Table 2, the unplaced gamma-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. Each line of this table contains the gamma-ray energy, intensity, nuclide identification, and energies and intensities of the most prominent gamma-rays from the decay of the radionuclides. This catalog is a compilation from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, of at February 1990. (author)

  9. PKA distributions: Contributions from transmutation products and from radioactive decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Gilbert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutrons generated in fusion plasmas interact with materials via nuclear reactions. The resulting transmutations and atomic displacements have life-limiting consequences for fusion reactor components. A detailed understanding of the production, evolution and material consequences of the damage created by cascades of atomic displacements requires, as a vital primary input, a complete description of the energy-spectrum of initial (prompt atomic displacement events (the primary knock on atoms or PKAs produced by direct neutron nuclear interactions. There is also the possibility that the radionuclides produced under transmutation will create further PKAs as they decay, and so the rate of these must also be quantified. This paper presents the latest results from the analysis of PKA spectra under neutron irradiation, focussing particularly on the variation in PKA distributions due to changes in composition under transmutation, but also on the PKA contributions from radioactive decay of materials that become activated under irradiation.

  10. Calculation of radioactive decay chains produced by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponti, C.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of the decay chains of radioactive isotopes may be solved by different computer codes that apply similar numerical methods. Analytical forms of solution of this problem are known since a long time, but their implementation has always been hindered by the possible occurrence of large numerical errors or by the need, to avoid them, of very high numerical precision. In this paper the reason of these difficulties has been pointed out and solved. In particular a new family of mathematical identities has been found

  11. Radioactive decay of sup(91m)Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, V.; Venkataratnam, S.; Rao, B.V.T.; Narasimham, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    The radioactive decay of sup(91m)Nb, produced by the reaction 89 Y(α, 2n), is studied using Ge(Li), HPGe and Si(Li) detectors. The K-conversion coefficient, αsub(K), of the 104.5 keV transition is determined accurately, for the first time, from the Nb Ksub(α) x-ray and 104.5 keV gamma-ray intensities. The experimental value of αsub(K) thus determined is 115(5), in agreement with the value expected for an M4 transition. (author)

  12. Radioactive decay of sup(91m)Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, V.; Venkataratnam, S.; Rao, B.V.T.; Narasimham, K.L.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1987-08-01

    The radioactive decay of sup(91m)Nb, produced by the reaction /sup 89/Y(..cap alpha.., 2n), is studied using Ge(Li), HPGe and Si(Li) detectors. The K-conversion coefficient, ..cap alpha..sub(K), of the 104.5 keV transition is determined accurately, for the first time, from the Nb Ksub(..cap alpha..) x-ray and 104.5 keV gamma-ray intensities. The experimental value of ..cap alpha..sub(K) thus determined is 115(5), in agreement with the value expected for an M4 transition.

  13. Radioactive decay properties of CANDU fuel. Volume 1: the natural uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, L.J.; Coady, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The two books of Volume 1 comprise the first in a three-volume series of compilations on the radioactive decay propertis of CANDU fuel and deal with the natural uranium fuel cycle. Succeeding volumes will deal with fuel cycles based on plutonium recycle and thorium. In Volume 1 which is divided into three parts, the computer code CANIGEN was used to obtain the mass, activity, decay heat and toxicity of CANDU fuel and its component isotopes. Data are also presented on gamma spectra and neutron emissions. Part 3 contains the data relating to the plutonium product and the high level wastes produced during fuel reprocessing. (author)

  14. Laser enhanced radioactive decay and selective transmutation of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloman, R.; Aarnio, P.; Ala-Heikkila, J.; Hakola, A.; Santala, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated narrow-band coherent laser radiation - ranging from visible to X- and to gamma-ray wave length region - and their interactions both directly with photon-nuclear couplings and indirectly through the photon-electron and electron-nucleus interactions. In particular we discuss various means of selective excitation of nuclear resonance states by narrowband lasers. During the relaxation process the active nucleus may return to its initial ground-state or find another final state. In the latter case the nucleus is transmuted into a state which may have beneficial properties for instance concerning radioactivity. One ideal case would be the destruction of long-lived nuclear waste isotopes into faster decaying ones. The essential presumption is that the excitation process is selective and efficient as regards background processes due to unwanted excitation channels of the primary isotope and due to other surrounding nuclides. The paper consists of 1) a short review of generating short-wave length coherent light sources, 2) a survey of potential photon-induced nuclear states and their decay channels, and 3) a determination of the selectivity of the transmutation process

  15. Cluster radioactive decay within the preformed cluster model using relativistic mean-field theory densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, BirBikram; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the (ground-state) cluster radioactive decays within the preformed cluster model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators [R. K. Gupta, in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, Varenna, edited by E. Gadioli (Ricerca Scientifica ed Educazione Permanente, Milano, 1988), p. 416; S. S. Malik and R. K. Gupta, Phys. Rev. C 39, 1992 (1989)]. The relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory is used to obtain the nuclear matter densities for the double folding procedure used to construct the cluster-daughter potential with M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction including exchange effects. Following the PCM approach, we have deduced empirically the preformation probability P 0 emp from the experimental data on both the α- and exotic cluster-decays, specifically of parents in the trans-lead region having doubly magic 208 Pb or its neighboring nuclei as daughters. Interestingly, the RMF-densities-based nuclear potential supports the concept of preformation for both the α and heavier clusters in radioactive nuclei. P 0 α(emp) for α decays is almost constant (∼10 -2 -10 -3 ) for all the parent nuclei considered here, and P 0 c(emp) for cluster decays of the same parents decrease with the size of clusters emitted from different parents. The results obtained for P 0 c(emp) are reasonable and are within two to three orders of magnitude of the well-accepted phenomenological model of Blendowske-Walliser for light clusters.

  16. Radioactive decay data tables: a handbook of decay data for application to radiation dosimetry and radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews compendium containing recommended decay data for approx. 500 radionuclides of interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology or of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Primary source of the decay data presented in this handbook is the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), developed and maintained by the US Nuclear Data Network. Topics covered include various radioactive decay processes; evaluation process and standards of ENSDF; tables and computer code MEDLIST used to produce ENSDF tables; radiation dosimetry and radiological assessments; parent-daughter activity ratios wherever the adopted decay data may contain significant uncertainties or errors due to the lack of appropriate experimental data

  17. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The primary focus this year has been the continuing studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z /approximately/ 82 region. Most notably, an extensive region of odd-mass nuclei is emerging within which low-lying low-energy electric monopole (EO) transitions occur. This is a completely new nuclear structure phenomenon. The empirical results are based on on-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR. In particular, many transition multipolarities are determined from conversion electron subshell ratios observed in γ-gated electron coincidence spectra. This is a completely new nuclear spectroscopic technique. To cite a specific example: our studies of the 185 Au → 185 Pt decay scheme reveal at least 11 transitions with EO components. This is unprecedented in nuclear structure. The role of EO transitions is being pursued in the larger framework of a signature of shape coexistence in nuclei

  18. Radioactive decay data tables: A handbook of decay data for application to radiation dosimetry and radiological assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, D. C.; Smith, J. S.

    Decay data are presented for approximately 500 radionuclides including those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals. Physical processes involved in radioactive decay which produce the different types of radiation observed, methods used to prepare the decay data sets for each radionuclide in the format of the computerized evaluated nuclear structure data file, the tables of radioactive decay data, and the computer code MEDLIST used to produce the tables are described. Applications of the data to problems of interest in radiation dosimetry and radiological assessments are considered as well as the calculations of the activity of a daughter radionuclide relative to the activity of its parent in a radioactive decay chain.

  19. Source term evaluation model for high-level radioactive waste repository with decay chain build-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Manish; Sunny, Faby; Oza, R B

    2016-09-18

    A source term model based on two-component leach flux concept is developed for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The long-lived radionuclides associated with high-level waste may give rise to the build-up of activity because of radioactive decay chains. The ingrowths of progeny are incorporated in the model using Bateman decay chain build-up equations. The model is applied to different radionuclides present in the high-level radioactive waste, which form a part of decay chains (4n to 4n + 3 series), and the activity of the parent and daughter radionuclides leaching out of the waste matrix is estimated. Two cases are considered: one when only parent is present initially in the waste and another where daughters are also initially present in the waste matrix. The incorporation of in situ production of daughter radionuclides in the source is important to carry out realistic estimates. It is shown that the inclusion of decay chain build-up is essential to avoid underestimation of the radiological impact assessment of the repository. The model can be a useful tool for evaluating the source term of the radionuclide transport models used for the radiological impact assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories.

  20. Quantum mechanical look at the radioactive-like decay of metastable dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, Marek [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Jagiellonian University, Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Krakow (Poland); Stachowski, Aleksander [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Urbanowski, Krzysztof [University of Zielona Gora, Institute of Physics, Zielona Gora (Poland)

    2017-12-15

    We derive the Shafieloo, Hazra, Sahni and Starobinsky (SHSS) phenomenological formula for the radioactive-like decay of metastable dark energy directly from the principles of quantum mechanics. To this aim we use the Fock-Krylov theory of quantum unstable states. We obtain deeper insight on the decay process as having three basic phases: the phase of radioactive decay, the next phase of damping oscillations, and finally the phase of power-law decay. We consider the cosmological model with matter and dark energy in the form of decaying metastable dark energy and study its dynamics in the framework of non-conservative cosmology with an interacting term determined by the running cosmological parameter. We study the cosmological implications of metastable dark energy and estimate the characteristic time of ending of the radioactive-like decay epoch to be 2.2 x 10{sup 4} of the present age of the Universe. We also confront the model with astronomical data which show that the model is in good agreement with the observations. Our general conclusion is that we are living in the epoch of the radioactive-like decay of metastable dark energy which is a relict of the quantum age of the Universe. (orig.)

  1. Is the basic law of radioactive decay exponential?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopych, P.M.; Zalyubovskii, I.I.

    1988-01-01

    Basic theoretical approaches to the explanation of the observed exponential nature of the decay law are discussed together with the hypothesis that it is not exponential. The significance of this question and its connection with fundamental problems of modern physics are considered. The results of experiments relating to investigation of the form of the decay law are given

  2. α decay and cluster radioactivity of nuclei of interest to the synthesis of Z =119 , 120 isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    Super-heavy nuclei of interest for the forthcoming synthesis of the isotopes with Z =119 , 120 are investigated. One of the very interesting latest experiments was performed at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI Darmstadt) trying to produce 299120 in a fusion reaction 248Cm(54Cr,3 n )299120 . We report calculations of α -decay half-lives using four models: AKRA (Akrawy), ASAF (analytical superasymmetric fission), UNIV (universal formula), and semFIS (semi-empirical formula based on fission theory). The released energy, Q , is calculated using the theoretical model of atomic masses, WS4. For Sr,9492 cluster radioactivity of 120,302300 we predict a branching ratio relative to α decay of -0.10 and 0.49, respectively, meaning that it is worth trying to detect such kinds of decay modes in competition with α decay.

  3. Cold valleys in the radioactive decay of 248-254Cf isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biju, R.K.; Sahadevan, Sabina; Santhosh, K.P.; Joseph, Antony

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concept of cold valley in cold fission and fusion, we have investigated the cluster decay process in 248-254 Cf isotopes. In addition to alpha particle minima, other deep minima occur for S, Ar and Ca clusters. It is found that inclusion of proximity potential does not change the position of minima but minima become deeper. Taking Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region, we computed half-lives and other characteristics for various clusters from these parents. Our study reveals that these parents are stable against light clusters and unstable against heavy clusters. Computed half-lives for alpha decay agree with experimental values within two orders of magnitude. The most probable clusters from these parents are predicted to be 46 Ar, 48,50 Ca which indicate the role of doubly or near doubly magic clusters in cluster radioactivity. Odd A clusters are found to be favorable for emission from odd A parents. Cluster decay model is extended to symmetric region and it is found that symmetric fission is also probable which stresses the role of doubly or near doubly magic 132 Sn nuclei. Geiger-Nuttal plots were studied for various clusters and are found to be linear with varying slopes and intercepts. (author)

  4. Physical limits on steam generation by radioactive decay heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the possibilities that flood water contacting the hot radioactive waste and rock at Yucca Mountain could produce enough steam to lift the top of the mountain off the repository

  5. New experimental data on the influence of extranuclear factors on the probability of radioactive decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarevskij, S I; Skorobogatov, G A

    2002-01-01

    New experimental data on influence of various extranuclear factors on probability (lambda) of radioactive decay are presented. During redox processes in solutions containing sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 Ce relative change in lambda measured by the DELTA I/I method was [I(Ce sup I sup V)-I(Ce sup I sup I sup I)]/I sub m sub e sub a sub n +(1.4+-0.6)x10 sup - sup 4. Using a modification of the method based on displacement of the age-old radioactive equilibrium, when a source MgO( sup 1 sup 2 sup 1 sup m Te) was cooled to 78 K, growth of lambda of tellurium nuclear isomer by 0.04+-0.02% was detected. New experimental data on increase in gamma-radioactivity of sample Be sup 1 sup 2 sup 3 sup m Te at the expense of low-temperature induced reaction, i.e. collective nuclear superluminescence, are provided

  6. The importance of the radioactive decay study on prospecting, research and plough of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliao, B.

    1990-01-01

    A radioactive decay series such as that of U-238 is said to be in a state of secular equilibrium when the number of atoms of each daughter being produced in the series is equal to the number of atoms of that daughter being lost be radioactive decay. When this condition exists, it is possible to determine the amount of the parent of the decay series by measuring the radiation from daughter element. Radioactive disequilibrium is quite a common occurrence in roll-front or sandstone-type uranium deposits. The reason is that uranium may be mobile when oxidized and daughter products formation lags behind. This leads to a distribution of radioelements wherein the daughter products (e.g. Bi - 214) are left behind, creating a daughter excess or parent-deficiency state, with strong gamma ray activity. Miners should receive from geologists a precise and sufficiently detailed geological report, including all the informations about disequilibrium problems of the uranium, deposits. (author)

  7. A simulation for radioactive decay and the absorption of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to derive and discuss these exponential laws for the benefit of teachers and interested pupils, and to discuss a simulation of the above phenoma should radioactive sources and Geiger-Mueller counters not be available in any particular school laboratory. The simulation can also be done by computer

  8. The Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the JEFF-3.3 radioactive decay data library: Combining international collaborative efforts on evaluated decay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Mark A.; Bersillon, Olivier

    2017-09-01

    The Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), is an international collaboration of decay data evaluators formed with groups from France, Germany, USA, China, Romania, Russia, Spain and the UK, mainly from the metrology community. DDEP members have evaluated over 220 radionuclides, following an agreed upon methodology, including a peer review. Evaluations include all relevant parameters relating to the nuclear decay and the associated atomic processes. An important output of these evaluations are recommendations for new measurements, which can serve as a basis for future measurement programmes. Recently evaluated radionuclides include: 18F, 59Fe, 82Rb, 82Sr, 88Y, 90Y, 89Zr, 94mTc, 109Cd, 133Ba, 140Ba, 140La, 151Sm and 169Er. The DDEP recommended data have recently been incorporated into the JEFF-3.3 Radioactive Decay Data Library. Other sources of nuclear data include 900 or so radionuclides converted from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), 500 from two UK libraries (UKPADD6.12 and UKHEDD2.6), the IAEA Actinide Decay Data Library, with the remainder converted from the NUBASE evaluation of nuclear properties. Mean decay energies for a number of radionuclides determined from total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy (TAGS) have also been included, as well as more recent European results from TAGS measurements performed at the University of Jyväskylä by groups from the University of Valencia, Spain and SUBATECH, the University of Nantes, France. The current status of the DDEP collaboration and the JEFF Radioactive Decay Data Library will be presented. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  9. Alloy development for fast induced radioactivity decay for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    During the operation of a fusion reactor, the structural material of the first wall and blanket structure will become highly radioactive from activation by the high-energy fusion neutrons. A difficult radioactive waste management problem will be involved in the disposal of this material after the service lifetime is complete. One way to minimize the management problem is the use of structural materials where the radioactive isotopes in the irradiated material decay to levels that allow for simplified disposal techniques. We are exploring how ferritic and austenitic steels could be developed to meet this objective

  10. Radioactive decay of the late-time light curves of GRB-SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Kuntal; Fruchte, Andrew Steven

    2018-04-01

    We present the late-time Hubble Space Telescope observations of two GRB associated supernovae, GRB 030329/SN 2003dh and XRF 060218/SN 2006aj. Using the multi-color data upto ˜ 320 days after the burst, we constrain the late-time decay nature of these supernovae. The decay rates of SN 2003dh are steeper than SN 2006aj. A comparison with two other GRB supernovae, GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the supernova associated with XRF 020903, shows that the decay rates of SN 2003dh are similar to XRF 020903 and those of SN 2006aj are similar to SN 1998bw. The late-time decay rates are steeper than the 56Co?56Fe radioactive decay rate (0.0098 mag day-1) indicating that there is some leakage of gamma-rays.

  11. Comments on equilibrium, transient equilibrium, and secular equilibrium in serial radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Equations describing serial radioactive decay are reviewed along with published descriptions or transient and secular equilibrium. It is shown that terms describing equilibrium are not used in the same way by various authors. Specific definitions are proposed; they suggest that secular equilibrium is a subset of transient equilibrium

  12. Method for utilizing decay heat from radioactive nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busey, H.M.

    1974-01-01

    Management of radioactive heat-producing waste material while safely utilizing the heat thereof is accomplished by encapsulating the wastes after a cooling period, transporting the capsules to a facility including a plurality of vertically disposed storage tubes, lowering the capsules as they arrive at the facility into the storage tubes, cooling the storage tubes by circulating a gas thereover, employing the so heated gas to obtain an economically beneficial result, and continually adding waste capsules to the facility as they arrive thereat over a substantial period of time

  13. Controlled study of the evolution of radon and its decay products in radioactive mine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calizaya A, F.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis discusses three aspects related to radon emissions and control of radon decay products in mine environments: (1) measurement of the effects of environmental parameters on radiation levels, (2) analysis of the data using ordinary linear regression and transfer function models and (3) prediction of the concentration of radioactive contaminants in the mine air. In-mine and laboratory experiments were conducted to develop the research data. In mine tests were conducted in a bulkhead isolated mine drift containing low grade uranium ore at the Colorado School of Mines, Experimental Mine with the US Bureau of Mines - Spokane Research Center (USBM, SRC) micro-computer based radiation monitoring system. Parameters such as amount of ore, amount of condensation nuclei in the mine air, temperature, air velocity, and barometric pressure were studied. The laboratory tests were conducted in an air-tight radon chamber equipped with a container of the radioactive material, various monitors, and the USBM, SRC Data Acquisition System. The effect of parameters such as ore grade, particle size, rock moisture, air temperature and relative humidity on radon concentrations were measured in the laboratory. Radiation levels, together with parameters affecting these levels, were measured over a period of one year (June 1984-July 1985) both in the laboratory model and in the field

  14. Nuclear structure and radioactive decay resources at the US National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Burrows, T.W.; Pritychenko, B.; Tuli, J.K.; Winchell, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center has a long tradition of evaluating nuclear structure and decay data as well as offering tools to assist in nuclear science research and applications. With these tools, users can obtain recommended values for nuclear structure and radioactive decay observables as well as links to the relevant articles. The main databases or tools are ENSDF, NSR, NuDat and the new Endf decay data library. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) stores recommended nuclear structure and decay data for all nuclei. ENSDF deals with properties such as: -) nuclear level energies, spin and parity, half-life and decay modes, -) nuclear radiation energy and intensity for different types, -) nuclear decay modes and their probabilities. The Nuclear Science References (NSR) is a bibliographic database containing nearly 200.000 nuclear sciences articles indexed according to content. About 4000 are added each year covering 80 journals as well as conference proceedings and laboratory reports. NuDat is a software product with 2 main goals, to present nuclear structure and decay information from ENSDF in a user-friendly way and to allow users to execute complex search operations in the wealth of data contained in ENSDF. The recently released Endf-B7.0 contains a decay data sub-library which has been derived from ENSDF. The way all these databases and tools have been offered to the public has undergone a drastic improvement due to advancements in information technology

  15. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The primary focus has been studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z equal to 82 region. Most notably, the structure of the neutron-deficient Au isotopes has been studied by on-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR, by on-line low-temperature nuclear orientation of mass-separated isotopes at LISOL, and by on-line laser atomic hyperfine spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at ISOLDE. Theoretical studies of neutron-deficient Au isotopes have been made. The most dramatic result is the observation of a sudden large increase in the mean-square charge radius between 187 Au and 186 Au, seen in the laser spectroscopy measurements as ISOLDE

  16. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary focus this year has been studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z ∼ 82 region. Most notably, the existence and conditions for the occurrence of electric monopole (E0) transitions have been considerably clarified. This has been a topic of considerable confusion. On-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR (in a collaboration with LSU) has now completely resolved all points of disagreement. These studies are part of a larger program directed towards building a complete picture of shape coexistence. It is becoming evident that E0 transitions are a key signature to shape coexistence. Thus, their correct identification and location are crucial

  17. Observation of Two-Proton Radioactivity of 19Mg by Tracking the Decay Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukha, I.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Espino, J.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Suemmerer, K.; Chatillon, A.; Geissel, H.; Hoffmann, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Yu.; Nociforo, C.; Ott, W.; Roeckl, E.; Weick, H.; Acosta, L.; Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Martel, I.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the two-proton radioactivity of the previously unknown 19 Mg ground state by tracking the decay products in-flight. For the first time, the trajectories of the 2p-decay products, 17 Ne+p+p, have been measured by using tracking microstrip detectors which allowed us to reconstruct the 2p-decay vertices and fragment correlations. The half-life of 19 Mg deduced from the measured vertex distribution is 4.0(15) ps in the system of 19 Mg. The Q value of the 2p decay of the 19 Mg ground state inferred from the measured p-p- 17 Ne correlations is 0.75(5) MeV

  18. Radioactivity around naval nuclear bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Between 12th July and 2nd August 1988, Greenpeace took sediment samples from around four Royal Navy bases in the United Kingdom. Faslane, where nuclear powered submarines are berthed; Devonport and Rosyth where refit work is carried out and Portsmouth where US and UK nuclear submarines often visit. Samples were also taken from the US Navy base at Holy Loch, Scotland, where nuclear powered ballistic missile submarines are based. The samples were analysed at St Bartholomew Hospital Medical School, London. Identical samples were provided to the MoD personnel at Faslane and Devonport on the date taken. The purpose of carrying out the sampling programme was to highlight the fact that publicly available statistics from Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food (MAFF) are too limited in range, concentrating as they do merely on radioactive levels found between tides. The findings point to the necessity of monitoring subtidal as well as intertidal areas since levels of radioactivity found in the samples at Faslane and Holy Loch were four to nine times the figures published by MAFF. Until such time as nuclear power is no longer used at sea, it is the contention of Greenpeace that a more independent and comprehensive picture of the nature of radioactive contamination from around UK naval establishments must be obtained, than that presently available from MAFF. (author)

  19. Application of the Laplace transform method for computational modelling of radioactive decay series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Deise L.; Damasceno, Ralf M.; Barros, Ricardo C. [Univ. do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IME/UERJ) (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias Computacionais

    2012-03-15

    It is well known that when spent fuel is removed from the core, it is still composed of considerable amount of radioactive elements with significant half-lives. Most actinides, in particular plutonium, fall into this category, and have to be safely disposed of. One solution is to store the long-lived spent fuel as it is, by encasing and burying it deep underground in a stable geological formation. This implies estimating the transmutation of these radioactive elements with time. Therefore, we describe in this paper the application of the Laplace transform technique in matrix formulation to analytically solve initial value problems that mathematically model radioactive decay series. Given the initial amount of each type of radioactive isotopes in the decay series, the computer code generates the amount at a given time of interest, or may plot a graph of the evolution in time of the amount of each type of isotopes in the series. This computer code, that we refer to as the LTRad{sub L} code, where L is the number of types of isotopes belonging to the series, was developed using the Scilab free platform for numerical computation and can model one segment or the entire chain of any of the three radioactive series existing on Earth today. Numerical results are given to typical model problems to illustrate the computer code efficiency and accuracy. (orig.)

  20. Application of the Laplace transform method for computational modelling of radioactive decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Deise L.; Damasceno, Ralf M.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that when spent fuel is removed from the core, it is still composed of considerable amount of radioactive elements with significant half-lives. Most actinides, in particular plutonium, fall into this category, and have to be safely disposed of. One solution is to store the long-lived spent fuel as it is, by encasing and burying it deep underground in a stable geological formation. This implies estimating the transmutation of these radioactive elements with time. Therefore, we describe in this paper the application of the Laplace transform technique in matrix formulation to analytically solve initial value problems that mathematically model radioactive decay series. Given the initial amount of each type of radioactive isotopes in the decay series, the computer code generates the amount at a given time of interest, or may plot a graph of the evolution in time of the amount of each type of isotopes in the series. This computer code, that we refer to as the LTRad L code, where L is the number of types of isotopes belonging to the series, was developed using the Scilab free platform for numerical computation and can model one segment or the entire chain of any of the three radioactive series existing on Earth today. Numerical results are given to typical model problems to illustrate the computer code efficiency and accuracy. (orig.)

  1. Radioactive decay pattern of actinides present in waste from Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiromoto, Goro; Dellamano, José Claudio, E-mail: hiromoto@ipen.br, E-mail: jcdellam@ipen.br [Instituto de PesquisasEnergéticas e Nucleares (GRR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerência de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    Brazil is currently planning to produce {sup 99}Mo from fission of LEU targets to meet the present national demand of {sup 99m}Tc. The {sup 99}Mo activity planned at the end of irradiation is 5000 Ci (185 TBq) per weekly cycle, in order to meet the present demand of 1000 Ci (37 TBq) per week, after target cooling and processing. To predict the activities that will be handled in the waste treatment facility, the computational code SCALE 6.0 was used to simulate the irradiation of the uranium targets and the decay of radioactive products. This study presents the findings of this research, mainly focused on the actinides activity that will be present in the waste and the respective radioactive decay pattern over a period of one hundred thousand years. (author)

  2. DCHAIN: A user-friendly computer program for radioactive decay and reaction chain calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, L.V.

    1994-05-01

    A computer program for calculating the time-dependent daughter populations in radioactive decay and nuclear reaction chains is described. Chain members can have non-zero initial populations and be produced from the preceding chain member as the result of radioactive decay, a nuclear reaction, or both. As presently implemented, chains can contain up to 15 members. Program input can be supplied interactively or read from ASCII data files. Time units for half-lives, etc. can be specified during data entry. Input values are verified and can be modified if necessary, before used in calculations. Output results can be saved in ASCII files in a format suitable for including in reports or other documents. The calculational method, described in some detail, utilizes a generalized form of the Bateman equations. The program is written in the C language in conformance with current ANSI standards and can be used on multiple hardware platforms

  3. Interactive information system on the nuclear physics properties of nuclides and radioactive decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyaskin, V.I.; Kosilov, R.A.; Manturov, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review is given of a computerized information system on the nuclear physics properties of nuclides and radioactive decay chains. The main difference between the system presented here and those already in existence is that these evaluated databases of nuclear physics constants are linked to a set of programs, thus enabling analysis of a wide range of problems regarding various nuclear physics applications. (author)

  4. Determination of the isomeric fraction in a postaccelerated radioactive ion beam using the coupled decay-chain equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ekstrom, A; Dijulio, D D; Cederkall, J; Van de Walle, J

    2010-01-01

    A method based on the coupled decay-chain equations for extracting the isotopic and the isomeric composition of a postaccelerated radioactive ion beam is presented and demonstrated on a data set from a Coulomb excitation experiment. This is the first attempt of analyzing the content of a postaccelerated radioactive ion beam using this technique. The beam composition is required for an absolute normalization of the measurement. The strength of the method, as compared to present online-based methods, lies in the determination of the isomeric fraction of a partially isomeric beam using all data accumulated during the experiment. We discuss the limitations and sensitivity of the method with respect to the gamma-ray detection efficiency and the accumulated flux. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of chemical structure on the radioactive decay rate of 71Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makariunas, K.; Makariuniene, E.; Dragunas, A.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the chemical structure on the electron capture radioactive decay rate of 71 Ge was observed. 71 Ge nuclei in bivalent sulphide GeS decay faster than in quadrivalent sulphide GeS 2 . The relative change Δlambda/lambda of the decay constant lambda is + (11.4 +- 1.7) X 10 -4 . A possibility to use the experimental values of Δlambda/lambda to determine the chemical changes in the electron density at germanium nuclei in germanium chemical compounds is discussed. Quantitative determination of the changes in the electron density is complicated because of insufficient reliability of the published values of exchange and overlap corrections to the electron capture probabilities. (Auth.)

  6. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Toraño, E., E-mail: e.garciatorano@ciemat.es [Laboratorio de Metrología de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peyres, V. [Laboratorio de Metrología de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), Bldg 602, PC111, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Salvat, F. [Facultat de Física (FQA and ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  7. Chemical aspects of the radioactive decay 38S to 38Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurs, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    The cyclotron-production of 38 S with the reaction 40 Ar(p,3p) 38 S is described. An excitation curve for this nuclear reaction is given and the chemistry used to produce sulfates labeled with 38 S and H 2 38 S is described. The probability distribution of the recoil energy of 38 Cl, produced by beta-decay of 38 S, is given. The probability for rupture of the original bonds due to the radioactive decay process, is estimated for gaseous H 2 38 S and for crystalline sulfates- 38 S. The results are given for the β,γ-decay of 38 S to 38 Cl under different circumstances in inorganic solid sulfates (with and without water of crystallization) and in the mixed crystal K 2 SO 4 .K 2 BeF 4 (1 : 2500). Finally, the reactions of 38 Cl, produced by radioactive decay of 38 S (as H 2 38 S) with gaseous 1,2-dichloroethylene are discussed

  8. Selection of nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    The criteria for selecting nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste are given. The reduced chains recommended for use with SYVAC are described. (author)

  9. LEAF: a computer program to calculate fission product release from a reactor containment building for arbitrary radioactive decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.E.; Apperson, C.E. Jr.; Foley, J.E.

    1976-10-01

    The report describes an analytic containment building model that is used for calculating the leakage into the environment of each isotope of an arbitrary radioactive decay chain. The model accounts for the source, the buildup, the decay, the cleanup, and the leakage of isotopes that are gas-borne inside the containment building

  10. Between atomic and nuclear physics: radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasov, Dinko; Bosch, Fritz; Brandau, Carsten; Chen, Xiangcheng; Dillmann, Iris; Gao, Bingshui; Geissel, Hans; Hagmann, Siegbert; Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Litvinov, Sergey A; Litvinov, Yuri A; Münzenberg, Gottfried; Blaum, Klaus; Bühler, Paul; Faestermann, Thomas; Gernhäuser, Roman; Izumikawa, Takuji; Kurcewicz, Jan; Ma, Xinwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly charged radioactive ions can be stored for extended periods of time in storage rings which allows for precision measurements of their decay modes. The straightforward motivation for performing such studies is that fully ionised nuclei or few-electron ions can be viewed as clean quantum-mechanical systems, in which the interactions of the many electrons can be either excluded or treated precisely. Thus, the influence of the electron shell on the decay probability can be investigated. Another important motivation is stellar nucleosynthesis, which proceeds at high temperatures and the involved atoms are therefore highly ionised. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at heavy-ion storage rings. Furthermore, we outline the perspectives for future experiments at new-generation storage-ring facilities. (paper)

  11. Multi-day radon signals with a radioactive decay limb-Occurrence and geophysical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinitz, G.; Martin, M.C.; Gazit-Yaari, N.; Quesada, M.L.; Nuez, J. de la; Casillas, R.; Malik, U.; Begin, Z.B.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-day signals, generally with duration of 2-10 days, are a prominent temporal variation type of radon (Rn) in geo gas in the unsaturated zone. Rare multi-day Rn signals have been found which are characterized by: (a) a declining limb lasting up to 10 days which conforms to the radioactive decay of Rn (b) recurs at the same location and (c) is recorded in diverse situations-volcanic and seismogenic. It suggested that a Rn blob is injected at a lower level on a steady upward flow of geogas whereby the rise and final fall of the signal are attributed to the edges of the blob while the central Rn-decay segment records the passing of the decaying blob itself. Rn-decay signals are a small subset of multi-day Rn signals which are considered as highly irregular and unusable for the understanding of geophysical processes. In difference, it is concluded that multi-day Rn signals are probably proxies of subtle geodynamic processes at upper crustal levels and are therefore significant for studying such processes

  12. Radioactivity and decay heat generation in precambrian magmatic rocks (with the South Pamirs as an example)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrmurzaev, A.S.; Alibekov, G.I.; Bekieva, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of the heat generation share in the results of the long-living radioactive elements (RAE) decay in the Earth surface layers is accomplished on the basis of the data on the uranium and thorium concentration in the precambrian magmatic rocks of the South Pamirs. It was supposed by the calculations, that the value of the heat flux, generated by the rocks, is determined mainly by the RAE content in the Earth upper layer crust itself of 10-15 km. It is shown that the radioheat generation share is within the range of 5-10% from the measured values of the geothermal flows [ru

  13. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  14. A general algorithm for radioactive decay with branching and loss from a medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    Many areas in the field of health physics require evaluation of the change of radionuclide quantity in a medium with time. A general solution to first-order compartmental models is presented in this paper for application to systems consisting of one physical medium that contains any number of radionuclide decay chain members. The general analytical solution to the problem is first described mathematically, and then extended to four applications: (1) evaluation of the quantity of radionuclides as a function of time, (2) evaluation of the time integral of the quantity during a time period, (3) evaluation of the amount in a medium as a function of time following deposition at a constant rate, and (4) evaluation of the time integral of the amount in a medium after deposition at a constant rate for a time. The solution can be applied to any system involving physical transfers from the medium and radioactive chain decay with branching in the medium. The general solution is presented for quantities expressed in units of atoms and activity. Unlike many earlier mathematical solutions, this solution includes chain decay with branching explicitly in the equations

  15. Alloy development for fast induced radioactivity decay for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1984-03-01

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels and austenitic stainless steels (primarily type 316 and variations on that composition) are the leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes. These isotopes lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by developing steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). This report discusses the development of such steels by making elemental substitutions in the steels now under consideration. Molybdenum must be replaced in the Cr-Mo steels; nickel and molybdenum both must be replaced in the austenitic stainless steels (the nitrogen concentration must be limited, and niobium, maintained to extremely low levels). Appropriate substitutions are tungsten for molybdenum in the Cr-Mo steels and manganese for nickel in the austenitic stainless steels. Indications are that suitable ferritic steels can be developed, but development of a nickel-free austenitic stainless steel with properties similar to the Cr-Ni stainless steels appears to be much more complex

  16. Discovery of the radioactive decay of 223Ra by 14C emission and experiments with the magnetic spectrometer Soleno

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourani, E.; Hussonnois, M.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this report is to review the experiment of Rose and Jones (discovery in 1984 of radioactive decay of 223 Ra by 14 C nuclei emission) with the subsequent one of Alexandrov (et al) performed with the same technique. The experiments performed by the group at Orsay on 14 C radioactivity of radium isotopes with the magnetic spectrometer Soleno are also reviewed. This review comprises the presentation and comments of the original results and arguments taken in their historical context

  17. Induced radioactivity in the target station and decay tunnel from a 4MW proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Otto, T; Silari, Marco

    2003-01-01

    An important aspect of a future CERN Neutrino Factory is the material activation arising from a 2.2 GeV, 4 MW proton beam striking a mercury target. A first estimation of the hadronic inelastic interactions and the production of residual nuclei in the target, the magnetic horn, the decay tunnel, the surrounding rock and a downstream dump has been performed by the Monte Carlo hadronic cascade code FLUKA. The aim is both to assess the dose equivalent rate to be expected during maintenance work and to evaluate the amount of residual radioactivity, which will have to be disposed of after the facility has ceased operation. This paper discusses the first results of such calculations.

  18. GAMCAT - a personal computer database on alpha particles and gamma rays from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepel, J.W.; Mueller, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    The GAMCAT database is a compilation of data describing the alpha particles and gamma rays that occur in the radioactive decay of all known nuclides, adapted for IBM Personal Computers and compatible systems. These compiled data have been previously published, and are now available as a compact database. Entries can be retrieved by defining the properties of the parent nuclei as well as alpha-particle and gamma-ray energies or any combination of these parameters. The system provides fast access to the data and has been completely written in C to run on an AT-compatible computer, with a hard disk and 640K of memory under DOS 2.11 or higher. GAMCAT is available from the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.)

  19. Suicide of EMT-6 tumor cells by decays from radioactively-labelled sensitizer adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, W.H.Y.; Chapman, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Nitroaromatic radiosensitizers become metabolically bound preferentially to hypoxic cells and at least 10/sup 9/ adducts/cell can be tolerated as non-toxic. EMT-6 tumor cells have been incubated in hypoxia in the presence of /sup 3/H-Misonidazole and /sup 125/I-Azomycin Riboside for various times and the amount of /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I bound/cell was determined. Cells were stored as monolayers at 25 0 C for up to 96 hr to accumulate radioactive decays and transferred at various times to 37 0 C for colony-forming assays. No radiation inactivation was measured in cells which had incorporated at least 10/sup 6/ /sup 3/H or 10/sup 5/ /sup 125/I atoms. Previous studies had shown that -- 1% of MISO adducts to EMT-6 cells was associated with cellular DNA. These data indicate that the radiation-induced damage produced by these quantities of bound /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I causes little or not cell inactivation. The results of current studies to measure the colony-forming ability of sensitizer-labelled cells which have been stored in liquid nitrogen to facilitate the accumulation of more decays will be reported. These data suggest that a ''sensitizer-adduct suicide technique'' as a hypoxic cell selective adjunct to other cancer therapies is not feasible. These data are also instructive for those who attempt to develop radiolabelled ''tumor specific'' antibodies for therapeutic purposes

  20. The real-time fitting of radioactive decay curves. Pt. 3. Counting during sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of a least-squares method for the real-time fitting of the theoretical total count function to the actual total count from radioactive decays has been given previously for the case where counting takes place after a sample is taken. The counting may be done in a number of different counting systems which distinguish between different types or energies of radiation emitted from the sample. The method would allow real-time determination of the numbers of atoms and hence activities of the individual isotopes present and has been designated the Time Evolved Least-Squares method (TELS). If the radioactivity which is to be measured exists as an aerosol or in a form where a sample is taken at a constant rate it may be possible to count during sampling and by so doing reduce the total time required to determine the activity of the individual isotopes present. The TELS method is extended here to the case where counting and the evaluation of the activity takes place concurrently with the sampling. The functions which need to be evaluated are derived and the calculations required to implement the method are discussed. As with the TELS method of counting after sampling the technique of counting during sampling and the simultaneous evaluation of activity could be achieved in real-time. Results of testing the method by computer simulation for two counting schemes for the descendants of radon are presented. ((orig.))

