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Sample records for based radiation therapy

  1. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. At this time, you will have a physical exam , talk about your medical history , and maybe have imaging tests . Your doctor or nurse will discuss external beam radiation therapy, its benefits and side effects, and ways you can care ...

  2. ROENTGEN: case-based reasoning and radiation therapy planning.

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, J.

    1992-01-01

    ROENTGEN is a design assistant for radiation therapy planning which uses case-based reasoning, an artificial intelligence technique. It learns both from specific problem-solving experiences and from direct instruction from the user. The first sort of learning is the normal case-based method of storing problem solutions so that they can be reused. The second sort is necessary because ROENTGEN does not, initially, have an internal model of the physics of its problem domain. This dependence on e...

  3. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  4. The new Wuerzburg data base for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conception, structure and realisation of a new data base for radiation therapy are present. The data base utilizes the commercial data base system ORACLE and the data base language SQL. A program package for statistical analyses including Kaplan-Meier-calculations, logrank test and Gehan/Breslow test was elaborated. The input of the data recorded on form sheets is carried out on a data base of the Tumor Centre in the first instance. From there the data are transfered to the ORACLE data base. Up to now the courses of disease of about 13 000 patients are stored. Therefore, extensive and detailed statistical analyses are practicable. (orig.)

  5. A computer based learning program for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many textbooks about radiation therapy for the education of medical, technical and scientific staff are available. But they are restricted to transfer of knowledge via text and figures. On the other hand movies and animated pictures can give you a more realistic impression of the procedures and technical equipment of a radiation therapy department. Therefore, an interactive multimedia teaching program was developed at the Universitaets-Krankenhaus Eppendorf for the department of radiation therapy. The electronic textbook runs under 'MS Windows 3.1 trademark ' (with multimedia extensions) and 'MS Windows 95 trademark ', contains eight chapters and can be used without any preliminary knowledge. The program has been tested by medical personnel, nurses, physicists and physicians and was generally welcome. The program was designed for people with different levels of education to reach as many users as possible. It was not created to replace textbooks but was designed for their supplement. (orig.)

  6. Criteria for radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery based EIC, TW, ly, and n factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of postoperative radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery has been accepted, but reports have been published which identify cases in which postoperative radiation therapy is not necessary. We therefore compared the postoperative disease-free rate in 65 cases by classifying them into a radiation therapy group and a non-radiation therapy group based on the level of extensive intraductal component (EIC) and lymphatic invasion (ly) and the presence or absence of n factor. The results of this comparison showed that in cases with the absence or minimal presence of EIC and the absence of ly, postoperative radiation therapy should no significant effect. Of these cases, those with negative TW and negative or unknown lymph node metastasis showed satisfactory postoperative results, even without radiation therapy. Furthermore, salvage operation was possible, even following recurrence. It is therefore thought that postoperative radiation therapy is not necessarily indicated in these cases. (author)

  7. Registration-based initialization during radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Girish; Mullick, Rakesh

    2007-03-01

    An established challenge in the field of image analysis has been the registration of images having a large initial misalignment. For example in chemo and Radiation Therapy Planning (RTP), there is often a need to register an image delineating a specific anatomy (usually in the surgery position) with that of a whole body image (obtained preoperatively). In such a scenario, there is room for a large misalignment between the two images that are required to be aligned. Large misalignments are traditionally handled in two ways: 1) Semi-automatically with a user initialization or 2) With the help of the origin fields in the image header. The first approach is user dependant and the second method can be used only if the two images are obtained from the same scanner with consistent origins. Our methodology extends a typical registration framework by selecting components that are capable of searching a large parameter space without settling on local optima. We have used an optimizer that is based on an Evolutionary Scheme along with an information theory based similarity metric that can address these needs. The attempt in this study is to convert a large misalignment problem to a small misalignment problem that can then be handled using application specific registration algorithms. Further improvements along local areas can be obtained by subjecting the image to a non-rigid transformation. We have successfully registered the following pairs of images without any user initialization: CTAC - simCT (neuro, lungs); MRPET/ CT (neuro, liver); T2-SPGR (neuro).

  8. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... goal of causing less harm to the surrounding healthy tissue. You don't have to worry that you'll glow in the dark after radiation treatment: People who receive external radiation are not radioactive. You' ...

  9. The design and implementation of the radiation therapy information management system (RTIMS) based on the workflow of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To meet the special needs of the department of radiation oncology, a radiation therapy information management system (RTIMS) has been developed as a secondary database system to supplement the Varian Varis/Aria since 2007. Methods: The RTIMS server was used to run a database and web service of Apache + PHP + MySQL. The RTIMS sever's web service could be visited with Internet Explorer (IE) to input, search, count, and print information from about 30 workstations and 20 personal computers. As some workstations were installed with Windows and IE in English only, some functions had English version. Results: In past five years, as the RTIMS was implemented in the department, some further needs were met and more practical functions were developed. And now the RTIMS almost covered the whole workflow of radiation therapy (RT). By September 2011 , recorded patients data in the RTIMS is as follows: 3900 patients, 2600 outpatient RT records, 6800 progress notes, 1900 RT summaries, 6700 charge records, 83000 workload records, 3900 plan application forms, 1600 ICRT records. etc. Conclusions: The RTIMS based on the workflow of RT has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. And it was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the department. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice. (authors)

  10. Couch height-based patient setup for abdominal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Shingo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kawanabe, Kiyoto; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-01-01

    There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height-based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup. PMID:26553471

  11. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  12. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... older the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms ... prostate. [beeping] Narrator: The more common form of radiation therapy is external beam. A typical treatment takes seven ...

  13. Population-based utilization of radiation therapy by a Canadian breast cancer cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Mittmann, N; Seung, S.J.; Liu, N.; Porter, J.; Saskin, R.; Hoch, J.S.; Evans, W.K.; Leighl, N.B.; Trudeau, M.; Earle, C.C.

    2014-01-01

    We examined trends in radiation therapy (rt) utilization by a population-based breast cancer cohort in Ontario. The provincial cancer registry provided a breast cancer cohort based on diagnosis dates from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010. Staging information was also available. The cohort was then linked, by encrypted health card number, to linkable administrative datasets, including rt utilization.

  14. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  15. Imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an important part of cancer treatment in which cancer patients are treated using high-energy radiation such as x-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and neutrons. Currently, about half of all cancer patients receive radiation treatment during their whole cancer care process. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver the necessary radiation dose to cancer cells while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. Success of radiation therapy highly relies on how accurately 1) identifies the target and 2) aim radiation beam to the target. Both tasks are strongly dependent of imaging technology and many imaging modalities have been applied for radiation therapy such as CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonant Image), and PET (Positron Emission Tomography). Recently, many researchers have given significant amount of effort to develop and improve imaging techniques for radiation therapy to enhance the overall quality of patient care. For example, advances in medical imaging technology have initiated the development of the state of the art radiation therapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), gated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). Capability of determining the local tumor volume and location of the tumor has been significantly improved by applying single or multi-modality imaging for static or dynamic target. The use of multi-modality imaging provides a more reliable tumor volume, eventually leading to a better definitive local control. Image registration technique is essential to fuse two different image modalities and has been in significant improvement. Imaging equipment and their common applications that are in active use and/or under development in radiation therapy are reviewed

  16. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. ...

  17. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate ... typical treatment takes seven weeks. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: A patient comes in every day, Monday to ...

  18. Verification of light & radiation field coincidence quality assurance for radiation therapy by using a-Se based DR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Eun-Tae; Choi, Yun-Seon; Cho, Heung-Lae; Ahn, Ki-Jung; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Ji-Na; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Seon; Hong, Ju-Yeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kyo-Tae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hyunjung; Jo, Sun-Mi; Oh, Won-Yong; Jin, Seong-Jin; Cho, Woong

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) recommends measuring the surface field size once a week by using an analog film in order to verify light and radiation field coincidence in the Quality Assurance (QA) of radiotherapy. However, the use of the film does not allow for a quantitative method of evaluation, and measuring the light field with radiation field detectors in a 2D array is difficult. Therefore, we used an amorphous-Se (a-Se) digital radiation detection system to measure the light and radiation fields simultaneously for a quantitative QA system, and the feasibility of using such a system was confirmed by ensuring the coincidence of the light and the radiation field measurements. The characteristics of the analog film and the a-Se digital radiation detection system were compared by delivering to each doses of 100, 10 monitor units(MU) of radiation at a rate of 400 MU/min to a radiation field 100 × 100 mm2 in size from a 100 cm source-surface distance (SSD). A 0.5 mm to 0.6 mm difference was measured in the X-axis, and a 0.3 mm difference was measured in the Y-axis. The difference in the measurements of the coincidence of light and the radiation field was less than 0.3 mm, which is relatively insignificant. These results indicate that the use of an a-Se digital radiation detection system is adequate for quality assurance of radiotherapy using light and radiation field coincidence. In addition, the experiment is considered to have provided valuable results in that the a-Se based digital radiation detection system enables simple and accurate QA for clinical radiation therapy by assessing the coincidence in the alignment of the light and the radiation fields.

  19. The scenario-based generalization of radiation therapy margins

    CERN Document Server

    Fredriksson, Albin

    2015-01-01

    We give a scenario-based treatment plan optimization formulation that is equivalent to planning with geometric margins if the scenario doses are calculated using the static dose cloud approximation. If the scenario doses are instead calculated more accurately, then our formulation provides a novel robust planning method that overcomes many of the difficulties associated with previous scenario-based robust planning methods. In particular, our method protects only against uncertainties that can occur in practice, it gives a sharp dose fall-off outside high dose regions, and it avoids underdosage of the target in ``easy'' scenarios. The method shares the benefits of the previous scenario-based robust planning methods over geometric margins for applications where the static dose cloud approximation is inaccurate, such as irradiation with few fields and irradiation with ion beams. These properties are demonstrated on a suite of phantom cases planned for treatment with scanned proton beams subject to systematic set...

  20. mRNA-based vaccines synergize with radiation therapy to eradicate established tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eradication of large, established tumors by active immunotherapy is a major challenge because of the numerous cancer evasion mechanisms that exist. This study aimed to establish a novel combination therapy consisting of messenger RNA (mRNA)-based cancer vaccines and radiation, which would facilitate the effective treatment of established tumors with aggressive growth kinetics. The combination of a tumor-specific mRNA-based vaccination with radiation was tested in two syngeneic tumor models, a highly immunogenic E.G7-OVA and a low immunogenic Lewis lung cancer (LLC). The molecular mechanism induced by the combination therapy was evaluated via gene expression arrays as well as flow cytometry analyses of tumor infiltrating cells. In both tumor models we demonstrated that a combination of mRNA-based immunotherapy with radiation results in a strong synergistic anti-tumor effect. This was manifested as either complete tumor eradication or delay in tumor growth. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumors revealed a variety of substantial changes at the tumor site following radiation. Genes associated with antigen presentation, infiltration of immune cells, adhesion, and activation of the innate immune system were upregulated. A combination of radiation and immunotherapy induced significant downregulation of tumor associated factors and upregulation of tumor suppressors. Moreover, combination therapy significantly increased CD4+, CD8+ and NKT cell infiltration of mouse tumors. Our data provide a scientific rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation and provide a basis for the development of more potent anti-cancer therapies. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1748-717X-9-180) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  1. Automated Erythema Quantification in Radiation Therapy - a Java Based Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Martin PUTORA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In radiotherapy, erythema is a common side-effect, especially during radiotherapy treatment regimes that last several weeks. The measurement of erythema might be of clinical relevance, especially when standardized interpretation is possible. Aim: The aim of this article is to present a tool that can be implemented for automatized and time efficient quantification of erythema from digital images taken during radiotherapy treatment. Method: Instead of relying on commercially available graphic editors and performing manual operations on the images within these programs we developed a java based tool that can automatically evaluate the “redness” of images. These erythema values receive a score number, are connected with the date and time the pictures were taken and are exported into a comma separated values (CSV file. Results: The Erythema values of images could be quickly evaluated with the developed tool. With spreadsheet software the exported file could be easily manipulated to produce graphical representations of erythema rise. Conclusion: Erythema quantification from digital images can be easily performed by custom developed java tools. An automated quantification provides a method of detecting an increase in erythema that may not be visible to the naked eye.

  2. Radiation therapy dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New therapeutic treatments generally aim to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity. Many aspects of radiation dosimetry have been studied and developed particularly in the field of external radiation. The success of radiotherapy relies on monitoring the dose of radiation to which the tumor and the adjacent tissues are exposed. Radiotherapy techniques have evolved through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments or radiosurgery and robotic radiation therapy. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care by improving the precision of the absorbed dose delivered. This paper presents state-of-the art radiation therapy dosimetry techniques as well as the value of integral dosimetry (INDOS), which shows promise in the fulfillment of radiation therapy dosimetry requirements. - highlights: • Pre-treatment delivery and phantom dosimetry in brachytherapy treatments were analyzed. • Dose distribution in the head and neck was estimated by physical and mathematical dosimetry. • Electron beam flattening was acquired by means of mathematical, physical and “in vivo” dosimetry. • Integral dosimetry (INDOS) has been suggested as a routine dosimetric method in all radiation therapy treatments

  3. Individualized Positron Emission Tomography–Based Isotoxic Accelerated Radiation Therapy Is Cost-Effective Compared With Conventional Radiation Therapy: A Model-Based Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Mathilda L., E-mail: ml.bongers@vumc.nl [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Coupé, Veerle M.H. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uyl-de Groot, Cornelia A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health effects, costs, and cost-effectiveness of positron emission tomography (PET)-based isotoxic accelerated radiation therapy treatment (PET-ART) compared with conventional fixed-dose CT-based radiation therapy treatment (CRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Our analysis uses a validated decision model, based on data of 200 NSCLC patients with inoperable stage I-IIIB. Clinical outcomes, resource use, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Maastro Clinic and the literature. Primary model outcomes were the difference in life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness and cost/utility ratio (ICER and ICUR) of PET-ART versus CRT. Model outcomes were obtained from averaging the predictions for 50,000 simulated patients. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis and scenario analyses were carried out. Results: The average incremental costs per patient of PET-ART were €569 (95% confidence interval [CI] €−5327-€6936) for 0.42 incremental LYs (95% CI 0.19-0.61) and 0.33 QALYs gained (95% CI 0.13-0.49). The base-case scenario resulted in an ICER of €1360 per LY gained and an ICUR of €1744 per QALY gained. The probabilistic analysis gave a 36% probability that PET-ART improves health outcomes at reduced costs and a 64% probability that PET-ART is more effective at slightly higher costs. Conclusion: On the basis of the available data, individualized PET-ART for NSCLC seems to be cost-effective compared with CRT.

  4. Individualized Positron Emission Tomography–Based Isotoxic Accelerated Radiation Therapy Is Cost-Effective Compared With Conventional Radiation Therapy: A Model-Based Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health effects, costs, and cost-effectiveness of positron emission tomography (PET)-based isotoxic accelerated radiation therapy treatment (PET-ART) compared with conventional fixed-dose CT-based radiation therapy treatment (CRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Our analysis uses a validated decision model, based on data of 200 NSCLC patients with inoperable stage I-IIIB. Clinical outcomes, resource use, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Maastro Clinic and the literature. Primary model outcomes were the difference in life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness and cost/utility ratio (ICER and ICUR) of PET-ART versus CRT. Model outcomes were obtained from averaging the predictions for 50,000 simulated patients. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis and scenario analyses were carried out. Results: The average incremental costs per patient of PET-ART were €569 (95% confidence interval [CI] €−5327-€6936) for 0.42 incremental LYs (95% CI 0.19-0.61) and 0.33 QALYs gained (95% CI 0.13-0.49). The base-case scenario resulted in an ICER of €1360 per LY gained and an ICUR of €1744 per QALY gained. The probabilistic analysis gave a 36% probability that PET-ART improves health outcomes at reduced costs and a 64% probability that PET-ART is more effective at slightly higher costs. Conclusion: On the basis of the available data, individualized PET-ART for NSCLC seems to be cost-effective compared with CRT

  5. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hendee, William R; Hendee, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an upd

  6. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be some permanent changes to the color and elasticity of the skin. How can you help? Dress ... to Home and School Cancer Center Cancer Basics Types of Cancer Teens Get Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Dealing ...

  7. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prostate or when the patient is older the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar ... different types. There's what we call external beam treatment, which is given from an x-ray machine, ...

  8. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... given from an x-ray machine, and there's a variety called interstitial implantation, which uses radioactive seeds. ... common form of radiation therapy is external beam. A typical treatment takes seven weeks. Gunnar Zagars, M. ...

  9. 3-D-conformal radiation therapy for pediatric giant cell tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E.B. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States). Section of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, M.W.; Vries, A. de [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Adams, J.A.; Munzenrider, J.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Rosenberg, A.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-05-01

    Background: Giant cell tumors (GCT) of the base of skull are rare neoplasms. This report reviews the treatment of four pediatric patients presenting with aggressive giant cell tumor, using fractionated and combined, conformal proton and photon radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Patients and Methods: Three female patients and one adolescent male, ages 10-15 years, had undergone prior, extensive surgical resection(s) and were treated for either primary (two patients) or recurrent (two patients) disease. Gross residual tumor was evident in three patients and microscopic disease suspected in one patient. Combined proton and photon radiation theory was based on three-dimensional (3-D) planning, consisting of fractionated treatment, one fraction per day at 1.8 CGE (cobalt-gray equivalent) to total target doses of 57.6, 57.6, 59.4, and 61.2 Gy/CGE. Results: With observation times of 3.1 years, 3.3, 5.3, and 5.8 years, all four patients were alive and well and remained locally controlled without evidence of recurrent disease. Except for one patient with partial pituitary insufficiency following radiotherapy for sellar recurrent disease, thus far no late effects attributable to radiation therapy have been observed. Conclusions: 3-D conformal radiation therapy offers a realistic chance of tumor control for aggressive giant cell tumor in the skull base, either postoperatively or at time of recurrence. Conformal treatment techniques allow the safe delivery of relatively high radiation doses in the pediatric patient without apparent increase of side effects. (orig.)

  10. Hardware design of radiation therapy table control system based on ARM and FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the actual needs of the patient positioning system in Lanzhou heavy ion cancer treatment facility, the hardware of radiation therapy table control system is designed. After fully research and consideration, ARM and FPGA are chose to be the core architecture of this hardware system. The architecture of the three PCB boards in hardware system and the system design of A3P250 FPGA in the core controllers are illustrated in detail. Moreover, important interface protocols such as CANopen, SSI interface are also introduced and the hardware circuit implementations are showed. The hardware design is fully taken into account in the project to meet the control requirements for radiation therapy table of the patient positioning system. (authors)

  11. Biosynchronous laser therapy based on high-intensity pulsed laser radiation utilization as a new trend in preventive medicine and rehabilitation of persons injured in radiation catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of laser therapy based on using high-intensity pulsed laser radiation provides for the high efficiency and effect universal character in the case of radiation injuries and accompanying diseases. The technique is applicable in critical period, for disease preventive medicine and when conducting rehabilitation measures. The laser therapy technique provides high treatment capacity in the case of large number of injured patients during radiation catastrophe

  12. Platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 39 patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy during the last five years at our departments. There were 26 men and 13 women with median age 55 (24-75) years. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients and undifferentiated carcinoma in the remaining 33 patients. Induction chemotherapy consisted of either regimen A (cisplating 100 mg/m2 day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 days 2-6 as continuous infusion, bleomycin 15 mg days 15 and 29 i.m., mitomycin 4 mg/m2 day 22 and hydroxyurea 1000 mg/m2 daily days 23-27) or regimen B (carboplatin 300 mg/m2 day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 days 1-5 as continuous infusion and methotrexate 1.2 g/m2 day 14 with leucovorin rescue). After completion of induction chemotherapy 13 patients (33%) had complete remission (CR) and 19 (49%) partial remission (PR). The CR rate was increased after radiation therapy to 72%. Survival rates were 88% at 12 and 78% at 24 months. Median time to progression was 29.5 months. In conclusion, induction chemotherapy with a platinum-based regimen followed by radiation therapy achieved a high rate of local control. If the treatment also prolongs survival must, however, be studied by randomized trials. (orig.)

  13. Radiation therapy imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a radiation therapy imaging apparatus for providing images in a patient being treated on a radiation therapy apparatus for verification and monitoring of patient positioning and verification of alignment and shaping of the radiation field of the radiation therapy apparatus. It comprises: a high-energy treatment head for applying a radiation dose to a patient positioned on a treatment table, and a gantry rotatable about an isocentric axis and carrying the treatment head for permitting the radiation dose to be applied to the patient from any of a range of angles about the isocentric axis; the radiation therapy imaging apparatus including a radiation therapy image detector which comprises a video camera mounted on the gantry diametrically opposite the treat head, an elongated light-excluding enclosure enveloping the camera to exclude ambient light from the camera, a fluoroscopic plate positioned on a distal end of the enclosure remote from the camera and aligned with the head to produce a fluoroscopic image in response to radiation applied from the head through the patient, mirror means in the enclosure and oriented for reflecting the image to the camera to permit monitoring on a viewing screen of the position of the radiation field in respect to the patient, and means for retracting at least the distal end of the enclosure from a position in which the fluoroscopic plate is disposed opposite the treatment head without disturbing the position of the camera on the gantry, so that the enclosure can be collapsed and kept from projecting under the treatment table when the patient is being positioned on the treatment table

  14. About radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Explained are the history and outline of technology in radiation therapy (RT), characteristics of dose distribution of major radiations in RT and significance of biological effective dose (BED) from aspects of radiation oncology and therapeutic prediction. The history is described from the first X-ray RT documented in 1896 to the latest (1994) RT with National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) carbon beam for tumors in trunk. X-ray RT has aimed to make the energy high because target tumors are generally present deep in the body and an ideal RT, the intensity modulated RT, has been developed to assure the desirable dose distribution (or, dose-volume histogram) based on precise planning with X-CT and computing. Low energy gamma ray emitted from radioisotopes provides also an ideal RT mean because of its excellent focusing to the internal target; however, problems remain of invasion and long lodging of the isotope in the body. Heavy ion RT is conducted on the planning on X-CT image and computation utilizing Bragg's principle and is superior for minimizing the exposure of normal, non-cancerous tissues. Boron neutron capture therapy is a promising RT as the local control is always possible at 10B ratio of the lesion/normal tissue >2.5, which is measurable by PET with 18F-boronophenylalanine. In the current oncology, BED is estimated by the linear quadratic model, α(nd)+β(nd)2, where d is a total irradiation dose and n, number of fractionation, and is a planning basis for the effect prediction in RT above. Physical problems in future involve the system development of more efficient dose focusing and convenient dose impartation, and development of more easily operable system and cost reduction is awaited. (R.T.)

  15. Enhancement of radiosensitization by metal-based nanoparticles in cancer radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Yu Su; Pei-Dang Liu; Hao Wu; Ning Gu

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy performs an important function in cancer treatment. However, resistance of tumor cells to radiation therapy still remains a serious concern, so the study of radiosensitizers has emerged as a persistent hotspot in radiation oncology. Along with the rapid advancement of nanotechnology in recent years, the potential value of nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizers has been discovered. hTis review summarizes the latest experimental ifndings bothin vitro andin vivo and attempts to highlight the underlying mechanisms of response in nanoparticle radiosensitization.

  16. Enhancement of radiosensitization by metal-based nanoparticles in cancer radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Pei-Dang; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy performs an important function in cancer treatment. However, resistance of tumor cells to radiation therapy still remains a serious concern, so the study of radiosensitizers has emerged as a persistent hotspot in radiation oncology. Along with the rapid advancement of nanotechnology in recent years, the potential value of nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizers has been discovered. This review summarizes the latest experimental findings both in vitro and in vivo and attempts...

  17. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Ohlhues, Lars; Roed, Henrik; Juhler, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    meningiomas and 100, 98.2 and 94.9% for pituitary adenomas, respectively. Patients with an impaired visual field function pre-FSRT were more likely to experience worsened function (p = 0.016). We found that RION, was a relatively uncommon event, in a large prospective cohort of patients that were......To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...... skull base meningiomas and 55 patients treated with FSRT for pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and December 2009 with at least 2 years follow-up were included. Patients were followed up prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging scans, visual acuity and visual field examinations. RION was found...

  18. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    higher dose. The EC50 model provides suggested dose–volume temporal lobe constraints for conventionally fractionated high-dose skull base radiation therapy.

  19. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    model provides suggested dose–volume temporal lobe constraints for conventionally fractionated high-dose skull base radiation therapy

  20. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-1799 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-1799 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth/shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the ''ground truth'' with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy.

  1. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  2. Interactive Decision-Support Tool for Risk-Based Radiation Therapy Plan Comparison for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States); Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To present a novel tool that allows quantitative estimation and visualization of the risk of various relevant normal tissue endpoints to aid in treatment plan comparison and clinical decision making in radiation therapy (RT) planning for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: A decision-support tool for risk-based, individualized treatment plan comparison is presented. The tool displays dose–response relationships, derived from published clinical data, for a number of relevant side effects and thereby provides direct visualization of the trade-off between these endpoints. The Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic reports were applied, complemented with newer data where available. A “relevance score” was assigned to each data source, reflecting how relevant the input data are to current RT for HL. Results: The tool is applied to visualize the local steepness of dose–response curves to drive the reoptimization of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plan for an HL patient with head-and-neck involvement. We also use this decision-support tool to visualize and quantitatively evaluate the trade-off between a 3-dimensional conformal RT plan and a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan for a patient with mediastinal HL. Conclusion: This multiple-endpoint decision-support tool provides quantitative risk estimates to supplement the clinical judgment of the radiation oncologist when comparing different RT options.

  3. Interactive Decision-Support Tool for Risk-Based Radiation Therapy Plan Comparison for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel tool that allows quantitative estimation and visualization of the risk of various relevant normal tissue endpoints to aid in treatment plan comparison and clinical decision making in radiation therapy (RT) planning for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: A decision-support tool for risk-based, individualized treatment plan comparison is presented. The tool displays dose–response relationships, derived from published clinical data, for a number of relevant side effects and thereby provides direct visualization of the trade-off between these endpoints. The Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic reports were applied, complemented with newer data where available. A “relevance score” was assigned to each data source, reflecting how relevant the input data are to current RT for HL. Results: The tool is applied to visualize the local steepness of dose–response curves to drive the reoptimization of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plan for an HL patient with head-and-neck involvement. We also use this decision-support tool to visualize and quantitatively evaluate the trade-off between a 3-dimensional conformal RT plan and a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan for a patient with mediastinal HL. Conclusion: This multiple-endpoint decision-support tool provides quantitative risk estimates to supplement the clinical judgment of the radiation oncologist when comparing different RT options

  4. Molecular-imaging-based dose painting – a novel paradigm for radiation therapy prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M.; Gregoire, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Dose painting is the prescription of a non-uniform radiation dose distribution to the target volume based on functional or molecular images shown to be indicative of the local risk of relapse. Two prototypical strategies for implementing this novel paradigm in radiation oncology are reviewed: sub-volume boosting and dose painting by numbers. Sub-volume boosting involves the selection of a “target within the target”, defined by image segmentation on the basis of the quantitative information in the image or morphologically, and this is related to image based target volume selection and delineation. Dose painting by numbers is a voxel-level prescription of dose based on a mathematical transformation of the image intensity of individual pixels. Quantitative use of images to decide both where and how to delivery radiation therapy in an individual case is also called theragnostic imaging. Dose painting targets are imaging surrogates for cellular or microenvironmental phenotypes associated with poor radioresponsiveness. In this review, the focus is on positron emission tomography (PET) tracers: FDG and choline as surrogates for tumor burden, FLT as a surrogate for proliferation (or cellular growth fraction) and hypoxia sensitive tracers including FMISO, EF3, EF5 and Cu-ATSM as surrogates of cellular hypoxia. Research advances supporting the clinico-biological rationale for dose painting are reviewed as are studies of the technical feasibility of optimizing and delivering realistic dose painted radiation therapy plans. Challenges and research priorities in this exciting research field are defined and a possible design for a randomized clinical trial of dose painting is presented. PMID:21356478

  5. An Integrated Simulation System Based on Digital Human Phantom for 4D Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Cai; You Zhang; Irina Vergalasova; Fan Zhang; W. Paul Segars; Fang-Fang Yin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test an integrated simulation system based on the digital Extended Cardio Torso (XCAT) phantom for 4-dimensional (4D) radiation therapy of lung cancer. Methods: A computer program was developed to facilitate the characterization and implementation of the XCAT phantom for 4D radiation therapy applications. To verify that patient-specific motion trajectories are reproducible with the XCAT phantom, motion trajectories of the diaphragm and chest were...

  6. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  7. Contextual Atlas Regression Forests: Multiple-Atlas-Based Automated Dose Prediction in Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Purdie, Thomas G

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy is an integral part of cancer treatment, but to date it remains highly manual. Plans are created through optimization of dose volume objectives that specify intent to minimize, maximize, or achieve a prescribed dose level to clinical targets and organs. Optimization is NP-hard, requiring highly iterative and manual initialization procedures. We present a proof-of-concept for a method to automatically infer the radiation dose directly from the patient's treatment planning image based on a database of previous patients with corresponding clinical treatment plans. Our method uses regression forests augmented with density estimation over the most informative features to learn an automatic atlas-selection metric that is tailored to dose prediction. We validate our approach on 276 patients from 3 clinical treatment plan sites (whole breast, breast cavity, and prostate), with an overall dose prediction accuracies of 78.68%, 64.76%, 86.83% under the Gamma metric. PMID:26660888

  8. Automatic atlas based electron density and structure contouring for MRI-based prostate radiation therapy on the cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  9. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  10. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on the graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on the CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called the column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on the GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5 x 5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm3 voxel size were tested to evaluate our algorithm on the GPU. It takes only 0.7-3.8 s for our implementation to generate high-quality treatment plans on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card. Our work has therefore solved a major problem in developing ultra-fast (re-)planning technologies for online ART.

  11. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  12. Replanning Criteria and Timing Definition for Parotid Protection-Based Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei-Rong; Xu, Shou-Ping; Liu, Bo; Cao, Xiu-Tang; Ren, Gang; Du, Lei; Zhou, Fu-Gen; Feng, Lin-Chun; Qu, Bao-Lin; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate real-time volumetric and dosimetric changes of the parotid gland so as to determine replanning criteria and timing for parotid protection-based adaptive radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Fifty NPC patients were treated with helical tomotherapy; volumetric and dosimetric (Dmean, V1, and D50) changes of the parotid gland at the 1st, 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, 31st, and 33rd fractions were evaluated. The clinical parameters affecting these changes were studied by analyses of variance methods for repeated measures. Factors influencing the actual parotid dose were analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model. The cut-off values predicting parotid overdose were developed from receiver operating characteristic curves and judged by combining them with a diagnostic test consistency check. The median absolute value and percentage of parotid volume reduction were 19.51 cm3 and 35%, respectively. The interweekly parotid volume varied significantly (p < 0.05). The parotid Dmean, V1, and D50 increased by 22.13%, 39.42%, and 48.45%, respectively. The actual parotid dose increased by an average of 11.38% at the end of radiation therapy. Initial parotid volume, initial parotid Dmean, and weight loss rate are valuable indicators for parotid protection-based replanning. PMID:26793717

  13. Replanning Criteria and Timing Definition for Parotid Protection-Based Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Rong Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate real-time volumetric and dosimetric changes of the parotid gland so as to determine replanning criteria and timing for parotid protection-based adaptive radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Fifty NPC patients were treated with helical tomotherapy; volumetric and dosimetric (Dmean, V1, and D50 changes of the parotid gland at the 1st, 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, 31st, and 33rd fractions were evaluated. The clinical parameters affecting these changes were studied by analyses of variance methods for repeated measures. Factors influencing the actual parotid dose were analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model. The cut-off values predicting parotid overdose were developed from receiver operating characteristic curves and judged by combining them with a diagnostic test consistency check. The median absolute value and percentage of parotid volume reduction were 19.51 cm3 and 35%, respectively. The interweekly parotid volume varied significantly (p<0.05. The parotid Dmean, V1, and D50 increased by 22.13%, 39.42%, and 48.45%, respectively. The actual parotid dose increased by an average of 11.38% at the end of radiation therapy. Initial parotid volume, initial parotid Dmean, and weight loss rate are valuable indicators for parotid protection-based replanning.