  1. Schemes of radioactive decay, its interpretations in the scope of the radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, N.; Caro, R.A.; Bergoc, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In our teaching experience we have verified that the interpretation of the symbols of radioactive decay schemes is one of the most difficult subject in the study of radioisotope methodologies for almost all professionals, and specially for those who have no solid background in mathematics or physics. The correct interpretation of decay schemes has fundamental importance for the proper election of measurement conditions and for performing the dosimetric and shielding calculations. Nuclides employed in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine are beta, gamma or beta/gamma emitters. Interpretation of decay schemes of beta emitters, by β + , β - or electronic capture are not difficult. In gamma emitting nuclides it is frequent that a particular level of energy is de-excited through more than one gamma transition of a given percentage and energy. On the other hand, it is also frequent that conversion electrons are emitted together with gamma photons, the proportion of which is usually given as the conversion factor, e/γ. The fraction of emitted photons is calculated as: 1 / [1+ (e/γ)], whereas the fraction of emitted conversion electrons is equal to: (e/γ) / [1+ (e/γ)]. Special attention should be given to the post-accommodation mechanism after disintegration in which orbital vacancies are produced: electron conversion or electron capture, in which the emission of X-rays and Auger electrons occur. All this information should be taken into account for the correct choice of measurement conditions, as well as internal and external dose calculations. In the present work we describe the analysis and interpretation of disintegration schemes in general and that of the most employed nuclides in Nuclear Medicine and Biomedicine. (author) [es

  2. Requirements for a radioactive waste data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, I.; Kikuchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    With the progress of nuclear fuel cycle in Japan, various types of radioactive waste will generate at each nuclear facility in the cycle. Therefor generated volume and stored quantity of waste will be supposed to increase. From the viewpoints of safety and public acceptance, by using mainframe computer it is necessary that the treatment of historical waste data, the estimation of generated waste volume and stored quantity and the investigation of research and development status of waste processing and disposal are carried out. This paper proposes design and development of the radioactive waste data base which is able to properly and correctly manage and grasp numerical and/or documentary information for generated radioactive waste. So the data base will be expected to use for planning the future management of radioactive waste. (author)

  3. The ENSDF radioactivity data base for IBM-PC and computer network access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, P.; Spanier, L.

    1989-08-01

    A data base system for radioactivity gamma rays is described. A base with approximately 15000 gamma rays from 2777 decays is available for installation on the hard disk of a PC, and a complete system with approximately 73000 gamma rays is available for on-line access via the NORDic University computer NETwork (NORDUNET) and the Swedish University computer NETwork (SUNET)

  4. EDISTR: a computer program to obtain a nuclear decay data base for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    This report provides documentation for the computer program EDISTR. EDISTR uses basic radioactive decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File developed and maintained by the Nuclear Data Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as input, and calculates the mean energies and absolute intensities of all principal radiations associated with the radioactive decay of a nuclide. The program is intended to provide a physical data base for internal dosimetry calculations. The principal calculations performed by EDISTR are the determination of (1) the average energy of beta particles in a beta transition, (2) the beta spectrum as function of energy, (3) the energies and intensities of x-rays and Auger electrons generated by radioactive decay processes, (4) the bremsstrahlung spectra accompanying beta decay and monoenergetic Auger and internal conversion electrons, and (5) the radiations accompanying spontaneous fission. This report discusses the theoretical and empirical methods used in EDISTR and also practical aspects of the computer implementation of the theory. Detailed instructions for preparing input data for the computer program are included, along with examples and discussion of the output data generated by EDISTR

  5. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and γ ray spectrum. FPGS90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting γ ray and β ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted γ ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library 'JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -', which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author)

  6. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and {gamma} ray spectrum. FPGS90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting {gamma} ray and {beta} ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted {gamma} ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library `JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -`, which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author).

  7. Anomalous effects of radioactive decay rates and capacitance values measured inside a modified Faraday cage: Correlations with space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholkmann, F.; Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recently we reported (Milián-Sánchez V. et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 828 (2016) 210) our experimental results involving 226Ra decay rate and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage. Our measurements exhibited anomalous effects of unknown origin. In this letter we report new results regarding our investigation into the origins of the observed effects. We report preliminary findings of a correlation analysis between the radioactive decay rates and capacitance time series and space weather related variables (geomagnetic field disturbances and cosmic-ray neutron counts). A significant correlation was observed for specific data sets. The results are presented and possible implications for future work discussed.

  8. Decay schemes of the radioactive nuclei A = 225 to 229. Skhemy raspada radioaktivnykh yader A = 225 - 229

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhelepov, B S; Ivanov, R B; Mikhailova, M A

    1976-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to properties of atomic nuclei with mass numbers A = 225 to 229. The book collects and systematizes all of the experimental data characterizing properties of radioactive isotopes: information concerning masses of nuclei, magnetic and electric moments, lifetimes of nuclear states, the most reliable information on characteristics of radiations, quantum characteristics of levels and other properties of the studied nuclei. On basis of a critical analysis of the totality of information, decay schemes of radioactive nuclei with mass numbers A = 225 to 229 were constructed, as well as the series of excited states of the isotopes which lie in this region of nuclei.

  9. Measurement of relative L X-ray intensity ratio following radioactive decay and photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcin, P. [Department of Science Education, Faculty of Education, Erzincan University, 24030 Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: pasayalcin@hotmail.com; Porikli, S.; Kurucu, Y.; Sahin, Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-05-22

    The measurements of the L X-ray intensity ratio I(L{alpha})/I(L{beta}), I(L{alpha})/I(L{gamma}), I(L{alpha})/I(L{iota}), I(L{beta})/I(L{gamma}) and I(L{iota})/I(L{gamma}) for elements Dy, Ho, Yb, W, Hg, Tl and Pb were experimentally determined both by photon excitation, in which 59.5 keV {gamma}-rays from a filtered radioisotope {sup 241}Am was used, and by the radioactive decay of {sup 160}Tb, {sup 160}Er, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 182}Re, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 203}Pb and {sup 207}Bi. L X-rays emitted by samples were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Obtained values were compared with the calculated theoretical values. Theoretical values of the I(L{alpha}/L{beta}), I(L{alpha}/L{gamma}), I(L{alpha}/L{iota}), I(L{beta}/L{gamma}) and I(L{iota}/L{gamma}) intensity ratios were calculated using theoretically tabulated values of subshell photoionization cross-section, fluorescence yield, fractional X-ray emission rates, Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. It was observed that present values agree with previous theoretical and other available experimental results.

  10. Pulsational Pair-instability Model for Superluminous Supernova PTF12dam:Interaction and Radioactive Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei; Quimby, Robert [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sorokina, Elena [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Baklanov, Petr, E-mail: alexey.tolstov@ipmu.jp [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Being a superluminous supernova, PTF12dam can be explained by a {sup 56}Ni-powered model, a magnetar-powered model, or an interaction model. We propose that PTF12dam is a pulsational pair-instability supernova, where the outer envelope of a progenitor is ejected during the pulsations. Thus, it is powered by a double energy source: radioactive decay of {sup 56}Ni and a radiative shock in a dense circumstellar medium. To describe multicolor light curves and spectra, we use radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the STELLA code. We found that light curves are well described in the model with 40 M {sub ⊙} ejecta and 20–40 M {sub ⊙} circumstellar medium. The ejected {sup 56}Ni mass is about 6 M {sub ⊙}, which results from explosive nucleosynthesis with large explosion energy (2–3)×10{sup 52} erg. In comparison with alternative scenarios of pair-instability supernova and magnetar-powered supernova, in the interaction model, all the observed main photometric characteristics are well reproduced: multicolor light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities.

  11. Chemical effects of the radioactive decay 7677Kr→7677Br reactions of recoil bromine in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, D. de.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the chemical reactions of 76 Br and 77 Br recoil species, formed by radioactive decay of 76 Kr and 77 Kr, with various gaseous compounds. Due to differences in decay energy and decay mode the resulting 76 Br and 77 Br isotopes obtain different kinetic energies and carry different charges; 76 Kr decays completely via electron capture and the resulting 76 Br is formed with a multiple positive charge and a kinetic energy of 7.2 eV at the most. 77 Kr decays for only 16% via electron capture, resulting in 77 Brsup(n+) ions with a maximal kinetic energy of 56.9 eV. 84% of the 77 Kr decays via #betta# + particle emission, which leads to 77 Br species, that are mainly negative or uncharged and that possess a maximal kinetic energy of 36.4 eV. The aim of this study was to explore whether these initial differences in charge and kinetic energy are reflected in the products, formed after chemical reactions of 76 Br and 77 Br. (Auth.)

  12. Decay data file based on the ENSDF file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A decay data file with the JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) format based on the ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) file was produced as a tentative one of special purpose files of JENDL. The problem using the ENSDF file as primary source data of the JENDL decay data file is presented. (author)

  13. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A.; Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V MAS /WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, τ c is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 10 τ c [S] 10 (τ/τ c ) > -17.0, where τ is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  14. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.C. de.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author) [pt

  15. Contribution of the radioactive decay to the study of the structure of N=Z nuclei of mass A>70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longour, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive decay study gives an access to the interaction which rules the β decay process as well as the structure of the nuclear states involved. This work describes the observation of the decay of N = Z nuclei with mass A > 70. For the odd-odd N = Z nuclei 78 Y, 82 Nb and 86 Tc, the decay has been established as superallowed Fermi type transitions. The results pave the way for more precise measurements and extend the mass range nowadays used to understand the behaviour of the weak interaction in the nuclear matter. The observation of the decay of the even-even N = Z 72 Kr leads us to build the Gamow-Teller strength distribution from which some clues about the ground state deformation of this isotope can be obtained. More complete experimental observation and some developments of the calculations used to interpret the distribution of the Gamow-Teller strength are needed. Finally, this work describes the developments and tests of a prototype detector the aim of which to determine the contribution of β particles to energy distribution observed in germanium detector. The tests we have performed show that this prototype can identify and reject 80% of the β particles emitted by a source with a 2,3 MeV end-point. The very satisfactory performances of this prototype need now to be confirmed under experimental conditions. (author)

  16. Chemical and biological consequences of the radioactive decay of iodine-125 in plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linz, U.

    1983-09-01

    The consequences of the decay of iodine-125 incorporated into DNA were studied on a molecular basis. Doubly ( 14 C and 125 I) labelled 5-iodo-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate (IdCTP) was synthesized and incorporated enzymatically into the SalI-cutting site of the plasmid pBR 322. Part of the radioiodinated DNA was treated with T4-DNA ligase in order to restore the circular structure of the native plasmid molecule. After 4 months of storage under various conditions the stable end products were analyzed by radio GC, radio HPLC and electron microscopy. The experiments were not only carried out with doubly-labelled DNA but also with solutions of 14 C-labelled DNA containing Na 125 I as internal radiation source. The results clearly indicate that radiolysis alone causes only minor damage. Transmutation of the covalently bound iodine, on the other hand, leads to complete destruction of the labelled nucleotide, giving rise to 14 CO 2 and 14 CO as main products. The production of 14 CO 2 which originates from both the base as well as the sugar component shows a strong solvent effect. The electron microscopy analysis of the DNA reveals that the local effects are always connected with at least one double strand break directly at the site of decay. In addition, one finds DNA double strand breaks in areas which are hundreds of base pairs apart from that site. Under certain circumstances most of the DNA molecules exhibit up to 10 breaks. A comparison between ligase-treated and untreated DNA shows that the configuration of the DNA and the position of the labelled nucleotide play in important role in the extent of the overall damage. It could be demonstrated that there is a linear correlation between gaseous fragmentation products and the number of double strand breaks. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Computer simulation of the natural U 238 and U 235 radioactive series decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, A.; Oncescu, M.

    1980-01-01

    The principles of the computer simulation of a radionuclide decay - its decay scheme adoption and codification -, and the adoption principle of a radionuclide chain in a series are applied to the natural U 238 and U 235 series radionuclide decay computer simulation. Using the computer simulation data of these two series adopted chains, the decay characteristic quantities of the series radionuclides, the gamma spectra and the basic characteristics of each of these series are determined and compared with the experimental values given in the literature. (author)

  18. No evidence for a decrease of nuclear decay rates with increasing heliocentric distance based on radiochronology of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    It has been argued that the decay rates of several radioactive nuclides are slightly lower at Earth's aphelion than at perihelion, and that this effect might depend on heliocentric distance. It might then be expected that nuclear decay rates be considerably lower at larger distances from the sun, e.g., in the asteroid belt at 2-3 AU from where most meteorites originate. If so, ages of meteorites obtained by analyses of radioactive nuclides and their stable daughter isotopes might be in error, since these ages are based on decay rates determined on Earth. Here we evaluate whether the large data base on nuclear cosmochronology offers any hint for discrepancies which might be due to radially variable decay rates. Chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301,000 a) is produced in meteorites by interactions with cosmic rays and is the nuclide for which a decay rate dependence from heliocentric distance has been proposed, which, in principle, can be tested with our approach and the current data base. We show that compilations of 36Cl concentrations measured in meteorites offer no support for a spatially variable 36Cl decay rate. For very short-lived cosmic-ray produced radionuclides (half-lives uranium decay rates in different meteorite parent bodies in the asteroid belt. Moreover, the oldest U-Pb ages of meteorites agree with the main-sequence age of the sun derived from helioseismology within the formal ˜1% uncertainty of the latter. Meteorite ages also provide no evidence for a decrease of decay rates with heliocentric distance for nuclides such as 87Rb (decay mode β-) 40K (β- and electron capture), and 147Sm (α).

  19. Prospects for studies of ground-state proton decays with the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    By using radioactive ions from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory it should be possible to identify many new ground-state proton emitters in the mass region from Sn to Pb. During this production and search process the limits of stability on the proton-rich side of the nuclidic chart will be delineated for a significant fraction of medium-weight elements and our understanding of the proton-emission process will be expanded and improved

  20. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Instituto Superior de Ciencias e Tecnologia Nucleares, La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V{sub MAS}/WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, {tau}{sub c} is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 <{approx_equal} log{sub 10} {tau}{sub c} [S] <{approx_equal} 27.50 and log {sub 10}({tau}/{tau}{sub c}) > -17.0, where {tau} is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  1. Paul Trapping of Radioactive 6He+ Ions and Direct Observation of Their β Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Mery, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Duval, F.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; Mauger, F.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Velten, Ph.; Thomas, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived β unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6 He + (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10 8 ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10 5 decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6 Li ++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments

  2. Simultaneous resolution of reactive radioactive decay, non-isothermal flow, and migration with application to the performance assessment for HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Font, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive decay is an important subject to take into account when studying the thermo-hydro-dynamic behavior of the buffer clay material used in the containment of radioactive waste. The modern concepts for the multibarrier design of a repository of high level waste in deep geologic formations consider that once canisters have failed, the buffer clay material must ensure the retention and/or delay of radionuclides within the time framework given in the assessment studies. Within the clay buffer, different chemical species are retarded/fixed according to several physicochemical processes (ion exchange, surface complexation, precipitation, matrix diffusion,..) but typical approaches do not consider the eventuality that radioactive species change their chemical nature (i.e. phase) thereby affecting their reactive behavior. The radioactive decay of an element takes place independently of the phase (aqueous, solid or gaseous) to which it belongs. This means that, in terms of radionuclide fixation, some geochemical processes will be effective scavengers (for instance mineral precipitation of crystal growth) while others will not (for instance ion exchange and/or sorption). In this contribution we present a reactive radioactive decay model of any number of chemical components including those that belong to decay series. The model, which is named FLOW-DECAY, also takes into account flow and isotopic migration and it has been applied considering a hypothetical model scenario provided by the project ENRESA 2000 and direct comparison with the results generated by the probabilistic code GoldSim. Results indicate that FLOW-DECAY may simulate the decay processes in a similar way that GoldSim, being the differences related to factors associated to code architecture. (orig.)

  3. Critical evaluation of radioactive decay constants for 99Mo, 144Ce, 144Pr and 144Pm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'yan, Yu.I.; Sokolovskij, L.L.; Chukreev, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    The decay schemes of 99 Mo, 144 Ce, 144 Pr, 144 Pm are reviewed on the basis of analysis of a large number of published experimental works. A knowledge of the decay constants of the first three nuclei, which are fission products, is of great importance in developing safeguards methods. Quantities characterizing the β-decay of 99 Mo, 144 Ce, 144 Pr and K-electron capture ( 144 Pm) are evaluated. Level schemes are plotted for the daughter nuclei. Evaluations are made in respect of the energies and intensities of γ-rays and conversion electrons accompanying β-decay and K-electron capture, internal conversion coefficients and transition multipolarities, level energies, spins, parities, and lifetimes of the ground and excited states of 99 Tc, 144 Pr, and 144 Nd. From the results obtained the 99 Mo- 99 Tc mass difference can be deduced and a new value of 1358.0 +- 3.0 keV is established instead of the previously used value of 1372.2 +- 3.9 keV. The analagous quantity for the nuclei 144 Pr- 144 Nd is taken as 2994.6 +- 3.2 keV instead of the value 2997.0 +- 3.0 keV. (author)

  4. Abnormal radioactive decays out of long-lived super- and hyper-deformed isomeric states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, A.; Gelberg, S.; Kolb, D.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Recently (1-3) long-lived isomeric states have been found in the super- and hyper-deformed wells of the potential. These isomers manifested themselves by abnormal particle decays. An isomeric state in the superdeformed well of the potential in the parent nucleus can decay by very enhanced α-particle groups to superdeformed states in the daughter (1) or by very retarded α-particles (3) and also by protons (2) to normal states in the daughters. Similarly an isomeric state in the hyper-deformed well may decay by very retarded α-particle groups to superdeformed states (3), or by very enhanced α-groups to hyper-deformed states in the daughter nucleus (4). All these very unusual decay modes have been observed experimentally (1-4). For instance, a very high energy α-group of 8.6 MeV with 40d ≤ t 1/2 ≤ 2y (retardation factor of ∼10 13 ) has been observed in 195 Hg and interpreted as a III min → II min α-transition (3). Likewise, relatively low-energy and very enhanced α-particle groups (enhancement factors of 10 5 to 10 7 ) have been seen in several actinide sources and interpreted as due to II min → II min and III min → III min transitions (4). These unusual decay modes introduce new considerations in the study of heavy and superheavy elements. For instance, if low-energy α-particle groups around 4.4 - 4.6 MeV have been seen in nature (5), they may be interpreted as due to very enhanced III min → III min transitions in the superheavy element region around Z = 108 (eka-Os) with t 1/2 ∼10 8 y rather than ∼10 15 y as expected for normal α-transitions of such energies in this region, or due to very retarded III min → II min or II min → I min decays in nuclei around Os itself. In both cases, if such activities have been seen in nature, they indicate that the existence of the II min and III min isomeric states may be important in the nucleosynthesis process. It should be mentioned that long-lived high

  5. Bases for safety of shipping radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frejman, Eh.S.; Shchupanovskij, V.D.; Kaloshin, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Classification is presented and design of packaging containers for radioactive substance shipment is described. Standard documents and the main activities related to the shipment radiation safety provision are considered. Practical recommendations on environment and personnel protection during radioactive cargo shipment by all types of vehicles are presented

  6. Radioactive decay properties of CANDU fuel. Volume 1: the natural uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, L.J.; Coady, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The computer code CANIGEN was used to obtain the mass, activity, decay heat and toxicity of CANDU fuel and its component isotopes. Data are also presented on gamma spectra and neutron emissions. Part 1 presents these data for unirradiated fuel, uranium ore and uranium mill tailings. In Part 2 they have been computed for fuel irradiated to levels of burnup ranging from 140 GJ/kg U to 1150 GJ/kg U. (author)

  7. Lethal Effect on Bacterium of Decay of Incorporated Radioactive Atoms (3H, 14C, 32P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelgot, Sonia

    1968-01-01

    The biological effect of decay of 3 H, 14 C and 32 P incorporated into a bacterium depends on the nature of the organic molecule labelled, on the position of the isotope within it and on the isotope itself. In sum, results obtained to date show that: The decay of 3 H atoms incorporated into certain macromolecules of a bacterium causes sterilization through ionization by the ß - particle emitted; transmutation is of negligible importance. This self-irradiation is comparable in effect with X-rays and is affected in a similar manner by the same factors: temperature, presence of a radioprotector, radiosensitivity of the strain. Decay of 14 C or 32 P atoms incorporated into bacterial DNA is lethal because of the transmutation effect; ionizations produced by emitted ß - particles may be disregarded. Survival curves for 32 P transmutations depend on the experimental conditions. Some of the results obtained with 32 P are similar to those obtained with X-rays, e.g. effects of temperature, radical capture and oxygen, while others are similar to those of u.v. light, e.g., effect of growth conditions. Comparative tests made with 32 P indicate that the recoil energy of transmutation is not the phenomenon responsible for the lethal effect observed. Comparison of the results obtained after X-irradiation or decay of 3 H or 32 P incorporated into the DNA of bacteria of the same strain of E. coli shows that the efficiency of a 32 P transmutation is about four times greater than that of an ionization produced at random within the same DNA. (author) [fr

  8. Studies of new modes of radioactive decay by spontaneous emission of complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwick, S.W.; Hulet, E.K.; Moody, K.; Price, P.B.; Ravn, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the two years since Rose and Jones first reported the novel spontaneous decay mode 223 Ra → 14 C + 209 Pb. Since then, the isotopes 222 Ra, 224 Ra, and 226 Ra have been observed to emit 14 C, and stringent upper limits have been set on branching ratios B( 14 C/α) for 221 Ra and 225 Ac. The discoveries of emission of 24 Ne from 232 U, and 231 Pa, and 233 U show that the phenomenon of heavy ion emission is a general one. A goal of recent experiments by the authors collaboration is to test models that differ by as much as 10 5 in predicted half-lives for the emission of complex nuclei with Z ≥ 12. Due to small branching ratios B approx-lt 10 -14 , and large fission background, they are developing new techniques to insure reliable identification of such rare decay modes. Experimental support for the unified models of alpha decay, complex nuclei emission, and spontaneous fission are addressed

  9. K concentration in seven rice varieties and two infusions (coffee and tea) determined by 40K-40Ar radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete, J.M.; Cabrera, L.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    As a result of the event occurred in Mexico about 20 years ago, by which milk powder contaminated with 137 CS was imported from an European country after the Chernobyl accident, a legal disposition was set up in the country in order to certify the absence of radioactive contamination by gamma emitters, performing gamma spectroscopy to every foodstuff sample either imported or to be exported. In this process is always detected the X rays (1461 KeV) natural radiation emitted by 11% of 40 K nucleus decaying to 40 Ar by EC. So, when the counts accumulated during a detection time from 12 to 24 hours in a low background scintillation detection system are expressed as cps, corrected for background and divided by the sample weight (g), detection efficiency (%), decay yielding (0.11) and constant specific activity of elementary K(31.19 Bq/gK), the K concentration in the sample .is obtained. This paper reports the results found in seven rice varieties and two more vegetables, coffee and tea, including the K fractions passing to infusions, as well as are discussed similarities and differences related to K concentration and the advantages of the method.

  10. Gaseous release of radioactive iodine from decaying plants. I. Release following foliar and root uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene; Grauby, Andre

    1975-12-01

    Iodine uptake by plants is a significant link in the contamination of the food chain. Long half-live iodine was studied considering foliar and root uptake, loss by rain scavenging, residue decay or outgassing in order to assess two aspects of the problem: the importance of outgassing and the effect of the route of transfer on iodine losses. It appeared that iodine release was a function of the vegetal type, there were differences according to the pattern of absorption (via leaf or root) and the processes of iodine release were usually related to biochemical mechanisms [fr

  11. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  12. The problem in 180 deg data sampling and radioactivity decay correction in gated cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Junichi

    1986-01-01

    In cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT, half 180 deg data collection (HD) vs. full 360 deg data collection (FD) and Tc-99m decay are problems in quantifying the ejection count (EC) (end-diastolic count - end-systolic count) of both ventricles and the ratio of the ejection count of the right and left ventricles (RVEC/LVEC). We studied the change produced by altering the starting position of data sampling in HD scans. In our results of phantom and 4 clinical cases, when the cardiac axis deviation was not large and there was not remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change in LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was small (1 - 4 %) within 12 degree change of the starting position, and the difference between the results of HD scan with a good starting position (the average of LV peak and RV peak) and FD scan was not large (less than 7 %). Because of this, we think HD scan can be used in those cases. But when the cardiac axis deviation was large or there was remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change of LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was large (more than 10 %) even within 12 degree change of the starting position. So we think FD scan would be better in those cases. In our results of 6 patients, the half-life of Tc-99m labeled albumin in blood varied from 2 to 4 hr (3.03 ± 0.59 hr, mean ± s.d.). Using a program for radioactivity (RA) decay correction, we studied the change in LVEC, RVEC and LVEC/RVEC in 11 cases. When RA decay correction was performed using a halflife of 3.0 hr, LVEC increased 7.5 %, RVEC increased 8.7 % and RVEC/LVEC increased 0.9 % on the average in HD scans of 8 cases (LPO to RAO, 32 views, 60 beat/1 view). We think RA decay correction would not be needed in quantifying RVEC/LVEC in most cases because the change of RVEC/LVEC was very small. (author)

  13. Radioactivity of radon and its short-lived decay products in room air, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michikuni; Katoh, Takao

    1983-01-01

    In the reactor room of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, the measurements of radon (Rn) and its short-lived decay products (Rn-Dts) were carried out under ventilated and non-ventilated conditions. The indoor activities were equal to outdoor ones under ventilated condition and those activities increased till about 10 times of outdoors under non-ventilated condition. We attempted to explain these results on a basis of a simple model. The calculations were performed taking into account: (1) supply of Rn and Rn-Dts from outdoor, (2) the emanation rate of Rn from the wall materials of building, (3) the removal rate of Rn-Dts by ventilation and wall deposition, and (4) the attachment rate of unattached atom to aerosols. In addition, natural ventilation were considered during periods without artificial ventilation. (author)

  14. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  15. Electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source: operating parameters vs. analytical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bunert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatographs with electron capture detectors are widely used for the analysis of electron affine substances such as pesticides or chlorofluorocarbons. With detection limits in the low pptv range, electron capture detectors are the most sensitive detectors available for such compounds. Based on their operating principle, they require free electrons at atmospheric pressure, which are usually generated by a β− decay. However, the use of radioactive materials leads to regulatory restrictions regarding purchase, operation, and disposal. Here, we present a novel electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source that shows similar detection limits compared to radioactive detectors but that is not subject to these limitations and offers further advantages such as adjustable electron densities and energies. In this work we show first experimental results using 1,1,2-trichloroethane and sevoflurane, and investigate the effect of several operating parameters on the analytical performance of this new non-radioactive electron capture detector (ECD.

  16. Decays of 22Al and 26P: discovery of beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, M.D.

    1983-02-01

    A helium-jet system and the 24 Mg( 3 He,p4n) 22 Al and 28 Si( 3 He,p4n) 26 P reactions have been used to discover the only known odd-odd, T/sub Z/ = -2 nuclides, 22 Al(t/sub 1/2/ approx. 70ms) and 26 P(t/sub 1/2/ approx. 20 ms). Observations of beta-delayed protons from each isotope (laboratory energies 7.839 +- 0.015 MeV and 8.149 +- 0.021 MeV for 22 Al and 7.269 +- 0.015 MeV and 6.827 +- 0.050 MeV for 26 P) established the existence of these nuclides and provided a measurement of the mass excesses of the lowest T = 2 states in their beta decay daughters, 22 Mg and 26 Si (13.650 +- 0.015 MeV and 5.936 +- 0.015 MeV, respectively). Measurement of these masses confirmed that these T = 2 states were unbound to two-proton emission as had been predicted theoretically

  17. Application of the equations of radioactive growth and decay to geochronological models and explicit solution of the equations by Laplace transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catchen, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A recently developed method of pore-fluid age determination assumes secular equilibrium in the 238 U decay chain. The efficacy of this approximation is investigated using computer evaluations of the equations that give the time evolution of the 238 U decay chain, i.e. the solution of the equations of radioactive growth and decay. This analysis is performed considering two alternative geochemical scenarios to that of secular equilibrium - only 238 U present initially and 238 U and 234 U present initially. In addition, the effects of the 235 U decay chain are also determined in a similar fashion. These particular examples were chosen to show that more sophisticated geochronological models for many dating applications can be developed using such computer calculations. To facilitate such analyses, a solution of the equations of radioactive growth and decay for an arbitrary initial condition is derived using the Laplace transformation method and matrix algebra. Other solutions - both general and special - that are found in some well-known textbooks are reviewed. (orig.)

  18. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  19. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  20. Development of Data Base on Radioactive Discharges and Environmental Activity Levels in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, B.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring in the environment in Slovenia has been currently performed on a regular basis as a monitoring of global radioactive contamination and as operational monitoring in the surroundings of facilities with radioactive discharges. Environmental radioactivity monitoring due to atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in Slovenia started in 1961, while monitoring of radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities in Slovenia started in early 1980s with the extent programmes: in the Krsko nuclear power plant in 1981, in the uranium mining and milling facility at Zirovski vrh (1985) and in the research reactor at Brinje near Ljubljana (1986). Both categories of the results are documented in written reports and sent to the competent authorities, mostly on annual basis. According to the requirements of the European Commission (Commission Recommendation of 8. June 2000 on the application of Article 36 of the Euratom Treaty concerning the monitoring of the levels of the radioactivity in the environment for the purpose of assessing the exposure of the population as a whole (2000/473/Euratom) and Commission Recommendation of 6. December 1999 on the application of Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty (1999/829/Euratom)) and on initiative of the IAEA (IAEA Document International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Project International Data base on Discharges of Radioactive Material to the Environment, 2000) the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) started in 2002 with development of the computerised data base on environmental data and radioactive discharges data for the most facilities, specially for the nuclear fuel cycle. At present the environmental database contains the data on global contamination of air, surface waters, tap water sources and food chain (1 37C s, 9 0S r) and also on levels of major natural radionuclides (7 B e, 2 10P b, 2 26R a, 4 0K ). Data base on radioactive discharges for the recent years comprises the activities of fission and activation

  1. Radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID and GPRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haiyang; Zhou Hongliang; Zhang Hongjian; Zhang Sheng; Zhou Junru; Weng Guojie

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produced by radioactive source is harmful to the health of human body, and the lost and theft of radioactive source will cause environmental pollution and social panic. In order to solve the abnormal leaks, accidental loss, theft and other problems of the radioactive source, a radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID, GPS, GPRS and GSM technology is put forward. Radiation dose detector and GPS wireless location module are used to obtain the information of radiation dose and location respectively, RFID reader reads the status of a tag fixed on the bottom of the radioactive source. All information is transmitted to the remote monitoring center via GPRS wireless transmission. There will be an audible and visual alarm when radiation dose is out of limits or the state of radioactive source is abnormal, and the monitoring center will send alarming text messages to the managers through GSM Modem at the same time. Thus, the functions of monitoring and alarming are achieved. The system has already been put into operation and is being kept in functional order. It can provide stable statistics as well as accurate alarm, improving the supervision of radioactive source effectively. (authors)

  2. Cluster decay half-lives of trans-lead nuclei based on a finite-range nucleon–nucleon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A., E-mail: aa.ahmed@mu.edu.sa [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-15

    Nuclear cluster radioactivity is investigated using microscopic potentials in the framework of the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation of quantum tunneling by considering the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization condition. The microscopic cluster–daughter potential is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model. A realistic M3Y-Paris NN interaction with the finite-range exchange part as well as the ordinary zero-range exchange NN force is considered in the present work. The influence of nuclear deformations on the cluster decay half-lives is investigated. Based on the available experimental data, the cluster preformation factors are extracted from the calculated and the measured half lives of cluster radioactivity. Some useful predictions of cluster emission half-lives are made for emissions of known clusters from possible candidates, which may guide future experiments.

  3. Trophic position and metabolic rate predict the long-term decay process of radioactive cesium in fish: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Doi

    Full Text Available Understanding the long-term behavior of radionuclides in organisms is important for estimating possible associated risks to human beings and ecosystems. As radioactive cesium (¹³⁷Cs can be accumulated in organisms and has a long physical half-life, it is very important to understand its long-term decay in organisms; however, the underlying mechanisms determining the decay process are little known. We performed a meta-analysis to collect published data on the long-term ¹³⁷Cs decay process in fish species to estimate biological (metabolic rate and ecological (trophic position, habitat, and diet type influences on this process. From the linear mixed models, we found that 1 trophic position could predict the day of maximum ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish; and 2 the metabolic rate of the fish species and environmental water temperature could predict ecological half-lives and decay rates for fish species. These findings revealed that ecological and biological traits are important to predict the long-term decay process of ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish.

  4. BEAM-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF PERSISTENT CURRENT DECAY IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; JAIN, A.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2001-01-01

    The two RHIC rings are equipped with superconducting dipole magnets. At injection, induced persistent currents in these magnets lead to a sextupole component. As the persistent currents decay with time, the horizontal and vertical chromaticities change. From magnet measurements of persistent current decays, chromaticity changes in the machine are estimated and compared with chromaticity measurements

  5. Data processing in the integrated data base for spent fuel and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Morrison, G.W.; Notz, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produces for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the official spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections for the United States through the year 2020. Inventory data are collected and checked for consistency, projection data are calculated based on specified assumptions, and both are converted to a standard format. Spent fuel and waste radionclides are decayed as a function of time. The resulting information constitutes the core data files called the Past/Present/Future (P/P/F) data base. A data file management system, SAS /sup R/, is used to retrieve the data and create several types of output: an annual report, an electronic summary data file designed for IBM-PC /sup R/ -compatible computers, and special-request reports

  6. An UPF3-based nonsense-mediated decay in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Julia; Begley, Victoria; Macias, Sandra; Villalobo, Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay recognises mRNAs containing premature termination codons. One of its components, UPF3, is a molecular link bridging through its binding to the exon junction complex nonsense-mediated decay and splicing. In protists UPF3 has not been identified yet. We report that Paramecium tetraurelia bears an UPF3 gene and that it has a role in nonsense-mediated decay. Interestingly, the identified UPF3 has not conserved the essential amino acids required to bind the exon junction complex. Though, our data indicates that this ciliate bears genes coding for core proteins of the exon junction complex. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced control of DFIG wind turbine based on stator flux decay compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Rongwu; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    For the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)- based wind energy conversion system (WECS), the decaying flux and negative flux are the main reasons to cause the DFIG rotor overcurrent, during grid faults. The stator decaying flux characteristics versus the depth and instant of the stator voltage...

  8. Computer code for double beta decay QRPA based calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, C. A.; Mariano, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina and Instituto de Física La Plata, CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Krmpotić, F. [Instituto de Física La Plata, CONICET, La Plata, Argentina and Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo (Brazil); Samana, A. R.; Ferreira, V. dos Santos [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, BA (Brazil); Bertulani, C. A. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX (United States)

    2014-11-11

    The computer code developed by our group some years ago for the evaluation of nuclear matrix elements, within the QRPA and PQRPA nuclear structure models, involved in neutrino-nucleus reactions, muon capture and β{sup ±} processes, is extended to include also the nuclear double beta decay.

  9. A comparison of specific effective energies values obtained for some radioactive element using 3 different decay data banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, J.E.C.; Bertelli Neto, L.

    1990-01-01

    The Specific Effective Energies (SEE) are the dose equivalents received by each of the body organs (targets organs) per nuclear transformation of a radionuclide deposited in an organ or tissue (source organ) after an intake of this isotope. The SEE values were calculated on basis of the dosimetric concepts of Publication 30 of the International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The results were evaluated using two of the three most known decay data banks. This study shows considerables discrepancies in the evaluation of the SEE values for some radionuclides. In theses cases it is recommended the use of the most complete and detailed decay data bank to perform the SEE calculations. (author) [pt

  10. Semiconductor-based experiments for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnabé Heider, Marik

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments are employing semiconductor detectors in the search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay: COBRA, Majorana and GERDA. COBRA is studying the prospects of using CdZnTe detectors in terms of achievable energy resolution and background suppression. These detectors contain several ββ emitters and the most promising for 0νββ-decay search is 116 Cd. Majorana and GERDA will use isotopically enriched high purity Ge detectors to search for 0νββ-decay of 76 Ge. Their aim is to achieve a background ⩽10 −3 counts/(kg⋅y⋅keV) at the Q improvement compared to the present state-of-art. Majorana will operate Ge detectors in electroformed-Cu vacuum cryostats. A first cryostat housing a natural-Ge detector array is currently under preparation. In contrast, GERDA is operating bare Ge detectors submerged in liquid argon. The construction of the GERDA experiment is completed and a commissioning run started in June 2010. A string of natural-Ge detectors is operated to test the complete experimental setup and to determine the background before submerging the detectors enriched in 76 Ge. An overview and a comparison of these three experiments will be presented together with the latest results and developments.

  11. 37-Active rods fuel element for Atucha 1 nuclear power plant. Effects of this change in design over the neutronic behavior, decay power and radioactive inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Javier E.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the use of 37-rods fuel element on the behavior of the Atucha 1 nuclear power plant homogeneous core with slightly enriched fuel to 0.85 w % were studied through representative parameters such as average discharge burnup, channel powers, reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters, radioactive inventory and decay power. In general, the values of mentioned parameters are similar to those corresponding to a core with the 36-rods fuel element actually in use, although it must be emphasized a decrease both in linear power and, in minor degree, in the efficiency of shut-off and control rods and a slight increase in the discharge burnup. The fuel management strategy developed for a core with 36-rods elements can be maintained. (author)

  12. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium

  13. Neutron emission from 9Be nucleus under the action of β+ and γ radiation emitted in radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Dak Bang; Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Miller, M.B.; Mikhajlov, L.V.; Fam Zui Khien; Kharisov, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The neutron yield from the 9 Be nucleus under the action of beta and gamma-radiation emitted at the radiative decay of 11 C, 62 Cu, 66 Ga, 74 Br isotopes is measured. These isotopes differ essentially by the emitted radiation spectra. The contribution of various processes ((γ, n)-reactions, inelastic scattering and positron nonradiative annihilation) to the neutron yield observed is determined [ru

  14. Calibration method based on direct radioactivity measurement for radioactive gas monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ohi, Yoshihiro; Chida, Tohru; Wu, Youyang.