  14. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy ...

  15. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... predict when or even if the remaining cancer cells will become active again. Christopher Wood, M.D.: It's at the ten-year mark where the differences between success rates with radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy become evident,and if you're not going ...

  16. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reviews (a) the natural history of metastatic bone disease in general terms and as it impacts on the use of radiation as therapy; (b) the clinical and radiographic evaluations used to guide the application of irradiation; and (c) the methods, results, and toxicities of various techniques of irradiation

  17. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prostate or when the patient is older the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms ... different types. There's what we call external beam treatment, which is given from an x-ray machine, ...

  18. Patterns of care study and evidence based medicine for radiation therapy. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, there is little evidence of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, we have to refer to the evidence of radiation therapy from Western countries, but we should pay attention to the differences of cultural, racial, or social background between Japan and Western countries. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) was conducted in Japan and extramural audits were performed for 50 randomly selected institutions. Detailed information of 311 prostate cancer patients without distant metastases and other cancers, who were treated with radiation therapy in 1996-1998, was collected. In this article, the results of PCS for primary prostate cancer were shown, with a review of literature for the appropriate choice of radiation therapy. This study was supported by the Grantin-Aid for Cancer Research from Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (10-17). (author)

  19. Clinical results of stereotactic body frame based fractionated radiation therapy for primary or metastatic thoracic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy for treating primary or metastatic thoracic tumors using a stereotactic body frame. Between January 1998 and February 2004, 101 lesions from 91 patients with thoracic tumors were prospectively reviewed. A dose of 10-12 Gy per fraction was given three to four times over consecutive days to a total dose of 30-48 Gy (median 40 Gy). The overall response rate was 82%, with 20 (22%) complete responses and 55 (60%) partial responses. The one- and two-year local progression free survival rates were 90% and 81%, respectively. The patients who received 48 Gy showed a better local tumor control than those who received less than 48 Gy (Fisher exact test; p=0.004). No pulmonary complications greater than a RTOG toxicity criteria grade 2 were observed. The experience of stereotactic body frame based radiation therapy appears to be a safe and promising treatment modality for the local management of primary or metastatic lung tumors. The optimal total dose, fractionation schedule and treatment volume need to be determined after a further follow-up of these results.

  20. Lymphatic atlas-based target volume definition for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the improvements in current imaging modalities such as CT and MRI, the detection of normal or malignant lymph nodes remains a challenge due to the large variability in lymph node characteristics and the variation in imaging quality and the limited imaging resolution. A computerized lymph node atlas could be the ideal tool for target volume definition based on the distribution of normal lymph nodes surrounding the verified malignant nodes to improve the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The standard lymph node topography in the newly constructed 3D lymph node atlas offers a detailed topographical distribution of discrete nodal locations in relation to surrounding organs at risk. In the present paper, the recently developed lymph node atlas is used for selection and delineation of target volumes in the head and neck, thorax and pelvic region. Image registration techniques were implemented to integrate the topography of the lymph node atlas into the patient's data set. By combining the knowledge-based lymph node distribution with the patient's data set, more detailed definitions of the target volumes were obtained to facilitate biologically based treatment plan optimization. The response values of the biologically optimized treatment plans were used to derive the probability of tumor control and the probability of complications in organs at risk. The treatment outcome of the lung reference plan showed a lower probability of recurrence in comparison to planning without the lymph node atlas. The lymph node atlas can improve and standardize the target volume definition by including more accurate anatomical knowledge for target volume definition and biologically optimized radiation therapy planning

  1. Microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Wagner, Hans-Peter; Archer, David W.; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Di Michiel, Marco; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Brauer, Elke; Spanne, Per O.; Gebbers, Jan-Olef; Dixon, Keith; Blattmann, Hans

    1999-10-01

    The central nervous system of vertebrates, even when immature, displays extraordinary resistance to damage by microscopically narrow, multiple, parallel, planar beams of x rays. Imminently lethal gliosarcomas in the brains of mature rats can be inhibited and ablated by such microbeams with little or no harm to mature brain tissues and neurological function. Potentially palliative, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in human infants under three years of age is so fraught with the danger of disrupting the functional maturation of immature brain tissues around the targeted tumor that it is implemented infrequently. Other kinds of therapy for such tumors are often inadequate. We suggest that microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) might help to alleviate the situation. Wiggler-generated synchrotron x-rays were first used for experimental microplanar beam (microbeam) radiation therapy (MRT) at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source in the early 1990s. We now describe the progress achieved in MRT research to date using immature and adult rats irradiated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, and investigated thereafter at the Institute of Pathology of the University of Bern.

  2. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  3. [Problems after radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of severe late adverse effects has decreased with the highly accurate administration of radiation therapy; however, the total number of patients who suffer from late effects has not decreased because of the increased total number of patients and better survival rates. Late adverse effects, occurring more than a few months after irradiation, include the extension and collapse of capillaries, thickening of the basement membrane, and scarring of tissue due to loss of peripheral vessels. The main causes of these late effects are the loss of stromal cells and vascular injury. This is in contrast to early reactions, which occur mainly due to the reorganization of slow-growing non-stem cell renewal systems such as the lung, kidney, heart, and central nervous system. In addition, the patient's quality of life is impaired if acute reactions such as mouth or skin dryness are not alleviated. Most adverse effects are radiation dose dependent, and the thresholds differ according to the radiosensitivity of each organ. These reactions occur with a latency period of a few months to more than 10 years. Understanding the clinical and pathological status, through discussion with radiation oncologists, is the essential first step. Some of the late effects have no effective treatment, but others can be treated by steroids or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. An appropriate decision is important. PMID:24423950

  4. Interactive Decision-Support Tool for Risk-Based Radiation Therapy Plan Comparison for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Maraldo, Maja V.; Aznar, Marianne C.;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To present a novel tool that allows quantitative estimation and visualization of the risk of various relevant normal tissue endpoints to aid in treatment plan comparison and clinical decision making in radiation therapy (RT) planning for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). METHODS AND MATERIALS: A de...

  5. Intracoronary radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Dae Hyuk; Oh, Seung Jun; Lee, Hee Kung; Park, Seong Wook; Hong, Myeong Ki [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bom, Hee Seung [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Restenosis remains a major limitation of percutaneous coronary interventions. Numerous Studies including pharmacological approaches and new devices failed to reduce restenosis rate except coronary stenting. Since the results of BENESTENT and STRESS studies came out, coronary stenting has been the most popular interventional strategy in the various kinds of coronary stenotic lesions, although the efficacy of stending was shown only in the discrete lesion of the large coronary artery. The widespread use of coronary stending has improved the early and late outcomes after coronary intervention, but it has also led to a new and serious problem, e.g., in-stent restenosis. Intravascular radiation for prevention of restenosis is a new technology in the field of percutaneous coronary intervention. Recent animal experiments and human trials have demonstrated that local irradiation, in conjunction with coronary interventions, substantially diminished the rate of restenosis. This paper reviews basic radiation biology of intracoronary radiation and its role in the inhibition of restenosis. The current status of intracoronary radiation therapy using Re-188 liquid balloon is also discussed.

  6. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin cells called melanocytes that produce skin color ( melanin ). Radiation therapy is used mostly for melanomas that ... in addition to surgery, chemotherapy or biologic therapy. Hair Epidermis Dermis Subcutaneous Hair Follicle Vein Artery © ASTRO ...

  7. Fractionated radiation therapy after Strandqvist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue damage in radiation therapy are becoming less empirical, more realistic, and more specific for different tissue reactions. The progression is described from the 'cube root law', through STRANDQVIST'S well known graph to NSD, TDF and CRE and more recently to biologically based time factors and linear-quadratic dose-response curves. New applications of the recent approach are reviewed together with their implications for non-standard fractionation in radiation therapy. It is concluded that accelerated fractionation is an important method to be investigated, as well as hyperfractionation; and that more data are required about the proliferation rates of clonogenic cells in human tumours. (orig.)

  8. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  9. Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. Ask your doctor for more information. For women undergoing reconstruction, post- mastectomy radiation may affect your options for reconstruction or the cosmetic outcome. Discuss with your surgeon and radiation oncologist ...

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  12. EBT GAFCHROMIC{sup TM} film dosimetry in compensator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaezzadeh, Seyedali [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Mahmoud, E-mail: alahverdi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedaie, Hasan A. [Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammadreza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza; Yarahmadi, Mehran [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The electron benefit transfer (EBT) GAFCHROMIC films possess a number of features making them appropriate for high-quality dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Compensators to deliver IMRT are known to change the beam-energy spectrum as well as to produce scattered photons and to contaminate electrons; therefore, the accuracy and validity of EBT-film dosimetry in compensator-based IMRT should be investigated. Percentage-depth doses and lateral-beam profiles were measured using EBT films in perpendicular orientation with respect to 6 and 18 MV photon beam energies for: (1) different thicknesses of cerrobend slab (open, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm), field sizes (5×5, 10×10, and 20×20 cm{sup 2}), and measurement depths (D{sub max}, 5.0 and 10.0 cm); and (2) step-wedged compensator in a solid phantom. To verify results, same measurements were implemented using a 0.125 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber in a water phantom and also in Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code. The mean energy of photons was increased due to beam hardening in comparison with open fields at both 6 and 18 MV energies. For a 20×20 cm{sup 2} field size of a 6 MV photon beam and a 6.0 cm thick block, the surface dose decreased by about 12% and percentage-depth doses increased up to 3% at 30.0 cm depth, due to the beam-hardening effect induced by the block. In contrast, at 18 MV, the surface dose increased by about 8% and depth dose reduced by 3% at 30.0 cm depth. The penumbral widths (80% to 20%) increase with block thickness, field size, and beam energy. The EBT film results were in good agreement with the ionization chamber dose profiles and Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code simulation behind the step-wedged compensator. Also, there was a good agreement between the EBT-film and the treatment-planning results on the anthropomorphic phantom. The EBT films can be accurately used as a 2D dosimeter for dose

  13. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  14. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  15. Geometric accuracy of a novel gimbals based radiation therapy tumor tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: VERO is a novel platform for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. Orthogonal gimbals hold the linac-MLC assembly allowing real-time moving tumor tracking. This study determines the geometric accuracy of the tracking. Materials and methods: To determine the tracking error, an 1D moving phantom produced sinusoidal motion with frequencies up to 30 breaths per minute (bpm). Tumor trajectories of patients were reproduced using a 2D robot and pursued with the gimbals tracking system prototype. Using the moving beam light field and a digital-camera-based detection unit tracking errors, system lag and equivalence of pan/tilt performance were measured. Results: The system lag was 47.7 ms for panning and 47.6 ms for tilting. Applying system lag compensation, sinusoidal motion tracking was accurate, with a tracking error 90% percentile E90% 90% of 0.54 mm, and tracking error standard deviations of 0.20 mm for pan and 0.22 mm for tilt. Conclusions: In terms of dynamic behavior, the gimbaled linac of the VERO system showed to be an excellent approach for providing accurate real-time tumor tracking in radiation therapy.

  16. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  17. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found. (paper)

  18. Combination of intensity-based image registration with 3D simulation in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Malsch, Urban; Bendl, Rolf

    2008-09-01

    Modern techniques of radiotherapy like intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) make it possible to deliver high dose to tumors of different irregular shapes at the same time sparing surrounding healthy tissue. However, internal tumor motion makes precise calculation of the delivered dose distribution challenging. This makes analysis of tumor motion necessary. One way to describe target motion is using image registration. Many registration methods have already been developed previously. However, most of them belong either to geometric approaches or to intensity approaches. Methods which take account of anatomical information and results of intensity matching can greatly improve the results of image registration. Based on this idea, a combined method of image registration followed by 3D modeling and simulation was introduced in this project. Experiments were carried out for five patients 4DCT lung datasets. In the 3D simulation, models obtained from images of end-exhalation were deformed to the state of end-inhalation. Diaphragm motions were around -25 mm in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction. To verify the quality of our new method, displacements of landmarks were calculated and compared with measurements in the CT images. Improvement of accuracy after simulations has been shown compared to the results obtained only by intensity-based image registration. The average improvement was 0.97 mm. The average Euclidean error of the combined method was around 3.77 mm. Unrealistic motions such as curl-shaped deformations in the results of image registration were corrected. The combined method required less than 30 min. Our method provides information about the deformation of the target volume, which we need for dose optimization and target definition in our planning system.

  19. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, M.; Werner, R.; Ehrhardt, J.; Schmidt-Richberg, A.; Schlemmer, H.-P.; Handels, H.

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found.

  20. Cherenkoscopy based patient positioning validation and movement tracking during post-lumpectomy whole breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate Cherenkov imaging (Cherenkoscopy) based patient positioning and movement tracking during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In a phase 1 clinical trial, including 12 patients undergoing post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation, Cherenkov emission was imaged with a time-gated ICCD camera synchronized to the LINAC pulse output, during different fractions of the treatment. Patients were positioned with the aid of the AlignRT system in the beginning of each treatment session. Inter-fraction setup variation was studied by rigid image registrations between images acquired at individual treatments to the average image from all imaged treatment fractions. The amplitude of respiratory motion was calculated from the registration of each frame of Cherenkov images to the reference. A Canny edge detection algorithm was utilized to highlight the beam field edges and biological features provided by major blood vessels apparent in the images. Real-time Cherenkoscopy can monitor the treatment delivery, patient motion and alignment of the beam edge to the treatment region simultaneously. For all the imaged fractions, the patient positioning discrepancies were within our clinical tolerances (3 mm in shifts and 3 degree in pitch angle rotation), with 4.6% exceeding 3 mm but still within 4 mm in shifts. The average discrepancy of repetitive patient positioning was 1.22 mm in linear shift and 0.34 degrees in rotational pitch, consistent with the accuracy reported by the AlignRT system. The edge detection algorithm enhanced features such as field edges and blood vessels. Patient positioning discrepancies and respiratory motion retrieved from rigid image registration were consistent with the edge enhanced images. Besides positioning discrepancies caused by globally inaccurate setups, edge enhanced blood vessels indicate the existence of deformations within the treatment region, especially for large patients. Real-time Cherenkoscopy imaging during EBRT is a

  1. Cherenkoscopy based patient positioning validation and movement tracking during post-lumpectomy whole breast radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Gladstone, David J; Hitchcock, Whitney L; Glaser, Adam K; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Jarvis, Lesley A

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Cherenkov imaging (Cherenkoscopy) based patient positioning and movement tracking during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In a phase 1 clinical trial, including 12 patients undergoing post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation, Cherenkov emission was imaged with a time-gated ICCD camera synchronized to the LINAC pulse output, during different fractions of the treatment. Patients were positioned with the aid of the AlignRT system in the beginning of each treatment session. Inter-fraction setup variation was studied by rigid image registrations between images acquired at individual treatments to the average image from all imaged treatment fractions. The amplitude of respiratory motion was calculated from the registration of each frame of Cherenkov images to the reference. A Canny edge detection algorithm was utilized to highlight the beam field edges and biological features provided by major blood vessels apparent in the images. Real-time Cherenkoscopy can monitor the treatment delivery, patient motion and alignment of the beam edge to the treatment region simultaneously. For all the imaged fractions, the patient positioning discrepancies were within our clinical tolerances (3 mm in shifts and 3 degree in pitch angle rotation), with 4.6% exceeding 3 mm but still within 4 mm in shifts. The average discrepancy of repetitive patient positioning was 1.22 mm in linear shift and 0.34 degrees in rotational pitch, consistent with the accuracy reported by the AlignRT system. The edge detection algorithm enhanced features such as field edges and blood vessels. Patient positioning discrepancies and respiratory motion retrieved from rigid image registration were consistent with the edge enhanced images. Besides positioning discrepancies caused by globally inaccurate setups, edge enhanced blood vessels indicate the existence of deformations within the treatment region, especially for large patients. Real-time Cherenkoscopy imaging during EBRT is a

  2. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena;

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL...... adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other...

  3. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-μm-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 μm) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at the

  4. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Laboratoire Imagerie et modelisation en neurobiologie et cancerologie, UMR8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 440., 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  5. Platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer; A retrospective analysis of 39 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountzilas, G.; Danilidis, J.; Kosmidis, P.; Srihar, K.S.; Kalogera-Fountzila, A.; Nicolaou, A.; Makrantonakis, P.; Banis, K.; Dimitriadis, A.; Sombolos, K.; Zaramboukas, T.; Themelis, C.; Vritsios, A.; Tourkantonis, A. (Ahepa Univ. Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece) Metaxa Cancer Hospital, Piraeaus (Greece) Miami School of Medicine and VA Hospital, FL (United States). Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center)

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 39 patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy during the last five years at our departments. There were 26 men and 13 women with median age 55 (24-75) years. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients and undifferentiated carcinoma in the remaining 33 patients. Induction chemotherapy consisted of either regimen A (cisplating 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m{sup 2} days 2-6 as continuous infusion, bleomycin 15 mg days 15 and 29 i.m., mitomycin 4 mg/m{sup 2} day 22 and hydroxyurea 1000 mg/m{sup 2} daily days 23-27) or regimen B (carboplatin 300 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-5 as continuous infusion and methotrexate 1.2 g/m{sup 2} day 14 with leucovorin rescue). After completion of induction chemotherapy 13 patients (33%) had complete remission (CR) and 19 (49%) partial remission (PR). The CR rate was increased after radiation therapy to 72%. Survival rates were 88% at 12 and 78% at 24 months. Median time to progression was 29.5 months. In conclusion, induction chemotherapy with a platinum-based regimen followed by radiation therapy achieved a high rate of local control. If the treatment also prolongs survival must, however, be studied by randomized trials. (orig.).

  6. Split-course radiation therapy of carcinoma of the base of the tongue: results of a prospective national collaborative clinical trial conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred forty-one patients with carcinoma of the base of tongue were randomized to receive either continuous course radiotherapy (6600 rad in 30/33 fractions over 7-8 weeks) or split course therapy (3000 rad in 10 fractions over 2 weeks, a three-week rest, 3000 rad in 10 fractions over 2 weeks). Both treatment groups tolerated the treatment well, but the continuous course group required more treatment modifications. The results of therapy, as judged by control of primary tumor, control of metastatic lymph nodes, time to failure and overall survival were comparable in the two treatment groups

  7. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  8. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT

  9. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. There's what we call external beam treatment, which is given from an x-ray ... the prostate. [beeping] Narrator: The more common form of radiation ...

  10. Radiation safety consideration during intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using in-house-designed phantoms, the authors evaluated radiation exposure rates in the vicinity of a newly acquired intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) system: Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System. The authors also investigated the perimeter radiation levels during three different clinical intraoperative treatments (breast, floor of the mouth and bilateral neck cancer patients). Radiation surveys during treatment delivery indicated that IORT using the surface applicator and IORT using balloons inserted into patient body give rise to exposure rates of 200 mR h-1, 30 cm from a treated area. To reduce the exposure levels, movable lead shields should be used as they reduce the exposure rates by >95 %. The authors' measurements suggest that intraoperative treatment using the 50-kVp X-ray source can be administered in any regular operating room without the need for radiation shielding modification as long as the operators utilise lead aprons and/or stand behind lead shields. (authors)

  11. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: evaluation of complications and influence of radiation timing on outcomes in a large, population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hegarty

    Full Text Available To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995-2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509 or with adjuvant (n = 894 or salvage (n = 734 radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.95 for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83 for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34 p = 0.148.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications.

  12. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  13. Vessel based delineation guidelines for the elective lymph node regions in breast cancer radiation therapy – PROCAB guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: A national project to improve the quality of breast radiation therapy was started, named PROCAB (PROject on CAncer of the Breast). One of the objectives was to reach a national consensus guideline for the delineation of the regional lymph node areas in breast radiation therapy. Methods: The realization of the new guidelines was a step by step process that started with multiple expert meetings where the existing guidelines were analyzed and the delineations of the lymph node regions were performed together with a surgeon, specialized in the anatomy of the drainage of the breast. Results: The delineation guidelines are vessel-based. Since the occurrence of pathological lymph nodes is typically around the veins, the cranial and caudal borders of all different nodal regions are based on a 5 mm margin around the veins, except for the parasternal lymph node area. Compared to the existing guidelines there are some major changes. Conclusion: With this project a national as well as a European (ESTRO) consensus guideline for the delineation of the regional lymph node areas in breast RT is reached. The new delineation atlas is vessel-based and no longer field-based

  14. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To utilize the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate trends in brachytherapy and alternative radiation therapy utilization in the treatment of cervical cancer, to identify associations with outcomes between the various radiation therapy modalities. Methods and Materials: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer in the National Cancer Data Base who received treatment from January 2004 to December 2011 were analyzed. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with type of boost radiation modality used and its impact on survival. Results: A total of 7654 patients had information regarding boost modality. A predominant proportion of patients were Caucasian (76.2%), had stage IIIB (48.9%) disease with squamous (82.0%) histology, were treated at academic/research centers (47.7%) in the South (34.8%), and lived 0 to 5 miles (27.9%) from the treating facility. A majority received brachytherapy (90.3%). From 2004 to 2011, brachytherapy use decreased from 96.7% to 86.1%, whereas intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use increased from 3.3% to 13.9% in the same period (P<.01). Factors associated with decreased brachytherapy utilization included older age, stage IVA disease, smaller tumor size, later year of diagnosis, lower-volume treatment centers, and facility type. After controlling for significant factors from survival analyses, IMRT or SBRT boost resulted in inferior overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.55; P<.01) as compared with brachytherapy. In fact, the survival detriment associated with IMRT or SBRT boost was stronger than that associated with excluding chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 1.61′ 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.04′ P<.01). Conclusions: Consolidation brachytherapy is a critical treatment component for

  15. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Jeff F. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Krivak, Thomas C. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Laskey, Robin A.; Ross, Malcolm S.; Lesnock, Jamie L. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To utilize the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate trends in brachytherapy and alternative radiation therapy utilization in the treatment of cervical cancer, to identify associations with outcomes between the various radiation therapy modalities. Methods and Materials: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer in the National Cancer Data Base who received treatment from January 2004 to December 2011 were analyzed. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with type of boost radiation modality used and its impact on survival. Results: A total of 7654 patients had information regarding boost modality. A predominant proportion of patients were Caucasian (76.2%), had stage IIIB (48.9%) disease with squamous (82.0%) histology, were treated at academic/research centers (47.7%) in the South (34.8%), and lived 0 to 5 miles (27.9%) from the treating facility. A majority received brachytherapy (90.3%). From 2004 to 2011, brachytherapy use decreased from 96.7% to 86.1%, whereas intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use increased from 3.3% to 13.9% in the same period (P<.01). Factors associated with decreased brachytherapy utilization included older age, stage IVA disease, smaller tumor size, later year of diagnosis, lower-volume treatment centers, and facility type. After controlling for significant factors from survival analyses, IMRT or SBRT boost resulted in inferior overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.55; P<.01) as compared with brachytherapy. In fact, the survival detriment associated with IMRT or SBRT boost was stronger than that associated with excluding chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 1.61′ 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.04′ P<.01). Conclusions: Consolidation brachytherapy is a critical treatment component for

  16. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cancer is not completely contained in the prostate or when the patient is older the treatment ... D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different ...

  17. Rectal injuries following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal injuries following radiation therapy were reviewed. Primary diseases in which radiation injuries appeared were described, and local injuries in the neibouring organs such as the small intestine, the bladder, the uterus, and the vagina were also referred to. Classification, frequency, fistulation, radiation necrosis, x-ray findings and occurrence time of rectal and sigmoid colonic injuries were reported. As occurrence factors of radiation injuries, total dose, measurement of dose, stage of primary disease, and history of laparatomy were mentioned. Countermeasures for reducing rectal injuries and treatment methods of local injuries were also described. (Serizawa, K.)

  18. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients

  19. Radiation therapy at the end of life: a population-based study examining palliative treatment intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine factors associated with the use of radiation therapy (RT) at the end of life in patients with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) – Medicare database, patients were over age 65 and diagnosed between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2011 with any stage of cancer when the cause of death, as defined by SEER, was cancer; or with stage 4 cancer, who died of any cause. We employed multiple logistic regression models to identify patient and health systems factors associated with palliative radiation use. 50% of patients received RT in the last 6 months of life. RT was used less frequently in older patients and in non-Hispanic white patients. Similar patterns were observed in the last 14 days of life. Chemotherapy use in the last 6 months of life was strongly correlated with receiving RT in the last 6 months (OR 2.72, 95% CI: 2.59-2.88) and last 14 days of life (OR 1.55, 95% CI: 1.40-1.66). Patients receiving RT accrued more emergency department visits, radiographic exams and physician visits (all comparisons p < 0.0001). Among patients with breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer, palliative RT use was common. End-of-life RT correlated with end-of-life chemotherapy use, including in the last 14 days of life, when treatment may cause increased treatment burden without improved quality of life. Research is needed optimize the role and timing of RT in palliative care. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0305-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. An athymic rat model of cutaneous radiation injury designed to study human tissue-based wound therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe a pilot study for a novel preclinical model used to test human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. A protocol was designed to irradiate the skin of athymic rats while sparing the body and internal organs by utilizing a non-occlusive skin clamp along with an x-ray image guided stereotactic irradiator. Each rat was irradiated both on the right and the left flank with a circular field at a 20 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). Single fractions of 30.4 Gy, 41.5 Gy, 52.6 Gy, 65.5 Gy, and 76.5 Gy were applied in a dose-finding trial. Eight additional wounds were created using the 41.5 Gy dose level. Each wound was photographed and the percentage of the irradiated area ulcerated at given time points was analyzed using ImageJ software. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred in any animals, and all irradiated skin areas in the multi-dose trial underwent ulceration. Greater than 60% of skin within each irradiated zone underwent ulceration within ten days, with peak ulceration ranging from 62.1% to 79.8%. Peak ulceration showed a weak correlation with radiation dose (r = 0.664). Mean ulceration rate over the study period is more closely correlated to dose (r = 0.753). With the highest dose excluded due to contraction-related distortions, correlation between dose and average ulceration showed a stronger relationship (r = 0.895). Eight additional wounds created using 41.5 Gy all reached peak ulceration above 50%, with all healing significantly but incompletely by the 65-day endpoint. We developed a functional preclinical model which is currently used to evaluate human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Similar models may be widely applicable and useful the development of novel therapies which may improve radiotherapy management over a broad clinical spectrum

  1. Novel composition of polymer gel dosimeters based on N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new composition of polymer gel dosimeters is developed based on radiation induced polymerization of N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide (NHMA) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The dosimeters were irradiated by 10 MV photon beam of a medical linear accelerator at a constant dose rate of 600 cGy/min with doses up to 20 Gy. The polymerization occurs and increases with increasing absorbed dose. The dose response of polymer gel dosimeters was studied using nuclear magnetic imaging (NMR) for relaxation rate (R2) of water proton. Dose rate, energy of radiation and the stability of the polymerization after irradiation were investigated. No appreciable effects of these parameters on the performance of the novel gel dosimeters were observed. - Highlights: • This manuscript relates to polymer gel dosimeter for used in radiotherapy. • Polymer gel containing N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide has been introduced. • Polymerization of NHMA gel increases gradually with increasing absorbed dose. • Response of NHMA gel was slightly affected by dose rate and energy of radiation

  2. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Narrator: When the cancer is not completely contained in the prostate or when the patient is older the treatment that is frequently used ... There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. ...

  3. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... the affected area). Damage to the bowels, causing diarrhea and ... a second cancer caused by radiation exposure. Second cancers that develop ...

  4. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  5. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns. PMID:12071811

  7. Knowledge-based optimization in external radiation therapy: association of an expert-system and a numerical optimization technique in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge-based optimization in external radiation therapy: association of an expert-system and a numerical optimization technique in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinomas. Optimization of radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma is particularly complex due to both the proximity of at risk organs and the high dose that has to be delivered. To obtain an optimal dose distribution, a knowledge-based optimization technique has been designed that associates an expert-system, named CAVCAV, with numeric optimization (gradient projection method). Based on clinical and physical criteria, CAVCAV determines the geometric characteristics of the radiation fields (beam direction, location and shape of the shielding blocks) for the three stages of radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinomas. Stage 2-treatment fields proposed by CAVCAV, though not perfectly adapted to the patient, are mathematically (beam weights, beam directions, isocenter position) and geometrically (adaptation of fields and shape of blocks by virtual simulation) optimized. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  9. Khan's the physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2014-01-01

    Expand your understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies with Khan's The Physics of Radiation Therapy, 5th edition, the book that set the standard in the field. This classic full-color text helps the entire radiation therapy team-radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists-develop a thorough understanding of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), high dose-rate remote afterloaders (HDR), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), image-guided radiation therapy (

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided versus Surrogate-Based Motion Tracking in Liver Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.paganelli@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Seregni, Matteo; Fattori, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Summers, Paul [Division of Radiology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: This study applied automatic feature detection on cine–magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) liver images in order to provide a prospective comparison between MRI-guided and surrogate-based tracking methods for motion-compensated liver radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In a population of 30 subjects (5 volunteers plus 25 patients), 2 oblique sagittal slices were acquired across the liver at high temporal resolution. An algorithm based on scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was used to extract and track multiple features throughout the image sequence. The position of abdominal markers was also measured directly from the image series, and the internal motion of each feature was quantified through multiparametric analysis. Surrogate-based tumor tracking with a state-of-the-art external/internal correlation model was simulated. The geometrical tracking error was measured, and its correlation with external motion parameters was also investigated. Finally, the potential gain in tracking accuracy relying on MRI guidance was quantified as a function of the maximum allowed tracking error. Results: An average of 45 features was extracted for each subject across the whole liver. The multi-parametric motion analysis reported relevant inter- and intrasubject variability, highlighting the value of patient-specific and spatially-distributed measurements. Surrogate-based tracking errors (relative to the motion amplitude) were were in the range 7% to 23% (1.02-3.57mm) and were significantly influenced by external motion parameters. The gain of MRI guidance compared to surrogate-based motion tracking was larger than 30% in 50% of the subjects when considering a 1.5-mm tracking error tolerance. Conclusions: Automatic feature detection applied to cine-MRI allows detailed liver motion description to be obtained. Such information was used to quantify the performance of surrogate-based tracking methods and to provide a prospective comparison with respect to MRI

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided versus Surrogate-Based Motion Tracking in Liver Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study applied automatic feature detection on cine–magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) liver images in order to provide a prospective comparison between MRI-guided and surrogate-based tracking methods for motion-compensated liver radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In a population of 30 subjects (5 volunteers plus 25 patients), 2 oblique sagittal slices were acquired across the liver at high temporal resolution. An algorithm based on scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was used to extract and track multiple features throughout the image sequence. The position of abdominal markers was also measured directly from the image series, and the internal motion of each feature was quantified through multiparametric analysis. Surrogate-based tumor tracking with a state-of-the-art external/internal correlation model was simulated. The geometrical tracking error was measured, and its correlation with external motion parameters was also investigated. Finally, the potential gain in tracking accuracy relying on MRI guidance was quantified as a function of the maximum allowed tracking error. Results: An average of 45 features was extracted for each subject across the whole liver. The multi-parametric motion analysis reported relevant inter- and intrasubject variability, highlighting the value of patient-specific and spatially-distributed measurements. Surrogate-based tracking errors (relative to the motion amplitude) were were in the range 7% to 23% (1.02-3.57mm) and were significantly influenced by external motion parameters. The gain of MRI guidance compared to surrogate-based motion tracking was larger than 30% in 50% of the subjects when considering a 1.5-mm tracking error tolerance. Conclusions: Automatic feature detection applied to cine-MRI allows detailed liver motion description to be obtained. Such information was used to quantify the performance of surrogate-based tracking methods and to provide a prospective comparison with respect to MRI

  12. Proton radiation therapy for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E B; Slater, J D

    2000-10-01

    Most patients with conventional radiotherapy after surgery die with local disease progression. The superior local tumor control and overall survival achieved with fractionated proton RT can be attributed to improved dose localization characteristics of protons, resulting in higher doses delivered. Patients with base of skull neoplasms are increasingly considered for stereotactic radiosurgery. Recently, Muthukumar et al reported for the University of Pittsburgh group on cobalt-60 Gamma Knife (Elekta Instruments, Atlanta, GA) therapy for 15 patients with chordomas or chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. With tumor volumes ranging between 0.98 and 10.3 mL (mean, 4.6 mL), doses to the tumor margin varying from 12 to 20 Gy (median, 18 Gy) were delivered. Two patients were treated without histologic tumor confirmation. After a median follow-up time of 40 months, 2 patients had died of disease, 2 patients had succumbed to intercurrent disease, and 1 patient surviving at the time of analysis had developed tumor progression. Neither actuarial local control nor actuarial survival data were presented. In the LLUMC series, most tumors exceeded sizes reportedly suitable for radiosurgery or were of a highly irregular configuration. Nevertheless, in 11 patients, tumors less than 15 mL in size remained locally controlled as did tumors sized between 15 and 25 mL in 11 additional patients; these patients were thus potential candidates for stereotactic radiosurgery. At present, too few reports on radiosurgery contain sufficient patient numbers and statistical analyses to permit one to draw conclusions about the feasibility of radiosurgery for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. A principal difference between proton RT and radiosurgery as currently practiced in most centers concerns target definition. In proton RT, the GTV is treated. In addition, a clinical volume is defined, which is distinctly different from the GTV in size and shape, to include the

  13. A DICOM-RT Based ePR radiation therapy information system for decision-support of brain tumor patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B. J.; Law, M.; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, L.