    1993-01-01

    A calibration method for radioactive gas monitoring instruments was studied. In the method, gaseous radioactivity standards were provided on the basis of the direct radioactivity measurement by the diffusion-in long proportional counter method (DLPC method). The radioactivity concentration of the gas mixture through a monitoring instrument was determined by sampling the known volume of the gas mixture into the proportional counter used for the DLPC method. Since oxygen in the gas mixture decreased the counting efficiency in a proportional counter, the influence on calibration was experimentally estimated. It was not serious and able to be easily corrected. By the present method, the relation between radioactivity concentration and ionization current was determined for a gas-flow ionization chamber with 1.5 l effective volume. It showed good agreement with the results in other works. (author)

  15. On Error Analysis of ORIGEN Decay Data Library Based on ENDF/B-VII.1 via Decay Heat Estimation after a Fission Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Gil, Choong-Sup; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The method is strongly dependent on the available nuclear structure data, i.e., fission product yield data and decay data. Consequently, the improvements in the nuclear structure data could have guaranteed more reliable decay heat estimation for short cooling times after fission. The SCALE-6.1.3 code package includes the ENDF/B-VII.0-based fission product yield data and ENDF/B-VII.1-based decay data libraries for the ORIGEN-S code. The generation and validation of the new ORIGEN-S yield data libraries based on the recently available fission product yield data such as ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.1, JENDL/FPY-2011, and JENDL-4.0 have been presented in the previous study. According to the study, the yield data library in the SCALE-6.1.3 could be regarded as the latest one because it resulted in almost the same outcomes as the ENDF/B-VII.1. A research project on the production of the nuclear structure data for decay heat estimation of nuclear fuel has been carried out in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The data errors contained in the ORIGEN-S decay data library of SCALE-6.1.3 have been clearly identified by their changing variables. Also, the impacts of the decay data errors have been analyzed by estimating the decay heats for the fission product nuclides and their daughters after {sup 235}U thermal-neutron fission. Although the impacts of decay data errors are quite small, it reminds us the possible importance of decay data when estimating the decay heat for short cooling times after a fission event.

  16. Ratio of thyroid radioiodine uptake calculated via the physic decay rate of the standard radioactive source: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yu; Zhou Luyi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the difference of the ratio of thyroid radioiodine ( 131 I) uptake calculated by actually measuring counts of the standard radioactive source(method 1) and by computing counts of the standard radioactive source via physic half life of 131 I (method 2). Methods: Two hundred and nine consecutive patients with Graves' Disease were prospectively recruited. The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake was calculated by two methods at 4 h and 24 h after administration of 1.48 MBq 131 I, respectively. Paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the two methods. Results: The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake at 4h was (32±16)% and ( 35±10)% (t=1.98, P=0.20), at 24h (72±19)% and (69±24)% ( t=1.49, P=0.23), respectively, by the two methods. Conclusion: To calculate the ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake via the physic half life of the standard radioactive resource is feasible, and can both reduce the risk of ionizing radiation to technical staff and act as verifying method for quality control of thyroid function equipment. (authors)

  17. Cluster decay of 218U isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivakumaraswamy, G.; Umesh, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of spontaneous emission of charged particles heavier than alpha particle and lighter than a fission fragment from radioactive nuclei without accompanied by the emission of neutrons is known as cluster radioactivity or exotic radioactivity. The process of emission of charged particles heavier than alpha particle and lighter than a fission fragment is called exotic decay or cluster decay. The phenomenon of cluster radioactivity was first predicted theoretically by Sandulescu et al in 1980. Rose and Jones made first experimental observations of 14 C emission from 223 Ra in 1984. Several cluster decay modes in trans-lead region have been experimentally observed. The half-life values for different modes of cluster decay from different isotopes of uranium have been calculated using different theoretical models such as the analytical super asymmetric model (ASAFM), Preformed cluster model (PCM) and Coulomb and Proximity potential model (CPPM) etc. Recently some semi-empirical formulae, i.e, single line of universal curve (UNIV), Universal decay law (UDL) for both alpha and cluster radioactivity have also been proposed to explain cluster decay data. The alpha decay half-life of 218-219 U isotopes has been experimentally measured in 2007. The half-life values for different cluster decay modes of 218 U isotopes have been calculated PCM model. Recently in 2011, the half-life values have also been calculated for some cluster decay modes of 222-236 U isotopes using the effective liquid drop description with the varying mass asymmetry (VMAS) shape and effective inertial coefficient. In the light of this, in the present work we have studied the cluster radioactivity of 218 U isotope. The logarithmic half-lives for few cluster decay modes from 218 U isotope have been calculated by using three different approaches, i.e, UNIV proposed by Poenaru et al in 2011, UDL proposed by Qi et al in 2009 and the CPPM model proposed by Santhosh et al in 2002. The CPPM based

  18. Investigation of nuclei near N = 82 and Z = 64 VIA radioactive decay of high-spin isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    An island of very high spin isomers was found recently in neutron-deficient Gd-Lu nuclei near the N = 82 closed shell in (H.I.,xn) measurements. This exciting discovery has led to a large number of experiments trying to identify the structures of these isomers and the nuclei in which they occur. These attempts have been helped in many instances by available spectroscopic information at low excitation energies. A systematic investigation of the low-lying structure of nuclei near N = 82 and Z greater than or equal to 64 was carried out. Heavy-ion beams were used to produce proton-rich isotopes which were then transported, with the use of gas-jet systems, to shielded areas where singles and coincidence γ-ray measurements could be made. Earlier investigations dealt with the decay of terbium ( 146-149 Tb) and dysprosium ( 147-152 Dy) nuclei. During the past two years the research program was extended to holmium nuclides (A less than or equal to 152) produced in 10 B bombardments of samarium. Two new isotopes, 149 Ho and 148 Ho, were identified. The decay data of 21-s 149 Ho supplement in-beam results and locate the hg/ 2 neutron state in 149 Dy to be at 1091 keV. The most intense γ-ray associated with 9-s 148 Ho has an energy of 1688 keV. It is possibly the first-excited to ground-state transition in 148 Dy. Recent in-beam measurements have shown that the first-excited state in 146 Gd is, unespectedly, 3 - in contrast to doubly evenN = 82 nuclei below gadolinium where it is 2 + . It would be interesting to determine whether the 1688-keV level in 148 Dy, the next nucleus in this isotonic series, is 2reverse arrow or 3 - in character. 12 references

  19. New type of natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubchenya, V.A.; Chechev, V.P.; Yavshits, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given in popular form to investigations of a new type of natural radioactivity - spontaneous emission of fragments, more massive than α-particles, by heavy element nuclei, called f-decay by analogy with known α and γ decays. Some data on radioactivity, origin of the decay are presented. Possibilities of f-decay, predictions and hypotheses are discussed. The reason of late discovery of f-decay lies in low f-decay probability 10 -9 with respect to α-decay and in a certain sluggishness of settled knowledge about possible types of radioactive decay. The idea of f-decay is presented. It differs from the idea about a new type of decay as modification of asymmetric fission and contains an attempt to explain the intermediate position of f-decay between α-decay and

  20. Photon and decay data libraries for ORIGEN2 code based on JENDL FP decay data file 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Katakura, J I

    2002-01-01

    Photon and decay data libraries for the ORIGEN2 code have been updated by using JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 (JENDL/FPD-00). As for the decay data, half-lives, branching ratios and recoverable energy values have been replaced with those of the JENDL/FPD-00 file. The data of the photon library has been also replaced with those of the JENDL/FPD-00 file in which photon data of the nuclides without measured data are calculated with a theoretical method. Using the updated photon library, the calculation of photon spectrum at a short time after fission event is able to be made.

  1. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  2. Properties of radioactive aerosols produced by interactions of indoor radon decay products with cigarette smoke and burning cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martell, E.A.; Sweder, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Risks of lung cancer to smokers, attributable in part to exposure to indoor radon decay products, are dependent on properties of radon progeny-tagged smoke particles. The authors have investigated the properties and interactions of radon progeny-tagged smoke particles as they pass through burning cigarettes into mainstream smoke, using /sup 212/Pb-tagged smoke particles as tracers, cascade impactors for particle size determinations, and low-level β/sup -/ counting techniques. /sup 212/Pb-tagged particles of submicron size are destroyed in the burning zone of cigarettes. However, /sup 212/Pb-tagged smoke particles exceeding 1.0 μm diameter pass readily through the burning zone and tobacco rod into mainstream smoke. /sup 212/ Pb- tagged particles in mainstream smoke have an activity median aerodynamic diameter between 1.0 and 2.0 μm diameter. Particles > 2.0 μm diameter carry about 10 percent of the total activity, are selectively deposited at the carina of bifurcations, and are resistant to dissolution in lung fluid. These results indicate that indoor radon progeny on large particles in mainstream smoke can contribute substantially to the cumulative alpha radiation dose at ''hot spots'' in the bronchi of smokers

  3. Data base for radioactive waste management: review of low-level radioactive waste disposal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clancy, J.J.; Gray, D.F.; Oztunali, O.I.

    1981-11-01

    This document is prepared in three volumes and provides part of the technical support to the draft environmental impact statement (NUREG-0782) on a proposed regulation, 10CFR Part 61, setting forth licensing requirements for land disposal of low level radioactive waste. Volume 1 is a summary and analysis of the history of low level waste disposal at both commercial and government disposal facilities

  4. Mesoscale meteorological model based on radioactive explosion cloud simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yi; Zhang Yan; Ying Chuntong

    2008-01-01

    In order to simulate nuclear explosion and dirty bomb radioactive cloud movement and concentration distribution, mesoscale meteorological model RAMS was used. Particles-size, size-active distribution and gravitational fallout in the cloud were considered. The results show that the model can simulate the 'mushroom' clouds of explosion. Three-dimension fluid field and radioactive concentration field were received. (authors)

  5. Development of radioactive source scanner based on PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guogui; Gao Xiang; Guo Hongli

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive radial uniformity of 68 Ge line radioactive sources is a critical quality parameter. The radioactive source scanner with linear scanning function is developed by making use of high-speed pulse counters, high-speed pulse output ports, and the powerful instruction system of Siemens S7-200 series programmable logic controller (PLC). A computer used as a host computer of the instrument communicate with. the PLC by point to point interface (PPI) protocol, The instrument with functions of data collection, transmission, displaying, saving, motion control and instrument parameter settings, can be used to measure the radioactive radial uniformity and total activity of line radioactive source. The advantages of Using the PLC to develop nuclear instrumentation are development speed, strong anti-interference ability, and low-cost. This paper mainly describes the control system implementation and feature of the instrument. (authors)

  6. Studies od radioactive decay after-effects by the method of perturbed angular γγ-correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpinkova, L.G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the methods applied for electron capture (Ec) after-effects studied is the time differential perturbed angular γγ-correlation (Tdpa( technique, which allows investigating hyperfine interactions of electromagnetic moments of nuclei with extranuclear fields created by electrons and ions around the probe atom in the studied matrix. After-effects can differentially affect the observed angular correlation and, thus, be studied by this method. The experiments performed so far with different nuclei in different matrixes showed that the after-effects are not important in TDPAC studies of metallic systems because of a considerable lag caused by a finite lifetime of the initial state of the γγ-cascade and the fast relaxation due to conduction electrons. In insulators and oxides. the after-effects should be taken into account while interpreting experimental data . A problem of molecular dynamic studies in liquids obscured by after-effects was also mentioned in the literature. A possibility of molecule disintegration caused by EC after-effects, initiated by the Auger-process was studied for 111 In-complexes with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in neutral aqueous solutions. The results of the work showed directly that the AC after-effects could cause the metal-legand complexes disintegration. The observation of the non-equilibrium fraction with presumably high transient gradients caused by both a relaxation from the highly ionised state od 111 Cd (the daughter nucleus in the EC decay of 111 In) and rearrangement of the chemical bonds allowed assessing the time required for these transient processes (before complex disintegration or complex relaxation to the equilibrium state)

  7. Double beta radioactivity and physics of the neutrino. Study of the background noise at 3 MeV in the search of 100Mo beta beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquemal, F.

    1994-05-01

    Double beta decay without neutrino emission provides a test of the mass and nature of neutrinos (Majorana or Dirac). Experimental proof would be the observation of a peak at the transition energy in the spectrum of the two emitted electrons. The expected half-life of the process is extremely long (about 10 25 years for 100 Mo). So, being thus, it is very important to get a good knowledge of the origins and contributions of background noise in the region where the signal could occur. The main origins of the background noise in the region where the signal could occur. The main origins of the background noise are found to be e + - e - pairs induced by heavy energy gamma rays. These gamma rays follow the thermal neutron capture by the components of the detector. Another factor in the production of background noise is natural radio-activity. For example, the presence of Radon in the laboratory has been observed to produce deposits of 214 Bi on the sides of the detector. Data taken with the NEMO 2 prototype and an enriched molybdenum source foil indicates that the background limit reached is of the order of 1 event per year in the 3 MeV region. Results of this work have proven the necessity to have a magnetic field in NEMO 3 in order to reject e + - e - pairs. (author)

  8. Radiolysis in cement-based materials ; application to radioactive waste-forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cement-based materials appear to be an original environment with respect to radiolysis, due to their intrinsic complexity (porous, multiphasic and evolutional medium) or their very specific physico-chemical conditions (hyper-alkaline medium with pH ≥ 13, high content in calcium) or by the fact of numerous couplings existing between different phenomenologies. At the level of a radioactive cemented wasteform, a high degree of complexity is reached, in particular if the system communicates with the atmosphere (open system allowing regulation of the pressures but also the admission of O 2 , strong reactive with regards to radiolysis). Then, the radiolysis description exceeds widely the only one aspect of the decomposition of alkaline water under irradiation and makes necessary a global phenomenological approach. In this context, some 'outlying' phenomena, highly coupled with radiation chemistry, have to be taken into account because they contribute to deeply modify the net result of the radiolysis: radioactive decay of multiple αβγ emitters with filiation, phase changes (for example H 2 aq → H 2 gas) within the pores, gas transport by convection (Darcy law) and by diffusion (Fick law), precipitation/dissolution of solid phases, effect of the ionic strength and the temperature, disturbances connected to the presence of some solutes with redox potentialities (iron, sulphur). The integration work carried out on the previous points leads to an operational model (DOREMI) allowing the estimate of H 2 amounts produced by radiolysis in different cemented radioactive waste-forms. As the final expression of the model, numerical simulations constitute a relevant tool of expertise and prospecting, contributing to accompany the thought on radiolysis in cement matrices in general and in cemented waste-forms in particular. Starting from different examples, simulations can be so used in order to test some hypotheses or illustrate the greatest influence of gas transport, dose

  9. Development of plastic scintillator based food radioactivity contamination monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Sahani, R.M.; Mahala, V.K.; Vaijapurkar, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactivity is naturally present in soil, water and food stuffs. Food can be contaminated after discharge of radioactivity into the environment from industries that concentrate natural radionuclide and from civil or military nuclear operations. The contamination can be in three ways; by direct deposition, through the food chain and induced radioactivity due to exposure of high neutron flux. The health effects on human depend on the type of radionuclide and the length of time people are exposed to it. The studies of fission product behaviour in the food chain have revealed radionuclide Strontium-90, Caesium 137 and Iodine-131 are of major concern. Plastic scintillator is already developed indigenously at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur. Efforts has been made to develop a portable field instrument using plastic scintillator for assessment of beta ( 90 Sr) and gamma ( 137 Cs and 131 I) radioactivity in food

  10. Outlines on data base for the use of radioactive sources, and environmental impact in egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, A M; Amin, E; El-Said, Kh M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, AEA Cairo (Egypt); Gomaa, M A [Reactors Division Nuclear Research Center, AEA Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Radio isotopes and radioactive sources have shown increase applications in scientific research, agriculture, medicine and industry. The prime concern in regulating activities involving the release of radioactive materials into the environment, is ensuring the safety of individuals and population. The management of radioactive wastes generated from medical centers, research institutes, industrial facilities, mining operations, and research reactors caused serious accidents. Radiation sources mismanagement resulted in injuries or fatalities to individuals. The objectives of this work is to develop the required data base and establish the necessary rules for safe management of radioactive sources. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Natural radioactivity in zirconia-based dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Gerstmann, Udo; La Porta, Caterina; Cantone, Marie C.; Veronese, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics are being increasingly used in dental prosthetics in substitution of metal cores, which are known to induce local toxic reactions and delayed allergic responses in the oral tissues. Some concerns have been however raised about the use of zirconia, since it is known that unpurified zirconia materials may contain non negligible levels of natural radionuclides of the U/Th series. Combined measurements of alpha and gamma spectrometry as well as beta dosimetry were conducted on zirconia samples used for dental applications. Samples were available in form of powder and/or solid blocks. The results showed that the beta dose rate in zirconia ceramics was on average only slightly higher than the levels measured in natural teeth, and generally lower than the values measured in feldspatic and glass ceramics. These materials are indeed known to deliver a beta dose significantly higher than that measured from natural teeth, due to the relatively high levels of 40 K (between 2 and 3 kBq·kg -1 ). The content of radionuclides of the U/Th series in the zirconia sample was estimated to be lower than 15 Bq·kg -1 , i.e. doubtlessly below the exclusion level of 1 kBq·kg -1 recommended by IAEA in the Safety Standard Series. Beta dosimetry measurements, however, gave indications of possible inhomogeneous clusters of radioactivity, which might give rise to local doses above the background. (author)

  12. Transportation legislative data base : state radioactive materials transportation statute compilation, 1989-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-30

    The Transportation Legislative Data Base (TLDB) is a computer-based information service containing summaries of federal, state and certain local government statutes and regulations relating to the transportation of radioactive materials in the United...

  13. Helium 3 precipitation in AISI 316L stainless steel induced by radioactive decay of tritium: Microstructural study of helium bubble precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, A.M.; Chene, J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the thermonuclear technology has given rise to a renewed interest in the study of the behavior of helium in metals. A great amount of work is still required for the understanding of the role of helium on the mechanical properties of structural materials for fusion technology, especially austenitic stainless steels. This article deals with the study of the influence of thermomechanical heat treatments, aging conditions (temperature and time), and helium concentration of helium bubble precipitation in a 316L austenitic steel. Helium was generated by the radioactive decay of tritium (tritium trick). Helium bubbles impede the grain growth in 316L steel aged at 1,373 K and also the recrystallization reaction at this temperature if cold working is performed prior to aging. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicated a weak helium precipitation at 1,073 and 1,223 K, presumably due to the presence of trapping sites for tritium, and no bubble growth after aging up to 100 hours. Precipitation sites are mainly dislocations in the matrix at 1,073 K and grain boundaries and individual dislocations in the matrix at 1,223 K. The large bubble size (50 nm) observed at 1,373 K, even for short aging times (0.083), can partly be attributed to bubble dragging by dislocations toward the grain boundaries. Cold deformation prior to aging leads to a larger bubble size due to growth enhancement during recrystallization. Decreasing the helium content leads to a smaller helium bubble size and density. Tritium trapping at helium bubbles may favor helium 3 accumulation on defects such as grain boundaries, as observed by tritium autoradiography

  14. Radioactive nuclear beam facilities based on projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrill, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The production of radioactive beams using direct separation techniques is discussed. The reaction mechanisms which can be used to produce radioactive beams with these techniques can be broadly divided into three groups, projectile fragmentation, nucleon transfer, and Coulomb disassociation. Radioactive nuclei produced in these ways have large forward momenta with relatively sharp angular distributions peaked near zero degrees which are suitable for collection with magnetic devices. Secondary beam intensities of up to a few percent of the primary beam intensity are possible, although depending on the production mechanism the beam emittance may be poor. Further beam purification can be achieved using atomic processes with profiled energy degraders. The features of the production reaction mechanism, separation techniques, and a review of world wide efforts are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are presented, with discussion of techniques to overcome some of the disadvantages. (Author)

  15. Watson-Crick base pairing controls excited-state decay in natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Dominik B; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-10-13

    Excited-state dynamics are essential to understanding the formation of DNA lesions induced by UV light. By using femtosecond IR spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the lifetimes of the excited states of all four bases in the double-stranded environment of natural DNA. After UV excitation of the DNA duplex, we detected a concerted decay of base pairs connected by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. A comparison of single- and double-stranded DNA showed that the reactive charge-transfer states formed in the single strands are suppressed by base pairing in the duplex. The strong influence of the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds indicates that proton transfer opens an efficient decay path in the duplex that prohibits the formation or reduces the lifetime of reactive charge-transfer states. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Purity and radioactive decay behaviour of industrial 2D-reinforced SiCf/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, H.W.; Zucchetti, M.; Casteleyn, K.; Adelhelm, C.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites based on SiC with continuous fibres (SiC f /SiC) are considered promising structural materials for future fusion devices. It was still to clarify, whether impurities in industrial SiC f /SiC could jeopardise radiological advantages. Experimental impurity analyses revealed a two-dimensionally reinforced SiC f /SiC with the matrix produced by CVI as very pure. Chemo-spectrometric methods were combined with radioactivation methods (CPAA, NAA). A quantification of the main constituents Si, C and O was added. Calculations with the FISPACT-2.4 code and EAF-2 library identified elements detrimental for different low-activation criteria. For the neutron exposure, EEF reactor-study first wall and blanket conditions were simulated. The calculated SiC f /SiC included 48 trace elements. Even under conservative assumptions, all low-activation limits of European interest are fulfilled. Exclusively the hands-on recycling limit for the First Wall can intrinsically not be satisfied with SiC. The theoretical goal of a SiC f /SiC depleted of 28 Si (isotopic tailoring) is critically discussed. ((orig.))

  17. Fixation and mobilisation of uranium and its radioactive decay products in C-richwater sediments; Festlegung und Mobilisierung von Uran und seinen radioaktiven Zerfallsprodukten in kohlenstoffreichen Gewaessersedimenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassour, Mohammad

    2014-05-27

    organic carbon as main metabolic energy source for low order lotic ecosystems on the fixation of uranium was investigated by analyzing, the effects of leaves (coarse particulate organic matter: CPOM) and their degradation products (mainly fine particulate organic matter: FPOM and biofilms etc.). It was found that the highly mobile fraction of uranium in the water pathway, preferably present under the given conditions in the form different uranyl-carbonato-complexes, is efficiently fixed on fresh organic plant material (plant litter, leaves) in the first steps of organic matter decomposition within a few days. But it also can be immobilized relatively stable. It was also found that CPOM is a temporary sink for uranium, which may be sedimented depending on the turbulence flow and discharge. This may contribute to the directional removal of uranium from the water into the sediment. Finally this work analyzed the conditions in the pelagic and benthic zone of the Neuensalz pre dam of the Poehl reservoir, which is located downstream of the mining site. It presents a periodically stagnant water body with seasonally continuous sedimentation, a possible stable sink of uranium and products of radioactive decay in early diagenesis. Water samples of the pelagic zone and undisturbed sediment cores were taken and analyzed during winter stagnation. The results are discussed in front of seasonal changes in water chemistry and load data. {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra showed a culmination of activity concentrations in the sediment horizons from 25 to 35 cm depth, in particular at a centrally located sampling point (K3). At this point highest activity concentrations of {sup 238}U were found with a median value of 770 Bq*kg{sup -1} at a depth of 30 cm. At the same location {sup 226}Ra shows activity concentrations of 250 Bq*kg{sup -1}(median). Based on the {sup 137}Cs dating method a sedimentation rate of 1.5 cm*yr{sup -1} was calculated for the pre-dam Neuensalz sediment. On average

  18. Estimates for the ionization and mass of type I supernova envelopes, based on the radioactivity hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklovskii, I.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of spectroscopic evidence for supernova 1972e fully confirms the hypothesis that radioactive 56 Ni decay produces the exponential tail in type I light curves. Relativistic positrons formed through the β decay of 56 Co will interact with material in the envelope thrown off by the supernova outburst; hence the ionization of the envelope can be estimated. The chief supplier of free electrons to the envelope will evidently be helium, the most abundant element there; iron, on the other hand, will mainly be in the Fe II state. The envelope would then have a mass of roughly-equal0.6 M/sub sun/ and a kinetic energy of roughly-equal5 x 10 50 erg, in agreement with observation. Accordingly, neutron stars should develop in type I as well as type II outbursts. Only type I supernovae, however, will synthesize the iron in the universe

  19. Establishment of radioactive source retirement mechanism based on the method of environmental liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    The retirement of radioactive source is a difficult problem that we are facing during the radiation safety regulation in China. This paper analyses the reason of the problem regarding the retirement of radioactive source both from the utilization units and the regulatory body. It is considered that the basic reason is the enterprises don't arrange and use the retirement funds reasonably, which is an economic problem. There exists a limitation when facing the radioactive source retirement in light of licensing and regulation mechanism of the manufacture, selling, uses of radioactive sources in China, and the key to solve this economic problem is to introduce economic method, Some measures and suggestions are given to establish radioactive sources retirement mechanism by using economic methods, based on the comprehensive analysis of the concept, development and function of the environmental liability insurance. (author)

  20. Design and development of the network based system for the supervision of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yaoyun; Su Genghua; Zhang Hui; Li Junli; Zhu Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To help the environmental protection authorities to upgrade the management of the related organizations and radioactive sources and improve the information level of nuclear technology utilization's supervision. Methods: On the basis of investigation of requirements, the network based system for the supervision of radioactive sources was divided into application system and supervision system, based on MYSQL and SQL Server2005 respectively. Results: The system satisfied the current requirements of the nuclear technology utilization's supervision and is in nationwide operation. Conclusion: The system achieved the dynamic tracking management of radioactive sources and improved the efficiency and level of radiation safety supervision in nuclear technology utilizations. (authors)

  1. Critical assessment of the deposition based dosimetric technique for radon/thoron decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayya, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation doses due to radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) are predominantly contributed by their decay products and not due to the gases themselves. Decay product measurements are being carried out essentially by either short-term active measurement like by air-sampling on a substrate followed by alpha or beta counting or by continuous active monitoring techniques based on silicon barrier detector. However, due to non-availability of satisfactory passive measurement techniques for the progeny species, it has been a usual practice to estimate the long time averaged progeny concentration from measured gas concentration using an assumed equilibrium factor. To be accurate, one is required to measure the equilibrium factor in situ along with the gas concentration. This being not practical, the assigned equilibrium factor (0.4 for indoor and 0.8 for outdoor for 222 Rn) approach has been an inevitable, though uncertain, part of the dosimetric strategies in both occupational and public domains. Further, in the case of thoron decay products however, equilibrium factor is of far more questionable validity. Thus, there is a need to shift from gas based dosimetric paradigm to that based on direct detection of progeny species

  2. Radioactive Decay: Audio Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struthers, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Many phenomena generate interesting audible time series. This data can be collected and processed using audio software. The free software package "Audacity" is used to demonstrate the process by recording, processing, and extracting click times from an inexpensive radiation detector. The high quality of the data is demonstrated with a simple…

  3. Radioactivity nuclide identification based on BP and LM algorithm neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jihong; Sun Jian; Wang Lianghou

    2012-01-01

    The paper provides the method which can identify radioactive nuclide based on the BP and LM algorithm neural network. Then, this paper compares the above-mentioned method with FR algorithm. Through the result of the Matlab simulation, the method of radioactivity nuclide identification based on the BP and LM algorithm neural network is superior to the FR algorithm. With the better effect and the higher accuracy, it will be the best choice. (authors)

  4. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  5. In-trap decay spectroscopy for ββ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in ββ decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from β decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and β detection with almost no β-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in ββ decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in ββ decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10 -5 and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating β background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge detectors, for the detection of X-rays, were

  6. Usefulness of the decay rate in the management of radioactive waste stocks; De l'interet de la decroissance pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodier, J; Cohendy, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    It became apparent, during first few years operation of the Marcoule Centre, that it was very useful to exploit the natural decay rate of the radioactive element contaminating the waste. The storage of this waste under the best possible conditions in each case, was first of all favorable for the radiological safety point of view; it led, furthermore, to a marked reduction in the cost price since it made it possible to avoid employing protection means which would have proved to be excessively outsize after a few years. Finally, even when the half-life of the radioelements involved seemed to annul any possible advantages of this method, the temporary storage made it possible to develop treatment processes which were unknown at the time. The overall result of this policy is that at the present time over 98 per cent of the solid waste produced by the Marcoule Centre has been processed in such a way that it can, at any moment, be discharged from the site without difficulty. (authors) [French] Des les premieres annees de fonctionnement du Centre de Marcoule, il est apparu qu'il etait extremement benefique de mettre a profit la decroissance naturelle des elements radioactifs contaminant les dechets. Le stockage de ces dechets dans des conditions appropriees a chaque cas d'espece a tout d'abord ete favorable a la surete radiologique; en outre, il a abouti a une reduction sensible des prix de revient, du fait qu'il a evite de mettre en oeuvre des moyens de protection qui se seraient reveles surdimensionnes au bout de quelques annees. Enfin, meme lorsque la periode des radioelements en cause semblait enlever tout interet a cette methode, le stockage d'attente a permis de mettre au point des procedes de traitement inconnus a l'epoque. Le resultat global de cette politique est que, actuellement, plus de 98 pour cent des dechets solides produits depuis l'origine du Centre de Marcoule ont ete conditionnes de telle sorte qu'ils peuvent, a tout moment, etre evacues hors du Site

  7. Study of glass ceramic material on the base of ash group simulating slag of plasma shaft furnace for high temperature reprocessing of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloj, A.S.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Stefanovskij, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Using the methods of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and micro-probe analysis it is shown that the processes of minerals formation and homogenization in ash residue based charge under the heating up to 1450 deg C take place with a high rate and completely finish during 10 minutes. Homogeneous materials containing besides glassy phase crystalline phases and metallic shots are formed in this process. The products obtained with fluxes (dolomite and clay) additions are more homogeneous than a flux-less fused slag. Losses of α-radioactive nuclides during the melting of ash residue at 1300 deg C do not exceed 1.5% and is likely attributed with the products of uranium decay. Hydrolytic stability of the slags estimated from the rate of α-radioactive elements lixiviation is on the level of (1.4-5.7)x10 -4 g/(cm 2 x day) at 95 deg C

  8. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M. [CEA/IRFU Saclay (France); Pascovici, G. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  9. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-01

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed

  10. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  11. Integrated data base report - 1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions

  12. High polymer-based composite containers for the disposal/storage of high radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miedema, I.

    2001-01-01

    Spent fuel disposal is one of the hottest topics in nuclear news, getting considerable amount of media coverage around the world. Canada as well as many other countries with nuclear electric generation plants has therefore been pushed to develop policy on this issue. One of the proposed and most widely supported strategies is to dispose of this so-called waste permanently in deep underground vaults. Through the use of engineered barriers including vault seals, vault composition, backfill and sophisticated containers this radioactive matter is isolated from the natural environment. According to a design developed by Atomic Energy of Canada, the seclusion must be maintained for approximately 500 years, which is a representative length of time it takes for the radioactive elements to decay to natural background levels. The purpose of the current study is to determine the feasibility of using poly(ether ether ketone), an advanced polymer, and continuous carbon fibre in a consolidated composite as a principal container component. Feasibility was determined by simulating the ultimate radioactive environment that the containers will be exposed to by exposing test specimens to neutron and gamma radiation fields at various temperatures (20 o C - 75 o C) for a variety of time intervals. (author)

  13. Correction of dynamic time-activity curves for gamma-camera dead time, radiotracer delivery, and radioactive decay: special considerations with ultrashort-lived radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, A.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Treves, S.

    1985-01-01

    Time-vs.-activity curves obtained by using ultrashort-lived radioisotopes often need to be corrected for the effects of gamma-camera dead time and physical decay. Count loss due to gamma-camera dead time can be monitored by using an electronic oscillator incorporated into the gamma camera. Two algorithms that use this information to correct time-activity curves are discussed. It is also shown that the effect of physical decay on a time-activity curve is dependent on the time course of delivery of the radioisotope to the organ of interest. A mathematical technique that corrects physical decay is described

  14. The Calculation Of Total Radioactivity Of Kartini Reactor Fuel Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budisantoso, Edi Trijono; Sardjono, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The total radioactivity of Kartini reactor fuel element has been calculated by using ORIGEN2. In this case, the total radioactivity is the sum of alpha, beta, and gamma radioactivity from activation products nuclides, actinide nuclides and fission products nuclides in the fuel element. The calculation was based on irradiation history of fuel in the reactor core. The fuel element no 3203 has location history at D, E, and F core zone. The result is expressed in graphics form of total radioactivity and photon radiations as function of irradiation time and decay time. It can be concluded that the Kartini reactor fuel element in zone D, E, and F has total radioactivity range from 10 Curie to 3000 Curie. This range is for radioactivity after decaying for 84 days and that after reactor shut down. This radioactivity is happened in the fuel element for every reactor operation and decayed until the fuel burn up reach 39.31 MWh. The total radioactivity emitted photon at the power of 0.02 Watt until 10 Watt

  15. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions

  16. Integrated Data Base for 1989: Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1988. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning waste, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous, highly radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 45 figs., 119 tabs

  17. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

  18. Integrated data base for 1990: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1989. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 22 refs., 48 figs., 109 tabs

  19. Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal

  20. Integrated Data Base for 1991: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1990. These data are based on the most reliable information available form government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated generally through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 160 refs., 61 figs., 142 tabs

  1. Integrated Data Base for 1992: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1991. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal

  2. The sorption of 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po on montmorillonite: a study with emphasis on reversibility aspects and on the effect of the radioactive decay of adsorbed nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, H.J.; Degueldre, C.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of the ionic strength and of pH on the adsorption/desorption processes of Pb, Bi and Po on montmorillonite has been investigated. For Pb, a strong dependence of the adsorption and desorption processes on the ionic strength was observed at pH d ) are measured. They range from 10 3 to 10 5 ml . g -1 for Pb and from 10 4 to 10 7 ml . g -1 for 210 Bi and 210 Po. When adsorption and desorption coefficients are compared, an agreement is found for both adsorption/desorption R d 's of Pb, whereas, for Bi and Po adsorption R d 's were several orders of magnitude lower than those obtained for desorption. The chemical activities of free Bi and Po in the liquid phase are limited by the formation of Bi and Po-colloids prior to the sorption step. This fact could explain the differences in the R d values. While the adsorption of Pb was reversible, only very small amounts of BI and Po could be desorbed from the montmorillonite (quasi-irreversible adsorption). The radioactive decay of adsorbed 210 Pb to 210 Bi, which in turn decays to 210 Po, can lead to significant changes in the desorption behaviour of the daughter nuclides. Whereas the sorption is nearly irreversible if Bi and Po adsorb on montmorillonite from the aqueous phase, they desorb more easily if they are generated by the radioactive decay of adsorbed 210 Pb. The difference in the distribution coefficients R d is approximately one order of magnitude in the case of Po, and more than 2 orders of magnitude in the case of Bi. (orig.)

  3. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  4. Search of the chemical change of the sup(119m)Sn (Tsub(1/2) = 293 days) radioactive decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makariunas, K.; Makariuniene, E.; Dragunas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The differences in decay rates of the nuclear isomer sup(119m)Sn (Tsub(1/2) = 293 days; the strongly converted M4 transition) have been measured for different chemical compounds. The experimental results show that the sup(119m)Sn nuclei in the telluride SnTe decay faster than in the metal β-Sn and in the dioxide SnO 2 [the relative change Δlambda/lambda the decay probability lambda is +(3.6+-1.4)x10 -4 ]. No measurable difference between the decay rates of sup(119m)Sn in β-Sn and SnO 2 has been observed [Δlambda/lambda = -(0.1+-1.2)x10 -4 ], irrespective of the great difference in electronic structure of the tin atoms. The results cannot be explained by considering the internal conversion of the valence electrons only. It is necessary to assume that the chemical changes of the decay rate are strongly influenced by the chemical changes of the probabilities of the internal conversion of electrons of the inner shells of the atom. This conclusion is confirmed by theoretical calculations. (Auth.)

  5. Efficient Removal of Cationic and Anionic Radioactive Pollutants from Water Using Hydrotalcite-Based Getters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Arixin; Sarina, Sarina; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Xiao, Qi; Gu, Yuantong; Ayoko, Godwin A; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2016-06-29

    Hydrotalcite (HT)-based materials are usually applied to capture anionic pollutants in aqueous solutions. Generally considered anion exchangers, their ability to capture radioactive cations is rarely exploited. In the present work, we explored the ability of pristine and calcined HT getters to effectively capture radioactive cations (Sr(2+) and Ba(2+)) which can be securely stabilized at the getter surface. It is found that calcined HT outperforms its pristine counterpart in cation removal ability. Meanwhile, a novel anion removal mechanism targeting radioactive I(-) is demonstrated. This approach involves HT surface modification with silver species, namely, Ag2CO3 nanoparticles, which can attach firmly on HT surface by forming coherent interface. This HT-based anion getter can be further used to capture I(-) in aqueous solution. The observed I(-) uptake mechanism is distinctly different from the widely reported ion exchange mechanism of HT and much more efficient. As a result of the high local concentrations of precipitants on the getters, radioactive ions in water can be readily immobilized onto the getter surface by forming precipitates. The secured ionic pollutants can be subsequently removed from water by filtration or sedimentation for safe disposal. Overall, these stable, inexpensive getters are the materials of choice for removal of trace ionic pollutants from bulk radioactive liquids, especially during episodic environmental crisis.

  6. TMD parton distributions based on three-body decay functions in NLL order of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Three-body decay functions in space-like parton branches are implemented to evaluate transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions in the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Interference contributions due to the next-to-leading-order terms are taken into account for the evaluation of the transverse momenta in initial state parton radiations. Some properties of the decay functions are also examined. As an example, the calculated results are compared with those evaluated by an algorithm proposed in [M. A. Kimber, A. D. Martin, and M. G. Ryskin, Eur. Phys. J. C 12, 655 (2000)], [M. A. Kimber, A. D. Martin, and M. G. Ryskin, Phys. Rev. D 63, 11402 (2001)], [G. Watt, A. D. Martin, and M. G. Ryskin, Eur. Phys. J. C 31, 73 (2003)], and [A. D. Martin, M. G. Ryskin, and G. Watt, Eur. Phys. J. C 66, 167 (2010)], in which the TMD parton distributions are defined based on the k t -factorization method with angular ordering conditions due to interference effects

  7. DP-THOT - a calculational tool for bundle-specific decay power based on actual irradiation history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, S.; Morrison, C.A.; Albasha, H.; Arguner, D.