    2006-03-01

    base for future data mining applications. As an initial first step, we will develop a methodology to perform medical imaging informatics research on a clinical scenario where brain tumor patients undergo treatment planning for either radiosurgery or radiation therapy. Specifically, we will research the "inverse treatment planning" process that is used for those types of treatments and integrate decision-support knowledge and tools designed to assist in the decision-making process, thus introducing an improved "knowledge-enhanced treatment planning" approach.

  14. Impact of radiation therapy on sexual life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on sexual life. The analysis was based on a Pubmed literature review. The keywords used for this research were 'sexual, radiation, oncology, and cancer'. After a brief reminder on the anatomy and physiology, we explained the main complications of radiation oncology and their impact on sexual life. Preventive measures and therapeutic possibilities were discussed. Radiation therapy entails local, systematic and psychological after-effects. For women, vaginal stenosis and dyspareunia represent the most frequent side effects. For men, radiation therapy leads to erectile disorders for 25 to 75% of the patients. These complications have an echo often mattering on the patient quality of life of and on their sexual life post-treatment reconstruction. The knowledge of the indications and the various techniques of irradiation allow reducing its potential sexual morbidity. The information and the education of patients are essential, although often neglected. In conclusion, radiation therapy impacts in variable degrees on the sexual life of the patients. Currently, there are not enough preventive and therapeutic means. Patient information and the early screening of the sexual complications are at stake in the support of patients in the reconstruction of their sexual life. (authors)

  15. Radiation therapy for endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although pelvic irradiation has traditionally been employed as an adjunct to surgery, the role of radiation therapy as a definitive therapeutic modality continues to be controversial. One-hundred and twenty-one patients were treated for endometrial carcinoma between 1978 and 1985 at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. These patients were divided into three groups with respect to their treatment. Group 1 consisted of 16 patients who had preoperative radiation therapy, group 2 consisted of 77 patients who had postoperative radiation therapy, and group 3 consisted of 28 patients who had radiation therapy alone. Ninety-three percent of the patients in groups 1 and 2 and 68% of patients in group 3 had stages I and II disease. In group 3, 32% of the patients had stages III and IV disease. Two-thirds of the patients in groups 1 and 2 had moderately differentiated tumor. One-third of patients in group 3 had poorly differentiated tumor. Sixty percent of the study's population in group 2 had deep myometrial invasion. The treatment doses utilized and local failures will be presented. All of the patients have been followed for a minimum period of 2 years. The observed actuarial 5-year survival was 85%, 80%, and 53%, respectively, for groups 1, 2, and 3. The overall survival of the entire patient population was 77%. There was 1 fatality secondary to small bowel complication in group 2 and another serious complication of rectovaginal fistula in group 1 requiring colostomy. Other side effects were skin reaction, diarrhea, and cystitis, which were treated symptomatically. Analysis of the authors' institution experience with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium and its management with radiation therapy is presented. Survival is correlated with stage, grade, and depth of myometrial invasion

  16. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, advances in ionizing radiation therapy are competitive to non-ionizing ones, as for example the laser light based therapy, resulting in a synergism that has revolutionized medicine. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive (e.g. through flexible endoscopes) therapeutic procedures in the management of patients represents a very interesting treatment option. Moreover, as the major breakthrough in cancer management is the individualized patient treatment, new biophotonic techniques, e.g. photo-activated drug carriers, help...

  17. Radiation therapy for retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment results were examined about 39 retinoblastoma introduced to the radiotherapy purpose, at National Center for Child Health and Development, during the 37 years from 1975 to 2012. In 29 patients of bilateral, 24 patients were postoperative radiotherapy, 4 patients were for preservation purpose. In 10 unilateral patients, 5 patients were postoperative, 4 patients were for preservation purpose. Delayed adverse events, 11 patients with cataracts requiring surgery, pituitary dysfunction 2 patients who take a hormone replacement, 1 glaucoma, were showed. The recurrence was 6 patients, and inner 1 patient was a trilateral retinoblastoma, and turned into the only death case. The onset of secondary cancer was observed in 4 patients, 1 was Merkel cell carcinoma and 3 patients were rhabdomyosarcoma. All had occurred out of the radiation field. (author)

  18. Anaemia and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaemia is frequent in cancer and may increase tumour hypoxia that stimulates angiogenesis. However, erythropoietin is a hypoxia-inducible stimulator of erythropoiesis which seems to improve quality of life in cancer patients. Two recent phase III randomized studies showed negative results using erythropoietin in head and neck cancer patients and in metastatic breast cancer patients with impaired specific survival. In vitro and in vivo experiments have provided erythropoietin-receptor expression in endothelial cancer cells including malignant tumours of the breast, prostate, cervix, lung, head and neck, ovary, melanoma, stomach, gut, kidney etc. Biologic effect of erythropoietin and its receptor linkage induces proliferation of human breast cancer and angiogenesis and may limit anti-tumour effect of cancer treatment, in part, by tumour vascularization improvement. In addition, the use of exogenous erythropoietin could be able to favour tumour progression by improving tumour oxygenation and nutriment supply. If erythropoietin receptor were functional in human cancer. the assessment of erythropoietin receptor expression on tumour cell may help to select patients benefiting from exogenous erythropoietin. However. the relationship between erythropoietin receptor expression, tumour growth and exogenous erythropoietin. requires more studies. The results of recent clinical trials suggest that using erythropoietin should be avoided in non-anemic patients and discussed in patients receiving curative therapy. (authors)

  19. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  20. Uncertainties in CT-Based Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Associated with Patient Breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties associated with treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) data obtained with the patient breathing freely. Methods and Materials: Patients with thoracic or abdominal tumors underwent a standard treatment-planning CT study while breathing quietly and freely, followed by CT scans while holding their breath at normal inhalation and normal exhalation. Identical treatment plans on all three CT data sets for each patient pointed out differences in: (a) radiation path lengths; (b) positions of the organs; (c) physical volumes of the lung, liver, and kidneys; (d) the interpretation of plan evaluation tools such as dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models; and (e) how well the planning CT data set represented the average of the inhalation and exhalation studies. Results: Inhalation and exhalation data differ in terms of radiation path length (nearly one quarter of the cases had path-length differences > 1 cm), although the free breathing and average path lengths do not exhibit large differences (0-9 mm). Liver and kidney movements averaged 2 cm, whereas differences between the free breathing and average positions averaged 0.6 cm. The physical volume of the liver between the free breathing and static studies varied by as much as 12%. The NTCP calculations on exhale and inhale studies varied from 3 to 43% for doses that resulted in a 15% NTCP on the free-breathing studies. Conclusion: Free-breathing CT studies may improperly estimate the position and volume of critical structures, and thus may mislead evaluation of plans based on such volume dependent criteria such as dose-volume histograms and NTCP calculations

  1. Analytical investigation of the possibility of parameter invariant TCP-based radiation therapy plan ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavreva, Nadejda; Markov, Krassimir; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Stavrev, Pavel (Medical Physics Dept., Inst. Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola, FC (Italy)); Nahum, Alan E. (Physics Dept., Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington CH63 4JY (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    Purpose. To analytically investigate the possibility of a parameter invariant ranking of radiotherapy (RT) plans based on comparing the tumor control probabilities (TCPs) produced by the competing plans for different values of the radiobiological model parameters determining the radiation response. Method. Individual TCP models based on the Single hit model of cell kill and on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell damage, with and without repopulation, are considered. The tumor dose distributions in case of heterogeneous dose irradiation are described by a Gaussian distribution function on the basis of which a TCP expression is derived depending only on the mean dose to the tumor and its standard deviation and the TCP model parameters. Results. It is shown that in case of homogeneous dose to the tumor the plan ranking in terms of TCP is parameter invariant. In case of heterogeneous dose to the tumor there are cases when the plan ranking is parameter invariant and cases when the parameter invariance is violated. An interesting dependence of the extent of the parameter invariance violation on the model of cell kill as well as on the size and repopulation rate of the tumor is noted. Conclusion. We conclude that in many cases RT plan ranking in terms of TCP is parameter invariant. However, since there exist cases where the parameter invariance is lost an investigation of the specific plans to be ranked should be performed applying the proposed approach

  2. Analytical investigation of the possibility of parameter invariant TCP-based radiation therapy plan ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To analytically investigate the possibility of a parameter invariant ranking of radiotherapy (RT) plans based on comparing the tumor control probabilities (TCPs) produced by the competing plans for different values of the radiobiological model parameters determining the radiation response. Method. Individual TCP models based on the Single hit model of cell kill and on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell damage, with and without repopulation, are considered. The tumor dose distributions in case of heterogeneous dose irradiation are described by a Gaussian distribution function on the basis of which a TCP expression is derived depending only on the mean dose to the tumor and its standard deviation and the TCP model parameters. Results. It is shown that in case of homogeneous dose to the tumor the plan ranking in terms of TCP is parameter invariant. In case of heterogeneous dose to the tumor there are cases when the plan ranking is parameter invariant and cases when the parameter invariance is violated. An interesting dependence of the extent of the parameter invariance violation on the model of cell kill as well as on the size and repopulation rate of the tumor is noted. Conclusion. We conclude that in many cases RT plan ranking in terms of TCP is parameter invariant. However, since there exist cases where the parameter invariance is lost an investigation of the specific plans to be ranked should be performed applying the proposed approach

  3. Radiation therapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has been used extensively in the management of patients with cancer of the esophagus. It has demonstrated an ability to cure a small minority of patients. Cure is likely to be limited to patients who have lesions less than 5 cm in length and have minimal, if any, involvement of lymph nodes. Esophagectomy is likely to cure a similar, small percentage of patients with the same presentation of minimal disease but has a substantial acute postoperative mortality rate and greater morbidity than irradiation. Combining surgery and either preoperative or postoperative irradiation may cure a small percentage of patients beyond the number cured with either modality alone. Radiation has demonstrated benefit as an adjuvant to surgery following the resection of minimal disease. However, radiation alone has never been compared directly with surgery for the highly select, minimal lesions managed by surgery. Radiation provides good palliation of dysphagia in the majority of patients, and roughly one third may have adequate swallowing for the duration of their illness when ''radical'' doses have been employed. Surgical bypass procedures have greater acute morbidity but appear to provide more reliable, prolonged palliation of dysphagia. Several approaches to improving the efficacy of irradiation are currently under investigation. These approahces include fractionation schedules, radiosensitizers, neutron-beam therapy, and helium-ion therapy

  4. Why do patients drop out during radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to see how much proportion of the patients receiving radiation therapy drop out during radiation therapy and to analyze the reason for the incomplete treatment. The base population of this study was 1,100 patients with registration numbers 901 through 2,000 at Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Authors investigated the incidence of incomplete radiation therapy, which was defined as less than 95% of initially planned radiation dose, and the reasons for incomplete radiation therapy. One hundred and twenty eight patients (12%) did not complete the planned radiation therapy. The performance status of the incompletely treated patients was generally poorer than that of the base population, and the aim of radiation therapy was more commonly palliative. The most common reason for not completing the planned treatment was the patients' refusal of further radiation therapy because of the distrust of radiation therapy and/or the poor economic status. Careful case selection for radiation therapy with consideration of the socioeconomic status of the patients in addition to the clinical indication would be necessary for the reduction of incomplete treatment, especially in the palliative setting

  5. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain

  6. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, AA (United States); Cao, M; Han, F; Santhanam, A; Neylon, J; Gomez, C; Kaprealian, T; Sheng, K; Agazaryan, N; Low, D; Hu, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.

  7. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.)

  8. An athymic rat model of cutaneous radiation injury designed to study human tissue-based wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifkin Lucas H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To describe a pilot study for a novel preclinical model used to test human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Methods A protocol was designed to irradiate the skin of athymic rats while sparing the body and internal organs by utilizing a non-occlusive skin clamp along with an x-ray image guided stereotactic irradiator. Each rat was irradiated both on the right and the left flank with a circular field at a 20 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD. Single fractions of 30.4 Gy, 41.5 Gy, 52.6 Gy, 65.5 Gy, and 76.5 Gy were applied in a dose-finding trial. Eight additional wounds were created using the 41.5 Gy dose level. Each wound was photographed and the percentage of the irradiated area ulcerated at given time points was analyzed using ImageJ software. Results No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred in any animals, and all irradiated skin areas in the multi-dose trial underwent ulceration. Greater than 60% of skin within each irradiated zone underwent ulceration within ten days, with peak ulceration ranging from 62.1% to 79.8%. Peak ulceration showed a weak correlation with radiation dose (r = 0.664. Mean ulceration rate over the study period is more closely correlated to dose (r = 0.753. With the highest dose excluded due to contraction-related distortions, correlation between dose and average ulceration showed a stronger relationship (r = 0.895. Eight additional wounds created using 41.5 Gy all reached peak ulceration above 50%, with all healing significantly but incompletely by the 65-day endpoint. Conclusions We developed a functional preclinical model which is currently used to evaluate human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Similar models may be widely applicable and useful the development of novel therapies which may improve radiotherapy management over a broad clinical spectrum.

  9. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 106 particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 105 particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation time

  10. Oray surgery and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1975-07-01

    Clinical evidence seems to indicate that careful oral surgery after radiation therapy contributes little, if anything at all, to the onset of osteoradionecrosis. In many cases the process of bone dissolution has already well progressed before teeth have to be extracted. The bone changes can be demonstrated radiographically and clinically. The teeth in the immediate area become very mobile and cause severe pain during mastication. Whether this condition could have been prevented by extractions before radiation therapy is difficult to establish. Osteoradionecrosis may be encountered in edentulous jaws. It manifests itself clinically by bone segments which break loose and penetrate through the mucosa leaving a defect which does not heal over. More research and more comparative studies are needed in this area in order to make reasonably accurate predictions.

  11. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  12. Clinical evaluations of an amplitude-based binning algorithm for 4DCT reconstruction in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Low, Daniel; Bradley, Jeffrey; Robinson, Clifford; Mutic, Sasa; Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Phase-binning algorithms are commonly utilized in 4DCT image reconstruction for characterization of tumor or organ shape and respiration motion, but breathing irregularities occurring during 4DCT acquisition can cause considerable image distortions. Recently, amplitude-binning algorithms have been evaluated as a potential improvement to phase-binning algorithms for 4DCT image reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the first commercially available on-line retrospective amplitude-binning algorithm for comparison to the traditional phase-binning algorithm. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for evaluation. A phantom of known geometry was mounted on a 4D motion platform programmed with seven respiratory waves (two computer generated and five patient trajectories) and scanned with a Philips Brilliance Big bore 16-slice CT simulator. 4DCT images were reconstructed using commercial amplitude- and phase-binning algorithms. Image quality of the amplitude- and phase-binned image sets was compared by evaluation of shape and volume distortions in reconstructed images. Clinical evaluations were performed on 64 4DCT patient image sets in a blinded review process. The amplitude- and phase-binned 4DCT maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were further evaluated for 28 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases of total 64 cases. A preliminary investigation of the effects of respiratory amplitude and pattern irregularities on motion artifact severity was conducted. Results: The phantom experiments illustrated that, as expected, maximum inhalation occurred at the 0% amplitude and maximum exhalation occurred at the 50% amplitude of the amplitude-binned 4DCT image sets. The phantom shape distortions were more severe in the images reconstructed from the phase-binning algorithm. In the clinical study, compared to the phase-binning algorithm, the amplitude-binning algorithm yielded fewer or less severe motion

  13. Clinical evaluations of an amplitude-based binning algorithm for 4DCT reconstruction in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Phase-binning algorithms are commonly utilized in 4DCT image reconstruction for characterization of tumor or organ shape and respiration motion, but breathing irregularities occurring during 4DCT acquisition can cause considerable image distortions. Recently, amplitude-binning algorithms have been evaluated as a potential improvement to phase-binning algorithms for 4DCT image reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the first commercially available on-line retrospective amplitude-binning algorithm for comparison to the traditional phase-binning algorithm. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for evaluation. A phantom of known geometry was mounted on a 4D motion platform programmed with seven respiratory waves (two computer generated and five patient trajectories) and scanned with a Philips Brilliance Big bore 16-slice CT simulator. 4DCT images were reconstructed using commercial amplitude- and phase-binning algorithms. Image quality of the amplitude- and phase-binned image sets was compared by evaluation of shape and volume distortions in reconstructed images. Clinical evaluations were performed on 64 4DCT patient image sets in a blinded review process. The amplitude- and phase-binned 4DCT maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were further evaluated for 28 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases of total 64 cases. A preliminary investigation of the effects of respiratory amplitude and pattern irregularities on motion artifact severity was conducted. Results: The phantom experiments illustrated that, as expected, maximum inhalation occurred at the 0% amplitude and maximum exhalation occurred at the 50% amplitude of the amplitude-binned 4DCT image sets. The phantom shape distortions were more severe in the images reconstructed from the phase-binning algorithm. In the clinical study, compared to the phase-binning algorithm, the amplitude-binning algorithm yielded fewer or less severe motion

  14. Radiation therapy for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is clear evidence that both pleural and peritoneal malignant mesothelioma are increasing in incidence in the United States. There is a recognized long period of latency from asbestos exposure to the emergence and diagnosis of tumor. Considering the levels of asbestos utilization in the mid-20th century, we must expect that the number of cases will continue to increase until the end of this century. Evaluation of treatment options is thus a critical issue in determining treatment approaches for this disease. Recognized only recently, mesothelioma has no effective treatment, and patients are reported only anecdotally as cured. Pleural mesothelioma is the more common presentation, but even here the reports are from small, uncontrolled series. Only one study is available in which a concomitant comparison of treatment methods was carried out. Randomized clinical studies regarding treatment of pleural mesothelioma have only recently been initiated by the clinical cooperative groups. There is thus a paucity of information on treatment in general and radiation therapy specifically for malignant mesothelioma. This chapter reviews the reported experience using radiation therapy alone and combined with other modalities for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma and considers the potential for improvement of the results of current methods of radiation therapy

  15. Primary management of esophageal carcinoma with radiation therapy and surgery and correlation of failure pattern based on autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study of forty-seven patients with esophageal carcinoma who were treated definitively with radiation therapy (n = 18) and radical surgery (n = 18) or received palliative treatment (n = 11) at the Medical College of Virginia between 1967 and 1982. The average intervals between diagnosis and death were 5, 7, and 4 months, respectively. Autopsy revealed that 80% with radiation therapy and 50% in the surgery group had persistent local-regional disease. Eleven of 36 had adrenal metastasis and eight of 36 had a second primary in the head, neck, lung or prostate. The data show a significant incidence of persistent disease in spite of negative surgical margins. Additional treatment with chemotherapy or postoperative radiation therapy should be considered

  16. Are We Ready for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-based Target Volume Definition in Lymphoma Radiation Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has become indispensable for the clinical management of lymphomas. With consistent evidence that it is more accurate than anatomic imaging in the staging and response assessment of many lymphoma subtypes, its utility continues to increase. There have therefore been efforts to incorporate PET/CT data into radiation therapy decision making and in the planning process. Further, there have also been studies investigating target volume definition for radiation therapy using PET/CT data. This article will critically review the literature and ongoing studies on the above topics, examining the value and methods of adding PET/CT data to the radiation therapy treatment algorithm. We will also discuss the various challenges and the areas where more evidence is required.

  17. Development of local radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed

  18. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  19. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  20. Practical risk management in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology advances in radiation therapy is very remarkable. In the technological progress of radiation therapy, development of computer control technology has helped. However, there is no significant progress in the ability of human beings who is operating. In many hospitals, by the incorrect parameter setting and wrong operations at radiation treatment planning system, many incidents have been reported recently. In order to safely use invisible radiation beam for treatment, what we should be careful? In state-of-the-art radiation therapy and many technological progress, risk management should be correspond continue. I report practical risk management in radiation therapy about the technical skills, non-technical skills and the quality control. (author)

  1. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F. (Rostovskij-na-Donu Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Onkologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature and clinical data of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%).

  2. SU-D-BRD-06: Automated Population-Based Planning for Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment planning for whole brain radiation treatment is technically a simple process but in practice it takes valuable clinical time of repetitive and tedious tasks. This report presents a method that automatically segments the relevant target and normal tissues and creates a treatment plan in only a few minutes after patient simulation. Methods: Segmentation is performed automatically through morphological operations on the soft tissue. The treatment plan is generated by searching a database of previous cases for patients with similar anatomy. In this search, each database case is ranked in terms of similarity using a customized metric designed for sensitivity by including only geometrical changes that affect the dose distribution. The database case with the best match is automatically modified to replace relevant patient info and isocenter position while maintaining original beam and MLC settings. Results: Fifteen patients were used to validate the method. In each of these cases the anatomy was accurately segmented to mean Dice coefficients of 0.970 ± 0.008 for the brain, 0.846 ± 0.009 for the eyes and 0.672 ± 0.111 for the lens as compared to clinical segmentations. Each case was then subsequently matched against a database of 70 validated treatment plans and the best matching plan (termed auto-planned), was compared retrospectively with the clinical plans in terms of brain coverage and maximum doses to critical structures. Maximum doses were reduced by a maximum of 20.809 Gy for the left eye (mean 3.533), by 13.352 (1.311) for the right eye, and by 27.471 (4.856), 25.218 (6.315) for the left and right lens. Time from simulation to auto-plan was 3-4 minutes. Conclusion: Automated database- based matching is an alternative to classical treatment planning that improves quality while providing a cost—effective solution to planning through modifying previous validated plans to match a current patient's anatomy

  3. SU-D-BRD-06: Automated Population-Based Planning for Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Crocker, I; Shu, H [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for whole brain radiation treatment is technically a simple process but in practice it takes valuable clinical time of repetitive and tedious tasks. This report presents a method that automatically segments the relevant target and normal tissues and creates a treatment plan in only a few minutes after patient simulation. Methods: Segmentation is performed automatically through morphological operations on the soft tissue. The treatment plan is generated by searching a database of previous cases for patients with similar anatomy. In this search, each database case is ranked in terms of similarity using a customized metric designed for sensitivity by including only geometrical changes that affect the dose distribution. The database case with the best match is automatically modified to replace relevant patient info and isocenter position while maintaining original beam and MLC settings. Results: Fifteen patients were used to validate the method. In each of these cases the anatomy was accurately segmented to mean Dice coefficients of 0.970 ± 0.008 for the brain, 0.846 ± 0.009 for the eyes and 0.672 ± 0.111 for the lens as compared to clinical segmentations. Each case was then subsequently matched against a database of 70 validated treatment plans and the best matching plan (termed auto-planned), was compared retrospectively with the clinical plans in terms of brain coverage and maximum doses to critical structures. Maximum doses were reduced by a maximum of 20.809 Gy for the left eye (mean 3.533), by 13.352 (1.311) for the right eye, and by 27.471 (4.856), 25.218 (6.315) for the left and right lens. Time from simulation to auto-plan was 3-4 minutes. Conclusion: Automated database- based matching is an alternative to classical treatment planning that improves quality while providing a cost—effective solution to planning through modifying previous validated plans to match a current patient's anatomy.

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT

  5. Transitioning from 2-D Radiation Therapy to 3-D Conformal Radiation Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Training Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology of radiation oncology has advanced very rapidly in recent years. However, the sophistication of technology available in individual radiation therapy centres varies dramatically throughout the world. Treatment capabilities with planar imaging and limited cross-sectional imaging support have been labelled as two dimensional radiation therapy (2-D RT). With increased use of more advanced cross-sectional imaging, the introduction of more complex dose calculation capabilities for treatment planning and more sophisticated treatment delivery procedures, three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) can be provided. Further sophistication in treatment planning and treatment delivery capabilities enables intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Recognizing that huge disparities exist across the world, and in an attempt to aid in advancing institutional capabilities, the IAEA published ‘Transition from 2-D Radiotherapy to 3-D Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy’ (IAEA-TECDOC-1588) in May 2008. Divided into two parts — on CRT and on IMRT — the publication provides guidelines on the transition from 2-D RT through 3-D CRT to IMRT. It is recognized that 3-D CRT is the standard of care in most radiation treatment processes and that IMRT technologies are still evolving. The publication provides clear guidelines and highlights the milestones to be achieved when transitioning from 2-D RT to 3-D CRT and IMRT. While IAEA-TECDOC-1588 provides comprehensive guidelines and milestones, the present publication provides training materials to aid professionals in the continuing education required for the implementation of more advanced treatment capabilities, especially 3-D CRT. These materials are based on the results of two consultants meetings organized by the IAEA in 2009 and 2010, primarily focused on providing guidance on what training materials were available or needed to be developed, with a special emphasis on transitioning from 2-D

  6. Convex reformulation of biologically-based multi-criteria intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization including fractionation effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.L.; Hertog, D. den; Siem, A.Y.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Huizenga, H.

    2008-01-01

    Finding fluence maps for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be formulated as a multi-criteria optimization problem for which Pareto optimal treatment plans exist. To account for the dose-per-fraction effect of fractionated IMRT, it is desirable to exploit radiobiological treatment plan

  7. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with chordoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study HIT-1-Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordomas of the skull base are relative rare lesions of the bones. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard, though complete resection is nearly impossible due to close proximity to critical and hence also dose limiting organs for radiation therapy. Level of recurrence after surgery alone is comparatively high, so adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chordomas. However, high-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumors. This clinical study is a prospective randomised phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie centre (HIT) and is a monocentric study. Patients with skull base chordoma will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV in carbon ion treatment (accelerated dose) will be 63 Gy E ± 5% and 72 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. Local-progression free survival (LPFS) will be analysed as primary end point. Toxicity and overall survival are the secondary end points. Additional examined parameters are patterns of recurrence, prognostic factors and plan quality analysis. Up until now it was impossible to compare two different particle therapies, i.e. protons and carbon ions directly at the same facility. The aim of this study is to find out, whether the biological advantages of carbon ion therapy can also be clinically confirmed and translated into the better local control rates in the treatment of skull base chordomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01182779

  8. Radiation therapy in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderly patients, or those individuals over 65 or 70 depending on the different authors, represent the majority of cancer patients who treated with radiation therapy (RT), however there are very few publications that we provide information needed to evaluate the use of RT in the treatment elders regarding: indication of dose, tissue tolerance, toxicity and association with other therapeutic modalities. In the treatment process must take into account RT radiobiology Clinical applied to each patient and is more relevant in the elderly in which often are comorbid conditions and functional limitations normal tissues increases with age and disease coexisting vascular and connective influencing RT treatment. Chronological age does not correlate with the biological age for tolerance normal tissue, however frequently refers to healthy tissue in the elderly are less tolerant than healthy tissue RT adults young but no data in the literature to support it and perhaps those claims probably based on the presence of comorbid conditions or diseases associated or previous surgeries that influence the risk of tissue damage healthy. Studies conducted by the EORTC not show differences in toxicity acute and late age-related. Elderly patients tolerate RT like younger patients with comparable side effects. In the case of concurrent chronic diseases should take into account a possible modification of the dose and volume irradiated to prevent the risk develop permanent damage or sector body lest un irradiated able to compensate for the loss of function of the irradiated tissue; but we should always note that the dose reduction while reducing the risk of complications also decreases the chance of cure

  9. Radiation therapy of suprasellar germinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1974 to 1984, nine patients with suprasellar germinoma were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy. The entire craniospinal axis was irradiated in all patients, with median doses of 45 Gy, 44.4 Gy, and 24 Gy delivered to the tumor volume, whole brain, and spinal cord, respectively. There have been no tumor recurrences, with median 56-month follow-up among seven survivors. Two patients have died (12, 14 months) without evidence of tumor, both of uncontrolled endocrine dysfunction. The dose usually recommended for treatment of intracranial germinoma is 50-55 Gy. The data suggest that 45 Gy may be sufficient

  10. Radiation therapy in bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Response of intrathoracic symptoms to thoracic irradiation was evaluated in 330 patients. Superior vena caval syndrome and hemoptysis showed the best response, with rates of 86% and 83%, respectively, compared to 73% for pain in the shoulder and arm and 60% for dyspnea and chest pain. Atelectasis showed re-expansion in only 23% of cases, but this figure increased to 57% for patients with oat-cell carcinoma. Vocal cord paralysis improved in only 6% of cases. Radiation therapy has a definite positive role in providing symptomatic relief for patients with carcinoma of the lung

  11. Insufficiency fracture after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insufficiency fracture occurs when normal or physiological stress applied to weakened bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Recently, many studies reported the development of IF after radiation therapy (RT) in gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, anal cancer and rectal cancer. The RT-induced insufficiency fracture is a common complication during the follow-up using modern imaging studies. The clinical suspicion and knowledge the characteristic imaging patterns of insufficiency fracture is essential to differentiate it from metastatic bone lesions, because it sometimes cause severe pain, and it may be confused with bone metastasis.