    2005-01-01

    A tool has been created for calculating the decay power of an individual fuel bundle to take account of its actual irradiation history, as tracked by the fuel management code SORO. The DP-THOT tool was developed in two phases: first as a standalone executable code for decay power calculation, which could accept as input an entirely arbitrary irradiation history; then as a module integrated with SORO auxiliary codes, which directly accesses SORO history files to retrieve the operating power history of the bundle since it first entered the core. The methodology implemented in the standalone code is based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1994 formulation, which has been specifically adapted for calculating decay power in irradiated CANDU reactor fuel, by making use of fuel type specific parameters derived from WIMS lattice cell simulations for both 37 element and 28 element CANDU fuel bundle types. The approach also yields estimates of uncertainty in the calculated decay power quantities, based on the evaluated error in the decay heat correlations built-in for each fissile isotope, in combination with the estimated uncertainty in user-supplied inputs. The method was first implemented in the form of a spreadsheet, and following successful testing against decay powers estimated using the code ORIGEN-S, the algorithm was coded in FORTRAN to create an executable program. The resulting standalone code, DP-THOT, accepts an arbitrary irradiation history and provides the calculated decay power and estimated uncertainty over any user-specified range of cooling times, for either 37 element or 28 element fuel bundles. The overall objective was to produce an integrated tool which could be used to find the decay power associated with any identified fuel bundle or channel in the core, taking into account the actual operating history of the bundles involved. The benefit is that the tool would allow a more realistic calculation of bundle and channel decay powers for outage heat sink planning

  8. Estimating the mean and variance of measurements from serial radioactive decay schemes with emphasis on 222Rn and its short-lived progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkret, W.C.; Borak, T.B.; Boes, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Classically, the mean and variance of radioactivity measurements are estimated from poisson distributions. However, the random distribution of observed events is not poisson when the half-life is short compared with the interval of observation or when more than one event can be associated with a single initial atom. Procedures were developed to estimate the mean and variance of single measurements of serial radioactive processes. Results revealed that observations from the three consecutive alpha emissions beginning with 222 Rn are positively correlated. Since the poisson estimator ignores covariance terms, it underestimates the true variance of the measurement. The reverse is true for mixtures of radon daughters only. (author)

  9. Low-level radioactive wastes. A bibliography of additions to the Energy Data Base in 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1981-12-01

    Access to information on management of low-level radioactive wastes is provided by this special bibliography and other products of the Technical Information Center. Citations to 215 references on low-level radioactive wastes added to the Energy Data Base in 1981 are presented. The abstracts are grouped in broad subject categories. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by non-reports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  10. Experience base for Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems: A preliminary survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayberry, J.; Geimer, R.; Gillins, R.; Steverson, E.M.; Dalton, D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-04-01

    In the process of considering thermal technologies for potential treatment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory mixed transuranic contaminated wastes, a preliminary survey of the experience base available from Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems is reported. A list of known commercial radioactive waste facilities in the United States and some international thermal treatment facilities are provided. Survey focus is upon the US Department of Energy thermal treatment facilities. A brief facility description and a preliminary summary of facility status, and problems experienced is provided for a selected subset of the DOE facilities

  11. Risk perception, risk evaluation and human values: cognitive bases of acceptability of a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, T.C.; Lindell, M.K.; Rankin, W.L.

    1981-07-01

    Public acceptance of radioactive waste management alternatives depends in part on public perception of the associated risks. Three aspects of those perceived risks were explored in this study: (1) synthetic measures of risk perception based on judgments of probability and consequences; (2) acceptability of hypothetical radioactive waste policies, and (3) effects of human values on risk perception. Both the work on synthetic measures of risk perception and on the acceptability of hypothetical policies included investigations of three categories of risk: (1) Short-term public risk (affecting persons living when the wastes are created), (2) Long-term public risk (affecting persons living after the time the wastes were created), and (3) Occupational risk (affecting persons working with the radioactive wastes). The human values work related to public risk perception in general, across categories of persons affected

  12. Computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition system for the radioactive waste evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, N.G.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Gomez, B.G.; Nekimken, H.L.; Sanchez, D.E.; Bibeau, R.A.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The evaporator process at TA-55 reduces the amount of transuranic liquid radioactive waste by separating radioactive salts from relatively low-level radioactive nitric acid solution. A computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed on the process that allows the operators to easily interface with process equipment. Individual single-loop controllers in the SCADA system allow more precise process operation with less human intervention. With this system, process data can be archieved in computer files for later analysis. Data are distributed throughout the TA-55 site through a local area network so that real-time process conditions can be monitored at multiple locations. The entire system has been built using commercially available hardware and software components

  13. Risk perception, risk evaluation and human values: cognitive bases of acceptability of a radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, T.C.; Lindell, M.K.; Rankin, W.L.

    1981-07-01

    Public acceptance of radioactive waste management alternatives depends in part on public perception of the associated risks. Three aspects of those perceived risks were explored in this study: (1) synthetic measures of risk perception based on judgments of probability and consequences; (2) acceptability of hypothetical radioactive waste policies, and (3) effects of human values on risk perception. Both the work on synthetic measures of risk perception and on the acceptability of hypothetical policies included investigations of three categories of risk: (1) Short-term public risk (affecting persons living when the wastes are created), (2) Long-term public risk (affecting persons living after the time the wastes were created), and (3) Occupational risk (affecting persons working with the radioactive wastes). The human values work related to public risk perception in general, across categories of persons affected. Respondents were selected according to a purposive sampling strategy.

  14. Remote monitoring of radioactive sources based on i.MX27 platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Defeng; Wang Renbo; Lin Gangyong; Ding Yufei

    2012-01-01

    It based on the ASIC solutions, has chosen Freescale's i.MX27 development system as a platform for designing video capture and transmission system. The article uses the latest H.264 video compression standard and complete the entire system of hardware and software design, which is successfully applied to remote monitoring of radioactive sources. (authors)

  15. Adjustments of microwave-based measurements on coal moisture using natural radioactivity techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto-Fernandez, I.; Luengo-Garcia, J.C.; Alonso-Hidalgo, M.; Folgueras-Diaz, B. [University of Oviedo, Gijon (Spain)

    2006-01-07

    The use of nonconventional on-line measurements of moisture and ash content in coal is presented. The background research is briefly reviewed. The possibilities of adjusting microwave-based moisture measurements using natural radioactive techniques, and vice versa, are proposed. The results obtained from the simultaneous analysis of moisture and ash content as well as the correlation improvements are shown.

  16. The first experimental investigation of the KLL Auger spectrum of Ni generated in the electron capture decay of radioactive Cu-64 in a solid state matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Gorozhankin, V. M.; Ryšavý, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 234 (2012), s. 1-5 ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LA08002 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : atomic-structure * ec decay * relativity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2012

  17. Time-based forgetting in visual working memory reflects temporal distinctiveness, not decay

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Alessandra S.; Oberauer Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Is forgetting from working memory (WM) better explained by decay or interference? The answer to this question is the topic of an ongoing debate. Recently a number of studies showed that performance in tests of visual WM declines with an increasing unfilled retention interval. This finding was interpreted as revealing decay. Alternatively it can be explained by interference theories as an effect of temporal distinctiveness. According to decay theories forgetting depends on the absolute time el...

  18. Radioactive waste data base through the net: A tool to improve the development of waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    2003-01-01

    One of the duties in Chilean Commission for Nuclear Energy (CCHEN) is the timely reply to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Net enable waste management data base (NEWMDB) in the waste management field. This duty is carried out by the Radioactive Waste Management Section. CCHEN has complete this data base from about one decade ago. Through the time, the data base has changed according to new available information technologies, to the point that the access using the international net is a need today. The NEWMDB objective is to exchange information and knowledge between member states related to radioactive waste management situation and to conform a world inventory of radioactive waste. The Chilean experience got from the NEWMDB first data collection cycle (1999-2000) is presented here, and recommendations to be considered for incorporation in the domestic waste management system are exposed. In so doing, the data base answer should be easy to do and totally understood by everyone whose job is waste management around the world, in the context of the glossary, criteria and conventions on this data base is supported. The composition of the NEWMDB considers a General Frame which indicates the way in which the waste management is enfaced in the country, regulations, authorities, policies, infrastructure; a Waste Classification matrix which give the equivalence between proper country waste classification and that recommended by IAEA; Waste Data which give the quantities and situation of waste in the different steps of the management such as: conditioned waste, unconditioned stored waste, etc. Finally, the Sustainable Development for radioactive waste management Indicators (SDI) for the safety and environmental radioactive waste management are estimated (Au)

  19. Integrated data base for 1988: Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1987. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reportd for miscellaneous, highly radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 89 refs., 46 figs., 104 tabs

  20. Enhancing usability of augmented-reality-based mobile escape guidelines for radioactive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Ming-Kuan; Yau, Nie-Jia

    2013-01-01

    When radioactive accidents occur, modern tools in information technology for emergency response are good solutions to reduce the impact. Since few information-technology-based applications were developed for people during radioactive accidents, a previous study (Tsai et al., 2012) proposed augmented-reality-based mobile escape guidelines. However, because of the lack of transparent escape routes and indoor escape guidelines, the usability of the guidelines is limited. Therefore, this study introduces route planning and mobile three-dimensional (3D) graphics techniques to address the identified problems. The proposed approach could correctly present the geographical relationship from user locations to the anticipated shelters, and quickly show the floor-plan drawings as users are in the buildings. Based on the testing results, in contrast to the previous study, this study offered better escape routes, when the participants performed self-evacuation in outdoor and indoor environments. Overall, this study is not only a useful reference for similar studies, but also a beneficial tool for emergency response during radioactive accidents. -- Highlights: ► Enhancing the efficiency when people escape from radioactive accidents. ► The spatial relationship is transparently displayed in real time. ► In contrast to a previous study, this study offers better escape guidelines

  1. RSS-based localization of isotropically decaying source with unknown power and pathloss factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shunyuan; Sun, Li; Ding, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the localization of an isotropically decaying source based on the received signal strength (RSS) measurements that are collected from nearby active sensors that are position-known and wirelessly connected, and it propose a novel iterative algorithm for RSS-based source localization in order to improve the location accuracy and realize real-time location and automatic monitoring for hospital patients and medical equipment in the smart hospital. In particular, we consider the general case where the source power and pathloss factor are both unknown. For such a source localization problem, we propose an iterative algorithm, in which the unknown source position and two other unknown parameters (i.e. the source power and pathloss factor) are estimated in an alternating way based on each other, with our proposed sub-optimum initial estimate on source position obtained based on the RSS measurements that are collected from a few (closest) active sensors with largest RSS values. Analysis and simulation study show that our proposed iterative algorithm guarantees globally convergence to the least-squares (LS) solution, where for our suitably assumed independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) zero-mean Gaussian RSS measurement errors the converged localization performance achieves the optimum that corresponds to the Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB).

  2. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwinski, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Bialas, P.; Dulski, K.; Glowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Korcyl, G.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedzwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Wieczorek, A.; Zielinski, M.; Moskal, P.; Curceanu, C.; Silarski, M.; Gorgol, M.; Jasinska, B.; Zgardzinska, B.; Hiesmayr, B.C.; Kowalski, P.; Raczynski, L.; Wislicki, W.; Krzemien, W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps → 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ(θ) ∼ 0.4 circle and σ(E) ∼ 4.1 keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities. (orig.)

  3. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwinski, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Bialas, P.; Dulski, K.; Glowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Korcyl, G.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedzwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Wieczorek, A.; Zielinski, M.; Moskal, P. [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Curceanu, C.; Silarski, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, CP 13, Frascati (Italy); Gorgol, M.; Jasinska, B.; Zgardzinska, B. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Lublin (Poland); Hiesmayr, B.C. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria); Kowalski, P.; Raczynski, L.; Wislicki, W. [Swierk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Krzemien, W. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Department, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps → 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ(θ) ∼ 0.4 {sup circle} and σ(E) ∼ 4.1 keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities. (orig.)

  4. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwiński, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Dulski, K.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the { o-Ps }→ 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ (θ ) ≈ {0.4°} and σ (E) ≈ 4.1 {keV}, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.

  5. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, S.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrated cement systems are described. The behaviour of slag-based cement is described with a view to predicting their long term pH, Esub(n) and mineralogical balance. Modelling studies which enable the prediction at long ages of cement composites are advanced and a base model of the CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O system presented. The behaviour of U and I in cements is explored. The tolerance of cement systems for a wide range of miscellaneous waste stream components and environmental hazards is described. The redox potential in cements is effectively lowered by irradiation. (author)

  6. Beam-based measurements of persistent current decay in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The two rings of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are equipped with superconducting dipole magnets. At injection, induced persistent currents in these magnets lead to a sextupole component. As the persistent currents decay with time, the horizontal and vertical chromaticities change. From magnet measurements of persistent current decays, chromaticity changes in the machine are estimated and compared with chromaticity measurements.

  7. Libraries of decay data and fission product yields in the ABBN-93 constant set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabrodskaya, S.V.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Tsibulya, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes three new libraries in the Abb. constant set which are essential for calculating radioactivity: basic decay data, radioactive decay photon spectra and fission product yields. (author)

  8. Management of radioactive waste: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Paulo Sant'ana; Taynara Cristina Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    The issue of disposal of radioactive waste around the world is not solved by now and the principal reason is the lack of an efficient technologic system. The fact that radioactive waste decays of radioactivity with time are the main reasons for setting nuclear or radioactive waste apart from the other common hazardous wastes management. Radioactive waste can be classified according to the state of matter and level of radioactivity and this classification can be differently interpreted from co...

  9. Decay in blood loss estimation skills after web-based didactic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Paloma; Eosakul, Stanley T; Goetz, Kristopher; Wong, Cynthia A; Grobman, William A

    2012-02-01

    Accuracy in blood loss estimation has been shown to improve immediately after didactic training. The objective of this study was to evaluate retention of blood loss estimation skills 9 months after a didactic web-based training. Forty-four participants were recruited from a cohort that had undergone web-based training and testing in blood loss estimation. The web-based posttraining test, consisting of pictures of simulated blood loss, was repeated 9 months after the initial training and testing. The primary outcome was the difference in accuracy of estimated blood loss (percent error) at 9 months compared with immediately posttraining. At the 9-month follow-up, the median error in estimation worsened to -34.6%. Although better than the pretraining error of -47.8% (P = 0.003), the 9-month error was significantly less accurate than the immediate posttraining error of -13.5% (P = 0.01). Decay in blood loss estimation skills occurs by 9 months after didactic training.

  10. Transportation legislative data base: State radioactive materials transportation statute compilation, 1989--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Transportation Legislative Data Base (TLDB) is a computer-based information service containing summaries of federal, state and certain local government statutes and regulations relating to the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The TLDB has been operated by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) under cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management since 1992. The data base system serves the legislative and regulatory information needs of federal, state, tribal and local governments, the affected private sector and interested members of the general public. Users must be approved by DOE and NCSL. This report is a state statute compilation that updates the 1989 compilation produced by Battelle Memorial Institute, the previous manager of the data base. This compilation includes statutes not included in the prior compilation, as well as newly enacted laws. Statutes not included in the prior compilation show an enactment date prior to 1989. Statutes that deal with low-level radioactive waste transportation are included in the data base as are statutes from the states of Alaska and Hawaii. Over 155 new entries to the data base are summarized in this compilation

  11. Cement-based grouts in geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.

    1996-01-01

    The behavior and performance of a specially developed high-performance cement-based grout has been studied through a combined laboratory and in situ research program conducted under the auspices of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP). A new class of cement-based grouts - high-performance grouts-with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures was developed and investigated. These high-performance grouts, which were injected into fractures in the granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, are shown to successfully reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass from -7 m s -1 to 10 -9 m s -1 and to penetrate fissures in the rock with apertures as small as 10 μm. Furthermore, the laboratory studies have shown that this high - performance grout has very low hydraulic conductivity and is highly leach resistant under repository conditions. Microcracks generated in this materials from shrinkage, overstressing or thermal loads are likely to self-seal. The results of these studies suggest that the high-performance grouts can be considered as viable materials in disposal-vault sealing applications. Further work is needed to fully justify extrapolation of the results of the laboratory studies to time scales relevant to performance assessment

  12. Low-level radioactive waste data base management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roles, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the uses of information obtained from a national system for management of low-level waste shipment manifest information from the perspective of the NRC Division of Waste Management (DWM). A background section is first presented which briefly reviews some of the basic attributes of a workable system, as well as the existing data management systems established by the disposal facility operators. This background leads into a more detailed discussion of the major uses to which a regulatory agency would put the manifest information, including technical studies and analyses of a broad nature as well as day-to-day compliance with regulations and disposal site license conditions. The next two sections respectively summarize NRC's current data base capabilities as well as the limitations in these capabilities. The final section addresses the question: Where do we go from Here? One option under consideration is a rule making which would: (1) set forth the minimum information to be included in shipment manifests in greater detail than that currently specified in 10 CFR 20.311, and (2) require that operators of all low-level waste disposal facilities reduce the information on incoming shipment manifests to an electronic data format which would be periodically forwarded to a centralized location. However, this option would conflict with other NRC priorities and probably require considerable time to implement. Much of the groundwork for a national system has already been prepared, and NRC's preferred approach is to work with States, Compacts, disposal site operators, and DOE to upgrade these existing capabilities. 8 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  13. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P.

    1998-04-01

    The use of a fracture mechanics based design for the radioactive material transport (RAM) packagings has been the subject of extensive research for more than a decade. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has played an important role in the research and development of the application of this technology. Ductile iron has been internationally accepted as an exemplary material for the demonstration of a fracture mechanics based method of RAM packaging design and therefore is the subject of a large portion of the research discussed in this report. SNL's extensive research and development program, funded primarily by the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation, Energy Management and Analytical Services (EM-76) and in an auxiliary capacity, the office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is summarized in this document along with a summary of the research conducted at other institutions throughout the world. In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed

  14. Radioactive waste disposal sites: Two successful closures at Tinker Air Force Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, G.; Mohatt, J.V.; Kowall, S.J.; Jarvis, M.F.

    1993-06-01

    This article describes remediation and closure of two radioactive waste disposal sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, making them exemption regulatory control. The approach consisted of careful exhumation and assessment of soils in sites expected to be contaminated based on historical documentation, word of mouth, and geophysical surveys; removal of buried objects that had gamma radiation exposure levels above background; and confirmation that the soil containing residual radium-226 was below an activity level equal to no more than a 10 mrem/yr annual dose equivalent. In addition, 4464 kg of chemically contaminated excavated soils were removed for disposal. After remediation, the sites met standards for unrestricted use. These sites were two of the first three Air Force radioactive disposal sites to be closed and were the first to be closed under Draft NUREG/CR-5512

  15. [Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year.

  16. Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year. (author)

  17. A simple dynamic rising nuclear cloud based model of ground radioactive fallout for atmospheric nuclear explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yi

    2008-01-01

    A simple dynamic rising nuclear cloud based model for atmospheric nuclear explosion radioactive prediction was presented. The deposition of particles and initial cloud radius changing with time before the cloud stabilization was considered. Large-scale relative diffusion theory was used after cloud stabilization. The model was considered reasonable and dependable in comparison with four U.S. nuclear test cases and DELFIC model results. (authors)

  18. Processing methods for operation test data of radioactive aerosols monitor based on accumulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Cuiming; Xi Pingping; Ma Yinghao; Tan Linglong; Shen Fu

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a radioactive aerosol continuous monitor based on accumulation sampling and measuring and three methods for processing the operation data. The monitoring results are processed by the 3 methods which are applied both under the conditions of natural background and at workplaces of a nuclear facility. How the monitoring results are assessed and how to calculate the detection limit when using the 3 different methods are explained. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 methods are discussed. (authors)

  19. Risk analysis of radioactive waste repository based on the time dependent hazard rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.H.; Cho, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    For the probabilistic risk analysis of the radioactive high level waste repository, the simplified method based on the time dependent hazard rate is proposed. The obtained results are compared with those from the time independent hazard rate. The estimation of the failure probability of the waste repository through this method gives more conservative results, especially when the half-life of nuclide is larger and retardation factors of nuclide is smaller. (Auth.)

  20. Risk assessment based on current release standards for radioactive surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1993-09-01

    Standards for uncontrolled releases of radioactive surface contamination have been in existence in the United States for about two decades. Such standards have been issued by various agencies, including the US Department of Energy. This paper reviews the technical basis of published standards, identifies areas in need of revision, provides risk interpretations based on current technical knowledge and the regulatory environment, and offers suggestions for improvements

  1. Mechanism of f-decay - spontaneous emission of fragments by heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubchenya, V.A.; Ehjsmont, V.P.; Yavshits, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of model of radioactive decay - spontaneous emission of fragments by heavy nuclei, for which f-decay has been suggested, is formulated. The consideration is based on representation about a disintegrating configuration, for which the probability of f-cluster formation is close to 1. The moments method is used to determine the parameters of the disintegrating configuration. The probability of disintegrating configuration formation is determined by collective properties of a disintegrating nucleus. Effect of nucleon shells of the daughter nucleus and fragment leads to more compact disintegrating configuration and to decay energy increase, that's why at f-decay magic nuclei are formed. Probable spontaneous f-decay values calculated agree satisfactorily with experimental data. The calculational results testify to considerable decrease of f-decay probability at Z≥94

  2. Effect of self-glazing on reducing the radioactivity levels of red mud based ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shuo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Wu, Bolin, E-mail: wubolin3211@gmail.com [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation level has clear change regularity that the radioactivity levels of red mud (6360 Bq) are obvious declined, and can be reduced to that of the natural radioactive background of Guilin Karst landform, China (3600 Bq). It will not only consume large quantities of red mud, but also decrease the production cost of self-glazing RMCM. And the statement of this paper will offer effective ways to reduce the radioactivity level of red mud. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The self-glazing phenomenon in red mud system was first discovered in our research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation levels of red mud can be reduced efficiently by self-glazing layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red mud based ceramic materials will not cause harm to environment and humans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This research possesses important economic significances to aluminum companies. - Abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation

  3. Probing flavor models with {sup 76}Ge-based experiments on neutrinoless double-β decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Matteo [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), L' Aquila (Italy); Merle, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Munich (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The physics impact of a staged approach for double-β decay experiments based on {sup 76}Ge is studied. The scenario considered relies on realistic time schedules envisioned by the Gerda and the Majorana collaborations, which are jointly working towards the realization of a future larger scale {sup 76}Ge experiment. Intermediate stages of the experiments are conceived to perform quasi background-free measurements, and different data sets can be reliably combined to maximize the physics outcome. The sensitivity for such a global analysis is presented, with focus on how neutrino flavor models can be probed already with preliminary phases of the experiments. The synergy between theory and experiment yields strong benefits for both sides: the model predictions can be used to sensibly plan the experimental stages, and results from intermediate stages can be used to constrain whole groups of theoretical scenarios. This strategy clearly generates added value to the experimental efforts, while at the same time it allows to achieve valuable physics results as early as possible. (orig.)

  4. A new model for ancient DNA decay based on paleogenomic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Logan; Ware, Roselyn; Smith, Oliver; Collins, Matthew; Allaby, Robin G

    2017-06-20

    The persistence of DNA over archaeological and paleontological timescales in diverse environments has led to a revolutionary body of paleogenomic research, yet the dynamics of DNA degradation are still poorly understood. We analyzed 185 paleogenomic datasets and compared DNA survival with environmental variables and sample ages. We find cytosine deamination follows a conventional thermal age model, but we find no correlation between DNA fragmentation and sample age over the timespans analyzed, even when controlling for environmental variables. We propose a model for ancient DNA decay wherein fragmentation rapidly reaches a threshold, then subsequently slows. The observed loss of DNA over time may be due to a bulk diffusion process in many cases, highlighting the importance of tissues and environments creating effectively closed systems for DNA preservation. This model of DNA degradation is largely based on mammal bone samples due to published genomic dataset availability. Continued refinement to the model to reflect diverse biological systems and tissue types will further improve our understanding of ancient DNA breakdown dynamics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. The deterministic computational modelling of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasceno, Ralf M.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a computational applicative (software) that modelling the simply radioactive decay, the stable nuclei decay, and tbe chain decay directly coupled with superior limit of thirteen radioactive decays, and a internal data bank with the decay constants of the various existent decays, facilitating considerably the use of program by people who does not have access to the program are not connected to the nuclear area; this makes access of the program to people that do not have acknowledgment of that area. The paper presents numerical results for typical problem-models

  6. Rare psi decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.

    1986-01-01

    Slightly more than ten years have passed since the psi was discovered, yet the study of psi decays continues to be an active and fruitful area of research. One reason for such longevity is that each successive experiment has increased their sensitivity over previous experiments either by improving detection efficiency or by increasing statistics. This has allowed the observation and, in some cases, detailed studies of rare psi decays. Branching ratios of ≅10-/sup 4/ are now routinely studied, while certain decay channels are beginning to show interesting effects at the 10-/sup 5/ level. Future experiments at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) have the potential for increasing sensitivities by one or two orders of magnitude, thus enabling many interesting studies impossible with current data samples. The author first examines the extent to which psi decays can be used to study electroweak phenomena. The remainder of this work is devoted to the more traditional task of using the psi to study quarks, gluons, and the properties of the strong interaction. Of particular interest is the study of radioactive psi decays, where a number of new particles have been discovered. Recent results regarding two of these particles, the θ(1700) and iota(1450), are discussed, as well as a study of the quark content of the eta and eta' using decays of the psi to vector-pseudoscalar final states

  7. Low-level radioactive waste source terms for the 1992 integrated data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loghry, S.L.; Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.; Icenhour, A.S.; DePaoli, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This technical manual presents updated generic source terms (i.e., unitized amounts and radionuclide compositions) which have been developed for use in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These source terms were used in the IDB annual report, Integrated Data Base for 1992: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections, and Characteristics, DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8, October 1992. They are useful as a basis for projecting future amounts (volume and radioactivity) of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) shipped for disposal at commercial burial grounds or sent for storage at DOE solid-waste sites. Commercial fuel cycle LLW categories include boiling-water reactor, pressurized-water reactor, fuel fabrication, and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) conversion. Commercial nonfuel cycle LLW includes institutional/industrial (I/I) waste. The LLW from DOE operations is category as uranium/thorium fission product, induced activity, tritium, alpha, and open-quotes otherclose quotes. Fuel cycle commercial LLW source terms are normalized on the basis of net electrical output [MW(e)-year], except for UF 6 conversion, which is normalized on the basis of heavy metal requirement [metric tons of initial heavy metal ]. The nonfuel cycle commercial LLW source term is normalized on the basis of volume (cubic meters) and radioactivity (curies) for each subclass within the I/I category. The DOE LLW is normalized in a manner similar to that for commercial I/I waste. The revised source terms are based on the best available historical data through 1992

  8. Study of ^{14}C Cluster Decay Half-Lives of Heavy Deformed Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamami, S. Rahimi; Pahlavani, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical model based on deformed Woods-Saxon, Coulomb and centrifugal terms are constructed to evaluate the half-lives for the cluster radioactivity of various super heavy nuclei. Deformation have been applied on all parts of their potential containing nuclear barrier for cluster decay. Also, both parent and daughter nuclei are considered to be deformed. The calculated results of ^{14}C cluster radioactivity half-lives are compared with available experimental data. A satisfactory agreement between theoretical and measured data is achieved. Also, obtained half-lives for each decay family is agreed with Geiger-Nuttall law.

  9. Handbook of radioactivity measurements procedures. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the measurement of radioactivity in general, but specifically it deals with radioactive materials that have become available in the last three decades, from nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, for applications in medicine, scientific research, and industry. It is also concerned with low-level radioactivity measurements for the monitoring of radioactivity in environmental media, such as air and water, in connection with the control of radioactive effluents associated with the production of nuclear power or the use of radionuclides. Included in appendices are nuclear decay data for selected radionuclides and statistics of radioactive decay. An extensive bibliography is also included

  10. Uav-Based Detection of Unknown Radioactive Biomass Deposits in Chernobyl's Exclusion Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briechle, S.; Sizov, A.; Tretyak, O.; Antropov, V.; Molitor, N.; Krzystek, P.

    2018-05-01

    Shortly after the explosion of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) in 1986, radioactive fall-out and contaminated trees (socalled Red Forest) were buried in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). These days, exact locations of the buried contaminated material are needed. Moreover, 3D vegetation maps are necessary to simulate the impact of tornados and forest fire. After 30 years, some of the so-called trenches and clamps are visible. However, some of them are overgrown and have slightly settled in the centimeter and decimeter range. This paper presents a pipeline that comprises 3D vegetation mapping and machine learning methods to precisely map trenches and clamps from remote sensing data. The dataset for our experiments consists of UAV-based LiDAR data, multi-spectral data, and aerial gamma-spectrometry data. Depending on the study areas overall accuracies ranging from 95.6 % to 99.0 % were reached for the classification of radioactive deposits. Our first results demonstrate an accurate and reliable UAV-based detection of unknown radioactive biomass deposits in the ChEZ.

  11. UAV-BASED DETECTION OF UNKNOWN RADIOACTIVE BIOMASS DEPOSITS IN CHERNOBYL’S EXCLUSION ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Briechle

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the explosion of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP in 1986, radioactive fall-out and contaminated trees (socalled Red Forest were buried in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ. These days, exact locations of the buried contaminated material are needed. Moreover, 3D vegetation maps are necessary to simulate the impact of tornados and forest fire. After 30 years, some of the so-called trenches and clamps are visible. However, some of them are overgrown and have slightly settled in the centimeter and decimeter range. This paper presents a pipeline that comprises 3D vegetation mapping and machine learning methods to precisely map trenches and clamps from remote sensing data. The dataset for our experiments consists of UAV-based LiDAR data, multi-spectral data, and aerial gamma-spectrometry data. Depending on the study areas overall accuracies ranging from 95.6 % to 99.0 % were reached for the classification of radioactive deposits. Our first results demonstrate an accurate and reliable UAV-based detection of unknown radioactive biomass deposits in the ChEZ.

  12. Ion exchanger material based on Titanium phosphate for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslova, M.; Gerasimova, L. [Tananaev Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Elements and Mineral Resources, Kola Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Apatity (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    A comparative study of the physicochemical and service properties of samples of Ti(OH) 1.36(HPO4) 1.32 * 2.3H2O sorbent in the finely dispersed and granulated forms, mastered for commercial production, was made. The sorption of Cs and Sr cations from solutions of various, compositions was studied in batch experiments, and the diffusion coefficients of the exchanging ions were determined. The hydrolytic stability of the. sorbents was examined with the aim to determine the optimal operation conditions. Experiments showed that the cation exchangers based on titanium phosphate are the most efficient in removal from liquid radioactive waste of induced radioactive isotopes of corrosion products, which is due to formation of weakly dissociating compounds of nonferrous metal ions with functional groups of the ion exchangers in the sorbent phase. (author)

  13. Chemical consequences of radioactive decay. 1. Study of 249Cf ingrowth into crystalline 249BkBr3: a new crystalline phase of CfBr3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.P.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Ensor, D.D.; Fellows, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Spectrophotometric and x-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to a study of the ingrowth of californium-249 by β - decay of berkelium-249 in crystalline 249 BkBr 3 . It was found that the Cf daughter grows in with the same oxidation state and crystal structure as the parent. Thus, six-coordinate BkBr 3 (AlCl 3 -type monoclinic structure) generates six-coordinate CfBr 3 , and eight-coordinate BkBr 3 (PuBr 3 -type orthorhombic structure) generates eight-coordinate CfBr 3 , a previously unknown form of CfBr 3 . It was also found that the daughter Cf(III) in the BkBr 3 parent compound can be reduced to Cf(II) by treatment with H 2 , as it can in pure CfBr 3 . 5 figures

  14. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  15. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  16. Marked disequilibrium between {sup 234}Th and {sup 230}Th of the {sup 238}U natural radioactive decay chain in IAEA reference materials n. 312, 313 and 314

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaianni, A. [Dipartimento di Geologia e Geofisica dell' Universita di Bari, Via Orabona, 4 - 70125 Bari (Italy); I.N.F.N. Sezione di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); D' Erasmo, G. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); I.N.F.N. Sezione di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Pantaleo, A., E-mail: pantaleo@ba.infn.i [I.N.F.N. Sezione di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Schiavulli, L. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); I.N.F.N. Sezione di Bari, Via G. Amendola, 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    A new laboratory for the spectroscopy of natural radioactivity with a good energy resolution is presented. It consists of two distinct parts equipped, respectively, the first one with a HpGe {gamma}-ray detector, whose setup has been already completed, and the second one with large area Silicon {alpha}-ray detectors and a radiochemical section for thin {alpha}-samples preparation, whose setup is yet in progress and will be the argument of a separate work. The {gamma}-ray spectrometer was calibrated by means of IAEA Reference Materials n. 312, 313, 314 and 375. A large difference from the predictions of secular equilibrium emerged between the activities of {sup 234}Th and {sup 230}Th in Materials n. 312, 313 and 314.

  17. A novel approach to the systematization of α-decaying nuclei, based on shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarman, Tolga; Azmi Altintas, Ali; Zaim, Nimet; Amon Susam, Lidya; Kholmetskii, Alexander; Arik, Metin; Ozaydin, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    We provide a novel systematization of α-decaying nuclei, starting with the classically adopted mechanism. The decay half-life of an α-disintegrating nucleus is framed, supposing that i) the α-particle is born inside the parent, then ii) it keeps on hitting the barrier, while it runs back and forth inside the parent, and hitting each time the barrier, and iii) it finally tunnels through the barrier. One can, knowing the decay half-life, consider the probability that the α-particle is born within the parent, before it is emitted, as a parameter. Under all circumstances, the decay appears to be governed by the shell structure of the given nucleus. Our approach well allows to incorporate (not only even-even nuclei, but) all nuclei, decaying via throwing an alpha particle. Though herein, we limit ourselves with just even-even nuclei, in the aim of comparing our results with the existing Geiger-Nuttal results. (orig.)

  18. Optimisation of the neutron source based on gas dynamic trap for transmutation of radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, Andrey V.

    2012-06-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in collaboration with the Russian and foreign organizations develop the project of 14 MeV neutron source, which can be used for fusion material studies and for other application. The projected neutron source of plasma type is based on the plasma Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Presented work continues the subject of development the GDT-based neutron source (GDT-NS) for hybrid fusion-fission reactors. The paper presents the results of recent numerical optimization of such neutron source for transmutation of the long-lives radioactive wastes in spent nuclear fuel.

  19. Simple description of cluster radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L.

    2012-05-01

    The partial half-life of radioactive decay of nuclei by the emission of fragments heavier than the alpha particle, such as the emission of carbon, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon isotopes from translead nuclei (known as cluster radioactivity), is re-evaluated in the framework of a semiempirical, one-parameter model based on the quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism through a potential barrier where the Coulomb, centrifugal, and overlapping contributions to the barrier are considered within the spherical nucleus approximation. This treatment has shown not only very adequate to t all the existing half-life data, but also to give more reliable half-life predictions for new, yet unmeasured cases of spontaneous emission of massive nuclear fragments both from heavy and intermediate-mass parent nuclei as well. (author)

  20. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations of the interaction between radioactive elements and imidazolium based ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, A. V. Sai; Abishek, B.; Anantharaj, R.

    2018-04-01

    The fundamental natures of the molecular level interaction and charge transfer between specific radioactive elements and ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([BMIM]+[NTf2]-), 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([BMIM]+[ES]-) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]+[BF4]-) were investigated utilising HF theory and B3LYP hybrid DFT. The ambiguity in reaction mechanism of the interacting species dictates to employ Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets such as UGBS, SDD, and SDDAll to account for the relativistic effects of deep core electrons in the system involving potential, heavy and hazardous radioactive elements present in nuclear waste. The SCF energy convergence of each system validates the characterisation of the molecular orbitals as a linear combination of atomic orbitals utilising fixed MO coefficients and the optimized geometry of each system is visualised based on which Mulliken partial charge analysis is carried out to account for the polarising behaviour of the radioactive element and charge transfer between the IL phase by comparison with the bare IL species.

  1. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  2. Development of windows based software to analyze fluorescence decay with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.B.; Ravindranath, S.V.G.; Das, N.C.

    2002-07-01

    A VUV spectroscopic facility for studies in photophysics and photochemistry is being set up at INDUS-I synchrotron source, CAT, Indore. For this purpose, a data acquisition system based on time-correlated single photon counting method is being developed for fluorescence lifetime measurement. To estimate fluorescence lifetime from the data collected with this sytem, a Windows based program has been developed using Visual Basic 5.0. It uses instrument response function (IRF) and observed decay curve and estimates parameters of single exponential decay by least square analysis and Marquardt method as convergence mechanism. Estimation of parameters was performed using data collected with a commercial setup. Goodness of fit was judged by evaluating χR 2 , weighted residuals and autocorrelation function. Performance is compared with two commercial software packages and found to be satisfactory. (author)

  3. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  4. Heavy fragment radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1991-06-01

    The effect of collective mode excitation in heavy fragment radioactivity (HFR) is explored and discussed in the light of current experimental data. It is found that the coupling and resonance effects in fragment interaction and also the proper angular momentum effects may lead to an important enhancing of the emission process. New useful procedures are proposed for the study of nuclear decay properties. The relations between different decay processes are investigated in detail. We are also trying to understand and explain in a unified way the reaction mechanisms in decay phenomena. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-01-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150 km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. - Highlights: • SRIM was used to study the alpha particle penetration depth and efficiency. • Correlation between thickness of decayable foil and propulsion force was established. • With the hypothesis of SAND, the travel time to Mars may be shortened to <20 days.

  6. Decay Heat Calculations for Reactors: Development of a Computer Code ADWITA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of release of energy (decay heat) over an extended period of time after termination of neutron induced fission is necessary for determining the heat removal requirements when the reactor is shutdown, and for fuel storage and transport facilities as well as for accident studies. A Fuel Cycle Analysis Code, ADWITA (Activation, Decay, Waste Incineration and Transmutation Analysis) which can generate inventory based on irradiation history and calculate radioactivity and decay heat for extended period of cooling, has been written. The method and data involved in Fuel Cycle Analysis Code ADWITA and some results obtained shall also be presented. (author)

  7. A passive decay heat removal system for LWRs based on air cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, 1-2-4 Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan); Yano, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 1-2-4 Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A passive decay heat removal system for LWRs is discussed. • An air cooler model which condenses steam is developed. • The decay heat can be removed by air coolers with forced convection. • The dimensions of the air cooler are proposed. - Abstract: The present paper describes the capability of an air cooling system (ACS) to remove decay heat from a core of LWR such as an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) and a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The motivation of the present research is the Fukushima severe accident (SA) on 11 March 2011. Since emergency cooling systems using electricity were not available due to station blackout (SBO) and malfunctions, many engineers might understand that water cooling was not completely reliable. Therefore, a passive decay heat removal (DHR) system would be proposed in order to prevent such an SA under the conditions of an SBO event. The plant behaviors during the SBO are calculated using the system code NETFLOW++ for the ABWR and PWR with the ACS. Two types of air coolers (ACs) are applied for the ABWR, i.e., a steam condensing air cooler (SCAC) of which intake for heat transfer tubes is provided in the steam region, and single-phase type of which intake is provided in the water region. The DHR characteristics are calculated under the conditions of the forced air circulation and also the natural air convection. As a result of the calculations, the decay heat can be removed safely by the reasonably sized ACS when heat transfer tubes are cooled with the forced air circulation. The heat removal rate per one finned heat transfer tube is evaluated as a function of air flow rate. The heat removal rate increases as a function of the air flow rate.

  8. Improved metamodel-based importance sampling for the performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadini, F.; Gioletta, A.; Zio, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a probabilistic performance assessment of a radioactive waste repository, the estimation of the probability of exceeding the dose threshold set by a regulatory body is a fundamental task. This may become difficult when the probabilities involved are very small, since the classically used sampling-based Monte Carlo methods may become computationally impractical. This issue is further complicated by the fact that the computer codes typically adopted in this context requires large computational efforts, both in terms of time and memory. This work proposes an original use of a Monte Carlo-based algorithm for (small) failure probability estimation in the context of the performance assessment of a near surface radioactive waste repository. The algorithm, developed within the context of structural reliability, makes use of an estimated optimal importance density and a surrogate, kriging-based metamodel approximating the system response. On the basis of an accurate analytic analysis of the algorithm, a modification is proposed which allows further reducing the computational efforts by a more effective training of the metamodel. - Highlights: • We tackle uncertainty propagation in a radwaste repository performance assessment. • We improve a kriging-based importance sampling for estimating failure probabilities. • We justify the modification by an analytic, comparative analysis of the algorithms. • The probability of exceeding dose thresholds in radwaste repositories is estimated. • The algorithm is further improved reducing the number of its free parameters

  9. Research on base rock mechanic characteristics of caverns for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isei, Takehiro; Katsuyama, Kunihisa; Seto, Masahiro; Ogata, Yuji; Utagawa, Manabu

    1997-01-01

    It has been considered that underground space is mechanically stable as compared with on the ground, and superior for storing radioactive waste for long period. However, in order to utilize underground space for the place of radioactive waste disposal, its long term stability such as the aseismatic ability of base rocks must be ensured, and for this purpose, it is necessary to grasp the mechanical characteristics of the base rocks around caverns, and to advance the technology for measuring and evaluating minute deformation and earth pressure change. In this research, the study on the fracture mechanics characteristics of base rocks and the development of the technology for measuring long terms stress change of base rocks were carried out. In this research, what degree the memory of past stress is maintained by rocks was presumed by measuring AE and strain when stress was applied to rock test pieces. The rocks tested were tuff, sandstone and granite. The experimental method and the experimental results of the prestress by AE method and DRA are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Kim, T.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO 3 ) 4 ⋅ 5H 2 O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  11. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Bak, M. S.; Kim, T.

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ṡ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  12. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, S. [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V. [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  13. Integrated data base report--1995: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The information in this report summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data base for inventories, projections, and characteristics of domestic spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. This report is updated annually to keep abreast of continual waste inventory and projection changes in both the government and commercial sectors. Baseline information is provided for DOE program planning purposes and to support DOE program decisions. Although the primary purpose of this document is to provide background information for program planning within the DOE community, it has also been found useful by state and local governments, the academic community, and some private citizens

  14. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on NaI gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U.

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general can disclose strong and medium level signals from manmade nuclides. But methods for detecting low level signals from weak, distant or shielded sources can be improved. New methods for source detection and identification based on noise adjusted singular value decomposition and on area specific stripping of spectra are presented

  15. Assessment of inhalation risk due to radioactivity released from coal-based thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.; Shukla, V.K.; Puranik, V.D.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    In India, the coal based thermal power plants have been the major source of power generation in the past and would continue for decades to come. As the coal contains naturally occurring primordial radionuclides the burning of pulverized coal to produce energy for generation of electricity in thermal power plants will result in the emission of a variety of natural radioactive elements into the environment in the vicinity of thermal power plants. In this paper we have used two different methods for characterization of uncertainty in inhalation risk to the general public around 10 Kms radius in the neighborhood of a coal-fired thermal power plant. (author)

  16. A leak-detection instrument for long buried pipelines based on radioactive tracer measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingqian; Zhou Shuxuan; Tang Yonghua; Sun Xiaolei; Hu Xusheng; Li Deyi; Yin Liqiang

    1987-01-01

    The instrument introduced provides a means for leak detection of long buried pipelines based on the radioactive tracer technique. The principle, block diagram and performances for the instrument are described. The leak-detecting method and the determination of some related parameters are also presented. Leak-detection sensitivity of the instrument is 185 kBq (5 μCi). Accuracy for leak localization is within 2.5 m (per km). It is suitable for the buried light oil (gasoline, kerosene, diesel oil) and industrial water pipelines with a diameter of 15 or 20 cm. The detection length for a single operation reaches up to 50 km

  17. Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages

  18. Data base for site specific migration analysis of radioactive elements in repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1982-01-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety aspects of radioactive waste repositories. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. With these we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. It is shown that the granitic basement induces strong time delays in nuclide migration. In contrast to that, the overlaying sedimentary layers cause primarily a dilution of the radionuclide concentrations.

  19. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  20. Study of radioactive sources accumulation with application of thermoluminescence dosemeters on the base of alkaline earth metals sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokbergenov, I.; Sadykov, T.

    2001-01-01

    Methodic for study of accumulation and distribution of radioactive sources in a nature objects is developed. An essence of the method consists of in that quantity of accumulated radioactive sources in a nature objects is defining by absorption dose measured with help of thermoluminescent dosemeters on the base of alkaline earth metals sulfates such as CaSO 4 :Dy and SrSO 4 :Eu

  1. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  2. A passive decay-heat removal system for an ABWR based on air cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, 1-2-4 Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan); Yano, Takahiro [School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 1-2-4 Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A passive decay heat removal system for an ABWR is discussed using combined system of the reactor and an air cooler. • Effect of number of pass of the finned heat transfer tubes on heat removal is investigated. • The decay heat can be removed by air coolers with natural convection. • Two types of air cooler are evaluated, i.e., steam condensing and water cooling types. • Measures how to improve the heat removal rate and to make compact air cooler are discussed. - Abstract: This paper describes the capability of an air cooling system (ACS) operated under natural convection conditions to remove decay heat from the core of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The motivation of the present research is the Fukushima Severe Accident (SA). The plant suffered damages due to the tsunami and entered a state of Station Blackout (SBO) during which seawater cooling was not available. To prevent this kind of situation, we proposed a passive decay heat removal system (DHRS) in the previous study. The plant behavior during the SBO was calculated using the system code NETFLOW++ assuming an ABWR with the ACS. However, decay heat removal under an air natural convection was difficult. In the present study, a countermeasure to increase heat removal rate is proposed and plant transients with the ACS are calculated under natural convection conditions. The key issue is decreasing pressure drop over the tube banks in order to increase air flow rate. The results of the calculations indicate that the decay heat can be removed by the air natural convection after safety relief valves are actuated many times during a day. Duct height and heat transfer tube arrangement of the AC are discussed in order to design a compact and efficient AC for the natural convection mode. As a result, a 4-pass heat transfer tubes with 2-row staggered arrangement is the candidate of the AC for the DHRS under the air natural convection conditions. The heat removal rate is re-evaluated as

  3. Trilateration-based reconstruction of ortho-positronium decays into three photons with the J-PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajos, A.; Kamińska, D.; Czerwiński, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Głowacz, B.; Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B.; Kapłon, Ł.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on a new reconstruction algorithm allowing us to reconstruct the decays of ortho-positronium atoms into three photons using the places and times of photons recorded in the detector. The method is based on trilateration and allows for a simultaneous reconstruction of both location and time of the decay. Results of resolution tests of the new reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, which yield a spatial resolution at the level of 2 cm (FWHM) for X and Y and at the level of 1 cm (FWHM) for Z available with the present resolution of J-PET after application of a kinematic fit. Prospects of employment of this method for studying angular correlations of photons in decays of polarized ortho-positronia for the needs of tests of CP and CPT discrete symmetries are also discussed. The new reconstruction method allows for discrimination of background from random three-photon coincidences as well as for application of a novel method for determination of the linear polarization of ortho-positronium atoms, which is also introduced in this work.

  4. Trilateration-based reconstruction of ortho-positronium decays into three photons with the J-PET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajos, A.; Kamińska, D. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Czerwiński, E., E-mail: eryk.czerwinski@uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Głowacz, B. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B. [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Kapłon, Ł. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Korcyl, G. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Kowalski, P. [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kozik, T. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Krzemień, W. [High Energy Department, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); and others

    2016-05-21

    This work reports on a new reconstruction algorithm allowing us to reconstruct the decays of ortho-positronium atoms into three photons using the places and times of photons recorded in the detector. The method is based on trilateration and allows for a simultaneous reconstruction of both location and time of the decay. Results of resolution tests of the new reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, which yield a spatial resolution at the level of 2 cm (FWHM) for X and Y and at the level of 1 cm (FWHM) for Z available with the present resolution of J-PET after application of a kinematic fit. Prospects of employment of this method for studying angular correlations of photons in decays of polarized ortho-positronia for the needs of tests of CP and CPT discrete symmetries are also discussed. The new reconstruction method allows for discrimination of background from random three-photon coincidences as well as for application of a novel method for determination of the linear polarization of ortho-positronium atoms, which is also introduced in this work.

  5. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  6. Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

    2014-03-18

    A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

  7. Development of risk-based computer models for deriving criteria on residual radioactivity and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Yew

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing multimedia environmental pathway and health risk computer models to assess radiological risks to human health and to derive cleanup guidelines for environmental restoration, decommissioning, and recycling activities. These models are based on the existing RESRAD code, although each has a separate design and serves different objectives. Two such codes are RESRAD-BUILD and RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC. The RESRAD code was originally developed to implement the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) residual radioactive materials guidelines for contaminated soils. RESRAD has been successfully used by DOE and its contractors to assess health risks and develop cleanup criteria for several sites selected for cleanup or restoration programs. RESRAD-BUILD analyzes human health risks from radioactive releases during decommissioning or rehabilitation of contaminated buildings. Risks to workers are assessed for dismantling activities; risks to the public are assessed for occupancy. RESRAD-BUILD is based on a room compartmental model analyzing the effects on room air quality of contaminant emission and resuspension (as well as radon emanation), the external radiation pathway, and other exposure pathways. RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC, currently under development, is intended to perform uncertainty analysis for RESRAD by using the Monte Carlo approach based on the Latin-Hypercube sampling scheme. The codes being developed at ANL are tailored to meet a specific objective of human health risk assessment and require specific parameter definition and data gathering. The combined capabilities of these codes satisfy various risk assessment requirements in environmental restoration and remediation activities. (author)

  8. Development of risk-based computer models for deriving criteria on residual radioactivity and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing multimedia environmental pathway and health risk computer models to assess radiological risks to human health and to derive cleanup guidelines for environmental restoration, decommissioning, and recycling activities. These models are based on the existing RESRAD code, although each has a separate design and serves different objectives. Two such codes are RESRAD-BUILD and RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC. The RESRAD code was originally developed to implement the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) residual radioactive materials guidelines for contaminated soils. RESRAD has been successfully used by DOE and its contractors to assess health risks and develop cleanup criteria for several sites selected for cleanup or restoration programs. RESRAD-BUILD analyzes human health risks from radioactive releases during decommissioning or rehabilitation of contaminated buildings. Risks to workers are assessed for dismantling activities; risks to the public are assessed for occupancy. RESRAD-BUILD is based on a room compartmental model analyzing the effects on room air quality of contaminant emission and resuspension (as well as radon emanation), the external radiation pathway, and other exposure pathways. RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC, currently under development, is intended to perform uncertainty analysis for RESRAD by using the Monte Carlo approach based on the Latin-Hypercube sampling scheme. The codes being developed at ANL are tailored to meet a specific objective of human health risk assessment and require specific parameter definition and data gathering. The combined capabilities of these codes satisfy various risk assessment requirements in environmental restoration and remediation activities

  9. Integrated data base for 1986: spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes through December 31, 1985, based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities and the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth. The materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions

  10. Lower fungi and radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamek, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sorption activities for radioactive elements were observed in molds Penicillinum muszynsky, Aspergillus versicolor and Alternaria tenius. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were isolated in laboratory and cultivated on a modified substrate containing uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate. They were found to be capable of absorbing in the biomass some members of the uranium decay series. (E.J.). 4 tabs., 11 refs

  11. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, A.

    1994-09-01

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  12. Disposal of radioactive waste. Some ethical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The threat posed to humans and nature by radioactive material is a result of the ionizing radiation released during the radioactive decay. The present use of radioactivity in medicine research and technologies produces steadily radioactive waste. It is therefore necessary to safely store this waste, particularly high level waste from nuclear facilities. The decisive factors determining the necessary duration of isolation or confinement are the physical half-life times ranging with some radionuclides up to many million years. It has therefore been accepted worldwide that the radioactive material needs to be confined isolated from the biosphere, the habitat of humans and all other organisms, for very long time periods. Although it is generally accepted that repositories for the waste are necessary, strong public emotions have been built up against the strategies to erect such installations. Apparently transparent information and public participation has been insufficient or even lacking. These problems have led to endeavours to achieve public acceptance and to consider ethical acceptability. Some aspects of such discussions and possibilities will be taken up in this contribution. This article is based on the work of an interdisciplinary group. The results have been published in 'Radioactive Waste - Technical and Normative Aspects of its Disposal' by C. Streffer, C.F. Gethmann, G. Kamp et al. in 'Ethics of Sciences and Technology Assessment', Volume 38, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  13. Disposal of radioactive waste. Some ethical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The threat posed to humans and nature by radioactive material is a result of the ionizing radiation released during the radioactive decay. The present use of radioactivity in medicine research and technologies produces steadily radioactive waste. It is therefore necessary to safely store this waste, particularly high level waste from nuclear facilities. The decisive factors determining the necessary duration of isolation or confinement are the physical half-life times ranging with some radionuclides up to many million years. It has therefore been accepted worldwide that the radioactive material needs to be confined isolated from the biosphere, the habitat of humans and all other organisms, for very long time periods. Although it is generally accepted that repositories for the waste are necessary, strong public emotions have been built up against the strategies to erect such installations. Apparently transparent information and public participation has been insufficient or even lacking. These problems have led to endeavours to achieve public acceptance and to consider ethical acceptability. Some aspects of such discussions and possibilities will be taken up in this contribution. This article is based on the work of an interdisciplinary group. The results have been published in 'Radioactive Waste - Technical and Normative Aspects of its Disposal' by C. Streffer, C.F. Gethmann, G. Kamp et al. in 'Ethics of Sciences and Technology Assessment', Volume 38, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  14. On-site radioactive soil contamination at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, Northwest Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reistad, O.; Dowdall, M.; Selnaes, O. G.; Standring, W. J. F.; Hustveit, S.; Steenhuisen, F.; Sorlie, A.

    The radioactive waste (RAW) storage site at Andreeva Bay in the Russian Northwest has experienced radioactive contamination both as a result of activities carried out at the site and due to incidents that have occurred there in the past such as accidental releases of radioactive materials. The site

  15. Bases for an environmental liability management system: application to a repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tostes, Marcelo Mallat

    1999-03-01

    This thesis aims the establishment of conceptual bases for the development of Environmental Liability Management System - instruments designed to provide financial and managerial coverage to financial liabilities arising from activities that impact the environment. The document analyses the theories that link the evolution of economic thought and environment, as a means of establish the necessary framework for the development of up-to-date environmental policy instruments. From these concepts and from the analysis of environmental liability system being implemented in several countries, the bases for environmental liability systems development are drawn. Finally, a study is carried out on the application of these bases for the development of an environmental liability management system for a radioactive waste repository. (author)

  16. Virtual Reality Based Accurate Radioactive Source Representation and Dosimetry for Training Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molto-Caracena, T.; Vendrell Vidal, E.; Goncalves, J.G.M.; Peerani, P.; )

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) technologies have much potential for training applications. Success relies on the capacity to provide a real-time immersive effect to a trainee. For a training application to be an effective/meaningful tool, 3D realistic scenarios are not enough. Indeed, it is paramount having sufficiently accurate models of the behaviour of the instruments to be used by a trainee. This will enable the required level of user's interactivity. Specifically, when dealing with simulation of radioactive sources, a VR model based application must compute the dose rate with equivalent accuracy and in about the same time as a real instrument. A conflicting requirement is the need to provide a smooth visual rendering enabling spatial interactivity and interaction. This paper presents a VR based prototype which accurately computes the dose rate of radioactive and nuclear sources that can be selected from a wide library. Dose measurements reflect local conditions, i.e., presence of (a) shielding materials with any shape and type and (b) sources with any shape and dimension. Due to a novel way of representing radiation sources, the system is fast enough to grant the necessary user interactivity. The paper discusses the application of this new method and its advantages in terms of time setting, cost and logistics. (author)

  17. Travel in the depth of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This educational booklet gives a general presentation of radioactivity: origin of natural radioactivity, characteristics of atoms and isotopes, the radioactivity phenomenon, its decay and measurement units, the radiations and their use in medicine, industry, agriculture and food industry, biology etc.. (J.S.)

  18. Classification of decays involving variable decay chains with convolutional architectures

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Vidyo contribution We present a technique to perform classification of decays that exhibit decay chains involving a variable number of particles, which include a broad class of $B$ meson decays sensitive to new physics. The utility of such decays as a probe of the Standard Model is dependent upon accurate determination of the decay rate, which is challenged by the combinatorial background arising in high-multiplicity decay modes. In our model, each particle in the decay event is represented as a fixed-dimensional vector of feature attributes, forming an $n \\times k$ representation of the event, where $n$ is the number of particles in the event and $k$ is the dimensionality of the feature vector. A convolutional architecture is used to capture dependencies between the embedded particle representations and perform the final classification. The proposed model performs outperforms standard machine learning approaches based on Monte Carlo studies across a range of variable final-state decays with the Belle II det...

  19. Radiation dose evaluation based on exposure scenario during the operation of radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Kim Chang Lak; Choi, Heui Joo; Park, Joo Wan

    1999-01-01

    Radiation dose to worker in disposal facility was calculated by using point kernel MICROSHIELD V5.02 computer code based on exposure scenarios. An conceptual design model for disposal vaults in disposal facility was used for object of shielding calculation model. Selected radionuclides and their activities among radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants were assumed as radiation sources for the exposure calculation. Annual radiation doses to crane workers and to people working on disposal vaults were calculated according to exposure time and distance from the sources with conservative operation scenarios. The scenarios used for this study were based on assumption for representing disposal activities in a future Korean near surface disposal facility. Calculated exposure rates to worker during normal disposal work were very low comparing with annual allowable limit for radiation worker

  20. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  1. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal- a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, an ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 gram of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity, the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment. (author)

  2. Low level radioactive waste disposal: An evaluation of reports comparing ocean and land based disposal options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This document evaluates reports presenting comparative assessments of land and sea disposal options for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. It was performed following a request by the LDC to the IAEA. In this evaluation, IAEA Safety Series No. 65 ''Environmental Assessment Methodologies for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Wastes'', was used as the main reference in reviewing the comparative assessments made to date. IAEA Safety Series No. 65 gives guidance on the performance of comparative assessments of the different options, and provides a list and scheme of factors to be considered. 5 studies were transmitted by the Contracting Parties and considered in this review. A larger number of reports was not considered in this effort on the basis that the evaluation would be most effective if directed at those studies which specifically compared ocean disposal with land based disposal in a consistent manner. It is not the purpose of this report to state whether one document is better than another or whether one report forms a good blueprint for future assessments. This would require a different type of review and is outside the scope of this document. Indeed since the purposes of the five reports were originally so different it would not be possible to produce such a ranking and any attempts in that direction would be very misleading. 11 refs, 3 tabs

  3. ZZ RADDECAY, Decay Data Library for Radiological Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Description of program or function: - Format: special format defined in documentation. - Nuclides: 500 nuclides of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, environmental problems, nuclear medicine, fusion reactor technology, and radiological protection assessment. - Origin: DLC-80/DRALIST. ZZ-RADDECAY is a data library of half-lives, radioactive daughter nuclides, probabilities per decay and decay product energies for alpha particles, positrons, electrons, X-rays, and gamma-rays. The current data base contains approximately 500 nuclides of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, environmental problems, nuclear medicine, fusion reactor technology, and radiological protection assessment. RADIATION DECAY VERSION 2 March 1997: This application is being provided by Aptec as 'Freeware' with permission of the author Mr. Charles Hacker, Engineering and Applied Science, Griffith University, Australia

  4. Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C. [and others

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  5. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs.

  6. Approach and issues toward development of risk-based release standards for radioactive scrap metal recycle and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Nieves, L.A.; Nabelssi, B.K.; LePoire, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is expected to generate large amounts of slightly radioactive scrap metal (RSM). It is likely that some of these materials will be suitable for recycling and reuse. The amount of scrap steel from DOE facilities, for instance, is estimated to be more than one million tons (Hertzler 1993). However, under current practice and without the establishment of acceptable recycling standards, the RSM would be disposed of primarily as radioactive low-level waste (LLW). In the United States, no specific standards have been developed for the unrestricted release of bulk contaminated materials. Although standards for unrestricted release of radioactive surface contamination (NRC 1974) have existed for about 20 years, the release of materials is not commonly practiced because of the lack of risk-based justifications. Recent guidance from international bodies (IAEA 1988) has established a basis for deriving risk-based release limits for radioactive materials. It is important, therefore, to evaluate the feasibility of recycling and associated issues necessary for the establishment of risk-based release limits for the radioactive metals

  7. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs

  8. Integrated Data Base for 1992: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton, M. L.; Williams, J. T.; Tolbert-Smith, M.; Klein, J. A.

    1992-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1991. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  9. Nano size Aerosols of Radon Decay Products in Various Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaupotic, J.

    2008-01-01

    The radioactive noble gas radon (222Rn, alpha decay, t 1/2 = 3.82 days) is always accompanied by its short-lived decay products (RnDP): 218Po (alpha decay, t 1/2 = 3.10 min), 214Pb (beta/gamma decay, t 1/2 = 26.8 min), 214Bi (beta/gamma decay, t 1/2 = 19.9 min), and 214Po (alpha decay, t 1/2 = 164 μs). In indoor and outdoor air, they appear as unattached RnDP in the form of clusters in the size range 0.5-3 nm and as attached RnDP between 200 and 800 nm. Because of plate-out of aerosols on the walls and floor of a room, as well as air movement and entry of fresh air, radioactive equilibrium between RnDP and Rn in indoor air is only partly achieved and is expressed as a fraction between 0 and 1, called the equilibrium factor, F. Birchall and James elaborated a dosimetric approach to calculate the dose conversion factor, DCF D , based on f un . In this paper, the results of our studies on fun in 29 rooms of kindergartens and 26 rooms of elementary and high schools, at the lowest point and the railway station in the Postojna Cave, and in 4 rooms in wineries in Slovenia are reported, and DCF D values based on the Porstendorfer formulae are discussed and compared with the DCF E value recommended by ICRP-65

  10. Dose-volume histograms based on serial intravascular ultrasound: a calculation model for radioactive stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, Christian; Wexberg, Paul; Gottsauner-Wolf, Michael; Pokrajac, Boris; Ortmann, Elisabeth; Aiginger, Hannes; Glogar, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radioactive stents are under investigation for reduction of coronary restenosis. However, the actual dose delivered to specific parts of the coronary artery wall based on the individual vessel anatomy has not been determined so far. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) permit an estimation of the actual dose absorbed by the target volume. We present a method to calculate DVHs based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements to determine the dose distribution within the vessel wall. Materials and methods: Ten patients were studied by intravascular ultrasound after radioactive stenting (BX Stent, P-32, 15-mm length) to obtain tomographic cross-sections of the treated segments. We developed a computer algorithm using the actual dose distribution of the stent to calculate differential and cumulative DVHs. The minimal target dose, the mean target dose, the minimal doses delivered to 10 and 90% of the adventitia (DV10, DV90), and the percentage of volume receiving a reference dose at 0.5 mm from the stent surface cumulated over 28 days were derived from the DVH plots. Results were expressed as mean±SD. Results: The mean activity of the stents was 438±140 kBq at implantation. The mean reference dose was 111±35 Gy, whereas the calculated mean target dose within the adventitia along the stent was 68±20 Gy. On average, DV90 and DV10 were 33±9 Gy and 117±41 Gy, respectively. Expanding the target volume to include 2.5-mm-long segments at the proximal and distal ends of the stent, the calculated mean target dose decreased to 55±17 Gy, and DV 90 and DV 10 were 6.4±2.4 Gy and 107±36 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of DVHs seems in principle to be a valuable tool for both prospective and retrospective analysis of dose-distribution of radioactive stents. It may provide the basis to adapt treatment planning in coronary brachytherapy to the common standards of radiotherapy

  11. A PC-based discrete tomography imaging software system for assaying radioactive waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.C.; Longoria, L.C.; Santos, J.; Perry, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    A PC-based discrete tomography imaging software system for assaying radioactive waste containers for use in facilities in Mexico has been developed. The software system consists of three modules: (i) for reconstruction transmission tomography, (ii) for reconstruction emission tomography, and (iii) for simulation tomography. The Simulation Module is an interactive computer program that is used to create simulated databases for input to the Reconstruction Modules. These databases may be used in the absence of physical measurements to insure that the tomographic theoretical models are valid and that the coding accurately describes these models. Simulation may also be used to determine the detection limits of the reconstruction methodology. A description of the system, the theory, and a demonstration of the systems capabilities is provided in the paper. The hardware for this system is currently under development

  12. Spent fuel and radioactive waste: an integrated data base of inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Forsberg, C.W.; Mastal, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program provides official US Department of Energy (DOE) data on spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. This information is provided through the cooperative efforts of the IDB Program and DOE lead offices, lead sites, major programs, and generator sites. The program is entering its fifth year, and major accomplishments are summarized in three broad areas: (1) the annual inventory report, including ORIGEN2 applications and a Quality Assurance (QA) plan; (2) the summary data file and direct user access; and (3) data processing methodology and support to other programs. Plans for future work in these areas are outlined briefly, including increased utilization of personal computers. Some examples of spent fuel data are given in terms of projected quantities for two growth scenarios, burnup and age profile of the existing inventory, and the approximate specific thermal power relative to high-level waste (HLW) from various sources. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Data base for a site-specific migration analysis radioactive elements out of a waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1981-11-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories. In a first step our plans are to calculate transport of radionuclides using data - as far as possible - for an undisturbed hydrogeology. Thereby a reference case is defined. In a later step, possible events and processes can be considered leading to a deviation from the reference case. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. For the first time we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. The well-known fact that the data basis is extremely sparse is pointed out once more and concretized in detail.

  14. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo; Lee, Taek Seung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive 60 Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  15. Colorimetric detection and removal of radioactive Co ions using sodium alginate-based composite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daigeun; Jo, Ara [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo [Decontamination and Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taek Seung, E-mail: tslee@cnu.ac.kr [Organic and Optoelectronic Materials Laboratory, Department of Organic Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Organic/inorganic hybridized alginate beads were newly synthesized via sol-gel chemistry. • Interaction between the azopyridine and metal ion is the main cause of Co ion detection. • The beads showed improved stability and least leakage of azopyridine during use. • Removal of Co ion was assessed by the ion-exchange of carboxylate groups in alginate. • The beads with dual functions of detection and removal of Co ion were successfully accomplished. - Abstract: We demonstrate a simple method for the visual determination and removal of Co ions using a bead-shaped, capturing probe based on hybridized sodium alginate. For Co ions, the designed protocol consisted of three main constituents: an azopyridine-based Co ion-probe for visual detection; sodium alginate as an adsorbent for the Co ion and a bead construct for removal and structure; silica as a linker for the probe and the alginate, leading to a robust structure. When the composite beads were exposed to Co ions, the yellow color of the beads turned to intensive violet and the color intensity was associated with the Co ion concentration. The color variation was quantified using red-green-blue (RGB) color values that were obtained with a scanner and evaluated with Photoshop. The technique achieved both visual recognition with obvious color change of the beads and efficient removal of the radioactive {sup 60}Co ion. The sensing and removal of any radioactive isotope could be achieved with an appropriate sensing probe, to provide a simple and universal platform for remediation.

  16. Low level radioactive waste management and discharge policies in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Oezdemir, C.; Uslu, I.

    2005-01-01

    The legal infrastructure in Turkey for the management of low-level radioactive waste covers the liquid, solid and gaseous wastes. Management of these radioactive wastes is briefly described in this paper. Moreover, delay and decay tank systems that are used to collect and store the low level radioactive wastes as a part of low-level radioactive effluent discharge policy are introduced. (author)

  17. Study on adsorption performance of coal based activated carbon to radioactive iodine and stable iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping; Zhang, Youchen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The impregnated coal-based activated carbons as adsorbent for removing methyl iodide. • The coal-based activated carbons to remove stable iodine. • Iodine residues are under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment. • The decontamination factor is much higher than 1000. - Abstract: Nuclear power plant, nuclear reactors and nuclear powered ship exhaust contains a large amount of gaseous radioactive iodine, and can damage to the workplace and the surrounding environment. The quantitative test to remove methyl iodide and the qualitative test for removing stable iodine were investigated using the impregnated coal-based activated carbons and coal-based activated carbons as adsorbents. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues were under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing the stable iodine was more than 1000, which can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, and satisfy the requirement of gaseous waste treatment of nuclear powered vessel and other nuclear plants

  18. Waste-acceptance criteria and risk-based thinking for radioactive-waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenthal, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The US system of radioactive-waste classification and its development provide a reference point for the discussion of risk-based thinking in waste classification. The official US system is described and waste-acceptance criteria for disposal sites are introduced because they constitute a form of de facto waste classification. Risk-based classification is explored and it is found that a truly risk-based system is context-dependent: risk depends not only on the waste-management activity but, for some activities such as disposal, it depends on the specific physical context. Some of the elements of the official US system incorporate risk-based thinking, but like many proposed alternative schemes, the physical context of disposal is ignored. The waste-acceptance criteria for disposal sites do account for this context dependence and could be used as a risk-based classification scheme for disposal. While different classes would be necessary for different management activities, the waste-acceptance criteria would obviate the need for the current system and could better match wastes to disposal environments saving money or improving safety or both

  19. A novel detection of radon based on its decay product inducing conformational changes of an aptamer probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Minzhi; Deng, Han; Tian, Gang; Song, Chunli; Liu, Hongwen; Shen, Yi; Lv, Changyin, E-mail: Lchy1955@163.com

    2016-09-14

    This study proposes a novel method for the detection of inert gas radon using a label-free, specific, fluorescence-sensing aptamer in the context of PW17-OG system. This method utilizes the cyanine dye OliGreen (OG) as a signal reactor and the aptamer PW17 as a fluorescent identification probe. When OG integrates into the free curling PW17, a strong fluorescence signal is generated. After radon decays, the long lived naturally occurring radon progeny Pb being disposed and introduced to the system. Lead ions induce PW17 to form a stable G-quadruplex, thereby inhibiting the interaction between OG and PW17 and resulting in a reduction of the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence intensity show a good linear relationship with lead ion and the radon concentration (D), thereinto, We fitted linear regression of radon concentration in the range of 0.92–4.22 (×10{sup 4} Bqhm{sup −3}) to receive a good relationship between ΔF and the concentration of radon with the detection limit of 1963 Bqhm{sup −3}. This method has been successfully applied for detecting standard cumulative concentration of radon and the detection limit reached the national standard of China. This sensitive method can exclude radiation damage in field testing, furthermore, it explores a new field in biological analysis using an aptamer to detected inorganic, gaseous, and radioactive materials. - Highlights: • The label-free fluorescence sensor for detection of radon. • This microscale experiment without radiation damage to experimenters and with less harm to environment. • It provides a sensitive, low cost and simple strategy for radon accumulated concentration and lead ion detection.

  20. A novel detection of radon based on its decay product inducing conformational changes of an aptamer probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Minzhi; Deng, Han; Tian, Gang; Song, Chunli; Liu, Hongwen; Shen, Yi; Lv, Changyin

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel method for the detection of inert gas radon using a label-free, specific, fluorescence-sensing aptamer in the context of PW17-OG system. This method utilizes the cyanine dye OliGreen (OG) as a signal reactor and the aptamer PW17 as a fluorescent identification probe. When OG integrates into the free curling PW17, a strong fluorescence signal is generated. After radon decays, the long lived naturally occurring radon progeny Pb being disposed and introduced to the system. Lead ions induce PW17 to form a stable G-quadruplex, thereby inhibiting the interaction between OG and PW17 and resulting in a reduction of the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence intensity show a good linear relationship with lead ion and the radon concentration (D), thereinto, We fitted linear regression of radon concentration in the range of 0.92–4.22 (×10"4 Bqhm"−"3) to receive a good relationship between ΔF and the concentration of radon with the detection limit of 1963 Bqhm"−"3. This method has been successfully applied for detecting standard cumulative concentration of radon and the detection limit reached the national standard of China. This sensitive method can exclude radiation damage in field testing, furthermore, it explores a new field in biological analysis using an aptamer to detected inorganic, gaseous, and radioactive materials. - Highlights: • The label-free fluorescence sensor for detection of radon. • This microscale experiment without radiation damage to experimenters and with less harm to environment. • It provides a sensitive, low cost and simple strategy for radon accumulated concentration and lead ion detection.

  1. Utility decay rates of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast based on redox-sensitive paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    The availability and applicability of the combination of paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agent and T 1 -weighted gradient echo (GE)-based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement for redox imaging are described. The time courses of T 1 -weighted GE MRI signal intensities according to first-order paramagnetic loss of a nitroxyl contrast agent were simulated for several experimental conditions. The apparent decay rate calculated based on decreasing T 1 -weighted MRI contrast (k MRI ) can show an approximate value of the original decay rate (k true ) discretionarily given for simulation with suitable experimental parameters. The difference between k MRI and k true can be sufficiently small under T 1 -weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) scan conditions (repetition time=75 ms, echo time=3 ms, and flip angle=45deg), with a conventional redox-sensitive nitroxyl contrast agent, such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) and/or 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-N-oxyl (carbamoyl-PROXYL), and with intravenous (i.v.) doses of below 1.5 γmol/g body weight (b.w.) for mice. The results of this simulation suggest that the k MRI of nitroxyl contrast agents can be the primary index of redox status under biological conditions. (author)

  2. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke

    2015-01-01

    The use of cementitious materials in nuclear waste management is quite widespread. It covers the solidification of low/intermediate-level liquid as well as solid wastes (e.g. laboratory wastes) and serves as shielding. For both high-level and intermediate-low level activity repositories, cement/concrete likewise plays an important role. It is used as construction material for underground and surface disposals, but more importantly it serves as barrier or sealing material. For the requirements of waste conditioning, special cement mixtures have been developed. These include special mixtures for the solidification of evaporator concentrates, borate binding additives and for spilling solid wastes. In recent years, low-pH cements were strongly discussed especially for repository applications, e.g. (Celine CAU DIT COUMES 2008; Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). Examples for relevant systems are Calcium Silicate Cements (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based) or Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC). Low-pH pore solutions are achieved by reduction of the portlandite content by partial substitution of OPC by mineral admixtures with high silica content. The blends follow the pozzolanic reaction consuming Ca(OH) 2 . Potential admixtures are silica fume (SF) and fly ashes (FA). In these mixtures, super plasticizers are required, consisting of polycarboxilate or naphthalene formaldehyde as well as various accelerating admixtures (Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). The pH regime of concrete/cement materials may stabilize radionuclides in solution. Newly formed alteration products retain or release radionuclides. An important degradation product of celluloses in cement is iso-saccharin acid. According to Glaus 2004 (Glaus and van Loon 2004), it reacts with radionuclides forming dissolved complexes. Apart from potentially impacting radionuclide solubility limitations, concrete additives, radionuclides or other strong complexants compete for surface sites for sorbing onto cement phases. In

  3. In sæcula sæculorum: A lab activity to create with students a radioactive secular equilibrium model⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santostasi, D.

    2017-03-01

    The teaching of radioactivity in the high school is often difficult to implement, especially from an experimental point of view. In this paper an activity based on a laboratory experiment on radioactivity is presented. The activity was proposed to high school students in their fourth year of studies attending the summer internship organized by the University of Pavia at the Department of Physics. The experiement concerns the radon decay chain, and in particular the measurement of the activity of 214Bi , both in absence and in presence of its progenitor 222Rn . This way it is possible to observe two different decay curves: the first provides a 214Bi decay constant in agreement with the theoretical one, whereas the trend of the second one can be understood only through the hypothesis of secular equilibrium with 222Rn . Using an engaging and interesting game with dice, a model of radioactive decay was developed and performed with students divided in small groups.

  4. Fine structure of cluster decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, O.

    1993-07-01

    Within the one level R-matrix approach the hindrance factors of the radioactive decays in which are emitted α and 14 C - nuclei are calculated. The generalization to radioactive decays in which are emitted heavier clusters such as e.g. 20 O, 24 Ne, 25 Ne, 28 Mg. 30 Mg, 32 Si and 34 Si is straightforward. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the shell model with effective residual interactions (e.g. the large scale shell model code-OXBASH - in the Michigan State University version for nearly spherical nuclei or by the enlarged superfluid model - ESM - recently proposed for deformed nuclei). The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster - nucleus double - folding model potential obtained with the M3Y interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of α - decay of 241 Am and 14 C -decay of 233 Ra. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained. (author). 78 refs, 2 figs, 6 tabs

  5. BioRadBase: A database for bioremediation of radioactive waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radioactive waste from different sectors such as nuclear energy, health care and food has become a discernible part of our environment. Several dumping methods are in routine practice to dispose radioactive wastes. Huge chemical and energy input in various skillful physico-chemical methods has limited their use while ...

  6. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Radioactivity. Draft. Begriffe und Benennungen in der radiologischen Technik. Radioaktivitaet. Entwurf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    Nuclides and their symbols: Nuclide, symbol for nuclides; Nuclear processes: Nuclear transformation, isomeric transition; Radioactive substances; Radiation of radioactive substances: Alpha radiation, beta radiation, k radiation, gamma radiation, conversion electrons, annihilation radiation, neutron radiation; Activity, specific activity, and activity concentration; Characteristic constants of radio nuclides: Decay constant, lifetime, half-life, specific gamma-ray constant, conversion coefficient; Decay series: Radioactive decay series, radioactive equilibrium; Nuclides with special names and symbols: Hydrogen isotopes, nuclides of the natural decay series.