  12. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997–2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62–0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05–1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non–medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy for uterine cervical cancer: comparison of outcomes, complications, and dose-volume histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to report our clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer, compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), in terms of tumor control, complications and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Between March 2008 and February 2014, 62 patients were treated with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy and whole-pelvic external beam radiation therapy (RT). Of these patients, 32 (52 %) received 3DCRT and 30 (48 %) received IMRT. The median follow-up periods were 40 months (range 2–74 months). The 3-year overall survival rate (OS), locoregional control rate (LRC) and progression-free survival rate (PFS) were 92, 95 and 92 % in the IMRT group, and 85, 82 and 70 % in the 3DCRT group, respectively. A comparison of OS, LRC and PFS showed no significant differences between IMRT and 3DCRT. The 3-year cumulative incidences of grade 2 or higher chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications were significantly lower with IMRT compared to 3DCRT (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .02) and in patients with V40 of the small bowel loops of ≤340 mL compared to those with >340 mL (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .001). Patients treated with IMRT had a higher incidence of grade 3 acute hematologic complications (p < .05). V40 and V45 of the small bowel loops or bowel bag were predictive for development of both acute and chronic GI complications. Our results suggest that IMRT for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer is useful for decreasing GI complications without worsening outcomes

  14. Risk analysis of external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy is carried out via a complex treatment process in which many different groups of staff work together. Much of the work is dependent on and in collaboration with advanced technical equipment. The purpose of the research task has been to identify a process for external radiation therapy and to identify, test and analyze a suitable method for performing risk analysis of external radiation therapy

  15. Lung Texture in Serial Thoracic Computed Tomography Scans: Correlation of Radiomics-based Features With Radiation Therapy Dose and Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra; Armato, Samuel G. [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Pham, Ngoc [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between radiation dose and change in a set of mathematical intensity- and texture-based features and to determine the ability of texture analysis to identify patients who develop radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 106 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified under institutional review board approval. For each patient, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before (0-168 days) and after (5-120 days) RT, and a treatment planning CT scan with an associated dose map was obtained. 32- × 32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) were randomly identified in the lungs of each pre-RT scan. ROIs were subsequently mapped to the post-RT scan and the planning scan dose map by using deformable image registration. The changes in 20 feature values (ΔFV) between pre- and post-RT scan ROIs were calculated. Regression modeling and analysis of variance were used to test the relationships between ΔFV, mean ROI dose, and development of grade ≥2 RP. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine each feature's ability to distinguish between patients with and those without RP. A classifier was constructed to determine whether 2- or 3-feature combinations could improve RP distinction. Results: For all 20 features, a significant ΔFV was observed with increasing radiation dose. Twelve features changed significantly for patients with RP. Individual texture features could discriminate between patients with and those without RP with moderate performance (AUCs from 0.49 to 0.78). Using multiple features in a classifier, AUC increased significantly (0.59-0.84). Conclusions: A relationship between dose and change in a set of image-based features was observed. For 12 features, ΔFV was significantly related to RP development. This study demonstrated the ability of radiomics to provide a quantitative, individualized

  16. Lung Texture in Serial Thoracic Computed Tomography Scans: Correlation of Radiomics-based Features With Radiation Therapy Dose and Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between radiation dose and change in a set of mathematical intensity- and texture-based features and to determine the ability of texture analysis to identify patients who develop radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 106 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified under institutional review board approval. For each patient, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before (0-168 days) and after (5-120 days) RT, and a treatment planning CT scan with an associated dose map was obtained. 32- × 32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) were randomly identified in the lungs of each pre-RT scan. ROIs were subsequently mapped to the post-RT scan and the planning scan dose map by using deformable image registration. The changes in 20 feature values (ΔFV) between pre- and post-RT scan ROIs were calculated. Regression modeling and analysis of variance were used to test the relationships between ΔFV, mean ROI dose, and development of grade ≥2 RP. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine each feature's ability to distinguish between patients with and those without RP. A classifier was constructed to determine whether 2- or 3-feature combinations could improve RP distinction. Results: For all 20 features, a significant ΔFV was observed with increasing radiation dose. Twelve features changed significantly for patients with RP. Individual texture features could discriminate between patients with and those without RP with moderate performance (AUCs from 0.49 to 0.78). Using multiple features in a classifier, AUC increased significantly (0.59-0.84). Conclusions: A relationship between dose and change in a set of image-based features was observed. For 12 features, ΔFV was significantly related to RP development. This study demonstrated the ability of radiomics to provide a quantitative, individualized

  17. Mobilized progenitor cells as a bridging therapy for radiation casualties: a brief review of tocopherol succinate-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K; Singh, Pankaj K; Wise, Stephen Y; Seed, Thomas M

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear detonation through either military or terrorist action would most likely lead to a mass-casualty scenario involving victims with varying degrees of exposure to ionizing radiation. As a result of radiation injury to the hematopoietic system, victims would suffer from a lack of red blood cells that deliver oxygen, immune cells that detect and eliminate infectious agents, and blood platelets that promote blood clot formation. In part, these symptoms are generally referred to as acute radiation syndrome (ARS). While some victims of moderate to high levels of radiation will be beyond saving, most will have received enough radiation to injure but not kill their bone marrow cells completely. Such people will recover from their injuries but face a 30-60day period during which they cannot fully fight infections and are prone to uncontrolled bleeding and anemia. To keep them alive until their hematopoietic system recovers, they must receive supportive care. Recently, using experimental animal models of ARS, transfusion of myeloid progenitor cells have been tried as a bridging therapy for radiation-exposed animals. Such cells have been shown to be effective in protecting animals exposed to lethal doses of radiation. These myeloid progenitors (along with of other hematopoietic progenitor cell types) can be mobilized out of the bone marrow into the blood for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis. This review discusses various approaches to the mobilization of progenitors using different mobilizing agents, and their utility as a bridging therapy for radiation casualties. We suggest that α-tocopherol succinate (TS) is an optimal mobilizing agent for progenitors. The extent of progenitor mobilization TS elicits in experimental mice is comparable to clinically used drugs such as recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor rhG-CSF/Neupogen® and the bicyclam AMD3100 (plerixafor/Mozobil); therefore, we propose that TS be considered for further translational development

  18. The application of equivalent uniform dose-based objective function in intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To propose an objective function based on equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to investigate the feasibility of its application in IMRT optimization. Methods: Both EUD-based and dose- based objective functions were applied to optimize the IMRT plan for 6 lung cancer patients. Genetic algorithm was selected and the population size, number of generation, mutation rate and crossover frequency were 101, 100, 0.008 and 0.8. The algorithm was implemented in C program and the dose calculation model was based on three-dimensional pencil beams. Results: It was found that EUD-based criteria provided better target coverage and was capable of improving the sparing of critical structures beyond the specified requirements. The penalty function led to much-improved target dose homogeneity. The average calculated EUD for organs at risk, normal tissue and tumor were 9.32 Gy, 35.21 Gy and 83.76 Gy. The corresponding data for the dose-based plan were 12.20 Gy, 36.96 Gy and 86.21 Gy. Conclusions: Equivalent uniform dose based objective function needs only a small number of parameters and allows the exploration of a much larger universe of solutions. It is nice derivability and convexity. It also could be a surrogate of biologic index such as tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability. (authors)

  19. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Williams, Melanie [Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niu, Jiangong [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad [Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J. [New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  20. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ2 were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data

  1. Curative radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has experienced an extremely rapid development in recent years. Important improvements such as the introduction of multileaf collimators and computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning software have enabled three dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3DCRT). The development of treatment planning systems and technology for brachytherapy has been very rapid as well. Development of accelerators with integrated on-board imaging equipment and technology, for example image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has further improved the precision with reduced margins to adjacent normal tissues. This has, in turn, led to the possibility to administer even higher doses to the prostate than previously. Although radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy have been used for the last decades as curative treatment modalities, still there are no randomized trials published comparing these two options. Outcome data show that the two treatment modalities are highly comparable when used for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  2. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Qi, X. Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  3. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  4. Inverse treatment planning for radiation therapy based on fast Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse treatment planning system based on fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is presented. It allows optimisation of intensity modulated dose distributions in 15 to 60 minutes on present day personal computers. If a multi-processor machine is available, parallel simulation of particle histories is also possible, leading to further calculation time reductions. The optimisation process is divided into two stages. The first stage results influence profiles based on pencil beam (PB) dose calculation. The second stage starts with MC verification and post-optimisation of the PB dose and fluence distributions. Because of the potential to accurately model beam modifiers, MC based inverse planning systems are able to optimise compensator thicknesses and leaf trajectories instead of intensity profiles only. The corresponding techniques, whose implementation is the subject for future work, are also presented here. (orig.)

  5. 2D-3D registration for prostate radiation therapy based on a statistical model of transmission images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In external beam radiation therapy of pelvic sites, patient setup errors can be quantified by registering 2D projection radiographs acquired during treatment to a 3D planning computed tomograph (CT). We present a 2D-3D registration framework based on a statistical model of the intensity values in the two imaging modalities. Methods: The model assumes that intensity values in projection radiographs are independently but not identically distributed due to the nonstationary nature of photon counting noise. Two probability distributions are considered for the intensity values: Poisson and Gaussian. Using maximum likelihood estimation, two similarity measures, maximum likelihood with a Poisson (MLP) and maximum likelihood with Gaussian (MLG), distribution are derived. Further, we investigate the merit of the model-based registration approach for data obtained with current imaging equipment and doses by comparing the performance of the similarity measures derived to that of the Pearson correlation coefficient (ICC) on accurately collected data of an anthropomorphic phantom of the pelvis and on patient data. Results: Registration accuracy was similar for all three similarity measures and surpassed current clinical requirements of 3 mm for pelvic sites. For pose determination experiments with a kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) and kV projection radiographs of the phantom in the anterior-posterior (AP) view, registration accuracies were 0.42 mm (MLP), 0.29 mm (MLG), and 0.29 mm (ICC). For kV CBCT and megavoltage (MV) AP portal images of the same phantom, registration accuracies were 1.15 mm (MLP), 0.90 mm (MLG), and 0.69 mm (ICC). Registration of a kV CT and MV AP portal images of a patient was successful in all instances. Conclusions: The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with multiple methods including methods that are based on a statistical model of a 3D CT and 2D projection images.

  6. Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patient’s radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were 60Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower doses

  7. Cancer Treatment with Gene Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy methods have evolved remarkably in recent years which have resulted in more effective local tumor control with negligible toxicity of surrounding normal tissues. However, local recurrence and distant metastasis often occur following radiation therapy mostly due to the development of radioresistance through the deregulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA damage repair mechanisms. Over the last decade, extensive progress in radiotherapy and gene therapy co...

  8. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia

  9. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  10. Online Image-based Monitoring of Soft-tissue Displacements for Radiation Therapy of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Salisbury, Kenneth [Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dhristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Emerging prolonged, hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens rely on high-dose conformality to minimize toxicity and thus can benefit from image guidance systems that continuously monitor target position during beam delivery. To address this need we previously developed, as a potential add-on device for existing linear accelerators, a novel telerobotic ultrasound system capable of real-time, soft-tissue imaging. Expanding on this capability, the aim of this work was to develop and characterize an image-based technique for real-time detection of prostate displacements. Methods and Materials: Image processing techniques were implemented on spatially localized ultrasound images to generate two parameters representing prostate displacements in real time. In a phantom and five volunteers, soft-tissue targets were continuously imaged with a customized robotic manipulator while recording the two tissue displacement parameters (TDPs). Variations of the TDPs in the absence of tissue displacements were evaluated, as was the sensitivity of the TDPs to prostate translations and rotations. Robustness of the approach to probe force was also investigated. Results: With 95% confidence, the proposed method detected in vivo prostate displacements before they exceeded 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral directions. Prostate pitch was detected before exceeding 4.7 Degree-Sign at 95% confidence. Total system time lag averaged 173 ms, mostly limited by ultrasound acquisition rate. False positives (FPs) (FP) in the absence of displacements did not exceed 1.5 FP events per 10 min of continuous in vivo imaging time. Conclusions: The feasibility of using telerobotic ultrasound for real-time, soft-tissue-based monitoring of target displacements was confirmed in vivo. Such monitoring has the potential to detect small clinically relevant intrafractional variations of the prostate position during beam delivery.

  11. Development of a compensator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Steve Bin

    In the present work, some major issues have been addressed to develop a compensator based IMRT system. A FSPB model has been developed to calculate the dosimetric input for the inverse treatment planning and to evaluate the optimization results. The PB dose kernel is represented with a sum of three Gaussian functions. The FSPB kernel is calculated by integrating the PB kernel with a uniform fluence distribution over the FSPB cross section and thus expressed with a closed analytical form. The amplitudes and standard deviations for the Gaussians are determined by fitting the calculated broad beam dose distributions with the measured data in water phantom. The superposition of the FSPB kernels with different weights yields the dose distributions in the patient's body for irregular blocked and compensated fields. The model has been verified by comparing the calculation with measurement for typical open, blocked, and wedged fields. An optimization procedure has been developed to calculate the optimal intensity profiles and thus the compensator geometries. The objective function of quadratic form, the target dose-uniformity constraints, and the dose-volume constraints to the critical structures are integrated into an augmented objective function by the use of the Zangwill's penalty function method. The augmented objective function is minimized using a gradient method. The compensator geometries are designed using the optimized intensity profiles. The significance of the beam perturbations caused by the compensator has also been investigated using the OMEGA Monte Carlo simulation for a 6 MV beam and cerrobend compensators. The developed inverse planning system has been applied to some patient's geometries. Five clinical cases have been studied, which include two with prostate cancer and three with brain, esophagus, and lung cancers. The dose distributions achieved by the system is very conformal to the target. The target dose is very homogeneous while the critical

  12. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  13. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  14. Outcome and prognostic factors in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy with PET-CT-based radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate prognostic factors in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) with PET-CT-based radiotherapy planning. Methods: Fifty nine patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more were enrolled into this study. The impact of prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The following-up rate was 98%. Nineteen patients completed 2 years' followed-up. The overall l-year and 2-year survival rate was 66% and 37%, respectively, with a median survival time of 17 months. At a univariate analysis, cigarette smoking status, T stage, radiation dose, the standardized uptake value, the gross tumor volume and clinical stage were significant prognostic factors (χ2 =7.46, 7.52, 8.37, 4.97, 5.82, 4.37, P =0.006, 0.006, 0.004, 0.026, 0.016, 0.037, respectively). At multivariate analyses, cigarette smoking status, radiation dose, gross tumor volume and clinical stage were significant prognostic factors (χ2 =6.20, 9.69, 6.39, 10.09, P =0.013, 0.002, 0.011, 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Cigarette smoking status, radiation dose, gross tumor volume and clinical stage are significant prognostic factors on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT based on PET-CT radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  15. Radiation therapy of CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis of 22 patients with central nervous system (CNS) non-Hodgkin's lymphomas seen from 1978 to 1989 at Hamamatsu University Hospital was carried out. These were corresponding to 16% (22/137) of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas treated by irradiation during the same period. Six patients had primary intracranial involvement, six had secondary one, five had leptomeningeal involvement and five had spinal cord compression. Median survival of these groups 29 months, 7 months, 6 months and 4 months, respectively. On the case primary intracranial involvement, neurological signs and symptoms and performance status (PS) were improved in most patients. Whole brain irradiation with a dose of 45 Gy to 50 Gy followed by systemic chemotherapy was considered as effective treatment modalities. On the other hand, for the secondary intracranial lymphomas, clinical symptoms and PS were excellently improved by radiation therapy; however, these did not reflect survival. The conditions having primary site on gastrointestinal tract and relapse as systemic dissemination were considerable risk factors for the control of CNS involvement. For these patients, prophylactic chemotherapy is necessary. Improvement of PS on patients with leptomeningeal lymphomas was obtained in only 3 of 5 cases. These were treated by irradiation on whole spine or neuroaxis and intrathecal MTX injection. We observed 2 cases dying from cerebrovascular accident and one case from leukoencephalopathy. This showed that such combination therapy should be carefully attempted. Five patients having spinal cord compression suffered from paraplegia and none of them had been improved on their symptoms. Four of 5 patients complained of back pain one to two months before onset of paraplegia without abnormal findings on spine roentgenograms. Therefore, studies with myelography or MRI are considered to be essential to patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who complained of back pain. (author)

  16. TOPOS: A new topometric patient positioning and tracking system for radiation therapy based on structured white light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A patient positioning system for radiation therapy based on structured white light and using off-the-shelf hardware components for flexibility and cost-effectiveness has been developed in house. Increased accuracy, patient comfort, abandonment of any skin marks, accelerated workflow, objective reading/recording, better usability and robust sensor design, compared to other positioning approaches, were the main goals of this work. Another aim was the application of a 6 degrees of freedom tracking system working without dose deposition. Methods: Two optical sensors are the main parts of the TOPOS® system (Topometrical Positioning, cyberTECHNOLOGIES, Germany). The components: cameras, projectors, and computers are commercial off-the-shelf products, allowing for low production costs. The black/white cameras of the prototype are capable of taking up to 240 frames per second (resolution: 640 × 488 pixels). The projector has a resolution of 1024 × 768 and a refresh rate of 120 Hz. The patient's body surface is measured continuously and registered to a reference surface, providing a transformation to superimpose the patient's surface to the reference (planning CT) surface as best as possible. The execution of the calculated transformation provides the correct patient position before the treatment starts. Due to the high-speed acquisition of the surfaces, a surveillance of the patient's (respiration) motion during treatment is also accomplished. The accuracy of the system was determined using a male mannequin. Two treatment sites were evaluated: one simulating a head and neck treatment and the other simulating a thoracic wall treatment. The mannequin was moved to predefined positions, and shift vectors given by the surface registration were evaluated. Additionally manual positioning using a color-coding system was evaluated. Results: Two prototypes have been developed, each allowing a continuous high density scan of a 500 × 500 × 400 mm3 (L × W × D) large

  17. Multiscale registration of medical images based on edge preserving scale space with application in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    adaptive gross tumor volume re-contouring for clinical PET/CT image-guided radiation therapy throughout the course of radiotherapy is also studied, and the overlap between the automatically generated contours for the CT image and the contours delineated by the oncologist used for the planning system are on average 90%. (paper)

  18. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the doctors who oversee the care of each person undergoing radiation treatment. Other members of the treatment team include radiation therapists, radiation oncology nurses, medical physicists, dosimetrists, social workers ...

  19. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  20. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  1. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, M; Arimura, H; Yuda, I [Kokura Memorial Hospital, Kitakyushu-shi, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room.

  2. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room

  3. Design and evaluation of an imaging informatics system for analytics-based decision support in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ruchi; DeMarco, John; Liu, Brent J.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a comprehensive DICOM RT specific database of retrospective treatment planning data for radiation therapy of head and neck cancer. Further, we have designed and built an imaging informatics module that utilizes this database to perform data mining. The end-goal of this data mining system is to provide radiation therapy decision support for incoming head and neck cancer patients, by identifying best practices from previous patients who had the most similar tumor geometries. Since the performance of such systems often depends on the size and quality of the retrospective database, we have also placed an emphasis on developing infrastructure and strategies to encourage data sharing and participation from multiple institutions. The infrastructure and decision support algorithm have both been tested and evaluated with 51 sets of retrospective treatment planning data of head and neck cancer patients. We will present the overall design and architecture of our system, an overview of our decision support mechanism as well as the results of our evaluation.

  4. Extramammary Paget's disease: role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extra mammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is an uncommon premalignant skin condition that has been traditionally managed with surgery. A report of long-standing Paget's disease with transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma definitively managed with radiation therapy is presented. A review of cases of extramammary Paget's disease treated with radiation therapy is discussed. The use of radiation therapy should be considered in selected cases, as these studies demonstrate acceptable rates of local control when used as an adjunct to surgery, or as a definitive treatment modality. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena

  6. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  7. Detoxication and antiproteolytic therapy of radiation complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakhontov, N.E.; Klimov, I.A.; Lavrikova, L.P.; Martynov, A.D.; Provorova, T.P.; Serdyukov, A.S.; Shestakov, A.F. (Gor' kovskij Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-11-01

    49 patients with uterine cervix and ovarian carcinomas were treated with detoxication and antiproteolytic therapy of radiation-induced side-effects. The therapy permits to complete without interruption the remote gamma-therapy course and to reduce patients in-hospital periods by 10+- 1 days. The prescription of hemoder intravenous injection in a dose of 450 ml and contrical intramuscular injection (10000 AtrE) in cases of pronounced manifestations of radiation-induced side-effects (asthenia, leukopenia, enterocolitis) for 3 days should be considered an efficient therapy.

  8. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  9. Memory and survival after microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Disturbances of memory function are frequently observed in patients with malignant brain tumours and as adverse effects after radiotherapy to the brain. Experiments in small animal models of malignant brain tumour using synchrotron-based microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) have shown a promising prolongation of survival times. Materials and methods: Two animal models of malignant brain tumour were used to study survival and memory development after MRT. Thirteen days after implantation of tumour cells, animals were submitted to MRT either with or without adjuvant therapy (buthionine-SR-sulfoximine = BSO or glutamine). We used two orthogonal 1-cm wide arrays of 50 microplanar quasiparallel microbeams of 25 μm width and a center-to-center distance of about 200 μm, created by a multislit collimator, with a skin entrance dose of 350 Gy for each direction. Object recognition tests were performed at day 13 after tumour cell implantation and in monthly intervals up to 1 year after tumour cell implantation. Results: In both animal models, MRT with and without adjuvant therapy significantly increased survival times. BSO had detrimental effects on memory function early after therapy, while administration of glutamine resulted in improved memory

  10. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means ({mu}), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic ({Sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [{mu}{sub CBCT}= (-1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, {Sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, {sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [{mu}{sub kV}= (-2.9, -0.4, 0.5) mm, {Sigma}{sub kV}= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, {sigma}{sub kV}= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [{mu}{sub US}= (-3.6, -1.4, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub US}= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, {sigma}{sub US}= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior

  11. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means (μ), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [μCBCT= (−1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, ΣCBCT= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, σCBCT= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [μkV= (−2.9, −0.4, 0.5) mm, ΣkV= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, σkV= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [μUS= (−3.6, −1.4, 0.0) mm, ΣUS= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, σUS= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior–posterior (A/P), superior–inferior (S/I), and the left–right (L/R) directions, respectively

  12. Superficial Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minni, John; Herold, David

    2015-01-01

    Superficial radiation therapy has become more widely available to dermatologists. With the advent of more portable machines, it has become more convenient for dermatology practices to employ in an office-based setting. The goal of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the role of superficial radiation therapy in dermatology practice and to review the current literature surrounding its use in the treatment of both basal and squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26705443

  13. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation myelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy may damage healthy tissues adjacent to tumor. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) is useful in treating soft tissue and osteoradionecrosis. In addition, HBO has been recommended to treat radiation-induced myelitis. We used radiation to induce a predictable myelitis in the spinal cords of rats who were randomized into treatment (HBO) and control groups 8 wk after irradiation. Serial neurologic examination showed no benefit or harm as a result of HBO. This small pilot study did not demonstrate any clinically significant benefit of HBO for radiation myelitis in rats

  15. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  16. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean ± standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 ± 0.12, 0.70 ± 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 ± 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 ± 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The

  17. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  18. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references

  19. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim;

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment......, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era....

  20. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%

  1. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  2. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. Methods/Design The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Discussion Up

  3. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer) beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT) centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume) in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS) rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Up to now it was impossible to compare two different

  4. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  5. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  6. A DICOM-RT based ePR radiation therapy information system for managing brain tumor patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J.; Law, Maria; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, Lawrence

    2005-04-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. One such system, the Cyberknife, is a radiation treatment system that utilizes image-guided information to control a multi-jointed, six degrees of freedom, robotic arm to deliver precise and required radiation dose to the tumor site of a cancer patient. The image-guided system is capable of tracking the lesion orientations with respect to the patient"s position throughout the treatment process. This is done by correlating live radiographic images with pre-operative, CT and MR imaging information to determine relative patient and tumor position repeatedly over the course of the treatment. The disparate and complex data generated by the Cyberknife system along with related data is scattered throughout the RT department compromising an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our research, tightly

  7. Neurobehavioral radiation mitigation to standard brain cancer therapy regimens by Mn(III) n-butoxyethylpyridylporphyrin-based redox modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Douglas H; Tovmasyan, Artak; Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Boico, Alina; Birer, Samuel R; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Herndon, James; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Peters, Katherine B; Spasojevic, Ivan; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    Combinations of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy have shown efficacy toward brain tumors. However, therapy-induced oxidative stress can damage normal brain tissue, resulting in both progressive neurocognitive loss and diminished quality of life. We have recently shown that MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) (Mn(III)meso-tetrakis(N-n-butoxyethylpyridinium -2-yl)porphyrin) rescued RT-induced white matter damage in cranially-irradiated mice. Radiotherapy is not used in isolation for treatment of brain tumors; temozolomide is the standard-of-care for adult glioblastoma, whereas cisplatin is often used for treatment of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, we evaluated the brain radiation mitigation ability of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) after either temozolomide or cisplatin was used singly or in combination with 10 Gy RT. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) accumulated in brains at low nanomolar levels. Histological and neurobehavioral testing showed a drastic decrease (1) of axon density in the corpus callosum and (2) rotorod and running wheel performance in the RT only treatment group, respectively. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) completely rescued this phenotype in irradiated animals. In the temozolomide groups, temozolomide/ RT treatment resulted in further decreased rotorod responses over RT alone. Again, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) treatment rescued the negative effects of both temozolomide ± RT on rotorod performance. While the cisplatin-treated groups did not give similar results as the temozolomide groups, inclusion of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) did not negatively affect rotorod performance. Additionally, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) sensitized glioblastomas to either RT ± temozolomide in flank tumor models. Mice treated with both MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) and radio-/chemo-therapy herein demonstrated brain radiation mitigation. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) may well serve as a normal tissue radio-/chemo-mitigator adjuvant therapy to standard brain cancer treatment regimens. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:372-381, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. A Mechanism-Based Approach to Predict the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons and Carbon Ions in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The physical and potential biological advantages of proton and carbon ions have not been fully exploited in radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. In this work, an approach to predict proton and carbon ion relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in a representative spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is derived using the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model. Methods and Materials: Formulas linking dose-averaged linear-quadratic parameters to DSB induction and processing are derived from the RMF model. The Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software is used to quantify the effects of radiation quality on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Trends in parameters α and β for clinically relevant proton and carbon ion kinetic energies are determined. Results: Proton and carbon ion RBE are shown to increase as particle energy, dose, and tissue α/β ratios decrease. Entrance RBE is ∼1.0 and ∼1.3 for protons and carbon ions, respectively. For doses in the range of 0.5 to 10 Gy, proton RBE ranges from 1.02 (proximal edge) to 1.4 (distal edge). Over the same dose range, the RBE for carbon ions ranges from 1.5 on the proximal edge to 6.7 on the distal edge. Conclusions: The proposed approach is advantageous because the RBE for clinically relevant particle distributions is guided by well-established physical and biological (track structure) considerations. The use of an independently tested Monte Carlo model to predict the effects of radiation quality on DSB induction also minimizes the number of ad hoc biological parameters that must be determined to predict RBE. Large variations in predicted RBE across an SOBP may produce undesirable biological hot and cold spots. These results highlight the potential for the optimization of physical dose for a uniform biological effect.

  9. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  10. Wound healing following radiation therapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy may interrupt normal wound healing mechanisms. Changes in vasculature, effects on fibroblasts, and varying levels of regulatory growth factors result in the potential for altered wound healing whether radiation is given before or after surgery. Surgical factors, such as incision size, as well as radiation parameters, including dose and fractionation, are important considerations in developing overall treatment plans. Experience suggests that certain practical measures may diminish the risk of morbidity, and investigations are ongoing

  11. Role of radiation therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa Hazard; John O'Connor; Courtney Scaife

    2006-01-01

    Outcomes in patients with gastric cancer in the United States remain disappointing, with a five-year overall survival rate of approximately 23%. Given high rates of local-regional control following surgery, a strong rationale exists for the use of adjuvant radiation therapy.Randomized trials have shown superior local control with adjuvant radiotherapy and improved overall survival with adjuvant chemoradiation. The benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients who have undergone D2 lymph node dissection by an experienced surgeon is not known, and the benefit of adjuvant radiation therapy in addition to adjuvant chemotherapy continues to be defined.In unresectable disease, chemoradiation allows long-term survival in a small number of patients and provides effective palliation. Most trials show a benefit to combined modality therapy compared to chemotherapy or radiation therapy alone.The use of pre-operative, intra-operative, 3D conformal, and intensity modulated radiation therapy in gastric cancer is promising but requires further study.The current article reviews the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of resectable and unresectable gastric carcinoma, focusing on current recommendations in the United States.

  12. Evolution of radiation therapy: technology of today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three well established arms of treatment are surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The management of cancer is multidisciplinary; Radiation Oncologists along with Surgical Oncologists and Medical Oncologists are responsible for cancer therapeutics. They all work in close collaboration with Pathologists and Radiologists for cancer diagnosis and staging and rely on Oncology Nurses, Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists, Nutritionists and Social Workers for optimal treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients. Therefore cancer management is a team work for getting the best results. Radiation therapy is one of the most effective methods of treating cancer

  13. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced...... Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are...... Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided...

  14. Dosimetric Evaluation and Treatment Outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The value of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is unknown. We assessed the dosimetric parameters, treatment outcomes, and toxicity of IMRT in PMBCL. Methods and Materials: Forty-one PMBCL patients underwent mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Thirty-eight patients had stage I-II disease, and 3 patients had stage III-IV disease. Most patients presented with bulky mediastinal disease (65.9%) and local invasion (82.9%). The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The average planning target volume (PTV) mean dose was 39 Gy. Only 0.5% and 1.4% of the PTV received <90% and <95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, indicating excellent target coverage. The median mean lung dose and percentage lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20) were 16.3 Gy and 30.6%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were 95.1% and 89.8%. After chemotherapy, consolidation radiation therapy in patients with complete/partial response resulted in significantly better survival than salvage radiation therapy in patients with stable/progressive disease (3-year OS 100% vs 75%; 3-year LC 96.6% vs 62.5%). No grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions: Mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy can be safely and efficiently delivered, and it provides favorable outcomes in PMBCL patients with a large target volume and high-risk features

  15. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  16. Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed

  17. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V10-V40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  18. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation therapy by way of the greedy principle: biologically-based adaptive boosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit a long-standing problem of optimization of fractionated radiotherapy and solve it in considerable generality under the following three assumptions only: (1) repopulation of clonogenic cancer cells between radiation exposures follows linear birth-and-death Markov process; (2) clonogenic cancer cells do not interact with each other; and (3) the dose response function s(D) is decreasing and logarithmically concave. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation identified in this work can be described by the following ‘greedy’ principle: give the maximum possible dose as soon as possible. This means that upper bounds on the total dose and the dose per fraction reflecting limitations on the damage to normal tissue, along with a lower bound on the time between successive fractions of radiation, determine the optimal radiation schedules completely. Results of this work lead to a new paradigm of dose delivery which we term optimal biologically-based adaptive boosting (OBBAB). It amounts to (a) subdividing the target into regions that are homogeneous with respect to the maximum total dose and maximum dose per fraction allowed by the anatomy and biological properties of the normal tissue within (or adjacent to) the region in question and (b) treating each region with an individual optimal schedule determined by these constraints. The fact that different regions may be treated to different total dose and dose per fraction mean that the number of fractions may also vary between regions. Numerical evidence suggests that OBBAB produces significantly larger tumor control probability than the corresponding conventional treatments. (paper)

  19. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Arai, Masahiko; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Niibe, Hideo; Tamura, Masaru

    1988-04-01

    The results of radiation therapy in 31 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors have been analyzed. The five-year survival rates were 70.1 % for germinomas and 38.1 % for teratomas. Three patients with germinoma have since died of spinal seeding. The prophylactic irradiation of the spinal canal has been found effective in protecting spinal seeding, since no relapse of germinoma has been observed in cases that received entire neuraxis iradiation, whereas teratomas and marker (AFP, HCG) positive tumors did not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and the cause of death in these patients has been local failure. Long-term survivors over 3 years after radiation therapy have been determined as having a good quality of life.