  7. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  8. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  9. NuFact muon storage ring: study of a triangle design based on solenoid focusing decay straights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Service Accelerateurs, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)]|[Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA, 31-33, rue de la Federation (Paris 15e), BP 510, 75752 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Reesy, G. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Properties of acceptance and beam transmission in a triangle design of the neutrino factory muon decay ring, with decay straights based on solenoidal focusing, are reported.The muon storage ring in the neutrino factory, NuFact, is located at the high energy end of the muon acceleration chain. It delivers the {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -} decay neutrinos to physics detectors. The design of concern here, is a triangle geometry 20 GeV storage ring, upgradable to 50 GeV, (the parameters are given), which features two decay straight sections, each one aiming at a distant detector. The third straight section of the ring is devoted to tuning, collimation and RF. A particularity of the proposed design, is in its being based on solenoid focusing decay straights, which has the virtue of minimizing the betatron amplitudes, compared to equivalent quadrupole focusing. The solenoidal focusing ensures the requested ratio, for the r.m.s. divergences of the 20 GeV muon and the neutrino beam, of 0.1 for an assumed muon normalized r.m.s. emittance of 4800 {pi} mm mr (3 {pi} cm, total). The goal of the present work is to show the viability of this design, in particular as concerns the impact of the solenoid focusing on machine behavior. It addresses the questions of residual coupling, machine acceptance, and concludes with a computation of beam transmission over 1000 turns. The paper has the following structure: 1. Introduction; 2. Working hypothesis; 3. Building-up ray-tracing data; 3.1. Arcs; 3.2. Solenoid straight; 3.3. Tuning/Collimation/RF straight; 3.4. Full ring; 3.4.1. Beam envelopes; 3.4.2. Closed orbits; 3.4.3. Momentum dispersion; 3.5 Large amplitude tracking, preliminary tests; 4. Tracking, linear machine; 4.1. Large amplitude tracking; 4.1.1. 2-D horizontal initial conditions; 4.1.2. 2-D vertical initial conditions; 4.1.3. 4-D + {delta}p/p initial conditions; 4.2. Transmission, 4-D + {delta}p/p, no sextupoles; 4.2.1. {epsilon}{sub x} {epsilon}{sub z} = 3 {pi} cm (norm.), {delta

  10. NuFact muon storage ring: study of a triangle design based on solenoid focusing decay straights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot, F.; Reesy, G.

    2006-06-01

    Properties of acceptance and beam transmission in a triangle design of the neutrino factory muon decay ring, with decay straights based on solenoidal focusing, are reported.The muon storage ring in the neutrino factory, NuFact, is located at the high energy end of the muon acceleration chain. It delivers the μ + /μ - decay neutrinos to physics detectors. The design of concern here, is a triangle geometry 20 GeV storage ring, upgradable to 50 GeV, (the parameters are given), which features two decay straight sections, each one aiming at a distant detector. The third straight section of the ring is devoted to tuning, collimation and RF. A particularity of the proposed design, is in its being based on solenoid focusing decay straights, which has the virtue of minimizing the betatron amplitudes, compared to equivalent quadrupole focusing. The solenoidal focusing ensures the requested ratio, for the r.m.s. divergences of the 20 GeV muon and the neutrino beam, of 0.1 for an assumed muon normalized r.m.s. emittance of 4800 π mm mr (3 π cm, total). The goal of the present work is to show the viability of this design, in particular as concerns the impact of the solenoid focusing on machine behavior. It addresses the questions of residual coupling, machine acceptance, and concludes with a computation of beam transmission over 1000 turns. The paper has the following structure: 1. Introduction; 2. Working hypothesis; 3. Building-up ray-tracing data; 3.1. Arcs; 3.2. Solenoid straight; 3.3. Tuning/Collimation/RF straight; 3.4. Full ring; 3.4.1. Beam envelopes; 3.4.2. Closed orbits; 3.4.3. Momentum dispersion; 3.5 Large amplitude tracking, preliminary tests; 4. Tracking, linear machine; 4.1. Large amplitude tracking; 4.1.1. 2-D horizontal initial conditions; 4.1.2. 2-D vertical initial conditions; 4.1.3. 4-D + δp/p initial conditions; 4.2. Transmission, 4-D + δp/p, no sextupoles; 4.2.1. ε x ε z = 3 π cm (norm.), δp/p = ±1%; 4.2.2. ε x ε z = 6 π cm (norm.), δp/p ±4

  11. Chalcogen-based aerogels as a multifunctional platform for remediation of radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ryan, Joseph V.; Matyas, Josef; Li, Xiaohong S.; Matson, Dean W.; Sundaram, S.K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Aerogels employing chalcogen-based (i.e., S, Se, and/or Te) structural units and interlinking metals are termed chalcogels and have many emerging applications. Here, chalcogels are discussed in the context of nuclear fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste remediation. Motivated by previous work on removal of heavy metals in aqueous solution, we explored the application of germanium sulfide chalcogels as a sorbent for gas-phase I2 based on Pearson's Hard/Soft Acid-Base (HSAB) principle. This work was driven by a significant need for high-efficiency sorbents for I-129, a long-lived isotope evolved during irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel reprocessing. These chalcogel compositions are shown to possess an affinity for iodine gas, I2(g), at various concentrations in air and the affinity is attributed to a strong chemical attraction between the chalcogen and I2(g), according to the HSAB principle. The high sorption efficiency is facilitated by the high porosity as well as the exceptionally large surface area of the chalcogels.

  12. Mixed radioactive and chemotoxic wastes (RMW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    During the first decades of development of nuclear energy, organizations involved in the management of nuclear wastes had their attention focused essentially on radioactive components. The impression may have prevailed that, considering the severe restrictions on radioactive materials, the protection measured applied for radioactive components of wastes would be more than adequate to cope with potential hazards from non radioactive components associated with radioactive wastes. More recently it was acknowledged that such interpretation is not necessarily justified in all cases since certain radioactive wastes also contain non-negligible amounts of heavy metals or hazardous organic components which, either, do not decay, or are subject to completely different decay (decomposition) mechanisms. The main purposes of the present study are to analyze whether mixed radioactive wastes are likely to occur in Europe and in what form, whether one needs a basis for integration for evaluating various forms of toxicity and by which practical interventions possible problems can be avoided or at least reduced. (au)

  13. Development of a computerized data base for low-level radioactive waste leaching data: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    This report documents the development of a computerized data base (db) of leaching data for solidified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms. Brookhaven National Lab performed this work under contract with the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program as part of an effort to develop an accelerated leach test(s) that can be used to predict leachabilities of LLW forms over long time periods, i.e., hundreds of years. The accelerated leach test(s) is (are) to be developed based on knowledge of leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching. Although developed specifically for the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program, this db may be useful to others concerned with the management of low-level waste. The db is being developed to provide efficient data compilation and analysis capabilities. The data compiled in the db, which include data from the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program and selected data from the literature, have been selected to elucidate leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching and are not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of leaching data. This report presents the data compilation aspect of the db. It does not present the programmatic results obtained from analysis of the data regarding leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching, which will be presented in reports from the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program. 6 refs

  14. Description of two-proton radioactivity by the methods of the quantum theory of ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmenskij, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    Two-proton decay of spherical nuclei has been investigated on the base of the formalism of quantum mechanical theory of ternary fission. The suggested method of construction of partial two-proton-decay-width amplitudes and of asymptotics of the decaying nucleus wave functions allows to solve a problem of two-proton radioactivity description without the traditionally used in R-matrix approaches laborious sewing procedure for internal and external parent nucleus wave functions in three-body scheme. In the frame of diagonal approximation, the wave-function structure for Cooper pair of two emitted protons in parent nucleus was analyzed as well as the behavior of the wave function describing potential scattering of two-proton-decay products with taking into account decay channel coupling and properties of interaction potentials between these products [ru

  15. Wealth distribution, Pareto law, and stretched exponential decay of money: Computer simulations analysis of agent-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydiner, Ekrem; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    We study by Monte Carlo simulations a kinetic exchange trading model for both fixed and distributed saving propensities of the agents and rationalize the person and wealth distributions. We show that the newly introduced wealth distribution - that may be more amenable in certain situations - features a different power-law exponent, particularly for distributed saving propensities of the agents. For open agent-based systems, we analyze the person and wealth distributions and find that the presence of trap agents alters their amplitude, leaving however the scaling exponents nearly unaffected. For an open system, we show that the total wealth - for different trap agent densities and saving propensities of the agents - decreases in time according to the classical Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts stretched exponential law. Interestingly, this decay does not depend on the trap agent density, but rather on saving propensities. The system relaxation for fixed and distributed saving schemes are found to be different.

  16. Radioactive waste produced by DEMO and commerical fusion reactors extrapolated from ITER and advanced data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.; Hertel, N.E.; Hoffman, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for providing energy with minimal environmental impact is a powerful motivation for the development of fusion and is the long-term objective of most fusion programs. However, the societal acceptability of magnetic fusion may well be decided in the near-term when decisions are taken on the construction of DEMO to follow ITER (if not when the construction decision is taken on ITER). Component wastes were calculated for DEMOs based on each data base by first calculating reactor sizes needed to satisfy the physics, stress and radiation attenuation requirements, and then calculating component replacement rates based on radiation damage and erosion limits. Then, radioactive inventories were calculated and compared to a number of international criteria for open-quote near-surface close-quote burial. None of the components in either type of design would meet the Japanese LLW criterion ( 3 ) within 10 years of shutdown, although the advanced (V/Li) blanket would do so soon afterwards. The vanadium first wall, divertor and blanket would satisfy the IAEA LLW criterion (<2 mSv/h contact dose) within about 10 years after shutdown, but none of the stainless steel or copper components would. All the components in the advanced data base designs except the stainless steel vacuum vessel and shield readily satisfy the US extended 10CFR61 intruder dose criterion, but none of the components in the open-quotes ITER data baseclose quotes designs do so. It seems unlikely that a stainless steel first wall or a copper divertor plate could satisfy the US (class C) criterion for near surface burial, much less the more stringent international, criteria. On the other hand, the first wall, divertor and blanket of the V/Li system would still satisfy the intruder dose concentration limits even if the dose criterion was reduced by two orders of magnitude

  17. The design of radioactive source tracking management system based on RFID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongjun; Zhou Jianliang

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a solution of safety and security management system of radioactive source in storage and use by employing advanced RFID technology and computer database technology. And make some suggestions for further improvement. (authors)

  18. Review of the bases for regulations governing the transport of fissile and other radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Thomas, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    The outstanding record of transport of radioactive materials prompted this brief review of the history of the regulations. IAEA as well as DOT regulations are discussed, as are all classes of shipments and materials (Class I, II, III)

  19. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  20. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  1. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  2. Waste water plant for radioactive polluted media, for example faeces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galler, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to provide simple transport of radioactive polluted wastewater to a decay container using simple structural means, where aerobic decay is to take place during storage in the decay container, it is proposed that a sub-pressure source should be connected to the place of origin via a pressure-tight and closed decay container and that the gasous fluid extracted by the subpressure source should be returned to the decay container. (orig./PW) [de

  3. Modeling of multi-species ion transport in cement-based materials for radioactive waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, X.Y.; Li, K.F.; Dangla, P.

    2015-01-01

    Through the conservations of heat and ions mass, a thermo-hydro-ionic model is established for radionuclide ions transport in cement-based porous barrier materials in radwaste disposal. This model is applied to the design and the safety assessment of a high-integrity container (HIC) used for near surface disposal of low- and intermediate-level radwaste. Five working cases are investigated in the safety assessment considering the internal nuclide ion release, internal heating and pressure accumulation, and external leaching. Comparative analysis shows that leaching increases concrete porosity from external side of container, internal heating of 10 K increase can considerably accelerate the nuclide transport process, and the internal pressure increases the transport rate to limited extent. It is shown that each increment of 10 mm in wall thickness will reduce the radioactivity release by 1.5 to 2 times. Together with the mechanical resistance of HIC under impact actions, the thickness of 100 mm is finally retained for design

  4. A fuzzy logic based method to monitor organizational resilience: application in a brazilian radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Vidal, Mario C.R.; Cosenza, Carlos A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Resilience is the intrinsic ability of a system to adjust its functioning prior to, during, or following changes and disturbances, so that it can sustain required operations under expected and unexpected conditions. This definition focuses on the ability to function, rather than on being impervious to failure, and thereby overcomes the traditional conflict between productivity and safety. Resilience engineering (RE) has fast become recognized as a valuable complement to the established approaches to safety of complex socio-technical systems and methods to monitor organizational resilience are needed. However, few, if any, comprehensive and systematic research studies focus on developing an objective, reliable and practical assessment model for monitoring organizational resilience. Most methods cannot fully solve the subjectivity of resilience evaluation. In order to remedy this deficiency, the aim of this research is to adopt a Fuzzy Set Theory (FST) approach to establish a method for resilience assessment in organizations based on leading safety performance indicators, defined according to the resilience engineering principles. The method uses FST concepts and properties to model the indicators and to assess the results of their application. To exemplify the method we performed an exploratory case study at the process of radiopharmaceuticals dispatch package of a Brazilian radioactive facility. (author)

  5. Dynamic analysis of an accelerator-based subcritical radioactive waste burning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.L. Jr.; Rydin, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled systems for radioactive waste management. This motivates the need for dynamic analysis of the nuclear kinetics of such systems. A physical description of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) concept is provided. This system is used as the basis for the kinetic study in this research. The current approach to the dynamic simulation of an accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled system includes four functional blocks: A discrete ordinates model is used to calculate the flux distribution for the source-driven system (DORT); A nodal convection model is used to calculate time-dependent isotope and temperature distributions which impact reactivity (ABCcore); A nodal importance weighting model is used to calculate the reactivity impact of temperature and isotope distributions and to feed this information back to the time-dependent nodal convection model (ABCvip); A transient driver simulates system transients and records simulation data (ABCtrans). Specific transients which have been analyzed with the current modeling system are discussed. These transients include loss-of-flow and loss-of-cooling accidents, xenon and samarium transients, and cold-plug and overfueling events. The results of various transients have uncovered unpredictable behavior, unresolved design issues, and the need for active control. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. A fuzzy logic based method to monitor organizational resilience: application in a brazilian radioactive facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.br, E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Instrumentacao e Confiabilidade Humana; Vidal, Mario C.R.; Cosenza, Carlos A.N., E-mail: mvidal@ergonomia.ufrj.br, E-mail: cosenza@pep.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEP/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2013-07-01

    Resilience is the intrinsic ability of a system to adjust its functioning prior to, during, or following changes and disturbances, so that it can sustain required operations under expected and unexpected conditions. This definition focuses on the ability to function, rather than on being impervious to failure, and thereby overcomes the traditional conflict between productivity and safety. Resilience engineering (RE) has fast become recognized as a valuable complement to the established approaches to safety of complex socio-technical systems and methods to monitor organizational resilience are needed. However, few, if any, comprehensive and systematic research studies focus on developing an objective, reliable and practical assessment model for monitoring organizational resilience. Most methods cannot fully solve the subjectivity of resilience evaluation. In order to remedy this deficiency, the aim of this research is to adopt a Fuzzy Set Theory (FST) approach to establish a method for resilience assessment in organizations based on leading safety performance indicators, defined according to the resilience engineering principles. The method uses FST concepts and properties to model the indicators and to assess the results of their application. To exemplify the method we performed an exploratory case study at the process of radiopharmaceuticals dispatch package of a Brazilian radioactive facility. (author)

  7. Synthesis and characterization of SiC based composite materials for immobilizing radioactive graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Teng, Yuancheng; Wu, Lang; Zhang, Kuibao; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuang

    2018-06-01

    In order to immobilize high-level radioactive graphite, silicon carbide based composite materials{ (1-x) SiC· x MgAl2O4 (0.1 ≤ x≤0.4) } were fabricated by solid-state reaction at 1370 °C for 2 h in vacuum. Residual graphite and precipitated corundum were observed in the as-synthesized product, which attributed to the interface reaction of element silicon and magnesium compounds. To further understand the reasons for the presence of graphite and corundum, the effects of mole ratio of Si/C, MgAl2O4 content and non-stoichiometry of MgAl2O4 on the synthesis were investigated. To immobilize graphite better, residual graphite should be eliminated. The target product was obtained when the mole ratio of Si/C was 1.3:1, MgAl2O4 content was x = 0.2, and the mole ratio of Al to Mg in non-stoichiometric MgAl2O4 was 1.7:1. In addition, the interface reaction between magnesium compounds and silicon not graphite was displayed by conducting a series of comparative experiments. The key factor for the occurrence of interface reaction is that oxygen atom is transferred from magnesium compound to SiO gas. Infrared and Raman spectrum revealed the increased disorders of graphite after being synthesized.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the induced structural radioactivity inventory of the base-case aqueous accelerator transmutation of waste reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdecny, J.A.; Vance, K.M.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Transmutation of (Nuclear) Waste (ATW) project is the substantial reduction in volume of long-lived high-level radioactive waste of the US in a safe and energy-efficient manner. An evaluation of the ATW concept has four aspects: material balance, energy balance, performance, and cost. An evaluation of the material balance compares the amount of long-lived high-level waste transmuted with the amount and type, of waste created in the process. One component of the material balance is the activation of structural materials over the lifetime of the transmutation reactor. A preliminary radioactivity and radioactive mass balance analysis has been performed on four structure regions of the reaction chamber: the tungsten target, the lead annulus, six tubing materials carrying the actinide slurry, and five reaction vessel structural materials. The amount of radioactive material remaining after a 100-yr cooling period for the base-case ATW was found to be 338 kg of radionuclides. The bulk of this material (313 kg) was generated in the zirconium-niobium (Zr-Nb) actinide tubing material. Replacement of the Zr-Nb tubing material with one of the alternative tubing materials analyzed would significantly reduce the short- and long-term radioactive mass produced. The alternative vessel material Al-6061 alloys, Tenelon, HT-9, and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and the alternative actinide tubing materials Al-6061 alloy, carbon-carbon matrix, silicon carbide, and Ti-6 Al-4 V qualify for shallow land burial. Alternative disposal options for the base-case structural material Type 304L stainless steel and the actinide tubing material Zr-Nb will need to be considered as neither qualifies for shallow land burial

  9. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  10. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  11. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André, E-mail: jovitamarcelo@gmail.com, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: apinheiro99@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  12. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  13. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  14. Genetic bases of fungal white rot wood decay predicted by phylogenomic analysis of correlated gene-phenotype evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    László G. Nagy; Robert Riley; Philip J. Bergmann; Krisztina Krizsán; Francis M. Martin; Igor V. Grigoriev; Dan Cullen; David S. Hibbett

    2016-01-01

    Fungal decomposition of plant cell walls (PCW) is a complex process that has diverse industrial applications and huge impacts on the carbon cycle. White rot (WR) is a powerful mode of PCW decay in which lignin and carbohydrates are both degraded. Mechanistic studies of decay coupled with comparative genomic analyses have provided clues to the enzymatic components of WR...

  15. Representations for the decay parameter of a birth-death process based on the Courant-Fischer theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Erik A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay parameter (the rate of convergence of the transition probabilities) of a birth-death process on $\\{0,1,...\\}$, which we allow to evanesce by escape, via state 0, to an absorbing state -1. Our main results are representations for the decay parameter under four different scenarios,

  16. Representations for the decay parameter of a birth-death process based on the Courant-Fischer Theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Erik A.

    We study the decay parameter (the rate of convergence of the transition probabilities) of a birth-death process on $\\{0,1,...\\}$, which we allow to evanesce by escape, via state 0, to an absorbing state -1. Our main results are representations for the decay parameter under four different scenarios,

  17. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  18. Decay correction methods in dynamic PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.; Lawson, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to reconstruct positron emission tomography (PET) images in quantitative dynamic studies, the data must be corrected for radioactive decay. One of the two commonly used methods ignores physiological processes including blood flow that occur at the same time as radioactive decay; the other makes incorrect use of time-accumulated PET counts. In simulated dynamic PET studies using 11 C-acetate and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), these methods are shown to result in biased estimates of the time-activity curve (TAC) and model parameters. New methods described in this article provide significantly improved parameter estimates in dynamic PET studies

  19. GALIST, Decay Gamma Spectra Retrieval from ENSDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: GALIST consists of two main programs, GAMRET and GNOI. - GAMRET retrieves from ENSDF or files with ENSDF-like format gamma rays following radioactive decay. GAMRET uses two auxiliary programs, ENSORT and AMSORT (see below under item 8). - GNOI makes a list of radionuclides and their gamma rays. In the decay data of ENSDF, however, not all gamma-ray intensities are included

  20. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  1. School-Based Caries Prevention, Tooth Decay, and the Community Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, R R; Niederman, R

    2018-04-01

    The school and community context can contribute to inequity in child oral health. Whether the school and community affect the effectiveness of school-based caries prevention is unknown. The association between the school and community environment and dental caries, as well as their moderating effects with school-based caries prevention, was assessed using multilevel mixed-effects regression. Data were derived from a 6-y prospective cohort study of children participating in a school-based caries prevention program. For the school and community, living in a dental-shortage area and the proportion of children receiving free or reduced lunch were significantly related to an increased risk of dental caries at baseline. Caries prevention was associated with a significant per-visit decrease in the risk of untreated caries, but the rate of total caries experience increased over time. Caries prevention was more effective in children who had prior dental care at baseline and in schools with a higher proportion of low socioeconomic status students. There was significant variation across schools in the baseline prevalence of dental caries and the effect of prevention over time, although effects were modest. The school and community environment have a direct impact on oral health and moderate the association between school-based caries prevention and dental caries. Knowledge Transfer Statement: School-based caries prevention can be an effective means to reduce oral health inequity by embedding dental care within schools. However, the socioeconomic makeup of schools and characteristics of the surrounding community can affect the impact of school-based care.

  2. International workshop on scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination of an urban environment. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This workshop aims to discuss the most important aspects of scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination in urban environment and to identify some scientific, social and economic open questions. Papers explaining in more details the principles of intervention, computational capabilities and measurements after a contamination of urban areas are presented. A review on practical experiences from Chernobyl and Goiania accidents is also included.

  3. International workshop on scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination of an urban environment. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This workshop aims to discuss the most important aspects of scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination in urban environment and to identify some scientific, social and economic open questions. Papers explaining in more details the principles of intervention, computational capabilities and measurements after a contamination of urban areas are presented. A review on practical experiences from Chernobyl and Goiania accidents is also included

  4. Method of monitoring volume activity of natural radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, V.

    1980-01-01

    The method of monitoring radioactivity of a aerosol trapped, eg., with a filter is based on counting quasi-coincidences of the RaC-RaC' and ThC-ThC' decay. The first electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the ThC' half-life while the second electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the RaC' half-life, reduced by the time interval of the first electronic unit. The quasi-coincidences are evaluated of the RaC-RaC' decay independently of the ThC-ThC' quasi-coincidences and the decay products of the trapped radon and thoron gases are thus offset separately. (J.P.)

  5. On-site radioactive soil contamination at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, Northwest Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reistad, O; Dowdall, M; Selnaes, Ø G; Standring, W J F; Hustveit, S; Steenhuisen, F; Sørlie, A

    2008-07-01

    The radioactive waste (RAW) storage site at Andreeva Bay in the Russian Northwest has experienced radioactive contamination both as a result of activities carried out at the site and due to incidents that have occurred there in the past such as accidental releases of radioactive materials. The site is an interesting case study for decommissioning due to the extremely large amounts of radioactivity present at the site and the conditions under which it is stored; very little has been previously published in the scientific literature about this site. This paper complements the paper describing dose rates at Andreeva Bay which is published in this issue of Journal of Environmental Radioactivity by the same authors. This study presents new data related to the activity concentrations of (137)Cs and (90)Sr in surface soils and measurements of alpha- and beta-particle fluxes taken at different areas around the site. Limited data on 60Co is also presented. The results of the study indicate that the main areas of site contamination are associated with the former spent nuclear fuel storage facility at Building 5, due to accidental discharges which began in 1982. Substantial contamination is also observed at the solid radioactive waste storage facilities, probably due to the ingress of water into these facilities. More than 240 samples were measured: maximum contamination levels were 1 x 10(6)Bq/kg (137)Cs (mean value 4.1 x 10(5)Bq/kg) and 4 x 10(6)Bq/kg (90)Sr (mean value 1.2 x1 0(5)Bq/kg). Localised patches of alpha and beta contamination were also observed throughout the site.

  6. Optimization of the radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste storage is the practice adopted in countries where the production of small quantities of radioactive waste does not justify the immediate investment in the construction of a repository. Accordingly, at IPEN, treated radioactive wastes, mainly solid compacted, have been stored for more than 20 years, in 200 dm 3 drums. The storage facility is almost complete and must be extended. Taking into account that a fraction of these wastes has decayed to a very low level due to the short half - life of some radionuclides and considering that 'retrieval for disposal as very low level radioactive waste' is one of the actions suggested to radioactive waste managers, the Laboratory of Waste Management of IPEN started a project to apply the concepts of clearance levels and exemption limits to optimize the radioactive waste storage capacity . This study has been carried out by determining the doses and costs related to two main options: either to maintain the present situation or to open the packages and segregate the wastes that may be subject to clearance, using the national, two international clearance levels and the annual public limit. Doses and costs were evaluated as well as the collective dose and the detriment cost. The analytical solution among the evaluated options was determined by using the technique to aid decision making known as cost-benefit analysis. At last, it was carried out the sensitivity analysis considering all criteria and parameters in order to assess the robustness of the analytical solution. This study can be used as base to other institutions or other countries with similar nuclear programs. (author)

  7. An automated system for selective fission product separations; decays of 113-115Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikrantz, D.H.; Gehrke, R.J.; McIsaac, L.D.; Baker, J.D.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer controlled radiochemical separation system has been developed for the isolation and study of fission products with half-lives of approx. >= 10 s. The system is based upon solvent extraction with three centrifugal contactors coupled in series, which provides both rapid and highly efficient separations with large decontamination factors. This automated system was utilized to study the radioactive decays of 113-115 Pd via solvent extraction of the Pd-dimethylglyoxime complex from 252 Cf fission products. As a result of this effort, γ-rays associated with the decay of approx. equal to 90-s sup(113,113m)Pd, 149-s 114 Pd and 47-s 115 Pd have been identified. The isotopic assignments to each of these Pd radioactivities have been confirmed from observation of the growth and decay curves of their respective Ag daughters. In addition, previously unreported Ag γ-rays have been assigned; one to the decay of 69-s 113 Ag, and two to the decay of 19-s 115 Ag. (orig.)

  8. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on Nal gamma spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general...

  9. The ENSDF radioactivity data base for IBM-PC and computer network access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, P.; Spanier, L.

    1989-08-01

    A database for about 15000 gamma rays from 2777 radioactive nuclides derived from the international Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is described together with supporting computer codes. The database is available on a PC diskette, costfree, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  10. Technical bases for OCRWM's [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] policy decisions on international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecher, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the technical factors that contributed to the formulation of the international safeguards policy enunciated in September 1988 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which is the federal organization responsible for the implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended

  11. Implementation of a laboratory apparatus based on a NaI(Tl) spectrometer: application to the characterization of soil radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianjafitrimo

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory apparatus based on a NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer for the assessment of radionuclides naturally occurring in environmental samples was established. This detection system is devoted to the quantitative determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in soils and rocks samples.The IAEA reference materials, RG S ET was used for calibration of the spectrometer. The photopics at 1460, 1765 and 2614 keV due to 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, were used for the corresponding activity measurements. The radioactivity characterization of soils was performed on primordial radionuclides distribution and radon emanation according to the grain-size. Because of social and economical interest that present the collected samples (mineralized sands and soils rich in uranium), their radiation protection aspects was considered in this work. Discussions was made on factors restricting the approach based on scintillation spectrometry, such as radioactive equilibrium and radon encapsulation in the one hand, and in the other hand, on the assessment of soils characterization, among other things, grain-size effects. The present work has also shown that radioactivity levels of building and fabrication materials can be reduced by the removal of fines or fraction having higher concentrations by sieving. [fr

  12. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  13. The ''invisible'' radioactive scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    1999-04-01

    Production and up-concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the petroleum industry has attracted steadily increasing attention during the last 15 years. Most production engineers today associate this radioactivity with precipitates (scales) and sludges in production tubing, pumps, valves, separators, settling tanks etc., wherever water is being transported or treated. 226 Ra and 228 Ra are the most well known radioactive constituents in scale. Surprisingly little known is the radioactive contamination by 210 Pb and progeny 210 Bi and 210 Po. These are found in combination with 226 Ra in ordinary scale, often in layer of non-radioactive metallic lead in water transportation systems, but also in pure gas and condensate handling systems ''unsupported'' by 226 Ra, but due to transportation and decay of the noble gas 222 Rn in NG/LNG. This latter contamination may be rather thin, in some cases virtually invisible. When, in addition, the radiation energies are low enough for not being detectable on the equipment outer surface, its existence has for most people in the industry been a secret. The report discusses transportation and deposition mechanisms, detection methods and provides some examples of measured results from the North Sea on equipment sent for maintenance. It is concluded that a regular measurement program for this type of contamination should be mandatory under all dismantling processes of transportation and fluid handling equipment for fluids and gases offshore and onshore

  14. Decay heat uncertainty quantification of MYRRHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorito Luca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MYRRHA is a lead-bismuth cooled MOX-fueled accelerator driven system (ADS currently in the design phase at SCK·CEN in Belgium. The correct evaluation of the decay heat and of its uncertainty level is very important for the safety demonstration of the reactor. In the first part of this work we assessed the decay heat released by the MYRRHA core using the ALEPH-2 burnup code. The second part of the study focused on the nuclear data uncertainty and covariance propagation to the MYRRHA decay heat. Radioactive decay data, independent fission yield and cross section uncertainties/covariances were propagated using two nuclear data sampling codes, namely NUDUNA and SANDY. According to the results, 238U cross sections and fission yield data are the largest contributors to the MYRRHA decay heat uncertainty. The calculated uncertainty values are deemed acceptable from the safety point of view as they are well within the available regulatory limits.

  15. Some problems of parametric neutron activation analysis based on the use of radioactive daughters of longer-lived mothers with low mother/daughter half-life ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and practical aspects of the use of radioactive daughters originated from the decay of longer-lived radioactive mothers in parametric activation analysis, when the ratio: mother half-life to daughter half-life is less than 10, are discussed. The mother-daughter relationships: 47 Ca/ 47 Sc; 95 Zr/ 95 Nb; 140 Ba/ 140 La; 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and 115 Cd/ 115m In are selected as models for the study. The cases when the radionuclide of interest is formed through both direct and indirect routes are also analyzed. As illustrative example, the direct reaction and the reaction chain: 47 Ti(n,p) 47 Sc/ 46 Ca(n,γ) 47 Ca(β - ) 47 Sc are evaluated with respect to the determination of the elements involved and their reciprocal interferences. (author)

  16. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  18. Design and development of microcontroller based programmable ramp generator for AC-DC converter for simulating decay power transient in experimental facility for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Gaurava Deep; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, fuel is subjected to a wide range of power and temperature transients during normal and abnormal conditions. The reactor setback and step-back power pattern, fast temperature profile occurred during Loss of Coolant Accident and decay power followed by shutdown of power plant are the typical transients in nuclear power plant. For a variety of reactor engineering and reactor safety related study, one needs to simulate these transients in experimental facility. In experimental facilities, high response AC-DC converters are used to handle these power and temperature transients safely in a controlled manner for generating a database which is utilized for design of thermal hydraulic system, development of computer codes, study of reliability of reactor safety system, etc. for nuclear power plants. The paper presents the methodology developed for simulating the typical reactor decay power transient in an experimental facility. The design and simulation of AC-DC power electronic converter of 3 MW capacity is also presented. The microcontroller based programmable ramp generator is designed and hardware implemented for feeding reference voltage to the closed loop control system of AC-DC converter for obtaining the decay power profile at the converter output. The typical decay power transient of the nuclear power plant is divided into several small power ramps for simulating the transient. The signal corresponding to each power ramp is generated by programmable ramp generator and fed to the comparator for generating control signal for the converter. The actual decay power transient obtained from the converter is compared with the theoretical decay power transient. (author)

  19. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  20. Verification of using SABINE-3.1 code for calculations of radioactive inventory in reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moukhamadeev, R.; Suvorov, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of calculations of radioactive inventory and doses of activation radiation for the International Benchmark Calculations of Radioactive Inventory for Fission Reactor Decommissioning, IAEA, and measurements of activation doses in shield of WWER-440 (Armenian NPP), using one-dimension modified code SABINE-3.1. For decommissioning of NPP it is very important to evaluate in correct manner radioactive inventory in reactor construction and shield materials. One-dimension code SABINE-3.1 (removing-diffusion method for neutron calculation) was modified to perform calculation of radioactive inventory in reactor shield materials and dose from activation photons behind them. These calculations are carried out on the base of nuclear constant system ABBN-78 and new library of activation data for a number of long-lived isotopes, prepared by authors on the base of [9], which present at shield materials as microimpurities and manage radiation situation under the decay more than 1 year. (Authors)

  1. A simple decay-spectroscopy station at CRIS-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, K.M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); EP Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cocolios, T.E. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Althubiti, N. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Farooq-Smith, G.J. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gins, W. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, BE-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Smith, A.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-01

    A new decay-spectroscopy station (DSS2.0) has been designed by the CRIS collaboration for use at the radioactive ion beam facility, ISOLDE. With the design optimised for both charged-particle and γ-ray detection, the DDS2.0 allows high-efficiency decay spectroscopy to be performed. The DSS2.0 complements the existing decay-spectroscopy system at the CRIS experiment, and together provide the ability to perform laser-assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy on both ground state and long-lived isomeric species. This paper describes the new decay-spectroscopy station and presents the characterisation studies that have recently been performed.

  2. Risk-based approach to long-term safety assessment for near surface disposal of radioactive waste in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, C.W.; Kim, K.I.; Lee, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Korean regulatory approach to safety assessment consistent with probabilistic, risk-based long-term safety requirements for near surface disposal facilities. The approach is based on: (1) From the standpoint of risk limitation, normal processes and probabilistic disruptive events should be integrated in a similar manner in terms of potential exposures; and (2) The uncertainties inherent in the safety assessment should be reduced using appropriate exposure scenarios. In addition, this paper emphasizes the necessity of international guidance for quantifying potential exposures and the corresponding risks from radioactive waste disposal. (author)

  3. Half-lives of cluster decay of neutron rich nuclei in trans-tin region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, G.S.; Umesh, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the logarithmic half-life [log 10 (T 1/2 )] values have been reported for the exotic decay of some neutron rich even–even parent nuclei (56≤Z≤64) accompanied by the emission of alpha-like and non-alpha-like clusters in the trans-tin region. These values were calculated by using the single line of universal curve (UNIV) for alpha and cluster radioactive decay as well as the universal decay law (UDL). The half-life values were also separately calculated by considering the interacting nuclear potential barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potentials. The half-life values based on the three calculations mentioned above, were found to agree with one another within a few orders of magnitude. Possible conclusions are drawn based on the present study. (author)

  4. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  5. Uncertainty analysis of the radiological characteristics of radioactive waste using a method based on log-normal distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigase, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainty on characteristics of radioactive LILW waste packages is difficult to determine and often very large. This results from a lack of knowledge of the constitution of the waste package and of the composition of the radioactive sources inside. To calculate a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty on a characteristic of a waste package one has to combine these various uncertainties. This paper discusses an approach to this problem, based on the use of the log-normal distribution, which is both elegant and easy to use. It can provide as example quantitative estimates of uncertainty intervals that 'make sense'. The purpose is to develop a pragmatic approach that can be integrated into existing characterization methods. In this paper we show how our method can be applied to the scaling factor method. We also explain how it can be used when estimating other more complex characteristics such as the total uncertainty of a collection of waste packages. This method could have applications in radioactive waste management, more in particular in those decision processes where the uncertainty on the amount of activity is considered to be important such as in probability risk assessment or the definition of criteria for acceptance or categorization. (author)

  6. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  7. TRIUMF - The Swedish data base system for radioactive waste in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogsberg, Marie; Andersson, Per-Anders

    2006-01-01

    All short lived LLW/ILW from the operation and maintenance of all Swedish Nuclear Power Plants are disposed in SFR, the Swedish final repository for radioactive operational waste. It is important to save all the information about radioactive waste that is needed now and in the future. To be secure that, we have developed a database system in Sweden called Triumf, consisting information about all the waste packages that are disposed in SFR. The waste producers register data concerning individual waste package during production. Before transport to SFR a data file with all information about the individual waste packages is transferred to Triumf. When transferred, the data are checked against accepted limitations before the waste can be loaded on the ship for transport to SFR. After disposal at SFR the deposition location in the repository is added to the database for each waste package. (author)

  8. A computer-based spectrometry system for assessment of body radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venn, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a PDP-11 computer system operating under RT-11 for the acquisition and processing of pulse height spectra in the measurement of body radioactivity. SABRA (system for the assessment of body radioactivity) provides control of multiple detection systems from visual display consoles by means of a command language. A wide range of facilities is available for the display, processing and storage of acquired spectra and complex operations may be pre-programmed by means of the SABRE MACRO language. The hardware includes a CAMAC interface to the detection systems, disc cartridge drives for mass storage of data and programs, and data-links to other computers. The software is written in assembler language and includes special features for the dynamic allocation of computer memory and for safeguarding acquired data. (orig.)

  9. A study on the diffusion of gaseous radioactive effluents based on the statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Lee, Goung Jin

    1998-01-01

    A diffusion model of radioactive gaseous effluents is improved to apply for domestic nuclear power plants. Up to now, XOQDOQ computer code package developed by U. S NRC has been used for the assessment of radioactive plume dispersion by normal operation of domestic nuclear power plants. XOQDOQ adopts the straight-line Gaussian plume model which was basically derived for the plane terrain. However, since there are so many mountains in Korea, the several shortcomings of XOQDOQ are improved to consider the complex terrain effects. In this work, wind direction change is considered by modifying the wind rose frequency using meteorological data of the local weather stations. In addition, an effective height correction model, a plume reduction model due to plume penetration into mountain, and a wet deposition model are adopted for more realistic assessments. The proposed methodology is implemented in Yonggwang nuclear power plants, and can be used for other domestic nuclear power plants

  10. Determination of radioactive emission origins based on analyses of isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.

    1987-01-01

    The nature of radioactivity emissions can be determined through gamma spectroscopy of air samples with good precision, which means that the type of source of the emission may be found, e.g. nuclear weapons test, of nuclear power plant accident. Combined with information on wind trajectories it is normally possible to recognize time and area for the emission. In this preliminary study, the knowledge of and preparedness for such measurements are described. (L.E.)

  11. Effects of natural radioactivity on food radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennyu, Atsuhito

    2012-01-01

    Since the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Company, groups and individuals including local governments, food manufacturers, distribution circles, retail circles, and citizens are eager to measure the radioactivity of food, in order to confirm the safety of food from the concerns about radioactive contamination. The measurement of radioactivity of food is done by quantitatively determining gamma rays due to radioactive cesium that was incorporated into the biosphere cycle after having been released into the environment. As for the radioactivity measurement of food using gamma-ray spectrometry with a potassium iodide scintillation detector, which is very commonly used, this paper describes the handling method of obtained data, the principle of erroneous detection of radioactive cesium and iodine interrupted by natural radionuclides, and countermeasures for it. Major natural radioactivity sources are uranium series and thorium series. This paper explains gamma rays, which are characteristic in the decay process of uranium series and often affect the measurement of radioactive cesium in food and water. (O.A.)

  12. Reactors physics. Bases of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, Ch.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of nuclear reactor physics is to quantify the relevant macroscopic data for the characterization of the neutronic state of a reactor core and to evaluate the effects of radiations (neutrons and gamma radiations) on organic matter and on inorganic materials. This first article presents the bases of nuclear physics in the context of nuclear reactors: 1 - reactor physics and nuclear physics; 2 - atomic nucleus - basic definitions: nucleus constituents, dimensions and mass of the atomic nucleus, mass defect, binding energy and stability of the nucleus, strong interaction, nuclear momentums of nucleons and nucleus; 3 - nucleus stability and radioactivity: equation of evolution with time - radioactive decay law; alpha decay, stability limit of spontaneous fission, beta decay, electronic capture, gamma emission, internal conversion, radioactivity, two-body problem and notion of radioactive equilibrium. (J.S.)

  13. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A System Simulation Model has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. This model can be used to quantify the impacts of different operating schedules, operational rules, system configurations, and equipment reliability and availability considerations on the performance of processes comprising the CRWMS and how these factors combine to determine overall system performance for the purpose of making system design decisions. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste

  14. Draft directive on the management of radioactive wastes based on deep geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission works on a legal framework to assure that all the member states apply the same standards in all the stages of the management of spent fuels and radioactive wastes till their definitive disposal. The draft propositions are the following. The standards to follow are those proposed by the IAEA. First, each member state has to set a national program dedicated to the management of radioactive wastes. This program will have to detail: the chosen solution, the description of the project, a time schedule, costs and financing. Secondly, the exportation of nuclear wastes for definitive disposal is not allowed unless the 2 countries have agreed to build a common nuclear waste disposal center. Thirdly, the population will have to be informed on the project and will have to take part in the decision process. Fourthly, the standards set by IAEA will be enforced by law. There is a broad consensus between scientists and international organizations like IAEA to consider that the disposal in deep geological layers of high-level radioactive wastes is the most adequate solution. (A.C.)

  15. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the civilian radioactive waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a System Simulation Model which has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste

  16. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  17. Weak Decays of Charmed Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Marc Gilles [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1986-05-01

    The lifetimes of charmed particles produced in interactions of high energy neutrinos with nucleons have been measured using a combination of a very high resolution emulsion-based vertex detector and a spectrometer allowing full kinematical reconstruction of the decays.

  18. Precision measurement of positron polarization in 68Ga decay based on the use of a new positron polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.; Newman, D.; Rich, A.; Sweetman, E.

    1977-01-01

    We report a new measurement of positron polarization (P) in 68 Ga decay. Using a new polarimeter the asymmetry (A) in the decay of positronium in a magnetic field was measured to 5%. When combined with a calculation of the positron depolarization on stopping in MgO powder the overall uncertainty in P is 11%. The most precise prior determination of P was to 12% accuracy. An eventual precision of 1% in A and 0.1% in comparisons of asymmetries from different sources is anticipated. In addition to the 68 Ga work we point out the possible use of the polarimeter in a number of new measurements including a determination of e + polarization in μ + and nuclear decay and in a g - 2 experiment

  19. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  20. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures

  1. Technology for commercial radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An analysis of the complete waste management system was developed to assess the total impact of managing radioactive wastes generated over the entire lifetime of a nuclear power system. The analysis considers the treatment and disposal of all post-fission TRU, gaseous and airborne and decommissioning wastes. Each radioactive waste stream is tracked each year from its origin through treatment, storage, transport, and accumulation in a geologic repository. The reference system is based on 400 GWe of nuclear power installed in the year 2000 and produces approximately 10,000 GWe-years of electric energy. An alternative low-growth projection based on 255 GWe in the year 2000 is also considered, but for fewer cases. This system produces approximately 6400 GWe year of electric energy. Capacity additions beyond the year 2000 are not considered a part of this system. After 40 years of operation each nuclear power plant is shut down and decommissioned. Thus, the last nuclear power plant is shut down in the year 2040. The last fuel reprocessing plant is shut down in the year 2044 and dismantled in the year 2075. Thus, the system operation encompasses a 101-year period from 1975 through 2075. In addition, the decay of radioactivity in the final repositories is followed over a million year period

  2. Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Vidal, J. Muñoz; Peña-Garay, C.

    2013-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, with Σm ν = (0.32±0.11) eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass m ββ involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based ββ0ν experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kg·year, could already have a sizeable opportunity to observe ββ0ν events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 ton·year, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely

  3. Some discussions on micrometeorology and atmospheric diffusion of classic and radioactive industrial pollutions. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.; Valenta, V.; Vlachovsky, K.

    1976-01-01

    Plume depletion and deposition is discussed for the cases of stack disposal of conventional and radioactive wastes. Dry and wet deposition processes and general radioactive decay chains including isomeric transitions are taken into account. (author)

  4. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  5. Impacts of accidental radioactive releases to the hydrosphere from floating and land-based nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    To assess the impacts of accidental radioactive releases to the hydrosphere from floating and land-based nuclear power plants, the Liquid Pathway Generic Study was initiated. The objective of this study was to compare the risks associated with releases through the liquid pathway from accidents that may reasonably be expected and those that are very improbable. Consequences were estimated in terms of radiation dose to man from drinking water ingestion, shell-fish and fish flesh consumption, and direct exposure (swimming, beach) as well as long-term effects, such as genetic effects or aquatic species degradation. (author)

  6. Microbial Influence on the Performance of Subsurface, Salt-Based Radioactive Waste Repositories. An Evaluation Based on Microbial Ecology, Bioenergetics and Projected Repository Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.S.; Reed, D.T.; Cherkouk, A.; Arnold, T.; Meleshyn, A.; Patterson, Russ

    2018-01-01

    For the past several decades, the Nuclear Energy Agency Salt Club has been supporting and overseeing the characterisation of rock salt as a potential host rock for deep geological repositories. This extensive evaluation of deep geological settings is aimed at determining - through a multidisciplinary approach - whether specific sites are suitable for radioactive waste disposal. Studying the microbiology of granite, basalt, tuff, and clay formations in both Europe and the United States has been an important part of this investigation, and much has been learnt about the potential influence of microorganisms on repository performance, as well as about deep subsurface microbiology in general. Some uncertainty remains, however, around the effects of microorganisms on salt-based repository performance. Using available information on the microbial ecology of hyper-saline environments, the bioenergetics of survival under high ionic strength conditions and studies related to repository microbiology, this report summarises the potential role of microorganisms in salt-based radioactive waste repositories

  7. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT. The unique environment of the EBIT provides backingfree storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  8. Radioactive thickness gauge (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes a thickness gauge in which the scintillating crystal detector alternately 'sees' a radioactive source through the material which is to be measured and then a control source of the same material; the radiations are separated in time by an absorbing valve whose sections are alternately full and hollow. The currents corresponding to the two sources are separated beyond the photomultiplier tube by a detector synchronized with the rotation of the valve. The quotient of these two currents is then obtained with a standard recording potentiometer. It is found that the average value of the response which is in the form G = f(I 1 /I 2 ) is not affected by decay of the radioactive sources, and that it is little influenced by variations of high tension, temperature, or properties of the air in the source detector interval. The performance of the gauge is given. (author) [fr

  9. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  10. Absolute radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactivity of a thin specimen can be determined directly, i.e. without reference to a standard and without knowing decay data, except for half-life, by means of counting at a given solid angle and by 4 πβ-γ coincidence measurement. In accordance with section 7 of the law on units, it is the task of PTB not only to represent the units and its derivation, but also to work out methods of adjusting national prototypes and normals to international prototypes and etalons in accordance with the international metre convention. (DG) [de

  11. Vietnam Project For Production Of Radioactive Beam Based On ISOL Technique With The Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong Khiem; Phan Viet Cuong; Fadi Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The presence in Vietnam of Dalat nuclear reactor dedicated to fundamental studies is a unique opportunity to produce Radioactive Ion (RI) Beams with the fission of a 235 U induced by the thermal neutrons produced by the reactor. We propose to produce RI beams at the Dalat nuclear reactor using ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) technique. This project should be a unique opportunity for Vietnamese nuclear physics community to use its own facilities to produce RI beams for studying nuclear physics at an international level. (author)

  12. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-06

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution.

  13. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  14. World ocean and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiknadze, O.E.; Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The radioecological situation that took shape in the Arctic, North Atlantic Ocean and Far East regions as a result of radioactive waste marine disposal was assessed. Accurate account of radionuclides formation and decay in submerged water-water reactors of nuclear submarines suggests that total activity of radioactive waste disposed near the Novaya Zemlya amounted to 107 kCi by the end of 1999. Activity of radioactive waste disposed in the North Atlantic currently is not in excess of 430 kCi. It is pointed out that the Far East region heads the list in terms of total activity disposed (529 kCi). Effective individual dose for critical groups of population in the Arctic, North Atlantic and Far East regions was determined. The conclusion was made that there is no detrimental effect of the radioactive waste disposed on radioecological situation in the relevant areas [ru

  15. Radioactive waste management information for 1990 and record-to-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litteer, D.L.; Peterson, C.N.; Sims, A.M.

    1991-07-01

    This document presents detailed data and graphics on volume, radioactivity, isotopic identity, origin, and decay status of radioactive waste for the calendar year 1990. It also summarizes the radioactive waste data records compiled from 1952 to present for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Information System (RWMIS)

  16. Radioactive waste management information for 1993 and record-to-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.A.

    1994-07-01

    This document presents detailed data, bar graphs, and pie charts on volume, radioactivity, isotopic identity, origin, and decay status of radioactive waste for the calendar year 1993. It also summarizes the radioactive waste data records compiled from 1952 to present for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Information System

  17. Method and program for decay scheme reconstruction based on formal logical analysis of gamma-gamma coincidence matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    A new, rigorously substantiated approach to construction of decay schemes on the basis of γ-γ coincidence data is described. Complete decay modes (concrete cascades of transitions from excited to the ground-state of a nucleus excited in a decay or a reaction) and continuity regions in complete modes (regions of successive transitions) are isolated by logical operations with rows (columns) of a symmetrical coincidence matrix where rows (columns) correspond to energies of coinciding transitions and matrix elements are unities and zeros, depending on the presence or absence of the given coincidence. To reject false complete modes and continuity regions arising from incompleteness of the coincidence data and errors in them, energy selection is introduced for complete modes and continuity regions, which demands that total energy of their constituent transitions should be equal to total energy of some other complete modes and continuity regions and to the energies of singles. With the continuity regions found, it is possible to order transitions in the selected complete modes and to algorithmize matching of complete modes into a decay scheme. 10 refs., 3 figs

  18. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  19. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  20. Three-body decays: structure, decay mechanism and fragment properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Jensen, A.S.; Fedorov, D.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Kirsebom, O.S.; Garrido, E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the three-body decay mechanisms of many-body resonances. R-matrix sequential description is compared with full Faddeev computation. The role of the angular momentum and boson symmetries is also studied. As an illustration we show the computed ?-particle energy distribution after the decay of 12 C(1 + ) resonance at 12.7 MeV. This article is based on the presentation by R. Alvarez-Rodriguez at the Fifth Workshop on Critical Stability, Erice, Sicily. (author)

  1. Management of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site using Decision-based, Probabilistic Performance Assessment Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carilli, J.; Crowe, B.; Black, P.; Tauxe, J.; Stockton, T.; Catlett, K.; Yucel, V.

    2003-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste from cleanup activities at the Nevada Test Site and from multiple sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex is disposed at two active Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. These facilities, which are managed by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, were recently designated as one of two regional disposal centers and yearly volumes of disposed waste now exceed 50,000 m3 (> 2 million ft3). To safely and cost-effectively manage the disposal facilities, the Waste Management Division of Environmental Management has implemented decision-based management practices using flexible and problem-oriented probabilistic performance assessment modeling. Deterministic performance assessments and composite analyses were completed originally for the Area 5 and Area 3 RWMSs located in, respectively, Frenchman Flat and Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site. These documents provide the technical bases for issuance of disposal authorization statements for continuing operation of the disposal facilities. Both facilities are now in a maintenance phase that requires testing of conceptual models, reduction of uncertainty, and site monitoring all leading to eventual closure of the facilities and transition to long-term stewardship

  2. Soil radioactivity levels and radiation hazard assessment around a Thermal Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Somdutt; Agrawal, Anshu; Kumar, Rajesh; Prajith, Rama; Sahoo, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Coal based thermal power plants further enhance the level of radioactivity in the environment, as burning of coal produces fly ash that can be released into the environment containing traces of 238 U, 232 Th and their decay products. Therefore, coal fired power plants are one of the major contributor towards the Technologically Enhanced Natural Radiation (TENR). Keeping this in view, a study of natural radioactivity in the soil of twenty five villages within 5 km radius around the Harduaganj Thermal Power Plant, Aligarh, UP, India is going on under a BRNS major project, to know the radiological implications on general population living around this plant

  3. Application of [sup 57]Fe emission Moessbauer spectroscopy to the investigation of the physico-chemical consequences of the double radioactive decay [sup 57]Ni[yields][sup 57]Co[yields][sup 57]Fe in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devillers, M.; Ladriere, J. (Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Lab. de Chimie Inorganique et Nucleaire)

    1994-04-01

    [sup 57]Fe emission Mossbauer spectroscopy is shown to be a useful technique for investigating the cumulative recoil and Auger after-effects associated with the double electron capture decay, [sup 57]Ni[yields][sup 57]Co''->[sup 57]Fe, in the solid state. Experimental results collected in several types of nickel-containing matrices are surveyed: conducting materials (Ni metal), ionic compounds with monoatomic ligands [potassium trifluoronickelate (II)] and coordination compounds with polyatomic ligands (carboxylates). (Author).

  4. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  5. Scalar mesons and radiative vector meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, A.; Ylmaz, O

    2002-01-01

    The light scalar mesons with vacuum quantum numbers J p =0 ++ have fundamental importance in understanding low energy QCD phenomenology and the symmetry breaking mechanisms in QCD. The nature and quark substructure of the best known scalar mesons, isoscalar σ(500), f0(980) and isovector a0(980) have been a subject of continuous controversy. The radioactive decay of neutral vector mesons ρ, w and φ into a single photon and a pair of neutral pseudoscalar mesons have been studied in order to obtain information on the nature of these scalar mesons. For such studies, it is essential that a reliable understanding of the mechanisms for these decays should be at hand. In this work, we investigate the particularly interesting mechanism of the exchange of scalar mesons for the radiative vector meson decays by analysing the experimental results such as measured decay rates and invariant mass spectra and compare them with the theoretical prediction of different reaction mechanisms

  6. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  7. The detection and measurement of the electrical mobility size distributions associated with radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Lin.

    1996-04-01

    The potential risk of lung cancer has evoked interest in the properties of radon decay products. There are two forms of this progeny: either attached to ambient aerosols, or still in the status of ions/molecules/small clusters. This ''unattached'' activity would give a higher dose per unit of airborne activity than the ''attached'' progeny that are rather poorly deposited. In this thesis, a system for determining unattached radon decay products electrical mobility size distribution by measuring their electrical mobilities was developed, based on the fact that about 88% of 218 Po atoms have unit charge at the end of their recoil after decay from 222 Rn, while the remainder are neutral. Essential part of the setup is the radon-aerosol chamber with the Circular Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (CEMS) inside. CEMS is used for sampling and classifying the charged radioactive clusters produced in the chamber. An alpha- sensitive plastic, CR-39 disk, is placed in CEMS as an inlaid disk electrode and the alpha particle detector. CEMS showed good performance in fine inactive particles' classification. If it also works well for radon decay products, it can offer a convenient size distribution measurement for radioactive ultrafine particles. However, the experiments did not obtain an acceptable resolution. Suggestions are made for solving this problem

  8. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  9. Environmental impact of radioactive releases from recycle of thorium-based fuel using current containment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Morse, L.E.; Meyer, H.R.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of thorium mining and milling suggests that the resulting doses should be similar to those from uranium operations. An absolute comparison cannot be made at this time, however, due to differences in some assumptions utilized by the various investigators and the lack in some cases of site-specific meteorology and population data at thorium resource sites in the western United States. A distinct difference resulting from the short half-life of 220 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 55.6 s) in the thorium decay chain compared to that for 222 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.82 d) in uranium decay was noted for emissions following mill shutdown. This effect is to make potential releases following thorium mill shutdown of lesser consequence than in the uranium case. Thorium tailings activity would also decrease relatively rapidly due to the comparatively short half-life (T/sub 1/2 = 5.75 y) of 228 Ra. Doses due to airborne releases from thorium-uranium carbide fuel refabrication are significantly less than that due to fuel reprocessing. Tritium is the principal contributor to reprocessing plant doses while carbon-14, 131 Cs, and 232 U account for most of the remaining dose. A tenfold increase in reprocessing plant CF for tritium reduces both individual and population doses by about 60%. For refabrication operations, a near linear dependence upon dose with 232 U content of the fuel was calculated between concentrations of 10 ppM and 5000 ppM. Comparison of (Th, U)C and (U, Pu)C showed little difference in dose commitment, but the presence of 232 U in the (Th, U) fuel causes a notable increase in the refabrication plant dose over that previously calculated for (U, Pu) type fuels

  10. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, J. [LPT, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  11. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J.; Charles, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  12. ANITA-2000 activation code package - updating of the decay data libraries and validation on the experimental data of the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisoni Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ANITA-2000 is a code package for the activation characterization of materials exposed to neutron irradiation released by ENEA to OECD-NEADB and ORNL-RSICC. The main component of the package is the activation code ANITA-4M that computes the radioactive inventory of a material exposed to neutron irradiation. The code requires the decay data library (file fl1 containing the quantities describing the decay properties of the unstable nuclides and the library (file fl2 containing the gamma ray spectra emitted by the radioactive nuclei. The fl1 and fl2 files of the ANITA-2000 code package, originally based on the evaluated nuclear data library FENDL/D-2.0, were recently updated on the basis of the JEFF-3.1.1 Radioactive Decay Data Library. This paper presents the results of the validation of the new fl1 decay data library through the comparison of the ANITA-4M calculated values with the measured electron and photon decay heats and activities of fusion material samples irradiated at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG of the NEA-Frascati Research Centre. Twelve material samples were considered, namely: Mo, Cu, Hf, Mg, Ni, Cd, Sn, Re, Ti, W, Ag and Al. The ratios between calculated and experimental values (C/E are shown and discussed in this paper.

  13. SCADA based radioactive sample bottle delivery system for fuel reprocessing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Subrat; Munj, Niket; Chauhan, R.K.; Kumar, Pramod; Mishra, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive samples of process streams need to be analyzed in centralized control lab for measuring concentration of heavy elements as well as activity at various stages of re-processing plants. The sample is taken from biologically shielded process cells remotely through sampling blisters in sample bottles. These are then transferred to control lab located about 50 meters using vacuum transfer system. The bottle movement is tracked from origin to destination in rich HMI SCADA system using Infra-red non contact type proximity sensors located along sampling line and these sensors are connected to PLC in a fail-safe mode. The sample bottle travels at a speed of 10 m/s under vacuum motive force and the detection time is of the order of 1 mS. The contact time Flow meters have been used to know the air flow in sampling line

  14. Induced structural radioactivity inventory analysis of the base case aqueous ATW reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdecny, J.A.; Henderson, D.L.; Sailor, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Transmutation of Nuclear Waste (ATW) project is the substantial reduction in volume of this country's long-lived high-level radioactive waste in a safe and energy efficient manner. An evaluation of the Accelerator Transmutation of Nuclear Waste concept has four aspects; material balance, energy balance, performance and cost. An evaluation of the material balance compares the amount of long-lived high-level waste transmuted with the amount and type of waste created in the process. One component of the material balance is the activation of structural materials over the lifetime of the transmutation reactor. An activation analysis has been performed on four structure regions of the reaction vessel: the tungsten target; the lead target and annulus; the Zircalloy and aluminum tubing carrying the actinide slurry and; the stainless steel tank

  15. Decontamination evaluation based on radioactivity measurement instead of air dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozugawa, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Air dose rate at 1 m above the ground comes from gamma radiations emitted from vast area ranging over several ten meters of the contaminated field from the counter. After showing the actual example of the difference between air dose rate data and Cs 137 distribution map made by using a shielded NaI-scintillation counter within and around a contaminated sinkhole (a ditch or trench) near Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, the author proposes to make a decontamination program according to the radioactivity distribution measurement instead of air dose rate measurement. Furthermore, he explains some problems arising from a point and plane radiation source, and also difficulties accompanied by movement of Cs 137 atoms in the soils according to the absorption characteristics of the existing minerals but these are also important to consider for performing an effective decontamination. (S. Ohno)

  16. Development of Labview based data acquisition and multichannel analyzer software for radioactive particle tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd, E-mail: nur-aira@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B. [Technical Support Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, Jaafar B.; Hassan, Hearie B. [Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    A DAQ (data acquisition) software called RPTv2.0 has been developed for Radioactive Particle Tracking System in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. RPTv2.0 that features scanning control GUI, data acquisition from 12-channel counter via RS-232 interface, and multichannel analyzer (MCA). This software is fully developed on National Instruments Labview 8.6 platform. Ludlum Model 4612 Counter is used to count the signals from the scintillation detectors while a host computer is used to send control parameters, acquire and display data, and compute results. Each detector channel consists of independent high voltage control, threshold or sensitivity value and window settings. The counter is configured with a host board and twelve slave boards. The host board collects the counts from each slave board and communicates with the computer via RS-232 data interface.

  17. SCADA based radioactive sample bottle delivery system for fuel reprocessing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Subrat; Munj, Niket; Chauhan, R.K.; Jayaram, M.N.; Haneef, K.K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive samples of process streams need to be analyzed in centralized control lab for measuring concentration of heavy elements as well as activity at various stages of re-processing plants. The sample is taken from biologically shielded process cells remotely through sampling blisters in sample bottles. These are then transferred to control lab located about 50 meters using vacuum transfer system. The bottle movement is tracked from origin to destination in rich HMI SCADA system using Infra-red non contact type proximity sensors located along sampling line and these sensors are connected to PLC in a fail-safe mode. The sample bottle travels at a speed of 10 m/s under vacuum motive force and the detection time is of the order of 1 mS. The flow meters have been used to know the air flow in sampling line. The system has been designed, developed, tested and commissioned and in use for four years. (author)

  18. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garfagnini, A.

    2014-08-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been per- formed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future. EXO and KamLAND-Zen experiments are based on the decay of Xe 136 , GERDA and MAJORANA experiments are based on the decay of Ge 76 , and the CUORE experiment is based on the decay of Te 130

  19. Alpha decay and cluster decay of some neutron-rich actinide nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. Nuclei in the actinide region are good in exhibiting cluster radioactivity. In the present work, the half-lives of α-decay and heavy cluster emission from certain actinide nuclei have been calculated using cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYEM). Our model has a cubic potential for the ...

  20. Radioactive wastes. Safety of storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    A radioactive waste storage facility is designed in a way that ensures the isolation of wastes with respect to the biosphere. This function comprises the damping of the gamma and neutron radiations from the wastes, and the confinement of the radionuclides content of the wastes. The safety approach is based on two time scales: the safety of the insulation system during the main phase of radioactive decay, and the assessment of the radiological risks following this phase. The safety of a surface storage facility is based on a three-barrier concept (container, storage structures, site). The confidence in the safety of the facility is based on the quality assurance of the barriers and on their surveillance and maintenance. The safety of a deep repository will be based on the site quality, on the design and construction of structures and on the quality of the safety demonstration. This article deals with the safety approach and principles of storage facilities: 1 - recall of the different types of storage facilities; 2 - different phases of the life of a storage facility and regulatory steps; 3 - safety and radiation protection goals (time scales, radiation protection goals); 4 - safety approach and principles of storage facilities: safety of the isolation system (confinement system, safety analysis, scenarios, radiological consequences, safety principles), assessment of the radiation risks after the main phase of decay; 5 - safety of surface storage facilities: safety analysis of the confinement system of the Aube plant (barriers, scenarios, modeling, efficiency), evaluation of radiological risks after the main phase of decay; experience feedback of the Manche plant; variants of surface storage facilities in France and abroad (very low activity wastes, mine wastes, short living wastes with low and average activity); 6 - safety of deep geological disposal facilities: legal framework of the French research; international context; safety analysis of the confinement system

  1. Radioactive waste management profiles. Compilation of data from the waste management data base. No. 2, April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In 1989, the International Atomic Energy Agency began development of the Waste Management Data Base (WMDB) to, primarily, establish a mechanism for the collection, integration, storage, and retrieval of information relevant to radioactive waste management in Member States. This current report is a summary and compilation of of the data received during the 1991 biennial update which covers the period of January 1991 through March 1993. This Profile report is divided into two main parts. One part describes the Waste Management Data Base system and the type of information it contains. The second part contains data provided by Member States in response to the IAEA's 1991 WMDB Questionnaire. This report also contains data of Member States that did nor report to the Questionnaire

  2. Radioactive waste management profiles. Compilation of data from the waste management data base. No. 2, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    In 1989, the International Atomic Energy Agency began development of the Waste Management Data Base (WMDB) to, primarily, establish a mechanism for the collection, integration, storage, and retrieval of information relevant to radioactive waste management in Member States. This current report is a summary and compilation of of the data received during the 1991 biennial update which covers the period of January 1991 through March 1993. This Profile report is divided into two main parts. One part describes the Waste Management Data Base system and the type of information it contains. The second part contains data provided by Member States in response to the IAEA`s 1991 WMDB Questionnaire. This report also contains data of Member States that did nor report to the Questionnaire 3 figs, 5 tabs

  3. [Nationwide survey on radioactive waste management related to positron emission tomography in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shinji

    2009-12-20

    A clearance system for medical radioactive solid waste has not yet been implemented in Japan. Since 2004 new regulations have allowed institutions using positron emission tomography(PET)to handle totally decayed radioactive waste as non-radioactive waste after decay-in-storage. It was expected that this new regulation would mediate the installation of clearance systems in Japan. In order to assess the current situation of radiation safety management in PET institutions, we conducted a nationwide survey. The study design was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted by questionnaire. The subjects of this survey were all the PET institutions in Japan. Among 224 institutes, 128 institutes are equipped with cyclotrons and 96 institutes are not. The number of returned questionnaires was 138. Among institutes that are using delivered radiopharmaceuticals, 80% treat their waste as non-radioactive according to the new regulation. The impact of new regulations for reducing radioactive waste in PET institutes without a cyclotron was estimated at about $400 thousand per year. The main concern of medical institutes was assessment of the contamination caused by by-products of radioactive nuclides generated in target water during the operation of a cyclotron. It was thought that a rational rule based on scientific risk management should be established because these by-products of radioactive nuclides are negligible for radiation safety. New regulation has had a good influence on medical PET institutes, and it is expected that a clearance system for medical radioactive waste will be introduced in the near future, following these recent experiences in PET institutes.

  4. The Integrated Data Base program: An executive-level data base of spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) is the official US Department of Energy (DOE) data base for spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections. As such, it should be as convenient to utilize as is practical. Examples of summary-level tables and figures are presented, as well as more-detailed graphics describing waste-form distribution by site and line charts illustrating historical and projected volume (or mass) changes. This information is readily accessible through the annual IDB publication. Other presentation formats are also available to the DOE community through a simple request to the IDB Program

  5. Purifications of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, AMoRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, HyangKyu

    2015-01-01

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) collaboration is going to use calcium molybdate crystals to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100 Mo isotope. In order to make the crystal, we use calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders as raw materials. Therefore it is highly necessary to reduce potential sources for radioactive backgrounds such as U and Th in the powders. In this talk, we will present our studies for purification of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders

  6. Foodstuffs (radioactive contamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Donald; Taylor, Teddy; Campbell-Savours, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings are given of the debate in the UK House of Commons on the maximum permitted radioactivity levels for foodstuffs, feeding stuffs and drinking water in the case of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident. The motion takes note of European Community Document no. 7183/87 and urges the Community to assure a common standard of health protection by adopting a rational set of scientifically based intervention levels for foodstuffs. (UK)

  7. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  8. Radioactive aerosols. [In Russian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, G L

    1956-01-01

    Tabulations are given presenting various published data on safe atmospheric concentrations of various radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols. Methods of determination of active aerosol concentrations and dispersion as well as the technical applications of labeled aerosols are discussed. The effect of atomic explosions are analyzed considering the nominal atomic bomb based on /sup 235/U and /sup 232/Pu equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT.

  9. Charmless B{sub s}{yields}PP, PV, VV decays based on the six-quark effective Hamiltonian with strong phase effects II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Huazhong Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhuang, Ci [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Yang, Yi-Bo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-03-15

    We provide a systematic study of charmless B{sub s}{yields}PP, PV, VV decays (P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector mesons, respectively) based on an approximate six-quark operator effective Hamiltonian from QCD. The calculation of the relevant hard-scattering kernels is carried out, the resulting transition form factors are consistent with the results of QCD sum-rule calculations. By taking into account important classes of power corrections involving ''chirally enhanced'' terms and the vertex corrections as well as weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase, we present predictions for the branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B{sub s} decays into PP, PV and VV final states, and also for the corresponding polarization observables in VV final states. It is found that the weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase have remarkable effects on the observables in the color-suppressed and penguin-dominated decay modes. In addition, we discuss the SU(3) flavor symmetry and show that the symmetry relations are generally respected. (orig.)

  10. Thermal decay of rhodopsin: role of hydrogen bonds in thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in the binding site and hydrolysis of protonated Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Monica Yun; Nguyen, Jennifer B; Bhagat, Aditi; Mooney, Victoria; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2009-07-01

    Although thermal stability of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is directly related to its extremely low dark noise level and has recently generated considerable interest, the chemistry behind the thermal decay process of rhodopsin has remained unclear. Using UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC analysis, we have demonstrated that the thermal decay of rhodopsin involves both hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base and thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal. Examining the unfolding of rhodopsin by circular dichroism spectroscopy and measuring the rate of thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in solution, we conclude that the observed thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal happens when 11-cis retinal is in the binding pocket of rhodopsin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that solvent deuterium isotope effects are involved in the thermal decay process by decreasing the rates of thermal isomerization and hydrolysis, suggesting that the rate-determining step of these processes involves breaking hydrogen bonds. These results provide insight into understanding the critical role of an extensive hydrogen-bonding network on stabilizing the inactive state of rhodopsin and contribute to our current understanding of the low dark noise level of rhodopsin, which enables this specialized protein to function as an extremely sensitive biological light detector. Because similar hydrogen-bonding networks have also been suggested by structural analysis of two other GPCRs, beta1 and beta2 adrenergic receptors, our results could reveal a general role of hydrogen bonds in facilitating GPCR function.

  11. Wrong low level radioactive waste management in hospitals and improvement steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keren, M.

    2000-01-01

    Hospitals are producers of great amounts of all kind of waste, including dangerous waste. The dangerous waste can be toxic, biological, radioactive, or a mixture of several kinds. There are clear procedures how to store and treat every kind of waste separately, according to its characteristics. Radioactive waste should be disposed only to a central radwaste disposal site. If the radioactive waste is mixed with biological waste, and contains long half-life isotopes, it should be neutralized from biological hazards before disposal to radwaste storage site. If the waste contains short half-life isotopes, it should be stored in a proper intermediate storage facility till a complete decay of the radioactive elements, and then treated as not radioactive. The existing procedures are old and a new proposal for radwaste procedures was prepared but not implemented. After several repetitive violations of the old regulations by some hospitals, it was decided to advance the implementation of the new proposal. This proposal consists of a detailed procedures for segregation, storage, decay and disposal of radwaste. It is based on the new recommendations of the IAEA. The responsibility for implementing the regulations is on the producers of the waste. This paper summarizes the violations and describes the main recommendations for improving procedures. The competent authority used moderate enforcement steps because of the delay in the implementation of the new procedures. As a matter of fact, the competent authority concluded that it's own investigation procedures should improve, but we shall not discuss it in this paper. (author)

  12. ELECTRONIC ANALOG COMPUTER FOR DETERMINING RADIOACTIVE DISINTEGRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, H.P.

    1959-07-14

    A computer is presented for determining growth and decay curves for elements in a radioactive disintegration series wherein one unstable element decays to form a second unstable element or isotope, which in turn forms a third element, etc. The growth and decay curves of radioactive elements are simulated by the charge and discharge curves of a resistance-capacitance network. Several such networks having readily adjustable values are connected in series with an amplifier between each successive pair. The time constant of each of the various networks is set proportional to the half-life of a corresponding element in the series represented and the charge and discharge curves of each of the networks simulates the element growth and decay curve.

  13. Management of radioactive medical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, S.; Mathey, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals are producers of small amounts of radioactive waste. Current legislation details exactly how hospitals should manage it. Sealed sources are returned to suppliers. Disposal of unsealed sources, liquid or solid, depends upon their half-life: short-lived radioisotopes (half-life less than two months) are stocked on site while they decay; isotopes with longer half-lives (greater than two months) are handled by a specialist organization (ANDRA). (authors). 8 refs

  14. Storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  15. Radiobiological significance of radioactive contamination - summary assessment based on great number of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, V.; Bonchev, Ts.; Mavrodiev, V.; Kyrdzhilov, N.

    1995-01-01

    In order to facilitate quantitative and qualitative characterisation of radioactive contamination the authors introduce a relative estimate of radionuclide activity by setting as a reference the most abundant element -Co-60 in the case of the Kozloduy NPP. The ratio η i of the mean annual permissible concentration in air for each radionuclide (RPC-92) to that of Co-60 is calculated. It is found that η i has the same or close values for groups of radionuclides, e.g. η i = 2.10 -4 for 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm; η i = 5 for 89 Sr, 91 Y; 93 Nb, 134 Cs, 137 Cs; η i = 50 for 55 Fe, 63 Ni, 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 140 Ba, 140 La. Then it is compared to the experimentally measured values of the same quantity η iexp , derived from surface contamination data. The ratio η iexp /η i is plotted against log η i . The resulting nomograms give graphic representation of the radiobiological significance of various radionuclide groups. Data from different locations at the Kozloduy NPP are presented. It is found that the alpha emitter contamination has highest values in the Unit 1 (WWER-440) control rooms after repair. The Unit 5 (WWER-1000) has lower alpha contamination compared to WWER-440 units. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. A data base for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, M.L.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1989-07-01

    A computerized database was developed to assist the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating methods and data for characterizing health hazards associated with land and ocean disposal options for low-level radioactive wastes. The data cover 1984 to 1987. The types of sites considered include Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed commercial disposal sites, EPA National Priority List (NPL) sites, US Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project (FUSRAP) and DOE Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) sites, inactive US ocean disposal sites, and DOE/Department of Defense facilities. Sources of information include reports from EPA, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as direct communication with individuals associated with specific programs. The data include site descriptions, waste volumes and activity levels, and physical and radiological characterization of low-level wastes. Additional information on mixed waste, packaging forms, and disposal methods were compiled, but are not yet included in the database. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. A computer method for simulating the decay of radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The analytical equations representing the decay of a series of radioactive atoms through a number of daughter products are well known. These equations are for an idealized case in which the expectation value of the number of atoms which decay in a certain time can be represented by a smooth curve. The real curve of the total number of disintegrations from a radioactive species consists of a series of Heaviside step functions, with the steps occurring at the time of the disintegration. The disintegration of radioactive atoms is said to be random but this random behaviour is such that a single species forms an ensemble of which the times of disintegration give a geometric distribution. Numbers which have a geometric distribution can be generated by computer and can be used to simulate the decay of one or more radioactive species. A computer method is described for simulating such decay of radioactive atoms and this method is applied specifically to the decay of the short half life daughters of radon 222 and the emission of alpha particles from polonium 218 and polonium 214. Repeating the simulation of the decay a number of times provides a method for investigating the statistical uncertainty inherent in methods for measurement of exposure to radon daughters. This statistical uncertainty is difficult to investigate analytically since the time of decay of an atom of polonium 218 is not independent of the time of decay of subsequent polonium 214. The method is currently being used to investigate the statistical uncertainties of a number of commonly used methods for the counting of alpha particles from radon daughters and the calculations of exposure

  18. The natural radioactivity of the biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertsov, L A

    1967-07-01

    Of the approximately 1200 isotopes presently known more than 900 are radioactive. The nuclei of these isotopes are unstable and decay spontaneously emitting ionizing gamma-, alpha- or beta-radiation. The overwhelming majority of known radioactive isotopes have been obtained artificially; only a few are natural. Numerous investigations have shown that many of the natural radioactive isotopes can be grouped into three radioactive families. Each such family is characterized by the existence of one long-lived isotope - the family parent, one gaseous isotope of radon, intermediate radioactive decay products and final stable isotopes of atomic weights 206, 207 and 208. No such generic relationship has been established among the remaining natural radioactive isotopes. The purpose of the book, in contrast to some recent review works, is to present, in addition to a summary of reference data characterizing the radioactivity levels of various components of the biosphere, a description of those phenomena and regularities which will apparently make it possible to understand more completely the basic dynamics of the natural radioactivity of the biosphere and, consequently, contribute to a more correct interpretation of radiation-hygiene in each specific case.

  19. The natural radioactivity of the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsov, L.A.

    1967-01-01

    Of the approximately 1200 isotopes presently known more than 900 are radioactive. The nuclei of these isotopes are unstable and decay spontaneously emitting ionizing gamma-, alpha- or beta-radiation. The overwhelming majority of known radioactive isotopes have been obtained artificially; only a few are natural. Numerous investigations have shown that many of the natural radioactive isotopes can be grouped into three radioactive families. Each such family is characterized by the existence of one long-lived isotope - the family parent, one gaseous isotope of radon, intermediate radioactive decay products and final stable isotopes of atomic weights 206, 207 and 208. No such generic relationship has been established among the remaining natural radioactive isotopes. The purpose of the book, in contrast to some recent review works, is to present, in addition to a summary of reference data characterizing the radioactivity levels of various components of the biosphere, a description of those phenomena and regularities which will apparently make it possible to understand more completely the basic dynamics of the natural radioactivity of the biosphere and, consequently, contribute to a more correct interpretation of radiation-hygiene in each specific case

  20. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  1. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  2. Experimental proof of quantum non-separability based on the transition of the atom in beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.