  20. Melanomas: radiobiology and role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review the radiobiology of malignant melanoma (MM) and the clinical use of radiation therapy for metastatic melanoma and selected primary sites. The course will emphasize the scientific principles underlying the clinical treatment of MM. Introduction: The incidence of malignant melanoma has one of the fastest growth rates in the world. In 1991, there were 32,000 cases and 7,000 deaths from MM in the United States. By the year 2000, one of every 90 Americans will develop MM. Wide local excision is the treatment of choice for Stage I-II cutaneous MM. Five-year survival rates depend on (a) sex: female-63%, male-40%; (b) tumor thickness: t 4 mm-25%; (c) location: extremity-60%, trunk-41%; and (d) regional lymph node status: negative-77%, positive-31%. Despite adequate surgery, 45-50% of all MM patients will develop metastatic disease. Radiobiology: Both the multi-target model: S = 1-(1-e-D/Do)n and the linear quadratic mode: -In(S) = alpha x D + beta x D2 predict a possible benefit for high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy) radiation therapy for some MM cell lines. The extrapolation number (n) varies from 1-100 for MM compared to other mammalian cells with n=2-4. The alpha/beta ratios for a variety of MM cell lines vary from 1 to 33. Other radiobiologic factors (repair of potentially lethal damage, hypoxia, reoxygenation, and repopulation) predict a wide variety of clinical responses to different time-dose prescriptions including high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy), low dose per fraction (200-300 cGy), or b.i.d. therapy. Based on a review of the radiobiology of MM, no single therapeutic strategy emerges which could be expected to be successful for all tumors. Time-Dose Prescriptions: A review of the retrospective and prospective clinical trials evaluating various time-dose prescriptions for MM reveals: (1) MM is a radiosensitive tumor over a wide range of diverse time-dose prescriptions; and (2) The high clinical response rates to a

  1. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  2. Early cardiac changes related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the incidence and severity of possible radiation-induced cardiac changes, 21 women without heart disease were investigated serially by echocardiography and by measuring systolic time intervals before and up to 6 months after postoperative radiation therapy because of breast cancer. Radiation was associated with a decrease in fractional systolic shortening of the left ventricular (LV) minor-axis diameter, from 0.35 +/- 0.05 to 0.32 +/- 0.06 (p less than 0.005), and in the systolic blood pressure/end-systolic diameter ratio, from 4.4 +/- 1.2 to 3.9 +/- 0.9 mm Hg/mm (p less than 0.005). The mitral E point-septal separation increased, from 2.8 +/- 1.5 to 4.2 +/- 2.5 mm (p less than 0.005). The preejection period/LV ejection time ratio of systolic time intervals increased, but only the decrease within 6 months after therapy was significant (p less than 0.005). All these changes reflect slight transient depression of LV function, which became normalized within 6 months after therapy. Up to 6 months after therapy, a slight pericardial effusion was found in 33% of the patients. Hence, conventional radiation therapy appeared to cause an acute transient and usually symptomless decrease in LV function, and later, slight pericardial effusion in one-third of the patients

  3. Eosinophilia following radiation therapy Fin childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation related eosinophilia (R.R.E.) has been observed mainly among the patients who received radiation therapy for uterine cancer, which was said to Fbe the sign of good prognosis. Retrospective study of eosinophilia following radiation therapy was performed in 41 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, brain tumor and so on. Thirty-two per cent of all courses of radiation therapy was associated with R.R.E.. Eosinophil counts increased gradually from two weeks after the start of therapy and reached to maximun on the 33rd day (mean). R.R.E. was seen much more frequently among the patients with brain tumor than those with ALL. And R.R.E. was also related to radiation dose. Patients under 3 years of age showed R.R.E. less frequently comparing to the older age group. Those findings might mean that R.R.E. was strongly related to the host's immunological function. This is the first report about R.R.E. in childhood. (author)

  4. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally-Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mann Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally-advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC, progression-free survival rate (PFS, overall survival rate (OS and toxicities were reported.Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6-67.2 months. The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4-205 cm3. All patients received prior EBRT with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24-75.6 Gy delivered in 12 to 42 fractions. 20 patients had surgeries prior to SABR. 19 patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, 8 patients received concurrent cetuximab (ErbituxTM with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP was 3.3 months (range: 0-16.9 months. For the 29 patients (93.5% who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5-41.4 months. The estimated 1-year overall survival (OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities.Conclusions: SABR has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally-advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base.

  5. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently

  6. Two Effective Heuristics for Beam Angle Optimization in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmand, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    In radiation therapy, mathematical methods have been used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to critical surrounding structures minimal. This optimization problem can be modeled using mixed integer programming (MIP) whose solution gives the optimal beam orientation as well as optimal beam intensity. The challenge, however, is the computation time for this large scale MIP. We propose and investigate two novel heuristic approaches to reduce the computation time considerably while attaining high-quality solutions. We introduce a family of heuristic cuts based on the concept of 'adjacent beams' and a beam elimination scheme based on the contribution of each beam to deliver the dose to the tumor in the ideal plan in which all potential beams can be used simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of these heuristics for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on a clinical liver case.

  7. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 (by Nordic Association of Clinica Physics) to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ''Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy''. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed

  8. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 49-year-old woman developed ascites 31 years after radiation therapy for ovarian cancer and was admitted to hospital 1 year later. Diffuse infiltration of both sheets of the peritoneum was found by CT, which on histological investigation turned out to be an advanced malignant peritoneal carcinoma. When there is a history of radiation exposure, malignant peritoneal mesothelioma should be considered as the cause of ascites. (orig.)

  9. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    OpenAIRE

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, adv...

  10. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  11. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels

  12. A definition of “uncomplicated bone metastases” based on previous bone metastases radiation trials comparing single-fraction and multi-fraction radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Paul M.; Wong, Erin; Thavarajah, Nemica; Dennis, Kristopher; Lutz, Stephen; Zeng, Liang; Chow, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The most recent systematic review of randomized trials in patients with bone metastases has shown equal efficacy of single fraction (SF) and multiple fraction (MF) palliative radiation therapy in pain relief. It is important to determine the patient population to which the evidence applies. This study aims to examine the eligibility criteria of the studies included in the systematic review to define characteristics of “uncomplicated” bone metastases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria of 21 studies included in the systematic review were compared. Common eligibility criteria were documented in hopes of defining the specific features of a common patient population representative of those in the studies. More than half of the studies included patients with cytological or histological evidence of malignancy. Patients with impending and/or existing pathological fracture, spinal cord compression or cauda equina compression were excluded in most studies. Most studies also excluded patients receiving retreatment to the same site. “Uncomplicated” bone metastases can be defined as: presence of painful bone metastases unassociated with impending or existing pathologic fracture or existing spinal cord or cauda equina compression. Therefore, MF and SF have equal efficacy in patients with such bone metastases. PMID:26579484

  13. A population-based case-cohort study of the risk of myocardial infarction following radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer (BrCa) in an exposed population. Methods: We identified and validated cases of AMI (vAMI), by electrocardiographic or enzyme criteria, among all 6680 women who received post-operative RT following lumpectomy or mastectomy, within 12 months following diagnosis of BrCa between 1982 and 1988 in Ontario, Canada. We identified women without vAMI whose death certification was ascribed to AMI (dAMI). We abstracted risk factors and treatment exposures for a random sample of women from the 6680, and for all with vAMI or dAMI. The hazards of vAMI and of dAMI were estimated using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, corrected for study design. Results: We validated 121 cases of vAMI and identified 92 cases of dAMI. The risk of vAMI associated with RT to the left breast HR = 1.96 (1.09, 3.54) among women at age ≥ 60 at time of RT, adjusted for history of smoking and prior MI. The adjusted HR dAMI = 1.90 (1.08, 3.35) for exposure to anterior internal mammary node (IMC) RT. Among women who received anterior left breast boost RT, increasing area of the boost is associated with adjusted HR vAMI = 1.02 (1.00, 1.03)/cm2, and adjusted HR dAMI = 1.02 (1.01, 1.03)/cm2. Conclusion: The risks of vAMI and dAMI following RT for BrCa are related to anatomic sites of RT (left breast, area of anterior left breast boost field, and anterior IMC field)

  14. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    therapies based on its micro-particle technologies, which act as transport vehicles to deliver: 1. ionising radiation (ie. SIR-Spheres, which is used in Selective Internal Radiation Therapy or SIRT); 2. chemotherapy drugs (ie Dox-Spheres); and 3. materials that can generate heat within the cancer (ie. Thermo-Spheres). The original concepts underpinning the core technology commercialised by SIRTeX Medical were initially developed by prominent Australian liver surgeon Dr Bruce Gray and the Cancer Research Institute Inc (CRI) and have been published in the scientific literature. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy using SIR-Spheres has been refined over many years and has been the subject of several clinical trials. Two independent clinical trials are currently underway to evaluate the advantages of using SIR-Spheres in combination with two new anti-cancer drugs to improve the treatment of liver cancer. The first trial will test the efficacy of combining SIR-Spheres with an anti-cancer drug combination that includes irinotecan, a major new drug marketed by Pharmacia for the treatment of advanced bowel cancer. As SIR-Spheres is a novel form of radiotherapy proven to regress bowel cancer that has spread to the liver, it is important to evaluate the benefits of adding increasing doses of irinotecan to SIR-Spheres. Supported by Pharmacia, the trial is being conducted in Australia with a small number of patients, and is expected to be completed by the end of 2002. The second trial will test the use of SIR-Spheres in combination with the drug oxaliplatin - another major anti-cancer drug used for the treatment of advanced bowel cancer. Supported by French-based anti-cancer specialist Sanofi Synthelabo, this trial will be conducted both in Australia and several major cancer centres in Europe. SIRTeX Medical is also currently in the process of researching and developing Dox-Spheres and Thermo-Spheres. Both are based on the same micro-particle technology as SIR-Spheres, but are used to

  15. Radiation Therapy of Maxillary Sinus Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Maxillary sinus cancers usually are locally advanced and involve the structures around sinus. It is uncommon for this cancer to spread to the regional lymphnodes. For this reason, local control is of paramount important for cure. A policy of combined treatment is generally accepted as the most effective means of enhancing cure rates. This paper reports our experience of a retrospective study of 31 patients treated with radiation therapy alone and combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Materials and Methods: Between July 1974 and January 1992, 47 patients with maxillary sinus cancers underwent either radiation therapy alone or combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Of these, only 31 patients were eligible for analysis. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 26%(8/31) for T2 and 74%(23/31) for T3 and T4. Eight patients had palpable lymphadenopathy at diagnosis. Primary site was treated by Cobalt-60 radiation therapy using through a 45 .deg. wedge-pair technique. Elective neck irradiation was not routinely given. Of these 8 patients, the six who had clinically involved nodes were treated with definite radiation therapy. The other two patients had received radical neck dissection. The twenty-two patients were treated with radiation alone and 9 patients were treated with combination radiation therapy. The RT alone patients with RT dose less than 60 Gy were 9 and those above 60 Gy were 13. Results: The overall 5 year survival rate was 23.8%. The 5 year survival rate by T-stage was 60.5% and 7.9% for T2 and T3, 4 respectively. Statistical significance was found by T-stage (p30.1). The 5 year survival rate for RT alone and combination RT was 22.5% and 27.4%, respectively. The primary local control rate was 65%(20/31). Conclusion: This study did not show significant difference in survival between RT alone and combination RT. There is still much controversy with regard to which treatment is optimum. Improved RT technique and

  16. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  17. Delineating organs at risk in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Cèfaro, Giampiero Ausili; Perez, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Defining organs at risk is a crucial task for radiation oncologists when aiming to optimize the benefit of radiation therapy, with delivery of the maximum dose to the tumor volume while sparing healthy tissues. This book will prove an invaluable guide to the delineation of organs at risk of toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy. The first and second sections address the anatomy of organs at risk, discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced damage, and present dose constraints and methods for target volume delineation. The third section is devoted to the radiological anatomy of orga

  18. Process of Coping with Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jean E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of informational intervention entailing objective descriptions of experience on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy among 84 men with prostate cancer. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of…

  19. Radiation therapy of cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the lung, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of cancer of the lung, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Three-dimensional personalized dosimetry for 188Re liver selective internal radiation therapy based on quantitative post-treatment SPECT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Grimes, J.; Bator, A.; Cwikla, J. B.; Celler, A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate patient-specific distributions of microspheres labeled with 188Re and resulting absorbed doses can be obtained from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies performed after 188Re selective internal radiation therapy when accurate correction methods are employed in image reconstruction. Our quantitative image reconstruction algorithm includes corrections for attenuation, resolution degradations and scatter as well as a window-based compensation for contamination. The procedure has been validated using four phantom experiments containing an 18 ml cylindrical source (82-93 MBq of 188Re activity) simulating a liver tumor. In addition, we applied our approach to post-therapy SPECT studies of ten patients with progressive primary or metastatic liver carcinomas. Our quantitative algorithm accurately (within 9%) recovered 188Re activity from four phantom experiments. In addition, for two patients that received three scans, deviations remained consistent between the measured and the reconstructed activities that were determined from studies with differing severity of the dead-time effect. The analysis of absorbed doses for patient studies allowed us to hypothesize that D90 (the minimum dose received by 90% of the tumor volume) may be a reliable metric relating therapy outcomes to the calculated doses. Among several considered metrics, only D90 showed statistically significant correlation with the overall survival.

  1. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose–response functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=−0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies

  2. Radiation therapy of the nasopharyngeal cancer and its prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    39 patients with the regional nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) underwent radiation therapy from 1975 through 1984 in the Department of Radiology, Chiba University Hospital. A retrospective study was carried out to find out prognostic factors of the NPC patients. Radiation therapy was performed under megavoltage condition. 31 patients were given more than 50 Gy. 41% of the whole had T4 extension and 69% had lymph node metastasis. The pathological slides were reviewed and classified by the proposal of Shanmugaratnam. Advanced N-stage and the absence of the lymphocytic infiltration tended to affect the survival unfavorably, whereas the prognostic significance of histology, especially of keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma remained unclear. T4 lesion often recurred even with high dose radiation therapy. To improve the local control rate in NPC, wide field irradiation from the base of skull to the lower neck seemed necessary as well as the dosage greater than 66 Gy. (orig.)

  3. Determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swafford, Larry G; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most significant predictors of employee retention in a variety of occupational settings, including health care and education. A national survey of radiation therapy educators (n = 90) has indicated that respondents are not satisfied with their jobs based on data collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). To predict the factors associated with job satisfaction or dissatisfaction, the authors used a nine-item questionnaire derived from the MSQ. Educators were grouped according to their job satisfaction scores, and multiple discriminant analysis was used to determine which factors were predictive of satisfaction among groups of educators. Statistical results indicate that ability utilization, institutional support, compensation, personnel, and job characteristics were key determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy educators. These results may better inform faculty and administration of important factors that can promote job satisfaction and retain faculty in radiation therapy education programs. PMID:19753428

  4. Comparison of particle-radiation-therapy modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of dose distribution, beam alignment, and radiobiological advantages accorded to high LET radiation were reviewed and compared for various particle beam radiotherapeutic modalities (neutron, Auger electrons, p, π-, He, C, Ne, and Ar ions). Merit factors were evaluated on the basis of effective dose to tumor relative to normal tissue, linear energy transfer (LET), and dose localization, at depths of 1, 4, and 10 cm. In general, it was found that neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam provided the best merit factors available for depths up to 8 cm. The position of fast neutron therapy on the Merit Factor Tables was consistently lower than that of other particle modalities, and above only 60Co. The largest body of clinical data exists for fast neutron therapy; results are considered by some to be encouraging. It then follows that if benefits with fast neutron therapy are real, additional gains are within reach with other modalities

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  6. Lymphocyte chromosome aberrations in partial-body fractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a relationship between lymphocyte chromosome aberration yields which occur in partial-body fractionated radiation therapy and those yields measured in vitro is derived. These calculations are applied to the case of patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma. (author)

  7. Lymphocyte chromosome aberrations in partial-body fractionated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstrand, K.E.; Dixon, R.L. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1982-03-01

    a relationship between lymphocyte chromosome aberration yields which occur in partial-body fractionated radiation therapy and those yields measured in vitro is derived. These calculations are applied to the case of patients undergoing radiation therapy for mammary carcinoma.

  8. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verona, C.; Magrin, G.; Solevi, P.; Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M.; Mayer, R.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm2 square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Bo\\vskovic' Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 109 ions.cm-2.s-1. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 1012 ions/cm2. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about 9.3 kGy-NIEL for both carbon and silicon ions.

  9. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma (Italy); Magrin, G.; Solevi, P.; Mayer, R. [EBG MedAustron Marie Curie-St. 5, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M. [Ruder Boškovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-11-14

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm{sup 2} square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Boškovic′ Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 10{sup 9} ions·cm{sup −2}·s{sup −1}. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about

  10. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm2 square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Boškovic′ Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 109 ions·cm−2·s−1. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 1012 ions/cm2. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about 9.3 kGy-NIEL for both carbon and

  11. Polymer gel dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Recently developed treatment modalities such as stereotactic and conformal radiation therapy produce complex dose distributions which are difficult or impractical to measure with conventional dosimetry instrumentation. Three-dimensional treatment planning systems which purport to calculate these complex dose distributions should be compared to experimental results before being routinely applied to clinical problems. There is a need for a new class of tissue-equivalent dosimeters capable of providing accurate, high resolution, time-integrated and three dimensional dose distributions. The recently developed BANG polymer gel dosimetry system (MGS Research, Inc., Guilford, CT) is ideally suited for the task described above. Physico-chemical principles of the polymer gel dosimetry are presented, together with examples of its application to radiation therapy. Data analysis and display program, written for Macintosh computer, is demonstrated. Materials and Methods: Radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic monomers, which are dispersed in tissue-equivalent gelatin, has been shown to be dependent on the dose, but independent of the dose rate or photon energy. Therefore, the spatial distribution of polymer in the gel is precisely representative of the dose distribution. As the polymeric microparticles reduce the water proton NMR relaxation times in the gel, the dose distribution can be measured with high resolution and accuracy using magnetic resonance imaging. Also, as these microparticles cannot diffuse through the gelatin matrix, their distribution is permanent. An improved formulation of the BANG dosimeter consists of 3% w/v acrylic acid, 3% N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide, 1% sodium hydroxide, 5% gelatin, and 88% water. MR images are transferred via a local network to a Macintosh computer, and R2 maps constructed on the basis of multiple TE images, using a non-linear least squares fit based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. A dose-to-R2

  12. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: Applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -enhanced images can be generated using a reduced sampled UTE sequence with no visible compromise in image quality and they preserved bone-to-air contrast with as low as a 25% sampling rate. Conclusions: This UTE strategy with angular undersampling preserves the image quality and contrast of cortical bone, while reducing the total scanning time by as much as 75%. The quantitative results of R2∗ and the water fraction of skull based on Dixon analysis of UTE images acquired at multiple echo times provide guidance for the clinical adoption and further parameter optimization of the UTE sequence when used for radiation therapy and MR-based PET attenuation correction

  13. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: Applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lingzhi, E-mail: hlingzhi@gmail.com, E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu; Traughber, Melanie [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Su, Kuan-Hao; Pereira, Gisele C.; Grover, Anu; Traughber, Bryan; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr., E-mail: hlingzhi@gmail.com, E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    brain. High-quality, bone-enhanced images can be generated using a reduced sampled UTE sequence with no visible compromise in image quality and they preserved bone-to-air contrast with as low as a 25% sampling rate. Conclusions: This UTE strategy with angular undersampling preserves the image quality and contrast of cortical bone, while reducing the total scanning time by as much as 75%. The quantitative results of R2{sup ∗} and the water fraction of skull based on Dixon analysis of UTE images acquired at multiple echo times provide guidance for the clinical adoption and further parameter optimization of the UTE sequence when used for radiation therapy and MR-based PET attenuation correction.

  14. Migratory organizing pneumonitis `primed` by radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, J.Y.; Nesme, P.; Guerin, J.C. [Hopital de la Croix Rousse, Service de Pneumologie, Lyon (France); Bejui-Thivolet, F. [Hopital de la Croix Rousse, Laboratorie d`Anatomopatologie, Lyon (France); Loire, R. [Hopital Cardiovasculaire et Pneumologique, Universite Claude Bernard, Laboratoire d`Anatomopathologie, Lyon (France); Cordier, J.F. [Hopital Cardiovasculaire et Pneumologique, Universite Claude Bernard, Service de Pneumologie, Lyon (France)

    1995-02-01

    We report on two women presenting with cough and fever, 4 and 7 months, respectively, after starting breast radiation therapy following surgery for breast carcinoma. Chest roentgenogram and computed tomographic (CT) scan demonstrated alveolar opacities, initially limited to the pulmonary area next to the irradiated breast, but later migrating within both lungs. Intra-alveolar granulation tissue was found in transbronchial lung biopsies. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in dramatic clinical improvment, together with complete clearing of the pulmonary opacities on chest imaging. However, clinical and imaging relapses occurred when corticosteroids were withdrawn too rapidly; with further improvment when they were reintroduced. The reported cases clearly differ from radiation pneumonitis. They were fairly typical of cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis, also called idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, with the exception of the radiation therapy, partially affecting the lung, which had been performed within the previous months. Since focal radiation therapy involving the lung may induce diffuse bilateral lymphocytic alveolitis, we hypothesize that this may `prime` the lung to further injury, leading to cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis. (au) (26 refs.).

  15. Migratory organizing pneumonitis 'primed' by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on two women presenting with cough and fever, 4 and 7 months, respectively, after starting breast radiation therapy following surgery for breast carcinoma. Chest roentgenogram and computed tomographic (CT) scan demonstrated alveolar opacities, initially limited to the pulmonary area next to the irradiated breast, but later migrating within both lungs. Intra-alveolar granulation tissue was found in transbronchial lung biopsies. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in dramatic clinical improvment, together with complete clearing of the pulmonary opacities on chest imaging. However, clinical and imaging relapses occurred when corticosteroids were withdrawn too rapidly; with further improvment when they were reintroduced. The reported cases clearly differ from radiation pneumonitis. They were fairly typical of cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis, also called idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, with the exception of the radiation therapy, partially affecting the lung, which had been performed within the previous months. Since focal radiation therapy involving the lung may induce diffuse bilateral lymphocytic alveolitis, we hypothesize that this may 'prime' the lung to further injury, leading to cryptogenic organizing pneumonitis. (au) (26 refs.)

  16. Quality Assurance Needs for Modern Image-Based Radiotherapy: Recommendations From 2007 Interorganizational Symposium on 'Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy: Challenges of Advanced Technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the consensus findings and recommendations emerging from 2007 Symposium, 'Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy: Challenges of Advanced Technology.' The Symposium was held in Dallas February 20-22, 2007. The 3-day program, which was sponsored jointly by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and National Cancer Institute (NCI), included >40 invited speakers from the radiation oncology and industrial engineering/human factor communities and attracted nearly 350 attendees, mostly medical physicists. A summary of the major findings follows. The current process of developing consensus recommendations for prescriptive quality assurance (QA) tests remains valid for many of the devices and software systems used in modern radiotherapy (RT), although for some technologies, QA guidance is incomplete or out of date. The current approach to QA does not seem feasible for image-based planning, image-guided therapies, or computer-controlled therapy. In these areas, additional scientific investigation and innovative approaches are needed to manage risk and mitigate errors, including a better balance between mitigating the risk of catastrophic error and maintaining treatment quality, complimenting the current device-centered QA perspective by a more process-centered approach, and broadening community participation in QA guidance formulation and implementation. Industrial engineers and human factor experts can make significant contributions toward advancing a broader, more process-oriented, risk-based formulation of RT QA. Healthcare administrators need to appropriately increase personnel and ancillary equipment resources, as well as capital resources, when new advanced technology RT modalities are implemented. The pace of formalizing clinical physics training must rapidly increase to provide an adequately trained physics workforce for advanced technology RT. The specific

  17. COMPARISON OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL RADIATION THERAPY IN POST MASTECTOMY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death in females and accounts for 1.8 million new cases and approximately 0.5 million deaths annually. Patients who present with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC require multidisciplinary team approach that incorporates diagnostic imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and histopathological assessment, including molecular-based studies, radiation, and, if indicated, biologic and hormonal therapies. Hypofractionated radiation therapy following mastectomy has been used in many institutions for several decades and have demonstrated equivalent local control, cosmetic and normal tissues between 50 Gy in 25 fractions and various hypofractionated radiotherapy prescriptions employing 13-16 fractions. Evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy may also be safe and effective for regional nodal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To compare the local control and side effects of hypofractionated radiation therapy with conventional radiation therapy in post mastectomy carcinoma breast with stage II and III and to compare the tolerability and compliance of both schedules. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted on 60 histopathologically proven patients of carcinoma of breast, treated surgically with modified radical mastectomy. Group I patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 39 Gy/13 fractions/3.1 weeks, a daily dose 3 Gy for 13 fractions in 4 days a week schedule and Group II patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, to receive a daily dose 2 Gy for 25 fractions in a 5 days a week schedule. RESULTS The median age at presentation in Group I and II was 48 and 50 years respectively. Locoregional control after completion of radiotherapy in Group I vs. Group II was 26/30 (86.7% vs. 27/30 (90% respectively. Acute reactions and their grades in Group

  18. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  19. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakiya, Munehisa [Okinawa Prefectural Miyako Hospital, Hirara (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We used hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) on 11 patients with radiation cystitis from 1996 to 1998. The patients aged from 46 to 78 years with a mean of 64 years underwent one or more courses of HBO consisting of 20 sessions. During the 60 min HBO patients received 100% oxygen at 2.5 absolute atmosphere pressure in the Simple Hyperbaric Chamber. Hematuria improved in all patients. Cystoscopic findings of mucosal edema, redness and capillary dilatation were improved. HBO appears to be useful for radiation cystitis. (author)

  1. Study on physical penumbra of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Bum; Whang, Woong Ku [Korea University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Hyun [Junior College of Allied Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    Proper evaluation about the penumbra is very important to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy. There are two kinds of physical penumbra, geometric penumbra and transmission penumbra. In this study, we evaluated the variation of physical penumbra according to the varing energy level, changing the field size and depth. Physical penumbra width was decreased as the source size decreased, and as the SDD increased, but the consideration about the scatter radiation and mechanical stability is an important factor. For the two adjacent beams, upper collimator should be used and especially for Co-60 unit, it is efficient to use the extended collimator.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation cystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) on 11 patients with radiation cystitis from 1996 to 1998. The patients aged from 46 to 78 years with a mean of 64 years underwent one or more courses of HBO consisting of 20 sessions. During the 60 min HBO patients received 100% oxygen at 2.5 absolute atmosphere pressure in the Simple Hyperbaric Chamber. Hematuria improved in all patients. Cystoscopic findings of mucosal edema, redness and capillary dilatation were improved. HBO appears to be useful for radiation cystitis. (author)

  3. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU

  4. Optical tomography for measuring dose distribution in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauppinen Matti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dosimetry is used to verify the dose magnitude with artificial samples (phantoms before giving the planned radiation therapy to the patient. Typically, dose distribution is measured only in a single point or on a two-dimensional matrix plane. New techniques of radiation therapy ensure more detailed planning of radiation dose distribution which will lead to the need of measuring the radiation dose distribution three-dimensionally. The gel dosimetry is used to indicate and determine the ionizing radiation three-dimensionally. The radiation causes changes in chemical properties of the gel. The radiation dose distribution is defined by measuring the chemical changes. A conventional method is the magnetic resonance imaging and a new possibility is optical computed tomography (optical-CT. The optical-CT is much cheaper and more practical than magnetic resonance imaging. In this project, an optical-CT based method device was built by aiming at low material costs and a simple realization. The constructed device applies the charge coupled device camera and fluorescent lamp technologies. The test results show that the opacity level of the radiated gel can be measured accurately enough. The imaging accuracy is restricted by the optical distortion, e. g. vignetting, of the lenses, the distortion of a fluorescent lamp as the light source and a noisy measuring environment.

  5. Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy may be indicated for larger invasive tumors of the head and neck that may be difficult to surgically excise or for which surgery would be significantly disfiguring. Previous studies of oral squamous cell carcinomas indicate that it should be possible to control approximately 80% of all but the most advanced local or locoregional tumors. Aggressive radiation therapy to total doses of 56 Gy or greater may be required. That can be done by using smaller doses per fraction and gradually reducing the size of the field so that the highest dose is given only to the tumor with a relatively tight margin. Malignant melanomas can be controlled locally apparently with a few large fractions. Metastatic disease limits survival; therefore, some type of systemic therapy seems to be needed to improve survival of those patients. Canine oral fibrosarcomas require a very high dose for a reasonable probability of control. It seems that a dose of 56 Gy given in 3.3 Gy fractions might provide local control of 50% of the tumors. It is likely that a combination of surgery and radiation would significantly improve the probability for control. Oral squamous cell carcinomas of cats must also be treated very aggressively to improve local control. Tumors of the nasal cavity are usually very large and invasive at the time of diagnosis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be effective in some instances. It is possible that with better definition of the tumor through computerized tomography imaging and improved treatment planning, control of these difficult to manage nasal tumors can be improved

  6. Lacrimal gland lymphoma: Role of radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Townsend; Aruna Turaka; Smith, Mitchell R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To report the clinical and treatment outcome of patients with lacrimal gland lymphoma (LGL) treated with radiation therapy (RT) at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approved retrospective chart review of eight patients and literature review. Results: The study patients included six males and two females with a mean age of 70 years (range 58-88 years). The mean follow-up period was 23 months (range 3–74 months). Four p...

  7. Perspectives of radiation therapy in benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: the numbers of patients with nonmalignant diseases referred for radiation therapy had to be evaluated for the last 4 years. Patients and methods: in the years 2002, 2004, and 2005 radiation therapy was performed in 61, 40, and 26 patients, respectively. Regularly, more women than men were treated, median age annually was 57, 54, and 55 years, respectively (table 1). The radiotherapy scheme was not modified within the evaluated period. Results: the proportion of nonmalignant diseases among all patients treated decreased from 4.7% in 2002 to 3.3% in 2004 and 2.2% in 2005, respectively. A shift was noticed toward the treatment of four main diseases (endocrine orbitopathy, prevention of heterotopic ossification, meningeoma, tendinitis, table 2). The number of referring physicians decreased from 19 to six. Conclusion: due to administrative restrictions for treatment in hospitals, budget restrictions in private practices and lasting, insufficient revenues for radiotherapy in nonmalignant diseases, radiation therapy for the entire group of benign diseases is endangered. (orig.)

  8. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  9. Quality-of-life assessment following surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the quality-of-life after surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the tongue base. Materials and Methods: At the 1995 ASTRO meeting, the University of Florida and MSKCC reported the quality-of-life (QOL) functional outcome of patients treated with primary radiation therapy (RT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base (BOT). Relatively little data evaluating the QOL following primary surgery has been published. Between January 1974 and December 1993, 89 patients (pts) underwent surgery alone (65 pts) or surgery combined with postoperative radiation therapy (24 pts) for tongue base cancer. Twenty-seven pts were alive at last contact. Three pts have been lost to follow-up and three pts declined to participate in the QOL assessment. Twenty-one pts consented to QOL assessment. Their median follow-up is 5.4 years (range 2.0-20.8 years). These patients completed: 1) the Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck Cancer Patients (PSS), a measure of ability to eat in public, understandability of speech, and normalcy of diet (scale 0-100, best score = 100); and 2) Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) (scale 0-28 for physical and social well-being, and 0-20 for emotional well-being, higher number=best score). Pathologic T stage was T1-7, T2-10, T3-3, T4-1. Twenty patients had ipsilateral neck dissection and 6 had bilateral neck dissection. The 8 patients who were treated with adjuvant RT received a median dose of 60 Gy. Prior to treatment, 62% had either full or part-time employment with a median annual income of $10,000-$40,000. Results: Mean PSS scores for all patients were 82 for eating in public, 92 for understandability of speech, and 78 for normalcy of diet. Normalcy of diet was significantly better in the surgery alone group than in the adjuvant RT group (91 vs. 56, p=0.0005). The ability to eat in public (88 vs. 72, p=NS) and understandability of speech (96 vs. 84, p=NS) did not differ

  10. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  11. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  12. Knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning versus planning by experts: validation of a KBRT algorithm for prostate cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning algorithm was recently developed. The purpose of this work is to investigate how plans that are generated with the objective KBRT approach compare to those that rely on the judgment of the experienced planner. Thirty volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were randomly selected from a database of prostate plans that were generated by experienced planners (expert plans). The anatomical data (CT scan and delineation of organs) of these patients and the KBRT algorithm were given to a novice with no prior treatment planning experience. The inexperienced planner used the knowledge-based algorithm to predict the dose that the OARs receive based on their proximity to the treated volume. The population-based OAR constraints were changed to the predicted doses. A KBRT plan was subsequently generated. The KBRT and expert plans were compared for the achieved target coverage and OAR sparing. The target coverages were compared using the Uniformity Index (UI), while 5 dose-volume points (D10, D30, D50, D70 and D90) were used to compare the OARs (bladder and rectum) doses. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test was used to check for significant differences (p < 0.05) between both datasets. The KBRT and expert plans achieved mean UI values of 1.10 ± 0.03 and 1.10 ± 0.04, respectively. The Wilcoxon test showed no statistically significant difference between both results. The D90, D70, D50, D30 and D10 values of the two planning strategies, and the Wilcoxon test results suggests that the KBRT plans achieved a statistically significant lower bladder dose (at D30), while the expert plans achieved a statistically significant lower rectal dose (at D10 and D30). The results of this study show that the KBRT treatment planning approach is a promising method to objectively incorporate patient anatomical variations in radiotherapy treatment planning

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko, E-mail: matsutomo_llp@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kogo, Kasei [Kumamoto Radiosurgery Clinic, Kumamoto (Japan); Oya, Natsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy10. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients

  15. Comprehensive Evaluations of Cone-beam CT dose in Image-guided Radiation Therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, Davide; Silvestri, Chiara; Graves, Yan J; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is fo...

  16. Radiation therapy for unresected gastric lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six consecutive patients with unresected gastric lymphoma which were treated by radiation therapy between November 1976 and March 1989 were reviewed. Radiation therapy was performed using involved fields, total radiation dosages of which ranged from 25.2 to 36 Gy (mean, 29.3 Gy). Five out of the 6 patients were treated with chemotherapy combined with radiation. Regimen of the chemotherapy was CHOP (cyclophophamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone) in most cases. Three out of the 6 underwent probe laparotomy, but the tumors were diagnosed as unresectable due to locally invading the adjacent structures. They were treated by chemo-radiotherapy and 2 of them are surviving as of the present study (40 and 116 months). The other 3 patients were diagnosed as with clinical stage IV disease and 2 of them were successfully treated with chemo-radiotherapy (21 and 66 months, surviving). These data suggest that unresected gastric lymphomas, which are locally advanced or stage IV disease, are treated by chemo-radiotherapy with high curability without any serious complications. (author)

  17. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (> 40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up

  19. Research Findings on Radiation Hormesis and Radon Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation hormesis research in Japan to determine the validity of Luckey's claims has revealed information on the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific data of animal tests we obtained and successful results actually brought by radon therapy on human patients show us a clearer understanding of the health effects of low-level radiation. We obtained many animal test results and epidemiological survey data through our research activities cooperating with more than ten universities in Japan, categorized as follows: 1. suppression of cancer by enhancement of the immune system based on gene activation; 2. rejuvenation and suppression of aging by increasing cell membrane permeability and enzyme syntheses; 3. adaptive response by activation of gene expression on DNA repair and cell apoptosis; 4. pain relief and stress moderation by hormone formation in the brain and central nervous system; 5. avoidance and therapy of obstinate diseases by enhancing damage control systems and form one formation

  20. Sensitometry in diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Vyborny, C.; Hoffer, P.B.; Doi, K.

    The purpose of this paper is to present a tutorial discussion on the sensitometric methods employed for determining the characteristic curve of interest in diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine. These methods are based on the way in which various recording systems are exposed in practice. In diagnostic radiology, an inverse-square sensitometer is used for measurements of the characteristic curves of conventional film and screen-film systems. In radiation therapy, a sensitometric technique can be used for the determination of the proper characteristic curve for a film which can be placed beneath the patient before radiation treatment and removed afterwards so that an image of the anatomy actually irradiated is obtained. In nuclear medicine, a sensitometric study served as a means of evaluating several radiographic films for imaging of the light output on an oscilloscope when the Anger camera is used.

  1. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for recurrent glioblastoma: single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor control and survival have improved with the use of radiotherapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but the prognosis remain poor. In most cases the recurrence occurs within 7–9 months after primary treatment. Currently, many approaches are available for the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent GBM, including resection, re-irradiation or systemic agents, but no standard of care exists. We analysed a cohort of patients with recurrent GBM treated with frame-less hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with a total dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. Of 91 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed GBM treated between 2007 and 2012 with conventional adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy, 15 underwent salvage RT at recurrence. The median time interval between primary RT and salvage RT was 10.8 months (range, 6–54 months). Overall, patients undergoing salvage RT showed a longer survival, with a median survival of 33 vs. 9.9 months (p= 0.00149). Median overall survival (OS) from salvage RT was 9.5 months. No patients demonstrated clinically significant acute morbidity, and all patients were able to complete the prescribed radiation therapy without interruption. Our results suggest that hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is effective and safe in recurrent GBM. However, until prospective randomized trials will confirm these results, the decision for salvage treatment should remain individual and based on a multidisciplinary evaluation of each patient

  2. Log-linear models in life table analysis for radiation therapy: an analysis based upon Hodgkin's disease outcome data from the patterns of care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for coding clinical experience and deriving treatment parameters from it is described. The method combines life table analysis with log-linear contingency also prescribes a representation of the heterogeneous patient population for fair comparison. An example is given from Patterns of Care Hodgkin's Disease Outcome Study, a national survey of radiation therapy processes and results

  3. Pulmonary function tests after radiation therapy following pneumonectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is often necessary after pneumonectomy, either immediately or due to local cancer recurrence. High radiation doses represent a challenge due to the limited tolerance of the necessity of preserving and protecting the remaining lung parenchyma. The use of CT scan based-treatment planning allows delivery of high radiation doses. To evaluate the radiation tolerance of the lung after high radiation dose, we compared pulmonary function tests performed before surgery and after radiation therapy. Ten male patients (mean age, 56 years old; age range, 45-73) were irradiated after pneumonectomy for lung cancer. All patients had a CT scan-based treatment planning. The mean radiation dose was 56 Gy (45-66 Gy) delivered with a linear accelerator and multiple complex fields. Two or more sets of pulmonary function tests were available (before surgery and 2 to 6 months after radiation). No patient developed clinical radiation pneumonitis and most of the patients had a minimal para-mediastinal fibrosis at CT scan. Postirradiation pulmonary lung tests were compared to the theoretical values of the estimated defect observed after pneumonectomy. No significant decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1s/inspiratory vital capacity (FEV1/IVC) was observed in ten evaluable patients; the observed values were comparable to those expected after pneumonectomy without irradiation (FEV1/IVC: 61 to 100%), showing that irradiation did not alter pulmonary function. Computerized tomography-based treatment planning and the use of complex beam positioning allowed optimal lung parenchymal preservation. Through this procedure, high doses of radiation can be delivered to the mediastinum and bed tumor. Comparison of pulmonary function tests performed before surgery and after radiation showed no alteration of lung function, even after high doses. Optimal tools required for the evaluation of radiation on lung parenchyma are still to be defined. (authors)

  4. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  5. An integrated ultrasound-computer dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly interactive on-line computer-based radiation therapy planning system has been developed to allow first-hand participation by the physician for maximum input of clinical judgement in treatment planning. The system utilizes an ultrasound scanning device for acquisition of the patient's contour and anatomical information for simultaneous evaluation by the therapist and processing by the computer. The man-machine interaction and graphic data entry are achieved through a sonic graph pen digitizer mounted on the screen of a multi-colour video monitor. A second graph pen digitizer on a radiograph view box is used for digitization and entry to the computer of other graphic data sources. Radiation treatment parameters are graphically entered directly on the echogram of the patient's cross-sectional anatomy. The radiation dose distribution for a proposed plan is then computed and displayed superimposed in a contrasting colour on the echogram for further scrutiny by the therapist and possible modification. When an acceptable plan is produced, the radiation fields are accurately marked on the patient body in reference to the radiation ports displayed. The system is used for external beam planning with simple, multiple, and irregular fields and intracavitary and interstitial implant dosimetry. Since in this system the radiation delivery is planned based on the cross-sectional anatomy, it is well suited for planning of heavy particle beam therapy which utilizes the stopping characteristics of the accelerated particles in the absorbing medium. (author)

  6. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm3 increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors

  7. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  8. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen, Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-08-01

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m3 MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within ±4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC-based

  9. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  10. Palliative radiation therapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a useful palliative modality for refractory lesions of multiple myeloma. It has been reported that total doses of 10 to 20 Gy are usually adequate to obtain some degree of pain relief. However, there are many patients who need additional doses to obtain sufficient pain relief. In this study. we retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with multiple myeloma irradiated at our department, in an attempt to develop an effective treatment policy for this disease. Twenty-nine patients with 53 lesions were treated between 1968 and 1993. Total irradiation doses were 4 to 60 Gy (median 40 Gy) with daily fractions of 2 Gy or less, and 16 to 51 Gy (median 30 Gy) with daily fractions greater than 2 Gy. Evaluated were 59 symptoms, including pain (68%), neurological abnormalities (15%), and masses (28%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 33 of 36 (92%) lesions with pain, 6 of 8 (75%) with neurological abnormalities, and 13 of 15 (87%) mass lesions. Pain was partially relieved at a median TDF of 34, and completely at a median TDF of 66 (equivalent to 40-42 Gy with daily fractions of 2 Gy). Radiation therapy is an effective and palliative treatment method for symptomatic multiple myeloma. However, the treatment seems to require higher radiation doses than those reported to obtain adequate relief of symptoms. (author)

  11. Radiation Therapy Result of Polymorphic Reticulosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Kim, Gwi Eon; Park, Young Nyun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-15

    During the period from January, 1975, to June, 1989, one hundred patients with histopathologically proven polymorphic reticulosis in the upper respiratory tract were treated with radiation therapy and the analysis of treatment results was undertaken. One hundred patients (69 males, 31 females) with a mean age of 46 years (range 12-79 years) were presented. Nasal cavity was the most frequent site of involvement(56%), and 44 cases had multifocal sites of involvement. The incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 24%. Staging was determined by Ann-Arbor classification, retrospectively. The number of patients of stage IE, IIE, IIIE and IVE were 35, 60, 1, and 4, respectively. The overall 5 year actuarial survival rates were 38.4%. The difference in 5 year survival rates between patients with stage IE and IIE, with solitary and multiple, with CR and PR after irradiation were significant statistically. For the analysis of failure patterns, failure sites include the following: local failure alone(30/55=54.6%), systemic failure alone(9/55=16.4%), both local and systemic failure(16/55=29.0%). Retrograde slide review was available in 29 cases of PMR with respect to histopathologic bases, and immunohistochemical studies were performed using MTI and DACO-UCHL-1 as T-cell markers, MB2 as a B-cell marker and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin as a histiocytic markers. All that 29 cases showed characteristic histologic features similar to those of peripheral T-cell lymphoma and showed positive reactio to the T-cell marker. These findings suggest strongly that quite a significant portion of PMR may be in fact T-cell lymphoma.

  12. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  13. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of Swedish oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. In primary breast cancer, it is estimated that about 300 of the annually 3,425 irradiated patients can potentially be candidates for proton beam therapy to reduce late toxicity, mainly from the heart and lungs

  14. Megavoltage radiation therapy: Meeting the technological needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In its simplest description, the purpose of radiation therapy is to hit the target and to miss all other parts of the patient. While there are multiple technological methods available for doing this, the actual radiation treatment needs to be considered in the broader context of the total radiation treatment process. This process contains multiple steps, each of which has an impact on the quality of the treatment and on the possible clinical outcome. One crucial step in this process is the determination of the location and extent of the disease relative to the adjacent normal tissues. This can be done in a variety of ways, ranging from simple clinical examination to the use of complex 3-D imaging, sometimes aided by contrast agents. As part of this localization process, it is very important that patient immobilization procedures be implemented to ensure that the same patient position will be used during both the planning and the daily treatment stages. With the knowledge of the location of the target and the critical tissues, decisions can be made about the appropriate beam arrangements to provide adequate tumour coverage while sparing the healthy tissues. This beam arrangement may have to be confirmed on a therapy simulator prior to actual implementation of the radiation treatment. In summary, the treatment process includes diagnosis, patient immobilization, target and normal tissue localization, beam selection, beam shaping, dose calculation, technique optimization, simulation, prescription, treatment verification and, finally, treatment. Dependent on the type of disease, it is not necessary that every patient undergoes all of the steps in the process; however, it is necessary that each step of the process used for a particular patient be carried out with the greatest accuracy. Uncertainties at any stage of the process will be carried through to subsequent stages and have an impact on clinical outcome. It is, therefore, important to recognize, when

  15. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR

  16. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren's disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  17. Mini-TEPCs for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mini-tissue-equivalent proportional-counter (TEPC) has been constructed to study the possibility to manufacture mini-counters without field-shaping tubes for radiation therapy. The mini-TEPC can be assembled with and without field-shaping tubes. It can be equipped with a mini-alpha source for a precise lineal energy calibration. After the positive conclusions of this study, a slim TEPC has been designed and constructed. The slim TEPC has an external diameter of only 2.7 mm. It has been tested with therapeutic proton beams and gamma ray sources. (authors)

  18. New irradiation geometry for microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) has the potential to treat infantile brain tumours when other kinds of radiotherapy would be excessively toxic to the developing normal brain. MRT uses extraordinarily high doses of x-rays but provides unusual resistance to radioneurotoxicity, presumably from the migration of endothelial cells from 'valleys' into 'peaks', i.e., into directly irradiated microslices of tissues. We present a novel irradiation geometry which results in a tolerable valley dose for the normal tissue and a decreased peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) in the tumour area by applying an innovative cross-firing technique. We propose an MRT technique to orthogonally crossfire two arrays of parallel, nonintersecting, mutually interspersed microbeams that produces tumouricidal doses with small PVDRs where the arrays meet and tolerable radiation doses to normal tissues between the microbeams proximal and distal to the tumour in the paths of the arrays

  19. TH-C-17A-02: New Radioluminescence Strategies Based On CRET (Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer) for Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotskova, O; Sun, C; Pratx, G; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov photons are produced when charged particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a media with a speed greater than that of the light in the media. Cerenkov radiation is mostly in the UV/Blue region and, thus, readily absorbed by biological tissue. Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) is a wavelength-shifting phenomenon from blue Cerenkov light to more penetrating red wavelengths. We demonstrate the feasibility of in-depth imaging of CRET light originating from radionuclides realized by down conversion of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, a novel particle composed of few atoms of gold coated with serum proteins) in vivo. Methods: Bovine Serum Albumin, Human Serum Albumin and Transferrin conjugated gold nanoclusters were synthesized, characterized and examined for CRET. Three different clinically used radiotracers: 18F-FDG, 90Y and 99mTc were used. Optical spectrum (440–750 nm) was recorded by sensitive bioluminescence imaging system at physiological temperature. Dose dependence (activity range from 0.5 up to 800uCi) and concentration dependence (0.01 to 1uM) studies were carried out. The compound was also imaged in a xenograft mouse model. Results: Only β+ and β--emitting radionuclides (18F-FDG, 90Y) are capable of CRET; no signal was found in 99mTc (γ-emitter). The emission peak of CRET by AuNCs was found to be ∼700 nm and was ∼3 fold times of background. In vitro studies showed a linear dependency between luminescence intensity and dose and concentration. CRET by gold nanoclusters was observed in xenografted mice injected with 100uCi of 18F-FDG. Conclusion: The unique optical, transport and chemical properties of AuNCs (gold nanoclusters) make them ideal candidates for in-vivo imaging applications. Development of new molecular imaging probes will allow us to achieve substantially improved spatiotemporal resolution, sensitivity and specificity for tumor imaging and detection.

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  1. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI

  2. The preventation of radiation accidents in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radio-therapy planning system (RTPS) has improved the speed and accuracy of dose calculation and has come to be used in most hospitals in recent years. The RTPS calculated monitor unit (MU) defines the dose delivered to the patient. Radiation accidents caused by wrong MU calculated by erroneous basic data registration has frequently been reported in Japan. We investigated the MU calculated with the RTPS of this hospital. The measurement value resulted in the permissible error range set by the AAPM13 TG24 report. The basic data registered in the RTPS of this hospital and calculated MU were proven to be proper. (author)

  3. Emerging Canadian QA standards for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Canada operates a publicly funded health care system in which 70% of health care costs are paid by some level of government. Radiotherapy, indeed most cancer management, falls within the publicly funded realm of Canada's health care system. National legislation (the Canada Health Act) guarantees access to cancer services for all Canadians. However, the financial responsibility for these services is borne by the provinces. Most Canadian provinces manage the cancer management problem through central cancer agencies. In the past few decades, these provincial cancer agencies have formed the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies (CAPCA). This association has adopted a broad mandate for cancer management in Canada (see www.capca.ca). Included in this mandate is the adoption of standards and guidelines for all aspects of cancer control. The complexity of radiation therapy has long underscored the need for cooperation at the international and national levels in defining programmes and standards. In recent decades formal quality assurance programme recommendations have emerged in the United States, Europe and Great Britain. When defining quality assurance programs, Canadian radiation treatment centres have referenced U.S. and other program standards since they have been available. Recently, under the leadership of the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies (CAPCA), Canadian national quality assurance program recommendations are emerging. A CAPCA sponsored project to harmonize Canadian quality assurance processes has resulted in a draft document entitled 'Standards for Quality Assurance at Canadian Radiation Treatment Centres'. This document provides recommendations for the broad framework of radiation therapy quality assurance programs. In addition, detailed work is currently underway regarding equipment quality control procedures. This paper explores the historical and political landscape in which the quality assurance problem has

  4. Involvement of Toll-like receptors in acute radiation syndrome and radiation therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are one of pattern recognition receptors that are indispensable for antibacterial and antiviral immunity. After TLRs sense pathogen-derived components, they activate intracellular signaling pathways, which results in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Although it is well known that radiation therapy is one of effective cancer therapies, radiation affects immune system. Recent evidences show the involvement of TLR in acute radiation syndrome and radiation therapy for cancer. I summarize to date knowledge on the involvement of Toll-like receptors in acute radiation syndromes and radiation therapy for cancer, and discuss the effects of ionizing radiation on TLR of innate immune cells. (author)

  5. A Comparison of Evidence-Based Estimates and Empirical Benchmarks of the Appropriate Rate of Use of Radiation Therapy in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Estimates of the appropriate rate of use of radiation therapy (RT) are required for planning and monitoring access to RT. Our objective was to compare estimates of the appropriate rate of use of RT derived from mathematical models, with the rate observed in a population of patients with optimal access to RT. Methods and Materials: The rate of use of RT within 1 year of diagnosis (RT1Y) was measured in the 134,541 cases diagnosed in Ontario between November 2009 and October 2011. The lifetime rate of use of RT (RTLIFETIME) was estimated by the multicohort utilization table method. Poisson regression was used to evaluate potential barriers to access to RT and to identify a benchmark subpopulation with unimpeded access to RT. Rates of use of RT were measured in the benchmark subpopulation and compared with published evidence-based estimates of the appropriate rates. Results: The benchmark rate for RT1Y, observed under conditions of optimal access, was 33.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.0%-34.1%), and the benchmark for RTLIFETIME was 41.5% (95% CI, 41.2%-42.0%). Benchmarks for RTLIFETIME for 4 of 5 selected sites and for all cancers combined were significantly lower than the corresponding evidence-based estimates. Australian and Canadian evidence-based estimates of RTLIFETIME for 5 selected sites differed widely. RTLIFETIME in the overall population of Ontario was just 7.9% short of the benchmark but 20.9% short of the Australian evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate. Conclusions: Evidence-based estimates of the appropriate lifetime rate of use of RT may overestimate the need for RT in Ontario

  6. A Comparison of Evidence-Based Estimates and Empirical Benchmarks of the Appropriate Rate of Use of Radiation Therapy in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kong, Weidong; Brundage, Michael; Hanna, Timothy P.; Zhang-Salomons, Jina; McLaughlin, Pierre-Yves [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Vancouver Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Estimates of the appropriate rate of use of radiation therapy (RT) are required for planning and monitoring access to RT. Our objective was to compare estimates of the appropriate rate of use of RT derived from mathematical models, with the rate observed in a population of patients with optimal access to RT. Methods and Materials: The rate of use of RT within 1 year of diagnosis (RT{sub 1Y}) was measured in the 134,541 cases diagnosed in Ontario between November 2009 and October 2011. The lifetime rate of use of RT (RT{sub LIFETIME}) was estimated by the multicohort utilization table method. Poisson regression was used to evaluate potential barriers to access to RT and to identify a benchmark subpopulation with unimpeded access to RT. Rates of use of RT were measured in the benchmark subpopulation and compared with published evidence-based estimates of the appropriate rates. Results: The benchmark rate for RT{sub 1Y}, observed under conditions of optimal access, was 33.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.0%-34.1%), and the benchmark for RT{sub LIFETIME} was 41.5% (95% CI, 41.2%-42.0%). Benchmarks for RT{sub LIFETIME} for 4 of 5 selected sites and for all cancers combined were significantly lower than the corresponding evidence-based estimates. Australian and Canadian evidence-based estimates of RT{sub LIFETIME} for 5 selected sites differed widely. RT{sub LIFETIME} in the overall population of Ontario was just 7.9% short of the benchmark but 20.9% short of the Australian evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate. Conclusions: Evidence-based estimates of the appropriate lifetime rate of use of RT may overestimate the need for RT in Ontario.

  7. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of parotid carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy appears to be useful in postoperative management of patients with parotid gland tumors. Because the local recurrence rate is excessive, postoperative irradiation should be routinely considered for high grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas, all squamous cell, adeno- and undifferentiated carcinomas of the parotid. Doses should be at least equivalent to 6500 rads in 6 weeks to 4 cm. depth (or measured tumor depth). The radiation fields should cover the base of skull and lower neck to prevent extension of the cancer. (U.S.)

  8. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  9. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  10. Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5Σ + 0.7 σ, where Σ and σ were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, −0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, −0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup

  11. Towards a quantitative, measurement-based estimate of the uncertainty in photon mass attenuation coefficients at radiation therapy energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a quantitative estimate is derived for the uncertainty in the XCOM photon mass attenuation coefficients in the energy range of interest to external beam radiation therapy—i.e. 100 keV (orthovoltage) to 25 MeV—using direct comparisons of experimental data against Monte Carlo models and theoretical XCOM data. Two independent datasets are used. The first dataset is from our recent transmission measurements and the corresponding EGSnrc calculations (Ali et al 2012 Med. Phys. 39 5990–6003) for 10–30 MV photon beams from the research linac at the National Research Council Canada. The attenuators are graphite and lead, with a total of 140 data points and an experimental uncertainty of ∼0.5% (k = 1). An optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor that minimizes the discrepancies between measurements and calculations is used to deduce cross section uncertainty. The second dataset is from the aggregate of cross section measurements in the literature for graphite and lead (49 experiments, 288 data points). The dataset is compared to the sum of the XCOM data plus the IAEA photonuclear data. Again, an optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor is used to deduce the cross section uncertainty. Using the average result from the two datasets, the energy-independent cross section uncertainty estimate is 0.5% (68% confidence) and 0.7% (95% confidence). The potential for energy-dependent errors is discussed. Photon cross section uncertainty is shown to be smaller than the current qualitative ‘envelope of uncertainty’ of the order of 1–2%, as given by Hubbell (1999 Phys. Med. Biol 44 R1–22). (paper)

  12. The Rate of Secondary Malignancies After Radical Prostatectomy Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study on 17,845 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) may predispose to secondary malignancies that include bladder cancer (BCa), rectal cancer (RCa), and lung cancer (LCa). We tested this hypothesis in a large French Canadian population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Overall, 8,455 radical prostatectomy (RP) and 9,390 EBRT patients treated between 1983 and 2003 were assessed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. Three endpoints were examined: (1) diagnosis of secondary BCa, (2) LCa, or (3) RCa. Covariates included age, Charlson comorbidity index, and year of treatment. Results: In multivariable analyses that relied on incident cases diagnosed 60 months or later after RP or EBRT, the rates of BCa (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; p = 0.02), LCa (HR, 2.0; p = 0.004), and RCa (HR 2.1; p <0.001) were significantly higher in the EBRT group. When incident cases diagnosed 120 months or later after RP or EBRT were considered, only the rates of RCa (hazard ratio 2.2; p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the EBRT group. In both analyses, the absolute differences in incident rates ranged from 0.7 to 5.2% and the number needed to harm (where harm equaled secondary malignancies) ranged from 111 to 19, if EBRT was used instead of RP. Conclusions: EBRT may predispose to clinically meaningfully higher rates of secondary BCa, LCa and RCa. These rates should be included in informed consent consideration.

  13. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  14. Evaluation of an atlas-based automatic segmentation software for the delineation of brain organs at risk in a radiation therapy clinical context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Conformal radiation therapy techniques require the delineation of volumes of interest, a time-consuming and operator-dependent task. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the potential interest of an atlas-based automatic segmentation software (ABAS) of brain organs at risk (OAR), when used under our clinical conditions. Materials and methods: Automatic and manual segmentations of the eyes, optic nerves, optic chiasm, pituitary gland, brain stem and cerebellum of 11 patients on T1-weighted magnetic resonance, 3-mm thick slice images were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The sensitivity and specificity of the ABAS were also computed and analysed from a radiotherapy point of view by splitting the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) space into four sub-regions. Results: Automatic segmentation of OAR was achieved in 7-8 min. Excellent agreement was obtained between automatic and manual delineations for organs exceeding 7 cm3: the DSC was greater than 0.8. For smaller structures, the DSC was lower than 0.41. Conclusions: These tests demonstrated that this ABAS is a robust and reliable tool for automatic delineation of large structures under clinical conditions in our daily practice, even though the small structures must continue to be delineated manually by an expert

  15. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  16. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV-WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV-Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV-Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV-WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV-Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV-WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV-Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  17. Radiation therapy of psoriasis and parapsoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective UV-Phototherapy with lambda 300-320 nm (SUP) as well as oral photochemotherapy with 8-methoxy-psoralen plus UVA-radiation (PUVA intern) are very effective in clearing the lesions of the generalized psoriasis and those of the chronic forms of parapsoriasis. Being treated with 4 suberythemal doses per week psoriasis patients are free or nearly free of symptoms after averagely 6.3 weeks of SUP-therapy or after 5.3 weeks of PUVA orally. The PUVA-therapy is mainly indicated in pustular, inverse and erythrodermic psoriasis as well as in parapsoriasis en plaques and variegata. In all other forms of psoriasis and in pityriasis lichenoides-chronica, we prefer the SUP-therapy because of less acute or chronic side effects, and because of its better practicability. X-rays are indicated in psoriais of nails, grenz-rays in superficial psoriatic lesions of the face, the armpits, the genitals and the anal region. (orig.)

  18. Stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma treated post-orchiectomy with radiation therapy versus other approaches: a population-based analysis of 241 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kamran A. Ahmed; Wilder, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate post-orchiectomy utilization of radiation therapy (RT) versus other management approaches in stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma patients. Materials and Methods Two hundred and forty-one patients with stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma were identified between 1988 and 2003 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Results Median follow-up was 10 years. Patients with stage IIA disease underwent RT more frequently than those with stage II...

  19. CT-scan based localization of the internal mammary chain and supra clavicular nodes for breast cancer radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the influence of the position and the exact localizations of supra clavicular nodes (SCN) and internal mammary chain (IMC) and their variability among patients in order to improve treatment planning in breast cancer (BC) patients. Patients and methods: A total of 46 CT scans of the chest were examined. All patients were female treated with breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy. The study was divided into two phases. The first consisted of measurements on 20 diagnostic CT scans, performed in the supine position with both arms over the head. All patients received contrast. This first phase was performed as a training program for radiologist and radiation oncologist to prepare for the second phase of the study: 26 CT scans in treatment position on angled board without injection. For this second group, patients had one arm raised above the head (treated side) and the other kept by the side (contralateral side). Measurements were performed on both sides to evaluate the influence of the arm position. The depths of IM- and SC vessels were measured at five points: (1) the origin of the internal mammary artery, (2) the sterno-clavicular articulation, (3-5) the first, second and third rib interspaces (RI). Measurements of the depth and of the distance between the internal mammary vessels and the middle axis of the sternum were obtained using electronic calipers on a PACS workstation. Results: There were important individual variations of the depth of SCN, as follows: 20-84 mm (diagnostic) and 19-64 (treatment position). No differences in the depth of the IMC were found between treated and contralateral side at the region of the I, II, and III rib interspaces. The lateral margin of the IMC was never more than 40 mm from the middle axis of the sternum (I, II, III rib interspaces). There was no difference in the lateral limits of IMC (the distance between the IM vessels and the middle axis of the sternum) between the two sides: treated

  20. Dose calculation algorithms for radiation therapy with an MRI-Integrated radiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) aims at improving therapy outcome on the basis of more precise knowledge of the anatomical and physiological situation during treatment. By integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), better differentiation is possible between the target volume to be irradiated and healthy surrounding tissues. In addition, changes that occur either between or during treatment fractions can be taken into account. On the basis of this information, a better conformation of radiation dose to the target volume may be achieved, which may in turn improve prognosis and reduce radiation side effects. This requires a precise calculation of radiation dose in a magnetic field that is present in these integrated irradiation devices. Real-time adaptation of the treatment plan is aimed at for which fast dose calculation is needed. Kernel-based methods are good candidates to achieve short calculation times; however, they presently only exist for radiation therapy in the absence of magnetic fields. This work suggests and investigates two approaches towards kernel-based dose calculation algorithms. One of them is integrated into treatment plan optimisation and applied to four clinical cases.

  1. How Should I Care for Myself During Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients to be advocates. View more information How Should I Care for Myself During Radiation Therapy? Get ... decrease some of their treatment-related fatigue. You should ask your radiation oncologist what the best form ...