    1988-01-01

    The basic non-local character of the quantum processes is a continuously discussed and doubted problem of quantum theory. Recent experimental proofs of the Bell inequalities are questioned in the literature, using local theories of hidden variables. Present paper shows a simple and direct proof of non-locality of quantum processes, analyzing the case of the beta decay. The hypothetical energy transfer between shell electrons and beta electron-neutrino system is proved to be superluminal but necessary for the energy balance of the process. This argumentation proves the nonseparability and nonlocality of quantum processes. (D.G.) 8 refs

  3. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  4. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  5. A simplified computer code based on point Kernel theory for calculating radiation dose in packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A study on radiation dose control in packages of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, hospitals and industries, such as sources of Ra-226, Co-60, Ir-192 and Cs-137, is presented. The MAPA and MAPAM computer codes, based on point Kernel theory for calculating doses of several source-shielding type configurations, aiming to assure the safe transport conditions for these sources, was developed. The validation of the code for point sources, using the values provided by NCRP, for the thickness of lead and concrete shieldings, limiting the dose at 100 Mrem/hr for several distances from the source to the detector, was carried out. The validation for non point sources was carried out, measuring experimentally radiation dose from packages developed by Brazilian CNEN/S.P. for removing the sources. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N.; Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  7. Analytical method for solving radioactive transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vudakin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical method for solving radioactive transformations is presented in this paper. High accuracy series expansion of the depletion function and nonsingular Bateman coefficients are used to overcome numerical difficulties when applying well-known Bateman solution of a simple radioactive decay. Generality and simplicity of the method are found to be useful in evaluating nuclide chains with one hundred or more nuclides in the chain. Method enables evaluation of complete chain, without elimination of short-lives nuclides. It is efficient and accurate

  8. UNIDOSE - a computer program for the calculation of individual and collective doses from airborne radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, O.; Schwartz, H.; Forssen, B.-H.; Marklund, J.-E.

    1979-01-01

    UNIDOSE is a program system for calculating the consequences of a radioactive release to the atmosphere. The program is applicable for computation of dispersion in a rnage of 0 - 50 km from the release point. The Gaussion plume model is used for calculating the external dose from activity in the atmosphere, on the ground and the internal dose via inhalation. Radioactive decay, as well as growth and decay of daughter products are accounted for. The influence of dry deposition and wash-out are also considered. It is possible to treat time-dependent release-rates of 1 - 24 hours duration and constant release-rates for up to one year. The program system also contains routines for the calculation of collective dose and health effects. The system operates in a statistical manner. Many weather-situations, based on measured data, can be analysed and statistical properties, such as cumulative frequences, can be calculated. (author)

  9. A proposed classification system for high-level and other radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Croff, A.G.

    1987-06-01

    This report presents a proposal for quantitative and generally applicable risk-based definitions of high-level and other radioactive wastes. On the basis of historical descriptions and definitions of high-level waste (HLW), in which HLW has been defined in terms of its source as waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, we propose a more general definition based on the concept that HLW has two distinct attributes: HLW is (1) highly radioactive and (2) requires permanent isolation. This concept leads to a two-dimensional waste classification system in which one axis, related to ''requires permanent isolation,'' is associated with long-term risks from waste disposal and the other axis, related to ''highly radioactive,'' is associated with shorter-term risks due to high levels of decay heat and external radiation. We define wastes that require permanent isolation as wastes with concentrations of radionuclides exceeding the Class-C limits that are generally acceptable for near-surface land disposal, as specified in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's rulemaking 10 CFR Part 61 and its supporting documentation. HLW then is waste requiring permanent isolation that also is highly radioactive, and we define ''highly radioactive'' as a decay heat (power density) in the waste greater than 50 W/m 3 or an external radiation dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the waste greater than 100 rem/h (1 Sv/h), whichever is the more restrictive. This proposal also results in a definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste and Equivalent as waste that requires permanent isolation but is not highly radioactive and a definition of low-level waste (LLW) as waste that does not require permanent isolation without regard to whether or not it is highly radioactive

  10. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  11. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Low radioactivities '85. (The 7th Nuclear Science Colloquium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The conference proceedings contain 108 papers. The following topics are dealt with: accelerator mass spectroscopy, rare decays, underground laboratories, low level counting and spectroscopy, double beta-decay experiments, low level detectors, cosmogenic radionuclides and rare events, 14 C counting and applications, 3 H counting and hydrology appllications, natural radioactivity in the environment, gaseous detectors, anthropogenic radionuclides and radioactivity in the environment. (J.P.)

  13. Alternative risk-based criteria for transportation of radioactive materials on the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado, J.E.; Field, J.G.; Smith, R.J.; Wang, O.S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an alternative method to evaluate packaging safety for radioactive material transported solely within the boundaries of a restricted site; the method uses risk-based criteria to assess and document packaging safety. These criteria offer a standard against which the results of a risk assessment are compared to evaluate the safety of a transportation operation. Numerous payloads are transported entirely within the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site boundaries. The U.S. Department of Energy requires that the safety of onsite transportation be equivalent to the safety provided for transporting radioactive materials in commerce as regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Some onsite packaging configurations do not meet the performance criteria that form the basis of these regulations, necessitating the establishment of alternative criteria to evaluate safety. Quantitatively defined criteria have been derived from the U.S. Department of Transportation limits for package radiation levels, curie content, activity release, and external contamination levels. Recommendations of the International Committee on Radiation Protection may further restrict the criteria. The proposed method documents packaging safety in a transportation risk assessment. The assessment estimates accident frequencies, conservatively evaluates the dose consequences of these accidents, and compares the results to the established risk acceptance criteria. Specific Hanford Site onsite packaging and transportation issues illustrate the alternative method. The paper compares the solutions resulting from the application of risk-based criteria to those resulting from strict compliance with commercial transportation regulations. (author)

  14. Beta decay and rhenium cosmochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashktorab, K.

    1992-01-01

    Among the problems which limit the use of the 187 Re/ 187 Os isobaric pair as a cosmochronometer for the age of the galaxy and the universe are the uncertainties in the partial half-lives of the continuum and bound state decays of 187 Re. While the total half-life of the decay is well established, the partial half-life for the continuum decay is uncertain, and several measurements are not compatible. A high temperature quartz proportional counter was used in this work to remeasure the continuum β - decay of 187 Re. The β endpoint energy for the decay of neutral 187 Re to singly ionized 187 Os of 2.75 ± 0.06 keV agrees with the earlier results. The corresponding half-life of (45 ± 3) x 10 9 years improves and agrees with the earlier measurement of Payne and Drever and refutes other measurements. Based on the new half-life for the continuum decay and a total half-life of (43.5 ± 1.3) x 10 9 years reported by Linder et al., the branching ratio for the bound state decay into discrete atomic states is estimated to be (3 ± 6)% in agreement with the most recent calculated theoretical branching ratio of approximately 1%. Anomalies in beta spectra reported by J.J. Simpson and others have been attributed to a 17 keV heavy-neutrino admixture. If confirmed, the implications from the existence of such a neutrino for particle and astrophysics would be significant. A multiwire open-quotes wall-lessclose quotes stainless steel proportional counter has been used in the present work to investigate the spectral shape of the β decay of 63 Ni. No anomalies in the spectral shape were observed which could be attributed to the presence of 17 keV heavy neutrino

  15. Radiobiological significance of radioactive contamination - summary assessment based on great number of measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelov, V [Civil Defence Administration, Sofia (Bulgaria); Bonchev, Ts; Mavrodiev, V; Kyrdzhilov, N [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    In order to facilitate quantitative and qualitative characterisation of radioactive contamination the authors introduce a relative estimate of radionuclide activity by setting as a reference the most abundant element -Co-60 in the case of the Kozloduy NPP. The ratio {eta}{sub i} of the mean annual permissible concentration in air for each radionuclide (RPC-92) to that of Co-60 is calculated. It is found that {eta}{sub i} has the same or close values for groups of radionuclides, e.g. {eta}{sub i} = 2.10{sup -4} for {sup 238} Pu, {sup 239} Pu, {sup 240} Pu, {sup 241} Am, {sup 244} Cm; {eta}{sub i} = 5 for {sup 89} Sr, {sup 91} Y; {sup 93} Nb, {sup 134} Cs, {sup 137} Cs; {eta}{sub i} = 50 for {sup 55} Fe, {sup 63} Ni, {sup 95} Zr, {sup 95} Nb, {sup 140} Ba, {sup 140} La. Then it is compared to the experimentally measured values of the same quantity {eta}{sub iexp}, derived from surface contamination data. The ratio {eta}{sub iexp}/{eta}{sub i} is plotted against log {eta}{sub i}. The resulting nomograms give graphic representation of the radiobiological significance of various radionuclide groups. Data from different locations at the Kozloduy NPP are presented. It is found that the alpha emitter contamination has highest values in the Unit 1 (WWER-440) control rooms after repair. The Unit 5 (WWER-1000) has lower alpha contamination compared to WWER-440 units. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, L.B.

    1969-01-01

    Certain proposed uses of nuclear explosives for peaceful purposes will introduce radioactive debris into the natural hydrologic environment. Consideration must therefore be given in each situation to the extent and significance to man of resulting radioactively contaminated water. For contained underground detonations, space-time - concentration predictions of radioactive materials in ground water are dependent on several factors: radionuclide production and initial distribution, radioactive decay, sorption on geologic materials, and dispersion during hydrologic transport. For uncontained (cratering) detonations, other aspects of the hydrologic cycle, particularly rainfall, and watershed characteristics must be considered. Programs sponsored principally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission have investigated these factors. Examination of their net effects on radioactivity concentration in water shows that areas if any, underlain by water exceeding permissible concentrations tend first to increase in size, then decrease, and finally disappear. Hydrologic processes at the surface remove or redistribute radioactive debris deposited on a watershed to other locations. Where sufficient information is available, predictions of location and concentration of radionuclides in natural waters can be made. Any potentially hazardous conditions arising from a particular detonation can then be evaluated. (author)

  17. Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, L B [Isotopes, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Certain proposed uses of nuclear explosives for peaceful purposes will introduce radioactive debris into the natural hydrologic environment. Consideration must therefore be given in each situation to the extent and significance to man of resulting radioactively contaminated water. For contained underground detonations, space-time - concentration predictions of radioactive materials in ground water are dependent on several factors: radionuclide production and initial distribution, radioactive decay, sorption on geologic materials, and dispersion during hydrologic transport. For uncontained (cratering) detonations, other aspects of the hydrologic cycle, particularly rainfall, and watershed characteristics must be considered. Programs sponsored principally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission have investigated these factors. Examination of their net effects on radioactivity concentration in water shows that areas if any, underlain by water exceeding permissible concentrations tend first to increase in size, then decrease, and finally disappear. Hydrologic processes at the surface remove or redistribute radioactive debris deposited on a watershed to other locations. Where sufficient information is available, predictions of location and concentration of radionuclides in natural waters can be made. Any potentially hazardous conditions arising from a particular detonation can then be evaluated. (author)

  18. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based

  19. QED based on self-energy: The relativistic 2S1/2→1S1/2+1γ decay rates of hydrogenlike atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Salamin, Y.I.

    1991-01-01

    Within the framework of the recently advanced formulation of QED based on self-energy, we calculate the relativistic rates of the 2S 1/2 →1S 1/2 +1γ transition in the hydrogen isoelectronic sequence for values of Z ranging between 1 and 92. We compare our results with those of Johnson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1123 (1972)] and Parpia and Johnson [Phys. Rev. A 26, 1142 (1982)], analytically and numerically. Although the two approaches are quite different, the formulas for decay rates are shown to be equivalent

  20. Determination of the radioactive aerosols transport coefficients generated in open pit uranium mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo Py Junior, D. de.

    1978-01-01

    The classical atmospheric transport model is applied to uranium mining operations. Among the transport parameters there is one concerned with radioactive decay, but it does not include the radioactive decay series which is the specific case for uranium. Therefore, an extension of the transport theory is developed and tested, giving results greater than the ones obtained with the classical model, as expected. (author)

  1. The role of the California Base Closure Environmental Committee's (CBCEC) Radioactive and Mixed Waste Process Action Team (RMWPAT) in expediting site restoration and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudon, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Base Realignment and Closure Act (BRAC) mandated the closing and transfer of Department of Defense (DoD) properties within specific timeframes. Due to requirements of federal and state laws, closing bases must be environmentally remediated to alleviate threats to human health and the environment upon transfer. Certain barriers such as legislative, regulatory, administrative, and technical issues, have been identified which threaten the timely restoration and transfer of these BRAC properties. The state of California, faced with the scheduled closure or realignment of 26 military bases, recognized the need to establish a base closure environmental committee to address issues affecting the timely cleanup and reuse of DoD properties and promote accelerated restoration. Accordingly, the California Base Closure Environmental Committee (CBCEC) was formed by executive order of Governor Pete Wilson. One of the barriers identified by the CBCEC is the potential contamination of DoD facilities with radioactive materials. As a result of the difficulties encountered in assessing the nature and extent of radioactive contamination at DoD sites in California, the CBCEC formed the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Process Action Team (RMWPAT). The RMWPAT was tasked with ''demystifying'' and working to address issues associated with radioactive contamination

  2. Removal of bulk contaminants from radioactive waste water at Bruce A using a clay based flocculent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davloor, R.; Harper, B.

    2011-01-01

    implement a clay-based flocculation Pre-Treatment System. In-service since late 2000, the system has been able to reliably treat a broad range of contaminants in the waste water before being sent to the downstream ROS. This clay-based system is unique in its application; it is able to remove bulk oil and grease, suspended solids, and metal contaminants in a waste stream that contains a high amount of surfactants originating from the laundering of plastic suits (personal protective equipment for working in radioactive environments) and other waste waters from the station. The treated water from the PTS consistently meets the strict requirements for subsequent treatment by the system RO membranes. This paper describes the laboratory and pilot scale testing that led to the development of the process, as well as the full scale implementation of this unique Pre-Treatment System. (author)

  3. Removal of bulk contaminants from radioactive waste water at Bruce A using a clay based flocculent system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davloor, R.; Harper, B. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    implement a clay-based flocculation Pre-Treatment System. In-service since late 2000, the system has been able to reliably treat a broad range of contaminants in the waste water before being sent to the downstream ROS. This clay-based system is unique in its application; it is able to remove bulk oil and grease, suspended solids, and metal contaminants in a waste stream that contains a high amount of surfactants originating from the laundering of plastic suits (personal protective equipment for working in radioactive environments) and other waste waters from the station. The treated water from the PTS consistently meets the strict requirements for subsequent treatment by the system RO membranes. This paper describes the laboratory and pilot scale testing that led to the development of the process, as well as the full scale implementation of this unique Pre-Treatment System. (author)

  4. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  5. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  6. Gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decay of (83)Se to levels of (83)Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, K S

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution γ ray spectroscopy experiments have been done to study the emissions from the radioactive decay of 22-min (83g)Se produced from neutron capture using samples of enriched (82)Se. Energy and intensity values have been obtained to roughly an order of magnitude greater precision than in previous studies. Based on energy sums, 2 new levels are proposed in the daughter (83)Br and one previously proposed level is shown to be doubtful. Some 25 new transitions appear to decay with the (83)Se halflife, about half of which can be accommodated among the previous or newly proposed levels. Several previous γ ray placements are shown to be inconsistent with the new determinations of the (83)Br energy levels, but cannot be accommodated anywhere else among the known levels. As a result of the missing γ ray placements, some of the β branchings in the decay to levels of (83)Br appear to be negative. Gamma rays from the 2.4-h decay of the daughter (83)Br to levels of (83)Kr have also been observed, along with decays of (81g)(,m)Se present as a small impurity in the enriched samples and also as a strong component in irradiated samples of natural Se. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proposals of new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste and of new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor based on these basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masuro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The author proposed new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste. • A principle of ‘continue confining’ to realize the basic concept on safety is also proposed. • It is indicated that only a HTGR can attain the conditions required from the principle. • Technologies to realize the basic concept on radioactive waste are also discussed. • A New HTGR system based on the new basic concepts is proposed. - Abstract: A new basic concept on safety of ‘Not causing any serious catastrophe by any means’ and a new basic concept on radioactive waste of ‘Not returning any waste that possibly affects the environment’ are proposed in the present study, aiming at nuclear power plants which everybody can accept, in consideration of the serious catastrophe that happened at Fukushima Japan in 2011. These new basic concepts can be found to be valid in comparison with basic concepts on safety and waste in other industries. The principle to realize the new basic concept on safety is, as known well as the inherent safety, to use physical phenomena such as Doppler Effect and so on which never fail to work even if all equipment and facilities for safety lose their functions. In the present study, physical phenomena are used to ‘continue confining’, rather than ‘confine’, because the consequence of emission of radioactive substances to the environment cannot be mitigated. To ‘continue confining’ is meant to apply natural correction to fulfill inherent safety function. Fission products must be detoxified to realize the new basic concept on radioactive waste, aiming at the final processing and disposal of radioactive wastes as same as that in the other wastes such as PCB, together with much efforts not to produce radioactive wastes and to reduce their volume nevertheless if they are emitted. Technology development on the detoxification is one of the most important subjects. A new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, namely the New HTGR

  8. Proposals of new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste and of new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor based on these basic concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Masuro, E-mail: ogawa.masuro@jaea.go.jp

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The author proposed new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste. • A principle of ‘continue confining’ to realize the basic concept on safety is also proposed. • It is indicated that only a HTGR can attain the conditions required from the principle. • Technologies to realize the basic concept on radioactive waste are also discussed. • A New HTGR system based on the new basic concepts is proposed. - Abstract: A new basic concept on safety of ‘Not causing any serious catastrophe by any means’ and a new basic concept on radioactive waste of ‘Not returning any waste that possibly affects the environment’ are proposed in the present study, aiming at nuclear power plants which everybody can accept, in consideration of the serious catastrophe that happened at Fukushima Japan in 2011. These new basic concepts can be found to be valid in comparison with basic concepts on safety and waste in other industries. The principle to realize the new basic concept on safety is, as known well as the inherent safety, to use physical phenomena such as Doppler Effect and so on which never fail to work even if all equipment and facilities for safety lose their functions. In the present study, physical phenomena are used to ‘continue confining’, rather than ‘confine’, because the consequence of emission of radioactive substances to the environment cannot be mitigated. To ‘continue confining’ is meant to apply natural correction to fulfill inherent safety function. Fission products must be detoxified to realize the new basic concept on radioactive waste, aiming at the final processing and disposal of radioactive wastes as same as that in the other wastes such as PCB, together with much efforts not to produce radioactive wastes and to reduce their volume nevertheless if they are emitted. Technology development on the detoxification is one of the most important subjects. A new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, namely the New HTGR

  9. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  10. α-decay chains and cluster-decays of superheavy 269-27110 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushil Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; Balasubramaniam, M.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the availability of radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) and the advancement in accelerator technology, it is now possible to synthesize very heavy elements (Z> 100), called superheavy elements. It is a well established fact that these superheavy elements, due to their shorter lifetime, decay via successive alpha emissions and at a later stage undergo spontaneous fission. Several such decay chains are now observed. An attempt is made to fit all such known decay chains and the results of the three observed α-decay chains of Z=110 ( 269-271 10) nuclei are presented. The model used is the preformed cluster model (PCM). Also, an attempt is made for the first time to find the possibility of any branching to heavy-cluster emissions in these chains

  11. The control of water radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Graubey, A.

    1962-01-01

    This report presents the different apparatuses and devices used to control and adjust routine releases, to detect accidental pollutions, and to identify the origins of an increased radioactivity. The objective is to perform permanent and continuous sampling and measurement. Samplers and measurement devices (Geiger probes, resin-based integrators, dry aerosol radioactivity recorders and dry sample radioactivity recorders) are presented. Water control stations are presented: these stations are either fixed, or mobile or floating

  12. Random numbers spring from alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, N.A.; Sanathanan, L.P.; Morley, M.; Clark, N.A.; Tyler, S.A.

    1980-05-01

    Congruential random number generators, which are widely used in Monte Carlo simulations, are deficient in that the number they generate are concentrated in a relatively small number of hyperplanes. While this deficiency may not be a limitation in small Monte Carlo studies involving a few variables, it introduces a significant bias in large simulations requiring high resolution. This bias was recognized and assessed during preparations for an accident analysis study of nuclear power plants. This report describes a random number device based on the radioactive decay of alpha particles from a 235 U source in a high-resolution gas proportional counter. The signals were fed to a 4096-channel analyzer and for each channel the frequency of signals registered in a 20,000-microsecond interval was recorded. The parity bits of these frequency counts (0 for an even count and 1 for an odd count) were then assembled in sequence to form 31-bit binary random numbers and transcribed to a magnetic tape. This cycle was repeated as many times as were necessary to create 3 million random numbers. The frequency distribution of counts from the present device conforms to the Brockwell-Moyal distribution, which takes into account the dead time of the counter (both the dead time and decay constant of the underlying Poisson process were estimated). Analysis of the count data and tests of randomness on a sample set of the 31-bit binary numbers indicate that this random number device is a highly reliable source of truly random numbers. Its use is, therefore, recommended in Monte Carlo simulations for which the congruential pseudorandom number generators are found to be inadequate. 6 figures, 5 tables

  13. Review of international radioactive waste management based on a report of the International Nuclear Societies Council (INSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.

    2003-01-01

    The INSC is an international group of 42 nuclear societies with the aim of promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. It has a number of working groups addressing important issues and publishes the reports of these groups. The latest report of the working group on radioactive waste management was published in August 2002. The main aim of the report is to provide the latest information on radioactive waste management among the member societies and particularly to provide access to internet resources on this topic including access to the radioactive waste management organisations in the several countries.The major topics addressed in the report are: what is radioactive waste management?; where does radioactive waste come from?; principles and objectives; management strategies - options and ethics; current worldwide status; international cooperation; and international instruments, including treaties and legislation

  14. MS-based monitoring of proteolytic decay of synthetic reporter peptides for quality control of plasma and serum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Thumfart, Jörg Oliver; Costina, Victor; Hofheinz, Ralf; Neumaier, Michael

    2013-09-01

    To determine the preanalytical quality of serum and plasma by monitoring the time-dependent ex vivo decay of a synthetic reporter peptide (RP) with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Serum and plasma specimens were spiked with the RP and proteolytic fragments were monitored with LC/MS at different preanalytical time points ranging from 2 to 24 hours after blood withdrawal. The concentration of fragments changed in a time-dependent manner, and respective peptide profiles were used to classify specimens according to their preanalytical time span. Classification accuracy was high, with values always above 0.89 for areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. This "proteomics degradation clock" can be used to estimate the preanalytical quality of serum and plasma and might have impact on quality control procedures of biobanking repositories.

  15. Efficient and compact mobile equipment based on the new RADEON-NWM technology to process liquid radioactive wastes resulted from the accidents of the nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoyan, Gagik; Nalbandyan, Garik; Gagiyan, Lavrenti; Karamyan, Gagik; Brutyan, Gagik

    2013-01-01

    During the operation of nuclear reactors important volume of liquid and solid radioactive wastes are generated, which, in normal conditions, becomes processed by stationary equipment by different methods to minimize their volume and then sent to specially constructed storages. The cases of accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima showed that the localization of rejected big quantity of radioactive wastes is a prior problem for their further processing by stationary equipment. In this regard it is very important the processing of radioactive wastes on the contaminated areas to localize them by mobile equipment based on the efficient technologies. RADEONNWM new technology allows resolving this problem. This technology is compact, completely automated, which makes possible to assemble it on a standard 40-ft by 7-ft trailer driven by heavy-duty truck. The new technology is fully elaborated, the necessary tests are conducted. (authors)

  16. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, WX; Dendooven, P; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Arutyunov, K; Pekola, JP; Aysto, J

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyvaskyla, Finland. An open Ra-223 alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium.

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  18. Low and intermediate radioactive waste characterization using MICROSHIELD 5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, Silvia; Pantazi, Doina; Stanciu, Marcela

    2002-01-01

    Low and intermediate radioactive gaseous, liquid and solid waste produced at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant must be known from the point of view of contained radionuclide activity, during all steps of their processing, storage and transport, to ensure the nuclear safety of radioactive waste management. As the waste activity changes by radioactive decay and nuclear transmutation, the evolution in time of these sources is necessary to be assess, for the purpose of biological shielding determination at any time. On the other hand, during the transport of waste package at the repository, the external dose rates must meet the national and international requirements concerning radioactive materials transportation on public roads. In this paper, a calculation methodology for waste characterization based on external exposure rate measurement and on sample analysis results is presented. The time evolution of waste activity, as well as the corresponding shielding at different moments of management process, has been performed using MICROSHIELD-5 code. The spent resins proceeded from systems for clean-up and purification of cooling water and moderator, water from spent fuel storage bays, etc. have been analyzed. In this paper an example of spent ionic resins characterization, using the MICROSHIELD 5 code, is presented. (authors)

  19. GERDA, a GERmanium Detector Array for the search for neutrinoless ββ decay in 76Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandola, L.; Tomei, C.

    2006-01-01

    The GERDA project, searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of 76Ge with enriched germanium detectors submerged in a cryogenic bath, has been approved for installation at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. The GERDA technique is aiming at a dramatic reduction of the background due to radioactive contaminations of the materials surrounding the detectors. This will lead to a sensitivity of about 1026 years on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay. Already in the first phase of the experiment, GERDA will be able to investigate with high statistical significance the claimed evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge based on the data of the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment

  20. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  1. Radioactivity and the French uranium bearing minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiollard, P.Ch.; Boisson, J.M.; Leydet, J.C.; Meisser, N.

    1998-01-01

    This special issue of Regne Mineral journal is entirely devoted to the French uranium mining industry. It comprises 4 parts dealing with: the uranium mining industry in France (history, uranium rush, deposits, geologic setting, prosperity and recession, situation in 1998, ore processing); radioactivity and the uranium and its descendants (discovery, first French uranium bearing ores, discovery of radioactivity, radium and other uranium descendants, radium mines, uranium mines, atoms, elements and isotopes, uranium genesis, uranium decay, isotopes in an uranium ore, spontaneous fission, selective migration of radionuclides, radon in mines and houses, radioactivity units, radioprotection standards, new standards and controversies, natural and artificial radioactivity, hazards linked with the handling and collecting of uranium ores, conformability with radioprotection standards, radioactivity of natural uranium minerals); the French uranium bearing minerals (composition, crystal structure, reference, etymology, fluorescence). (J.S.)

  2. Radioactive waste disposal process geological structure for the waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.; Jaouen, C.

    1983-01-01

    The process described here consists to carry out the two phases of storage operation (intermediate and definitive) of radioactive wastes (especially the vitrified ones) in a geological dispositif (horizontal shafts) at an adequate deepness but suitable for a natural convection ventilation with fresh air from the land surface and moved only with the calorific heat released by the burried radioactive wastes when the radioactive decay has reached the adequate level, the shafts are totally and definitely occluded [fr

  3. Radioactivity, radiation protection and monitoring during dismantling of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, L.; Zech, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the radioactivity inventory in the systems and components of light-water reactors observed during operation, the impact of actions during plant emptying after the conclusion of power operation and possible subsequent long-term safe enclosure concerning the composition of the nuclide inventory of the plant to be dismantled will be described. Derived from this will be the effects on radioactivity monitoring in the plant, physical radiation protection monitoring, and the measured characterization of the residual materials resulting from the dismantling. The impact of long-term interim storage will also be addressed in the discussion. The talk should provide an overview of the interrelationships between source terms, decay times and the radioactivity monitoring requirements of the various dismantling concepts for commercial light-water reactors. (orig.)

  4. Development of Public Training System for Emergency Exercise Using Virtual Reality Technology Based on Radioactive Release Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Song, Sub Lee; Park, Younwon [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An exercise is normally conducted for a day or two days depending on the scale of the exercise. What we have experienced up to date there are several limitations in the radiological emergency exercises such as low public acceptance, poor enthusiasm in the exercise participation, not very attracting exercise scenarios, low efficiency in conducting an exercise, and so on. In order to overcome the limitations of the present exercising system, we would like to develop a radiological emergency exercise system using VR (virtual reality) technology based on a radioactive release accident. In this paper, we just introduce some basic development methods and event tree based scenario as a beginning stage. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi NPP, the importance of emergency exercise especially for the public is far more emphasized around the world more and more. However, the human labor focused radiological emergency exercise up to now has many limitations. After developing this system properly and by using it, we could even expect to estimate the weak points of the emergency arrangements and strategy we have.

  5. Development of Public Training System for Emergency Exercise Using Virtual Reality Technology Based on Radioactive Release Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Song, Sub Lee; Park, Younwon

    2016-01-01

    An exercise is normally conducted for a day or two days depending on the scale of the exercise. What we have experienced up to date there are several limitations in the radiological emergency exercises such as low public acceptance, poor enthusiasm in the exercise participation, not very attracting exercise scenarios, low efficiency in conducting an exercise, and so on. In order to overcome the limitations of the present exercising system, we would like to develop a radiological emergency exercise system using VR (virtual reality) technology based on a radioactive release accident. In this paper, we just introduce some basic development methods and event tree based scenario as a beginning stage. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi NPP, the importance of emergency exercise especially for the public is far more emphasized around the world more and more. However, the human labor focused radiological emergency exercise up to now has many limitations. After developing this system properly and by using it, we could even expect to estimate the weak points of the emergency arrangements and strategy we have

  6. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  7. PRAMANA Cluster radioactivity in xenon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exotic decay or cluster radioactivity was first predicted by sandulescu et al [1] in. 1980 on the basis of ... separator by 58Ni(58Ni, 2n) reaction and carbon clusters were searched for by means of solid state nuclear ..... Lett. 55, 582 (1985). [22] D N Poenaru, W Greiner, K Depta, M Ivascu, D Mazilu and A Sandulescu, At. Data.

  8. History of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minder, W.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the historical development of the physics of atoms and nuclei. After a consideration of the ancient Greek philosophy concerning atoms the behaviour of gases is discussed with regards to statistical mechanics. Then the developement of chemistry from alchemy is described. Thereafter the early studies of gas discharges are described with regards to the electronic structure of atoms. In this connection the periodic system of elements is considered. Then the detection of the α-radiation of Uranium by Becquerel and the detections of M. and P. Curie are described. Thereafter the radiactive decay of nuclei is discussed. Then a popular introduction into nuclear structure is given with special regards to artificial radioactivity and nuclear fission. Finally nuclear reactors, the atomic bombs, applications of radionuclides, and problems of radiation protection are described. (HSI) [de

  9. Radioactivity in houses built of aerated concrete based on alum shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The highest activities in commonly used Swedish building materials are found in aerated concrete based on alum shale. The enhanced activity level is due to the high content of radium-226. The average activity concentration of radium-226 varies between different producers of aerated concrete based on alum shale from 700 Bq kg - (20 pCi g - ) to 2 400 Bq kg - (65 pCi g - ). Houses built in the same way with the same amounts of aerated concrete can therefore have very different gamma levels and very different concentrations of radon in the air with the same air exchange rate. Aerated concrete based on alum shale was used as a building material in Sweden from 1930 to 1975. The average concentration of radon daughters found in houses built of aerated concrete based to a major extent on alum shale is about 100 bq/m 3 (2.7 pCi 1 - ). The highest radon concentrations have been found in houses built entirely of aerated concrete based on alum shale. A group of 9 houses with natural draught ventilation systems has been investigated with regard to the concentration of radon, the equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC) and the gamma dose rate. The air exchange rates varied between the houses from 0.21 to 0.43 h - and the radon concentration from 540 Bq m - (15 pCi 1 - ) to 1 160 Bq m - (31 pCi 1 - ). The values given are averages for each house. (author)

  10. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  12. Beta decay of polarized nuclei and the decay asymmetry of 8Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, R.; Freedman, S.J.; Napolitano, J.; Quin, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Under certain conditions, it is possible to produce vector-polarized radioactive nuclei in reactions with a polarized projectile and an unpolarized target. Using the intense polarized beams at the University of Wisconsin, the authors have begun a program to study the weak interaction through the beta decay of polarized nuclei produced in this way. Such experiments bear on tests of CVC in light nuclei, sensitive searches for second-class weak currents, and measurements of the weak vector-coupling constant. One may also deduce the values of certain matrix elements. Our effort is presently centering on a study of the energy dependence of the beta-decay asymmetry of 8 Li

  13. Revk - a Tool for the Fulfilment of Requirements from National Rules for Tracking and Documentation of Radioactive Residual Material and Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, B.; Haeger, M.; Gruendler, D.

    2006-01-01

    According to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance treatment, storage, whereabouts of radioactive material etc. have to be documented. Due to legal requirements an electronic documentation system for radioactive waste has to be installed. Within the framework of the currently largest decommissioning project of nuclear facilities by Energiewerke Nord GmbH, a material flow-waste tracking and control system (ReVK) has been developed, tailored to the special needs of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. With this system it is possible to record radioactive materials which can be released after treatment or decay storage for restricted and unrestricted utilization. Radioactive waste meant for final storage can be registered and documented as well. Based on ORACLE, ReVK is a client/server data base system with the following modules: 1. data registration, 2. transport management, 3. waste tracking, 4. storage management, 5. container management, 6. reporting, 7. activity calculation, 8. examination of technical acceptance criteria for storages and final repositories. Furthermore ReVK provides a multitude of add-ons to meet special user needs, which enlarge the spectrum of application enormously. ReVK is validated and qualified, accepted by experts and authorities and fulfils the requirements for a radioactive waste documentation system. (authors)

  14. Development and application of a radioactivity evaluation technique the to obtain radiation exposure dose of radioactivity evaluation technique when a severe accident occurs in the a power station of a severe accident. Accident management guidelines of knowledge-based maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Ikuo; Yoshida, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    As a One of the lessons learned from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company, the was the need for improvement of accident management guidelines is required. In this report study, we developed and applied a dose evaluation technique to evaluated the radiation dose in a nuclear power plant assuming three conditions: employees were evacuation evacuated at the time of a severe accident occurrence; operators carried out the accident management operation; of the operators, and the repair work was carried out for of the trouble damaged apparatuses in a the nuclear power plant using a dose evaluation system. The following knowledge findings were obtained and should to be reflected to in the knowledge base of the guidelines was obtained. (1) By making clearly identifying an areas beforehand becoming the that would receive high radiation doses at the time of a severe accident definitely beforehand, we can employees can be moved to the evacuation places through an areas having of low dose rate and it is also known it how much we long employees can safely stay in the evacuation places. (2) When they circulate CV containment vessel recirculation sump water is recirculated by for the accident management operation and the restoration of safety in the facilities, because the plumbing piping and the apparatuses become radioactive radioactivity sources, the dose evaluation of the shortest access route and detour access routes with should be made for effective the accident management operation is effective. Because the area where a dose rate rises changes which as safety apparatuses are restored, in consideration of a plant state, it is necessary to judge the rightness or wrongness of the work continuation from the spot radioactive dose of the actual apparatus area, with based on precedence of the need to restore with precedence, and to choose a system to be used for accident management. (author)

  15. Transition from Autler–Townes splitting to electromagnetically induced transparency based on the dynamics of decaying dressed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaogang; Miao, Xingxu; Bai, Jinhai; Wang, Meng; Gao, Yanlei; Wu, Ling-An; Fu, Panming; Wang, Ruquan; Zuo, Zhanchun; Pei, Liya

    2015-01-01

    The threshold for the transition between Autler–Townes splitting (ATS) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is studied through examining the dynamics of decaying dressed states, which are derived from the effective Hamiltonian. It is found that the threshold corresponds to the suppression of the Rabi oscillation of the populations by the relaxation as the coupling field becomes weak. Moreover, ATS and EIT belong to two different regimes, the former being in the non-perturbation regime, where there is coherent Rabi oscillation of the populations of the states coupled by the coupling field. By contrast, EIT is in the perturbation regime, and the transparency window in the EIT resonance can be explained as being due to the gain of the four-wave mixing process. Experiments are performed in cold rubidium atoms, where both the absorption and dispersion are measured, showing that EIT can be discriminated from ATS through Fourier transformation of the spectra. Compared to the statistical method proposed by Anisimov et al (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 163604), our method is more direct and is deterministic. (paper)

  16. An FPGA-based trigger system for the search of μ+→e++γ decay in the MEG experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, L; Cei, F; Galeotti, S; Magazzù, C; Morsani, F; Nicolò, D; Signorelli, G; Grassi, M

    2013-01-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI aims at investigating the μ + → e + + γ decay with improved sensitivity on the branching ratio (BR) by two orders of magnitude with respect to the previous experimental limit (BR(μ + → e + + γ) ≈ 10 −13 ). The use of the most intense continuous muon beam world wide ( ≈ 10 8 μ/s) to search for such a rare event must be accompanied by an efficient trigger system, able to suppress the huge beam-related background to sustainable rates while preserving the efficiency on signal close to unity. In order to accomplish both objectives, a digital approach was exploited by means of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), working as a real-time processors of detector signals to perform an accurate event reconstruction within a 450 ns latency. This approach eventually turned out to be flexible enough to allow us to record calibration events in parallel with the main data acquisition and monitor the detector behavior throughout the data taking. We describe here the hardware implementation of the trigger and its main features as well: signal digitization, online waveform processing, reconstruction algorithms. A detailed description is given of the system architecture, the feature of the boards and their use. The trigger algorithms will be described in details in a dedicated article to be published afterwards.

  17. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation.

  18. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation

  19. Observable signatures of inflaton decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battefeld, Diana; Battefeld, Thorsten [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Goettingen, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Gottingen (Germany); Giblin, John T. Jr.; Pease, Evan K., E-mail: dbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: tbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: peasee@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022, U.S.A (United States)

    2011-02-01

    We numerically compute features in the power-spectrum that originate from the decay of fields during inflation. Using a simple, phenomenological, multi-field setup, we increase the number of fields from a few to thousands. Whenever a field decays, its associated potential energy is transferred into radiation, causing a jump in the equation of state parameter and mode mixing at the perturbed level. We observe discrete steps in the power-spectrum if the number of fields is low, in agreement with analytic arguments in the literature. These features become increasingly smeared out once many fields decay within a given Hubble time. In this regime we confirm the validity of the analytic approach to staggered inflation, which is based on a coarse-graining procedure. Our numerical approach bridges the aforementioned analytic treatments, and can be used in more complicated scenarios.

  20. Constraining neutrinoless double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorame, L.; Meloni, D.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    A class of discrete flavor-symmetry-based models predicts constrained neutrino mass matrix schemes that lead to specific neutrino mass sum-rules (MSR). We show how these theories may constrain the absolute scale of neutrino mass, leading in most of the cases to a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay effective amplitude.