  2. Megavoltage radiation therapy: Meeting the technological needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of radiation therapy is complex and contains multiple steps, each of which has an impact on the quality of the treatment and on the possible clinical outcome. This treatment process includes diagnosis, patient immobilization, target and normal tissue localization, beam selection, beam shaping, dose calculation, technique optimization, simulation, prescription, treatment verification and, finally, the actual radiation treatment. Depending on the type of disease, it is not necessary that every patient undergo all the steps in the process; however, it is necessary that each step of the process used for a particular patient be carried out with the greatest accuracy. Inaccuracies at any stage of the process will be carried through to subsequent stages and have an impact on clinical outcome. It is therefore important to recognize, when addressing technological needs for megavoltage radiation treatment, that the radiation treatment machine technology should not be considered in isolation from the technologies associated with the other steps of the treatment process. In the purchase of radiation treatment equipment in any country, the following should be considered: (a) the availability and reliability of a country's physical infrastructure; (b) financial considerations; (c) the types and stages of disease most likely to be treated; (d) the number and types of professional staff available to apply the treatment technologies; (e) professional staff training and continuing education resources; (f) the number of patients requiring treatment with the treatment equipment available (i.e. the efficient use of available resources); (g) the treatment planning technologies (e.g. immobilization, imaging and the treatment planning computer) available to prepare the patient for the actual irradiation procedure; (h) the technological considerations of the therapy equipment in the context of the above factors (e.g. 60Co versus linac); (i) the cost of maintenance and local

  3. Potential for heavy particle radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy remains one of the major forms of cancer treatment. When x rays are used in radiotherapy, there are large variations in radiation sensitivity among tumors because of the possible differences in the presence of hypoxic but viable tumor cells, differences in reoxygenation during treatment, differences in distribution of the tumor cells in their cell cycle, and differences in repair of sublethal damage. When high-LET particles are used, depending upon the LET distribution, these differences are reduced considerably. Because of these differences between x rays and high-LET particle effects, the high-LET particles may be more effective on tumor cells for a given effect on normal cells. Heavy particles have potential application in improving radiotherapy because of improved dose localization and possible advantages of high-LET particles due to their radiobiological characteristics. Protons, because of their defined range, Bragg peak, and small effects of scattering, have good dose localization characteristics. The use of protons in radiotherapy minimizes the morbidity of radiotherapy treatment and is very effective in treating deep tumors located near vital structures. Fast neutrons have no physical advantages over 60Co gamma rays but, because of their high-LET component, could be very effective in treating tumors that are resistant to conventional radiations. Negative pions and heavy ions combine some of the advantages of protons and fast neutrons

  4. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinoma of the ear is rarely reported. From 1978 through 1992, we treated 9 patients, of whom 5 had malignant tumors of the external auditory canal and 4 had malignant tumors of the middle ear, with radiation. These patients accounted for only 0.9% of all patients with head and neck carcinomas treated with radiation at our hospital. Most patients had otorrhea and otalgia, but few patients had specific symptoms of carcinoma. The outcome in cases in which radiotherapy was given after tumor was completely resected was good. The overall 5-year survival rate was 55%. In addition, the 3-year survival rates in cases of carcinoma of the middle ear and of the external auditory canal were 50% and 60%. However, there was no statistical difference in 5-year survival rates between the two sites. We believe factors that affect prognosis are early diagnosis of malignant change, the area of tumor involvement at diagnosis, and combined therapy with surgery and radiation. (author)

  5. The Impact of Brachytherapy on Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality for Definitive Radiation Therapy of High-Grade Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This population-based analysis compared prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of patients with high-risk prostate cancer after nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), or combination (BT + EBRT). Methods and Materials: We identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database patients diagnosed from 1988 through 2002 with T1–T3N0M0 prostate adenocarcinoma of poorly differentiated grade and treated with BT, EBRT, or BT + EBRT. During this time frame, the database defined high grade as prostate cancers with Gleason score 8–10, or Gleason grade 4–5 if the score was not recorded. This corresponds to a cohort primarily with high-risk prostate cancer, although some cases where only Gleason grade was recorded may have included intermediate-risk cancer. We used multivariate models to examine patient and tumor characteristics associated with the likelihood of treatment with each radiation modality and the effect of radiation modality on PCSM. Results: There were 12,745 patients treated with EBRT (73.5%), BT (7.1%), or BT + EBRT (19.4%) included in the analysis. The median follow-up time for all patients was 6.4 years. The use of BT or BT + EBRT increased from 5.1% in 1988–1992 to 31.4% in 1998–2002. Significant predictors of use of BT or BT + EBRT were younger age, later year of diagnosis, urban residence, and earlier T-stage. On multivariate analysis, treatment with either BT (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–0.86) or BT + EBRT (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence ratio, 0.66–0.90) was associated with significant reduction in PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Conclusion: In patients with high-grade prostate cancer, treatment with brachytherapy is associated with reduced PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Our results suggest that brachytherapy should be investigated as a component of definitive treatment strategies for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  6. Application of the measurement-based Monte Carlo method in nasopharyngeal cancer patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to utilize a measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method to evaluate the accuracy of dose distributions calculated using the Eclipse radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) based on the anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dose distributions were calculated for the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten NPC IMRT plans were evaluated by comparing their dose distributions with those obtained from the in-house MBMC programs for the same CT images and beam geometry. To reconstruct the fluence distribution of the IMRT field, an efficiency map was obtained by dividing the energy fluence of the intensity modulated field by that of the open field, both acquired from an aS1000 electronic portal imaging device. The integrated image of the non-gated mode was used to acquire the full dose distribution delivered during the IMRT treatment. This efficiency map redistributed the particle weightings of the open field phase-space file for IMRT applications. Dose differences were observed in the tumor and air cavity boundary. The mean difference between MBMC and TPS in terms of the planning target volume coverage was 0.6% (range: 0.0–2.3%). The mean difference for the conformity index was 0.01 (range: 0.0–0.01). In conclusion, the MBMC method serves as an independent IMRT dose verification tool in a clinical setting. - Highlights: ► The patient-based Monte Carlo method serves as a reference standard to verify IMRT doses. ► 3D Dose distributions for NPC patients have been verified by the Monte Carlo method. ► Doses predicted by the Monte Carlo method matched closely with those by the TPS. ► The Monte Carlo method predicted a higher mean dose to the middle ears than the TPS. ► Critical organ doses should be confirmed to avoid overdose to normal organs

  7. /sup 192/Ir pharyngoepiglottic fold interstitial implants. The key to successful treatment of base tongue carcinoma by radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.E. Jr.; Wells, J.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Clarke, D.; Mariscal, J.M.; Goode, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    Twenty-eight patients with squamous carcinomas of the base tongue were seen and evaluated in a conjoint Head and Neck Tumor Board at Stanford between 1976 and 1982. Fourteen patients were treated by combined external beam and interstitial irradiation, 11 of whom had Stage III and IV carcinomas (American Joint Committee). An initial dose of 5000 to 5500 rad was first delivered by external beam irradiation in 5 to 5.5 weeks, followed approximately 3 weeks later by an iridium 192 interstitial implant boost by the trocar and loop technique. The key to successful treatment of these neoplasms was found to be the use of a lateral percutaneous cervical technique, which placed horizontal loops through the oropharyngeal wall above and below the hyoid bone; the superior loop included the pharyngoepiglottic fold and the tonsilloglossal groove. Standard multiple loop implants (submentally inserted) of the base tongue from the vallecula anteriorly to the circumvallate papillae were also used routinely. This approach has been successful, since 10 of the 14 patients (71%) remain without evidence of disease (mean follow-up, 32 months). There have been only two local recurrences, both on the pharyngoepiglottic fold in patients who did not receive the now standard pharyngoepiglottic fold/lateral pharyngeal wall implants. No patients have relapsed after 18 months. The other 14 patients were treated prospectively during the same period by combining initial resection, radical neck dissection, and postoperative irradiation.

  8. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  9. Comparison of CT and integrated PET-CT based radiation therapy planning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When combined with adequate tumoricidal doses, accurate target volume delineation remains to be the one of the most important predictive factors for radiotherapy (RT) success in locally advanced or medically inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Recently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated significant improvements in diagnosis and accurate staging of MPM. However, role of additional PET data has not been studied in RT planning (RTP) of patients with inoperable MPM or in those who refuse surgery. Therefore, we planned to compare CT with co-registered PET-CT as the basis for delineating target volumes in these patients group. Retrospectively, the CT and co-registered PET-CT data of 13 patients with histologically proven MPM were utilized to delineate target volumes separately. For each patient, target volumes (gross tumor volume [GTV], clinical target volume [CTV], and planning target volume [PTV]) were defined using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. The PTV was measured in two ways: PTV1 was CTV plus a 1-cm margin, and PTV2 was GTV plus a 1-cm margin. We analyzed differences in target volumes. In 12 of 13 patients, compared to CT-based delineation, PET-CT-based delineation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the mean GTV, CTV, PTV1, and PTV2. In these 12 patients, mean GTV decreased by 47.1% ± 28.4%, mean CTV decreased by 38.7% ± 24.7%, mean PTV1 decreased by 31.1% ± 23.1%, and mean PTV2 decreased by 40.0% ± 24.0%. In 4 of 13 patients, hilar lymph nodes were identified by PET-CT that was not identified by CT alone, changing the nodal status of tumor staging in those patients. This study demonstrated the usefulness of PET-CT-based target volume delineation in patients with MPM. Co-registration of PET and CT information reduces the likelihood of geographic misses, and additionally, significant reductions observed in target volumes may potentially allow escalation of RT dose beyond

  10. Megavoltage X-Ray Imaging Based on Cerenkov Effect: A New Application of Optical Fibres to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teymurazyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study imaging and dosimetric characteristics of a novel design of megavoltage (MV X-ray detectors for radiotherapy applications. The new design uses Cerenkov effect to convert X-ray energy absorbed in optical fibres into light for MV X-ray imaging. The proposed detector consists of a matrix of optical fibres aligned with the incident X rays and coupled to an active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI for image readout. Properties, such as modulation transfer function, detection quantum efficiency (DQE, and energy response of the detector, were investigated. It has been shown that the proposed detector can have a zero-frequency DQE more than an order of magnitude higher than that of current electronic portal imaging device (EPID systems and yet a spatial resolution comparable to that of video-based EPIDs. The proposed detector is also less sensitive to scattered X rays from patients than current EPIDs.

  11. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens

  12. SU-E-J-16: Automatic Image Contrast Enhancement Based On Automatic Parameter Optimization for Radiation Therapy Setup Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In RT patient setup 2D images, tissues often cannot be seen well due to the lack of image contrast. Contrast enhancement features provided by image reviewing software, e.g. Mosaiq and ARIA, require manual selection of the image processing filters and parameters thus inefficient and cannot be automated. In this work, we developed a novel method to automatically enhance the 2D RT image contrast to allow automatic verification of patient daily setups as a prerequisite step of automatic patient safety assurance. Methods: The new method is based on contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and high-pass filtering algorithms. The most important innovation is to automatically select the optimal parameters by optimizing the image contrast. The image processing procedure includes the following steps: 1) background and noise removal, 2) hi-pass filtering by subtracting the Gaussian smoothed Result, and 3) histogram equalization using CLAHE algorithm. Three parameters were determined through an iterative optimization which was based on the interior-point constrained optimization algorithm: the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor, the CLAHE algorithm block size and clip limiting parameters. The goal of the optimization is to maximize the entropy of the processed Result. Results: A total 42 RT images were processed. The results were visually evaluated by RT physicians and physicists. About 48% of the images processed by the new method were ranked as excellent. In comparison, only 29% and 18% of the images processed by the basic CLAHE algorithm and by the basic window level adjustment process, were ranked as excellent. Conclusion: This new image contrast enhancement method is robust and automatic, and is able to significantly outperform the basic CLAHE algorithm and the manual window-level adjustment process that are currently used in clinical 2D image review software tools

  13. Radiation reactions and injuries, their prophylaxis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most frequent local and total radiation reactions (epithema, dry and wet epidermitises, esophagitises, radiation variations of pulmonary tissues, the reaction of mucous membrane of the rectum, radiation cystitises) are described. The problems on delayed radiation injuries (delayed skin injuries, injuries of intestine, limbs, lungs, heart, organs of urochesia) are considered. Delayed radiation injuries are shown to be expected, if the tolerant level of healthy tissues irradiated increases during radiotherapy. Special attention is paid to prophylaxis and radiation injuries therapy

  14. iMagis 2.0: a platform toward image-based processes inherent to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the main weapons against the leading cause of death in Cuba. The integration between radiotherapy and imaging modalities show an increasing trend across clinical applications, innovation and research. The availability of a platform for the inclusion of new applications in this area is crucial. the goal of this work was to demonstrate the possibilities of iMagis 2.0 as an existing platform, with applications in the planning process of pre-treatment based on images of cancer patients. iMagis® was the first Cuban PACS DICOM support, and the most widely applied in the Cuban Health System. Some available plugins were applied for medical planning of simulated patients with a homemade flatbed prototype, the latter installed on a CT unit SHIMADZU SCT 7800 TC in an Oncology Center. Multiple views for definitions of treatment volume were used, including the two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions visualization. the viability of basic operations such as zoom images, rotations and translations are demonstrated. Monitoring changes in tumor volume during treatment were shown in combination with the estimated statistics of regions of interest. iMagis® supports a wide range of imaging modalities: computed Tomography, Magnetic Imaging PET / CT scan, Ultrasound, angiography, SPECT and providing a ready platform for adding new feature for radiotherapy and diagnostic. (Author)

  15. Effect of body mass index on shifts in ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy for abdominal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether corrective shifts determined by daily ultrasound-based image-guidance correlate with body mass index (BMI) of patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for abdominal malignancies. The utility of daily image-guidance, particularly for patients with BMI > 25.0, is examined. Materials and methods: Total 3162 ultrasound-directed shifts were performed in 86 patients. Direction and magnitude of shifts were correlated with pretreatment BMI. Bivariate statistical analysis and analysis of set-up correction data were performed using systematic and random error calculations. Results: Total 2040 daily alignments were performed. Average 3D vector of set-up correction for all patients was 12.1 mm/fraction. Directional and absolute shifts and 3D vector length were significantly different between BMI cohorts. 3D displacement averaged 4.9 mm/fraction and 6.8mm/fraction for BMI ≤ 25.0 and BMI > 25.0, respectively. Systematic error in all axes and 3D vector was significantly greater for BMI > 25.0. Differences in random error were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Set-up corrections derived from daily ultrasound-based IG-IMRT of abdominal tumors correlated with BMI. Daily image-guidance may improve precision of IMRT delivery with benefits assessed for the entire population, particularly patients with increased habitus. Requisite PTV margins suggested in the absence of daily image-guidance are significantly greater in patients with BMI > 25.0.

  16. How can we overcome tumor hypoxia in radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local recurrence and distant metastasis frequently occur after radiation therapy for cancer and can be fatal. Evidence obtained from radiochemical and radiobiological studies has revealed these problems to be caused, at least in part, by a tumor-specific microenvironment, hypoxia. Moreover, a transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), was identified as pivotal to hypoxia-mediated radioresistance. To overcome the problems, radiation oncologists have recently obtained powerful tools, such as 'simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT), which enables a booster dose of radiation to be delivered to small target fractions in a malignant tumor', 'hypoxia-selective cytotoxins/drugs', and 'HIF-1 inhibitors' etc. In order to fully exploit these innovative and interdisciplinary strategies in cancer therapy, it is critical to unveil the characteristics, intratumoral localization, and dynamics of hypoxia/HIF-1-active tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy. We have performed optical imaging experiments using tumor-bearing mice and revealed that the locations of HIF-1-active tumor cells changes dramatically as tumors grow. Moreover, HIF-1 activity changes markedly after radiation therapy. This review overviews fundamental problems surrounding tumor hypoxia in current radiation therapy, the function of HIF-1 in tumor radioresistance, the dynamics of hypoxic tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy, and how we should overcome the difficulties with radiation therapy using innovative interdisciplinary technologies. (author)

  17. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Clayton B; Thompson, Holly M; Benedict, Stanley H; Seibert, J Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T; Chen, Allen M

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning--a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of "gentle IGRT

  18. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-three patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were treated with radiation therapy alone between 1961 and 1980 at the NIRS. The five-year survival rate and local control rate in each stage were 91 % and 36 % in T2 and 71 % and 64 % in T3, respectively. These results indicated that the early detection of recurrent tumor by close follow-up and an adequate retreatment procedure is very important for prologing survival. Late recurrence, more than five years after treatment, appeared in 30 % of the patients and this may be one of the special figures of postirradiated vulval carcinoma. The primary site was irradiated with external electron beams or radium needles, and better results were obtained with the later. Irradiation to the lymph node area in the pelvic cavity was necessary in patients with a more advanced stage of disease than T2. (author)

  19. Clinical results of radiation therapy for thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasai, Keisuke; Kitakabu, Yoshizumi; Abe, Mitsuyuki (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, Masaji; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Fushiki, Masato

    1992-05-01

    From August 1968 to December 1989, 58 patients with thymoma were treated by radiotherapy using cobalt-60 gamma ray. Eleven cases were treated by radiothrapy alone, 1 by preoperative radiotheapy, 43 by postoperative radiotherapy, and 3 in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy. The following points were clarified: (a) Postoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy were effective; (b) For postoperative radiotherapy, operability was the major factor influencing survival and local control, and Stage I and II tumors resected totally or subtotally as well as Stage III tumors resected totally were good indications for such therapy; (c) The patients with complicating myasthenia gravis had a longer survival time and better local control rate than those without it. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17 patients, and none of them died of this complication. In all cases in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy, dry desquamation was observed within the irradiated field. (author).

  20. Radiation Therapy in Malignant Tumors of the Parotid Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Dong; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Kwang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 55 patients with malignant parotid tumor who were treated with radiation therapy between March, 1979 and July, 1989. Of these patients, 8 patients received radiation therapy(RT) alone and 47 patients were treated with combined operation and radiation therapy(OP+RT). The follow-up period of the survivors ranged form 1 to 129 months with a median of 48 months. The common histologic types were mucoepidermoid carcinoma (25 cases), malignant mixed tumor(12 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma(6 cases). The 5 and 10 year local control rate were 69.8% and 65.7% in all patients. In OP+RT group, prognostic factors related to local control were histologic grade, tumor size, lymph node metastasis. Resection of facial nerve did not affect the local control rate significantly(p=0.129). Distant metastasis developed in 23.6% of patients, mostly to the lung. Actuarial overall survival rate was 72.2% at 10 years and formed plateau after 5 years. Disease-free (NED) survival rate was 49.4% at 10 years and was better achieved in OP+RT group and low grade lesions. Based on our result, a well planned postoperative RT following parotidectomy is highly efficacious in controlling malignant tumors of the parotid gland and preservation of facial nerve.

  1. Radiation Therapy in Malignant Tumors of the Parotid Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 55 patients with malignant parotid tumor who were treated with radiation therapy between March, 1979 and July, 1989. Of these patients, 8 patients received radiation therapy(RT) alone and 47 patients were treated with combined operation and radiation therapy(OP+RT). The follow-up period of the survivors ranged form 1 to 129 months with a median of 48 months. The common histologic types were mucoepidermoid carcinoma (25 cases), malignant mixed tumor(12 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma(6 cases). The 5 and 10 year local control rate were 69.8% and 65.7% in all patients. In OP+RT group, prognostic factors related to local control were histologic grade, tumor size, lymph node metastasis. Resection of facial nerve did not affect the local control rate significantly(p=0.129). Distant metastasis developed in 23.6% of patients, mostly to the lung. Actuarial overall survival rate was 72.2% at 10 years and formed plateau after 5 years. Disease-free (NED) survival rate was 49.4% at 10 years and was better achieved in OP+RT group and low grade lesions. Based on our result, a well planned postoperative RT following parotidectomy is highly efficacious in controlling malignant tumors of the parotid gland and preservation of facial nerve

  2. An Evaluation of Dose Equivalence between Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy and Conventional Broadbeam Radiation Using Clonogenic and Cell Impedance Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Yuqing Yang; Marina Zaitseva; Andrew W Stevenson; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Premila Paiva

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB) radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHO...

  3. Radiation therapy for malignant lid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 42-year-old man with Meibomian gland carcinoma in his right lower lid is reported. The tumor found in the nasal part of the lower lid, was 12 mm x 13 mm in size. First, surgical resection was performed. The pathological diagnosis of the frozen section was 'undifferentiated basal cell epithelioma'. Second, cryotherapy was performed all over the cut surface. Later, the permanent section was pathologically diagnosed as 'undifferentiated Meibomian gland carcinoma'. Total 50 Gy irradiation therapy was therefore performed using a 9 Mev Linac electron beam, 25 x 20 mm field, with a lead protector for the cornea and lens. A lead contact lens did not afford good results because it was too easily shifted on the cornea, owing to its weight. Therefore, we made a racket-shaped lead protector. Fixed well with tape, this protector afforded good protective effect. Three years after treatment, the patient has good visual function, with no recurrence. This racket-shaped lead protector is thought to be useful in radiation therapy for malignant lid tumors. (author)

  4. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  5. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs

  6. Interfraction changes in the brain during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study population consisted of 63 patients with brain tumours treated using image-guided radiation therapy(IGRT). Cranial IGRT corrections were expected to be small, it was found that interfraction changes occurred in a sizable proportion of these radiation therapy patients. Such changes affect clinical target volume coverage and critical structure avoidance. (author)

  7. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840 Section 892.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy...

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy compared with radiation therapy alone in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to assess the outcomes of patients receiving such treatment. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 137 previously untreated and histologically confirmed advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with either radiation therapy only or combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy at the Seoul National University Hospital between 1984 and 1996. The stage distribution was as follows: AJCC Stage III-21, Stage IV-61 in the radiation therapy group (RT group); AJCC Stage III-1, Stage IV-54 in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy group (CT/RT group). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 48 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 71% for the CT/RT group and 59% for the RT group (p = 0.04). The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 63% for the CT/RT group and 52% for the RT group (p = 0.04). Distant metastasis (DM) incidence was significantly lower in the CT/RT group. The 5-year freedom from distant metastasis rates were 84% for the CT/RT group and 66% for the RT group (p 0.01). The incidence of locoregional failures was also lower in the CT/RT group, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (69% vs. 56%, p = 0.09) Conclusion: While not providing conclusive evidence, historical evidence from this institution suggests that neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improves both overall and the disease-free survival of patients with advanced stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  9. Radiation therapy - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung cancer - small cell Metastatic brain tumor Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Prostate cancer Testicular cancer Patient Instructions Abdominal radiation - discharge Bleeding during cancer treatment Brain radiation - discharge Breast radiation - discharge Chest radiation - ...

  10. Radiation therapy and photodynamic therapy for biliary tract and ampullary carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroya; Takada, Tadahiro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nagino, Masato; Kondo, Satoshi; Furuse, Junji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Kimura, Fumio; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Nozawa, Satoshi; YOSHIDA, Masahiro; Wada, Keita; Amano, Hodaka

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of radiation therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer is to prolong survival or prolong stent patency, and to provide palliation of pain. For unresectable bile duct cancer, there are a number of studies showing that radiation therapy is superior to the best supportive care. Although radiation therapy is used in many institutions, no large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed to date and the evidence level supporting the superiority of this treatment is low....

  11. Use of Single- versus Multiple-Fraction Palliative Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases: Population-Based Analysis of 16,898 Courses in a Canadian Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Robert A., E-mail: rolson2@bccancer.bc.ca [BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tiwana, Manpreet S. [BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Barnes, Mark [BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Kiraly, Andrew; Beecham, Kwamena [BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Miller, Stacy [BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hoegler, David [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: There is abundant evidence that a single fraction (SF) of palliative radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases is equivalent to more protracted and costly multiple fraction courses. Despite this, there is low utilization of SFRT internationally. We sought to determine the utilization of SFRT in a population-based, publicly funded health care system. Methods and Materials: All consecutive patients with bone metastases treated with RT during 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia (BC) were identified. Associations between utilization of SFRT and patient and provider characteristics were investigated. Results: A total of 16,898 courses of RT were delivered to 8601 patients. SFRT was prescribed 49% of the time. There were positive relationships among SFRT utilization and primary tumor group (P<.001; most commonly in prostate cancer), worse prognosis (P<.001), increasing physician experience (P<.001), site of metastases (P<.001; least for spine metastases), and area of training (P<.001; most commonly for oncologists trained in the United Kingdom). There was wide variation in the prescription of SFRT across 5 regional cancer centers, ranging from 25.5% to 73.4%, which persisted after controlling for other, potentially confounding factors (P<.001). Conclusions: The large variability in SFRT utilization across BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) cancer centers suggests there is a strong cultural effect, where physicians' use of SFRT is influenced by their colleagues' practice. SFRT use in BC was similar to that in other Canadian and western European reports but strikingly higher than in the United States. Further work is needed to standardize SFRT prescribing practices internationally for this common indication for RT, with the potential for huge health system cost savings and substantial improvements in patients' quality of life.

  12. Use of Single- versus Multiple-Fraction Palliative Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases: Population-Based Analysis of 16,898 Courses in a Canadian Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There is abundant evidence that a single fraction (SF) of palliative radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases is equivalent to more protracted and costly multiple fraction courses. Despite this, there is low utilization of SFRT internationally. We sought to determine the utilization of SFRT in a population-based, publicly funded health care system. Methods and Materials: All consecutive patients with bone metastases treated with RT during 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia (BC) were identified. Associations between utilization of SFRT and patient and provider characteristics were investigated. Results: A total of 16,898 courses of RT were delivered to 8601 patients. SFRT was prescribed 49% of the time. There were positive relationships among SFRT utilization and primary tumor group (P<.001; most commonly in prostate cancer), worse prognosis (P<.001), increasing physician experience (P<.001), site of metastases (P<.001; least for spine metastases), and area of training (P<.001; most commonly for oncologists trained in the United Kingdom). There was wide variation in the prescription of SFRT across 5 regional cancer centers, ranging from 25.5% to 73.4%, which persisted after controlling for other, potentially confounding factors (P<.001). Conclusions: The large variability in SFRT utilization across BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) cancer centers suggests there is a strong cultural effect, where physicians' use of SFRT is influenced by their colleagues' practice. SFRT use in BC was similar to that in other Canadian and western European reports but strikingly higher than in the United States. Further work is needed to standardize SFRT prescribing practices internationally for this common indication for RT, with the potential for huge health system cost savings and substantial improvements in patients' quality of life

  13. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part

  14. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  15. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  16. Radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideomi; Yamashita; Wataru; Takahashi; Akihiro; Haga; Keiichi; Nakagawa

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy(SBRT)has a locacontrol rate of 95%at 2 years for non-small cell lungcancer(NSCLC)and should improve the prognosis oinoperable patients,elderly patients,and patients withsignificant comorbidities who have early-stage NSCLCThe safety of SBRT is being confirmed in internationalmulti-institutional PhaseⅡtrials for peripheral lungcancer in both inoperable and operable patients,bureports so far have found that SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for early-stage NSCLC and early metastatic lung cancer.Radiation pneumonitis(RP)is oneof the most common toxicities of SBRT.Although mospost-treatment RP is Grade 1 or 2 and either asymptomatic or manageable,a few cases are severe,symptomatic,and there is a risk for mortality.The reportedrates of symptomatic RP after SBRT range from 9%to28%.Being able to predict the risk of RP after SBRT isextremely useful in treatment planning.A dose-effecrelationship has been demonstrated,but suggesteddose-volume factors like mean lung dose,lung V20and/or lung V2.5 differed among the reports.We foundthat patients who present with an interstitial pneumo-nitis shadow on computed tomography scan and high levels of serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein D have a high rate of severe radiation pneumo-nitis after SBRT.At our institution,lung cancer patients with these risk factors have not received SBRT since 2006,and our rate of severe RP after SBRT has de-creased significantly since then.

  17. The Role of 18F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in Patients with Colorectal Liver Metastases Undergoing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy with Yttrium-90: A First Evidence-Based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Annunziata; Giorgio Treglia; Carmelo Caldarella; Federica Galiandro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To provide a first evidence-based review of the literature on the role of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET and PET/CT) in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) undergoing selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres. Methods. A comprehensive computer literature search was conducted to find relevant published articles on whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT in ...

  18. Radiation therapy among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the continuing evaluations of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects, not only doses from the A-bombs but those from other radiation sources must be considered, for the latter may be concomitantly acting factors causing bias among these investigations. In the present study, among 73 Hiroshima and 22 Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects who reported receiving radiation therapy, from 1970 through 1979, the medical records of 72 and 20, respectively, were reviewed, and 41 Hiroshima and 14 Nagasaki subjects were confirmed to have received radiation therapy. The data obtained in the present study were pooled with those of the previous investigation on radiation therapy exposures of AHS subjects prior to 1970. A total of 190 subjects have been documented as receiving radiation therapy and their doses were estimated. Energies used in treatments and diseases treated are discussed. Malignancies developed subsequent to radiation therapy in seven cases; five after treatment for malignancies and two after treatment for benign diseases. Neoplasms of 12 AHS subjects may have been induced by earlier radiation therapy; 5 in the earlier study and 7 in the present one. These investigations underscore the need for continued documentation of exposures to ionizing radiation for medical reasons, especially from sources incurring relatively high doses. Bias in assessments of late radiation effects among A-bomb survivors can thus be avoided. (author)

  19. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C [Wayne State University, Grosse Pointe, MI (United States); Borras, C [Radiological Physics and Health Services, Washington, DC (United States); Carlson, D [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how

  20. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how

  1. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yoshitaka [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG.

  2. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG

  3. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  4. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  5. Optimal approach in early breast cancer: Radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Poortmans, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy significantly reduces by at least 70% the relative risk of local and regional recurrences for breast cancer after surgery. A positive influence on overall survival has been clearly demonstrated, especially for patients with a high absolute risk for locoregional recurrences. However, this is partially counterbalanced by late toxicity (dependent upon the radiation dose) especially to cardiac structures. Apart from this toxicity, a clear influence of radiation-therapy-related f...

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: emerging cancer treatment technology

    OpenAIRE

    T.S. Hong; Ritter, M. A.; Tomé, W. A.; Harari, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is rapidly advancing in the field of radiation oncology. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy allows for improved dose conformality, thereby affording the potential to decrease the spectrum of normal tissue toxicities associated with IMRT. Preliminary results with IMRT are quite promising; however, the clinical data is relatively immature and overall patient numbers remain small. High-quality IMRT requires intensive physics support and ...

  7. Strategies for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late 2011 The Swedish Society of Radiation Physics formed a working group to concentrate on the Quality Assurance of modern radiation therapy techniques. The given task was to identify and summarise the different QA strategies in Sweden and also the international recommendations. This was used to formulate recommendations for practical guidelines within Sweden. In this paper a brief summery of the group's work is presented. All the Swedish radiation therapy centres do a pre treatment verification measurement as QA for every new IMRT and VMAT plan. Physicists do it and they believe it to be time consuming. A general standpoint from all the centres was that new guidelines and legislation is needed to allow QA that does not require a measurement. Based on various international publications and recommendations the working group has presented two strategies, one where all new plans are checked through measurement and one where no measurement is needed. The measurement- based strategy is basically the same as the one used today with an extended machine QA part. The other presented strategy is process oriented where all the different parts of the treatment chain are checked separately. The final report can be found in Swedish on http://www.radiofysik.org

  8. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. PMID:26235550

  9. Radiation-induced lung injury outside the irradiated area after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizing pneumonia (OP) and eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) are known as lung injuries after radiation therapy for breast cancer. In this study, we reported nine cases of OP and a case of EP after radiation therapy. All 10 women (62±10 years of age) were nonsmokers. Nine patients received endocrine therapy after radiation therapy. The mean intervals from completion of radiation therapy to occurrence of any symptoms were 119 days. All the patients have symptoms, but none are severe. Seven patients were treated with corticosteroids, and three were without treatment. All patients improved, but a relapse occurred in three (two treated with corticosteroid, one without treatment). Because of our findings and the previous studies, tobacco smoke may have played a suppressive role in the occurrence of lung injury in nonirradiated areas after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients, and endocrine therapy may have played a promotive role. (author)

  10. Clinical impact of new radiation therapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cornerstone of external beam radiation therapy is the delivery of a therapeutic dose to the target tissues. Traditional '2D' techniques broadly rely on the physician to assimilate the clinical information (history, examination, and radiographs) to define the target volume which is then localized via fluoroscopy on a traditional simulator. This approach required an in-depth understanding of the relationship between surface anatomy, radiographically visible anatomy (i.e. bones on simulator films) and three dimensional soft tissue anatomy. Radiation therapy treatment beams were generally limited to orientations wherein the physician/planner could understand the three dimensional relationship between the internal structures and their projection onto a simulator film. Three dimensional treatment planning allowed the more direct incorporation of three dimensional imaging information into the planning process. The 3D relationship between internal targets and normal tissues seen on 3D imaging (e.g. computed tomography - CT), were therefore more accurately known. This facilitated the use of 'non-standard' beam orientations, and more conformal shaping of the treatment beams. Software allows incorporation of multi-modality three dimensional imaging with, for example, positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Therefore, the vast anatomic/functional information from multiple three dimensional imaging modalities can be used in concert to facilitate accurate treatment delivery. Software allows such three dimensional information to be displayed and viewed from any orientation. Beam orientations and shapes are then chosen to encompass the target yet minimize, as possible, normal tissue exposure. Thus, 3D tools allow three dimensional anatomic information to be more accurately incorporated into the planning process. In almost all instances, the target is fully encompassed within each

  11. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax after radiation therapy to the thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twiford, T.W. Jr.; Zornoza, J.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1978-03-01

    Two patients who received radiation therapy to the thorax and who developed recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces are presented. Patients with recurrent pneumothoraces secondary to radiation have not been described previously. Pleural changes secondary to radiation may contribute significantly to the complicated clinical course of these patients.

  12. Localized fibrous mesothelioma of pleura following external ionizing radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbey, J.H.; Mueller, N.L.M.; Miller, R.R.; Nelems, B.

    1988-12-01

    Carcinogenesis is a well-known complication of radiation exposure. Ionizing radiation also leads to an increased incidence of benign tumors. A 36-year-old woman had a localized fibrous mesothelioma of the pleura and an ipsilateral breast carcinoma 23 years after receiving external radiation therapy for treatment of a chest wall keloid.

  13. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - the role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the approach to the diagnosis, assessment, treatment and continuing management of patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with the emphasis on the role of radiation therapy in this group of diseases. The entity of 'Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma' encompasses a diverse group of disorders involving almost any part of the body. This diversity bedevils any attempt to unify the approach to this disease on a rational basis. Nevertheless, some broad principles can be applied to almost any presentation of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The approach to the management of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is based on the histologic type, localization and extent of disease and other disease and patient related prognostic factors. The accurate pathologic diagnosis of lymphoma has been greatly facilitated by availability of markers, molecular and genetic techniques. The newly proposed revised classification of lymphomas and its impact on these of RT will be discussed. Although the Ann Arbor staging classification has been shown to provide important prognostic information, other factors have equivalent, if not greater, influence on outcome in patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The management of lymphomas is based primarily on the histologic type and extent of the disease including stage, tumour bulk, number of sites involved and location of the disease. The success of curative radiation therapy is contingent upon the presence of localized disease, normal tissue tolerance allowing the delivery of RT curative dose (30-35 Gy) and the tumour bulk. The current evidence suggests that locoregional RT for stage I and II low grade lymphoma results in approximately 50% prolonged (10-15 years) failure free rate and possible cure. Radiation alone is no longer used for intermediate and high grade lymphomas. The standard management of stage I and II intermediate grade large cell and mixed lymphomas is with doxorubicin based chemotherapy (e.g. CHOP) followed by involved field radiation. The

  14. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  15. Beam’s-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) guided rotational station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) planning based on reweighted total-variation minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional VMAT optimizes aperture shapes and weights at uniformly sampled stations, which is a generalization of the concept of a control point. Recently, rotational station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) has been proposed to improve the plan quality by inserting beams to the regions that demand additional intensity modulations, thus formulating non-uniform beam sampling. This work presents a new rotational SPORT planning strategy based on reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization (min.), using beam’s-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) guided beam selection. The convex programming based reweighted TV min. assures the simplified fluence-map, which facilitates single-aperture selection at each station for single-arc delivery. For the rotational arc treatment planning and non-uniform beam angle setting, the mathematical model needs to be modified by additional penalty term describing the fluence-map similarity and by determination of appropriate angular weighting factors. The proposed algorithm with additional penalty term is capable of achieving more efficient and deliverable plans adaptive to the conventional VMAT and SPORT planning schemes by reducing the dose delivery time about 5 to 10 s in three clinical cases (one prostate and two head-and-neck (HN) cases with a single and multiple targets). The BEVD guided beam selection provides effective and yet easy calculating methodology to select angles for denser, non-uniform angular sampling in SPORT planning. Our BEVD guided SPORT treatment schemes improve the dose sparing to femoral heads in the prostate and brainstem, parotid glands and oral cavity in the two HN cases, where the mean dose reduction of those organs ranges from 0.5 to 2.5 Gy. Also, it increases the conformation number assessing the dose conformity to the target from 0.84, 0.75 and 0.74 to 0.86, 0.79 and 0.80 in the prostate and two HN cases, while preserving the delivery efficiency, relative to conventional single-arc VMAT plans

  16. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm2. The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows higher

  17. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning

  18. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X [JFK Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Lake Worth, FL (United States); Choi, M; Pai, S [Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Li, J [Doctors Hospital of Augusta, Augusta, GA (United States); Cranford, K [Trident Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  19. Radiation-based security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems presented in different security areas are varied but the solutions that have been offered are generally based upon the same principles. Employing radiation to locate and identify explosives or contraband has been most obvious at airports but other locations are now receiving equal attention. Neutron and X-ray interrogation are the systems most frequently employed. However, the more recently developed approaches such as multi-view dual-energy imaging and the use of high-speed diffraction measurements are the most likely systems to become widely available. This review looks briefly at the neutron and X-ray based systems that have been developed indicating their mode of operation and their advantages and disadvantages. It then summarizes the current state-of-the-art. The paper finishes by looking in some detail at one of the most promising areas of development--in-line diffraction measurements. (author)

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan S; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  1. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for ovarian cancer is based on data from six randomized trials. Moreover, data from one prospective study and three retrospective studies were used. In total, 10 scientific articles are included, involving 1,282 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in the following points: There is no scientific documentation supporting adjuvant radiotherapy for early-stage, low-risk patients. No studies have been reported where adjuvant radiotherapy has been compared with no adjuvant therapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy, either whole abdominal irradiation or intraperitoneal P32, has been compared with adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. There is no scientific evidence to show that there is a difference in efficacy. There is some evidence to suggest that adjuvant radiotherapy after radical surgery leads to an increase in disease-free survival rate for patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. There is little documentation on long-term side effects (second malignancy) after adjuvant radiotherapy and no conclusions can be drawn

  2. Radianttrademark Liquid Radioisotope Intravascular Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RADIANTtrademark is manufactured by United States Surgical Corporation, Vascular Therapies Division, (formerly Progressive Angioplasty Systems). The system comprises a liquid β-radiation source, a shielded isolation/transfer device (ISAT), modified over-the-wire or rapid exchange delivery balloons, and accessory kits. The liquid β-source is Rhenium-188 in the form of sodium perrhenate (NaReO4), Rhenium-188 is primarily a β-emitter with a physical half-life of 17.0 hours. The maximum energy of the β-particles is 2.1 MeV. The source is produced daily in the nuclear pharmacy hot lab by eluting a Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 generator manufactured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using anion exchange columns and Millipore filters the effluent is concentrated to approximately 100 mCi/ml, calibrated, and loaded into the (ISAT) which is subsequently transported to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The delivery catheters are modified Championtrademark over-the-wire, and TNTtrademark rapid exchange stent delivery balloons. These balloons have thickened polyethylene walls to augment puncture resistance; dual radio-opaque markers and specially configured connectors

  3. Radiation therapy for the solitary plasmacytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cell neoplasms are classically categorized into four groups as: multiple myeloma (MM, plasma-cell leukemias, solitary plasmacytomas (SP of the bone (SPB, and extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP. These tumors may be described as localized or diffuse in presentation. Localized plasma-cell neoplasms are rare, and include SP of the skeletal system, accounting for 2-5% of all plasma-cell neoplasms, and EMP of soft tissue, accounting for approximately 3% of all such neoplasms. SP is defined as a solitary mass of neoplastic plasma cells either in the bone marrow or in various soft tissue sites. There appears to be a continuum in which SP often progresses to MM. The main treatment modality for SP is radiation therapy (RT. However, there are no conclusive data in the literature on the optimal RT dose for SP. This review describes the interrelationship of plasma-cell neoplasms, and attempts to determine the minimal RT dose required to obtain local control.

  4. Insufficiency fractures following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, clinical and radiological findings of insufficiency fractures (IF) of the female pelvis following radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the radiation oncology records of 108 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent external beam radiation therapy of the whole pelvis. All patients underwent conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) scan every 6 months in follow-up after radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide bone scan were added when the patients complained of pelvic pain. Thirteen of 108 patients (12%) developed IF in the irradiated field with a median interval of 6 months (range 3-51) from the completion of external beam radiation therapy. All patients who developed IF were postmenopausal women. Age of the patients who developed IF was significantly higher than that of the other patients. The parts of IF were sacroiliac joints, pubis, sacral body and 5th lumbar vertebra and six of 14 patients had multiple lesions. Treatment with rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs lead to symptomatic relief in all patients, although symptoms lasted from 3 to 20 months. Radiation-induced pelvic IF following radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies were frequently observed in the post-menopausal patients within 1 year after external beam radiation therapy. Symmetrical fractures of the bilateral sacroiliac joint and pubis were the characteristic pattern of pelvic IF. All patients healed with conservative treatment, and nobody became non-ambulant. (author)

  5. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  6. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Instituto Mario Penna, Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Hospital Luxemburgo

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  7. Radiation Therapy for the Management of Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Matthew D; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Yanagihara, Ted K; Jani, Ashish; Wang, Tony J C

    2016-08-01

    Brain metastases are the most common malignant intracranial tumors and carry a poor prognosis. The management of brain metastases may include a variety of treatment modalities including surgical resection, radiation therapy, and/or systemic therapy. The traditional treatment for brain metastasis involved whole brain irradiation. However, improved systemic control of primary cancers has led to longer survival for some groups of patients and there is increasing need to consider the late effects of radiation to the entire brain. With advances in imaging and radiation treatment planning and delivery stereotactic radiosurgery has become more frequently utilized and may be delivered through Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery or linear accelerator-based systems. Furthermore, experience in treating thousands of patients on clinical trials has led to diagnosis-specific prognostic assessment systems that help guide our approach to the management of this common clinical scenario. This review provides an overview of the literature supporting radiotherapy for brain metastasis and an update on current radiotherapeutic options that is tailored for the nonradiation oncologist. PMID:27213494

  8. Biological basis of combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological basis for combination therapy with radiation and bleomycin (BLM) was studied on C2W cells growing in vitro. When BLM was added to the medium before or after irradiation, a potentiating effect was observed. The potentiation remained for 4-6 hours after irradiation. To make clear the mechanism, both type of repair from radiation damage (Elkind type and PLD) by BLM were examined. BLM didn't inhibit the Elkind type recovery but it did inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD repair). Plateau phase C2W cells were irradiated, incubated at 370C for a various number of hours, then trypsinized for colony formation. PLD repair was inhibited when BLM was added immediately after irradiation. Based on such experimental results, we treated lung cancer with combination of radiation and BLM. BLM was injected intravenously within 30 minutes after irradiation. Although it seems too early to discuss the result of the combination therapy, it is very promising. (J.P.N.)

  9. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Luxemburgo Hospital, Mario Penna Institute, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  10. A Method for Evaluating Quality Assurance Needs in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed

  11. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.A.J. van de Schoot

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduc

  12. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeck, S.Aa.J

    1998-12-01

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification 103 refs, 20 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification

  14. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Oneschuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative interactions. This involves understanding the role and effect on metabolizing enzymes. This review will highlight the present evidence for both the beneficial and negative consequences of the use of natural health products during chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  15. Radiation therapy and host immunity in malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Host resistance to the growth of neoplastic cells has been a subject of intense interest for many years. The recent demonstration that many tumors in man have tumor-associated antigens has provided a firm basis for experimental investigations of this resistance. Thus, it is important to determine whether radiation therapy for malignant tumors incurs detrimental effects on the host resistance. This article reviews the information on the relationship of radiation therapy to patient's immune status, and discusses the concept that in radiation therapy for cancer, the patient's immunological responses to the malignat tumor must be considered. (auth.)

  16. An anatomy-based beam segmentation tool for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and its application to head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In segmental intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the beam fluences result from superposition of unmodulated beamlets (segments). In the inverse planning approach, segments are a result of 'clipping' intensity maps. At Ghent University Hospital, segments are created by an anatomy-based segmentation tool (ABST). The objective of this report is to describe ABST. Methods and Materials: For each beam direction, ABST generates segments by a multistep procedure. During the initial steps, beam's eye view (BEV) projections of the planning target volumes (PTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) are generated. These projections are used to make a segmentation grid with negative values across the expanded OAR projections and positive values elsewhere inside the expanded PTV projections. Outside these regions, grid values are set to zero. Subsequent steps transform the positive values of the segmentation grid to increase with decreasing distance to the OAR projections and to increase with longer pathlengths measured along rays from their entrance point through the skin contours to their respective grid point. The final steps involve selection of iso-value lines of the segmentation grid as segment outlines which are transformed to leaf and jaw positions of a multileaf collimator (MLC). Segment shape approximations, if imposed by MLC constraints, are done in a way that minimizes overlap between the expanded OAR projections and the segment aperture. Results: The ABST procedure takes about 3 s/segment on a Compaq Alpha XP900 workstation. In IMRT planning problems with little complexity, such as laryngeal (example shown) or thyroid cancer, plans that are in accordance with the clinical protocol can be generated by weighting the segments generated by ABST without further optimization of their shapes. For complex IMRT plans such as paranasal sinus cancer (not shown), ABST generates a start assembly of segments from which the shapes and weights are further optimized

  17. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for breast cancer is based on data from 29 randomized trials, 6 meta-analyses and 5 retrospective studies. In total, 40 scientific articles are included, involving 41,204 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 285,982 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is strong evidence for a substantial reduction in locoregional recurrence rate following postmastectomy radiation therapy to the chest wall and the regional nodal areas. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiation therapy increases the disease-free survival rate. There are conflicting data regarding the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy upon overall survival. There is strong evidence that breast cancer specific survival is improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is strong evidence for a decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival after postmastectomy radiotherapy. There is some evidence that overall survival is increased by optimal postmastectomy radiation therapy. There is strong evidence that postmastectomy radiotherapy in addition to surgery and systemic therapy in mainly node-positive patients decreases local recurrence rate and improves survival. There is moderate evidence that the decrease in non-breast cancer specific survival is attributed to cardiovascular disease in irradiated patients. There are conflicting data whether breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of local recurrence rate. There is strong evidence that breast conservation surgery plus radiotherapy is comparable to modified radical mastectomy alone in terms of disease-free survival

  18. Immunotherapy and radiation therapy: considerations for successfully combining radiation into the paradigm of immuno-oncology drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Elad; Polley, Mei-Yin; Bernstein, Michael B; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-08-01

    As the immunotherapy of cancer comes of age, adding immunotherapeutic agents to radiation therapy has the potential to improve the outcomes for patients with a wide variety of malignancies. Despite the enormous potential of such combination therapy, laboratory data has been lacking and there is little guidance for pursuing novel treatment strategies. Animal models have significant limitation in combining radiation therapy with immunotherapy and some of the limitations of preclinical models are discussed in this article. In addition to the preclinical challenges, radiation therapy and immunotherapy combinations may have overlapping toxicities, and for both types of therapy, early and late manifestations of toxicity are possible. Given these risks, special attention should be given to the design of the specific Phase I clinical trial that is chosen. In this article, we describe several Phase I design possibilities that may be employed, including the 3 + 3 design (also known as the cohort of 3 design), the continual reassessment method (CRM), and the time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM). Efficacy end points for further development of combination therapy must be based on multiple factors, including disease type, stage of disease, the setting of therapy and the goal of therapy. While the designs for future clinical trials will vary, it is clear that these two successful modalities of therapy can and should be combined for the benefit of cancer patients. PMID:25003314

  19. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  20. CT findings of organizing pneumonia after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizing pneumonia is known as a rare complication after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer. CT findings consist of consolidation and ground-glass opacities including the irradiated lung and patchy infiltrates in the nonirradiated lung. Steroid therapy is very effective, but relapse is frequently seen. In relapsed disease, lesions tend to appear in the different site from prior lesions. Radiologists should notice that organizing pneumonia is one form of radiation lung injury with good prognosis. (author)

  1. Stem Cell Therapy Remediates Reconstruction of the Craniofacial Skeleton After Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Sagar S.; Gallagher, Kathleen K.; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Sun, Hongli; Krebsbach, Paul H; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a cellular replacement therapy to remedy radiation-induced injury and restore impaired new bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO). BMSC therapy brought about the successful generation of new bone and significantly improved both the rate and quality of a bony union of irradiated, distracted [X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)/DO] murine mandibles to the level of nonirradiated DO animals. The bone mineral density and ...

  2. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@imnc.in2p3.fr [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France); Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N. [Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay, Campus Universitaire, Bât. 101, Orsay 91898 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  3. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  4. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  6. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Moon, Hye Seong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Chong Il; Ahn, Jung Ja [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  7. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  8. Automated Segmentation of the Parotid Gland Based on Atlas Registration and Machine Learning: A Longitudinal MRI Study in Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wu, Ning; Cheng, Guanghui [Radiation Oncology, Jilin University, Chuangchun, Jilin (China); Zhou, Zhengyang [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing (China); Yu, David S.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Curran, Walter J. [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parotid segmentation method to monitor radiation-induced parotid gland changes in patients after head and neck radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The proposed method combines the atlas registration method, which captures the global variation of anatomy, with a machine learning technology, which captures the local statistical features, to automatically segment the parotid glands from the MRIs. The segmentation method consists of 3 major steps. First, an atlas (pre-RT MRI and manually contoured parotid gland mask) is built for each patient. A hybrid deformable image registration is used to map the pre-RT MRI to the post-RT MRI, and the transformation is applied to the pre-RT parotid volume. Second, the kernel support vector machine (SVM) is trained with the subject-specific atlas pair consisting of multiple features (intensity, gradient, and others) from the aligned pre-RT MRI and the transformed parotid volume. Third, the well-trained kernel SVM is used to differentiate the parotid from surrounding tissues in the post-RT MRIs by statistically matching multiple texture features. A longitudinal study of 15 patients undergoing head and neck RT was conducted: baseline MRI was acquired prior to RT, and the post-RT MRIs were acquired at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up examinations. The resulting segmentations were compared with the physicians' manual contours. Results: Successful parotid segmentation was achieved for all 15 patients (42 post-RT MRIs). The average percentage of volume differences between the automated segmentations and those of the physicians' manual contours were 7.98% for the left parotid and 8.12% for the right parotid. The average volume overlap was 91.1% ± 1.6% for the left parotid and 90.5% ± 2.4% for the right parotid. The parotid gland volume reduction at follow-up was 25% at 3 months, 27% at 6 months, and 16% at 12 months. Conclusions: We have validated

  9. Automated Segmentation of the Parotid Gland Based on Atlas Registration and Machine Learning: A Longitudinal MRI Study in Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop an automated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parotid segmentation method to monitor radiation-induced parotid gland changes in patients after head and neck radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The proposed method combines the atlas registration method, which captures the global variation of anatomy, with a machine learning technology, which captures the local statistical features, to automatically segment the parotid glands from the MRIs. The segmentation method consists of 3 major steps. First, an atlas (pre-RT MRI and manually contoured parotid gland mask) is built for each patient. A hybrid deformable image registration is used to map the pre-RT MRI to the post-RT MRI, and the transformation is applied to the pre-RT parotid volume. Second, the kernel support vector machine (SVM) is trained with the subject-specific atlas pair consisting of multiple features (intensity, gradient, and others) from the aligned pre-RT MRI and the transformed parotid volume. Third, the well-trained kernel SVM is used to differentiate the parotid from surrounding tissues in the post-RT MRIs by statistically matching multiple texture features. A longitudinal study of 15 patients undergoing head and neck RT was conducted: baseline MRI was acquired prior to RT, and the post-RT MRIs were acquired at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up examinations. The resulting segmentations were compared with the physicians' manual contours. Results: Successful parotid segmentation was achieved for all 15 patients (42 post-RT MRIs). The average percentage of volume differences between the automated segmentations and those of the physicians' manual contours were 7.98% for the left parotid and 8.12% for the right parotid. The average volume overlap was 91.1% ± 1.6% for the left parotid and 90.5% ± 2.4% for the right parotid. The parotid gland volume reduction at follow-up was 25% at 3 months, 27% at 6 months, and 16% at 12 months. Conclusions: We have validated

  10. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  11. Approach of combined cancer gene therapy and radiation: response of promoters to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy is an emerging cancer treatment modality. We are interested in developing a radiation-inducible gene therapy system to sensitize the tumor vasculature to the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment. An expression system based on irradiation-inducible promoters will drive the expression of anti-tumor genes in the tumor vasculature. Solid tumors are dependent on angio genesis, a process in which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature. Vascular endothelial cells are un transformed and genetically stable, thus avoiding the problem of resistance to the treatments. Vascular endothelial cells may therefore represent a suitable target for this therapeutic gene therapy strategy.The identification of IR-inducible promoters native to endothelial cells was performed by gene expression profiling using cDNA micro array technology. We describe the genes modified by clinically relevant doses of IR. The extension to high doses aimed at studying the effects of total radiation delivery to the tumor. The radio-inductiveness of the genes selected for promoter study was confirmed by RT-PCR. Analysis of the activity of promoters in response to IR was also assessed in a reporter plasmid. We found that authentic promoters cloned onto a plasmid are not suitable for cancer gene therapy due to their low induction after IR. In contrast, synthetic promoters containing repeated sequence-specific binding sites for IR-activated transcription factors such as NF-κB are potential candidates for gene therapy. The activity of five tandemly repeated TGGGGACTTTCCGC elements for NF-κB binding in a luciferase reporter was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the response to fractionated low doses was improved in comparison to the total single dose. Thus, we put present evidence that a synthetic promoter for NF-κB specific binding may have application in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancer. (author)

  12. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, A.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduce radiation-induced toxicities. First, the clinically implemented adaptive strategy was described and the dosimetric consequences of this adaptive strategy compared to conventional non-adaptive rad...

  13. Results of radiation therapy for medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Ono, Koji (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, Masaji

    1989-12-01

    Results of radiation therapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at Kyoto University Hospital were reviewed. Between 1962 and 1988, 30 patients with histologically-proven medulloblastoma completed radiotherapy. Before 1971, the treatment volume was either the posterior fossa only or posterior fossa plus spinal axis, but after 1972, it was extended to include the entire neuraxis. The mean dose was 48 Gy to the posterior fossa, 36 Gy to the whole brain, and 25 Gy to the spinal axis. The 5-year survival rate and 5-year relapse-free survival rate estimated by the Kaplan-Meier's method were 36% and 37%, respectively, for total cases, but were as high as 79% and 80%, respectively, for the recent 10 patients. This improvement in the treatment results appeared to be due to extensive tumor resection and improved radiotherapy technique, and not to the use of chemotherapy. The prognosis was significantly better in patients treated with craniospinal irradiation than in those otherwise treated. There was a trend towards better survival in patients who received 50 Gy or more to the posterior fossa or 24 Gy or more to the spinal axis, compared to the patients who received lower doses to each site. No significant morbidity of radiotherapy was seen. Four of the six surviving patients who were treated below age 12 have a mental retardation and/or a short stature, but one patient treated at age 5 has a normal growth and a good intelligence. From these analysis, it is recommended to irradiate craniospinal axis and posterior fossa up to 25{approx}35 Gy and 50{approx}55 Gy, respectively. (author).

  14. Advances in Radiation Therapy in Pediatric Neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Ranjit S; Wolden, Suzanne L

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy remains a highly effective therapy for many pediatric central nervous system tumors. With more children achieving long-term survival after treatment for brain tumors, late-effects of radiation have become an important concern. In response to this problem, treatment protocols for a variety of pediatric central nervous system tumors have evolved to reduce radiation fields and doses when possible. Recent advances in radiation technology such as image guidance and proton therapy have led to a new era of precision treatment with significantly less exposure to healthy tissues. These developments along with the promise of molecular classification of tumors and targeted therapies point to an optimistic future for pediatric neuro-oncology. PMID:26271789

  15. Patient dosimetry in intravascular radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is a well-accepted method for nonsurgical myocardial revascularization. However, the long-term success of this method is limited by the occurrence of restenosis. Endovascular brachytherapy has been put forward as a means to avoid restenosis. Since this technique involves the placement of a radioactive source in a catheter in the patient's arteries, the possible radiation risk should be considered. In this paper the effective dose of the patient associated with the use of Iridium-192 for IRT treatment has been calculated using Monte Carlo techniques. To put the results into perspective the effective dose form the PTCA procedure was also calculated using the same techniques. Calculations were based on the measurement of DAP (Dose Area Product) for the procedure. We found a mean effective dose of 9 mSv for both the PTCA procedures as for the IRT treatment. Thus leading to the conclusion that, from the perspective of radiation burden, the elimination of one PTCA procedure through the use of IRT is a benefit for the patient. (author)

  16. Clinical Oral Examinations: Assessment of Competency in Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Leech, Michelle; POOLE, CLAIRE; CRAIG, AGNELLA; COFFEY, MARY ANNE; NI CHUINNEAGAIN, SIOBHAN

    2009-01-01

    Matching assessment strategies to learning outcomes in radiation therapy education is of the utmost importance. Assessing clinical competence requires that `competence? be clearly defined prior to the start of any clinical programme. In this article, we report on our experience in using clinical oral examinations in assessing competence in second year undergraduate radiation therapy students. The shortcomings of clinical oral examinations such as `leaking? of the agenda are addressed and more...

  17. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Doreen Oneschuk; Jawaid Younus

    2011-01-01

    Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative in...

  18. Pneumothorax following thoracic radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy alone to the nodal drainage sites above the diaphragm, namely a ''mantle'' field, is often standard treatment for early stage Hodgkin's disease and may be used in combination with chemotherapy in more advanced disease. Localised pneumonitis and fibrosis are recognised treatment related sequelae; however, other pulmonary complications, including pneumothorax, have been described. Two cases of spontaneous pneumothorax following mantle radiation therapy are presented. (author)

  19. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students’ experience on clini...

  20. Risk factors for development of radiation pneumonitis following radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors contributing to development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with lung cancer who undergo radiation therapy to the thorax. Methods and Materials: Development and severity of RP were retrospectively analyzed for 89 patients with lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy at the National Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital between 1991 and 1995. The severity of RP was determined using a modified grading scale based on that of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer. Results: Fifty-two (58%) patients developed RP: 34 patients with Grade 1, 5 with Grade 2, 8 with Grade 3, and 5 with Grade 5 RP. Severe RP tended to develop earlier than less severe RP, but not to a significant extent (p = 0.151). On logistic regression analysis including both patient condition and treatment factors, development of Grade 1 or more severe RP was most frequently observed for Stage I-II disease (p = 0.011). The use of chemotherapy, large daily radiation dose, and once-daily fractionation (vs. twice-daily fractionation) were possibly related to the development of RP (p = 0.057, p = 0.069, and p = 0.092, respectively). For the group of 48 patients who underwent chemo radiation therapy, the use of large daily radiation dose was a significant risk factor for RP (p = 0.014). In addition, the use of once-daily fractionation was a marginally significant risk factor (p = 0.052). Among chemotherapy drugs administered, cisplatin was a favorable factor (p = 0.011), while adriamycin was a risk factor (p = 0.061). Conclusions: In radiation therapy for lung cancer, administration of a large daily dose should be avoided in order to prevent RP, particularly when radiation therapy is combined with chemotherapy

  1. SU-F-BRD-02: Application of ARCHERRT-- A GPU-Based Monte Carlo Dose Engine for Radiation Therapy -- to Tomotherapy and Patient-Independent IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As a module of ARCHER -- Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments, ARCHERRT is designed for RadioTherapy (RT) dose calculation. This paper describes the application of ARCHERRT on patient-dependent TomoTherapy and patient-independent IMRT. It also conducts a 'fair' comparison of different GPUs and multicore CPU. Methods: The source input used for patient-dependent TomoTherapy is phase space file (PSF) generated from optimized plan. For patient-independent IMRT, the open filed PSF is used for different cases. The intensity modulation is simulated by fluence map. The GEANT4 code is used as benchmark. DVH and gamma index test are employed to evaluate the accuracy of ARCHERRT code. Some previous studies reported misleading speedups by comparing GPU code with serial CPU code. To perform a fairer comparison, we write multi-thread code with OpenMP to fully exploit computing potential of CPU. The hardware involved in this study are a 6-core Intel E5-2620 CPU and 6 NVIDIA M2090 GPUs, a K20 GPU and a K40 GPU. Results: Dosimetric results from ARCHERRT and GEANT4 show good agreement. The 2%/2mm gamma test pass rates for different clinical cases are 97.2% to 99.7%. A single M2090 GPU needs 50~79 seconds for the simulation to achieve a statistical error of 1% in the PTV. The K40 card is about 1.7∼1.8 times faster than M2090 card. Using 6 M2090 card, the simulation can be finished in about 10 seconds. For comparison, Intel E5-2620 needs 507∼879 seconds for the same simulation. Conclusion: We successfully applied ARCHERRT to Tomotherapy and patient-independent IMRT, and conducted a fair comparison between GPU and CPU performance. The ARCHERRT code is both accurate and efficient and may be used towards clinical applications

  2. Efficiency considerations in the expansion of radiation therapy services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: An economic option appraisal to determine whether early investment in capital is an efficient means of expanding radiation therapy services. Methods and Materials: Costs were based on 1991 data from a center in western Sydney. Two options were costed: Option 1 based on an increase in overtime performed by existing staff, using capital more intensively and possible use of shifts; Option 2 based on an investment in new capital and associated increases in levels of staffing. The health sector costs of both options were determined in one center at workloads of between 70,940 and 98,525 fields per year to assess relative efficiency. Results: There was very little difference in cost between both options, with Option 1 slightly cheaper at workloads up to 98,525 fields per year. Conclusions: The results suggest that capital investment may be introduced at a fairly early stage without efficiency loss. Sensitivity analysis reinforces these conclusions and the generalizability of the results

  3. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently

  4. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy

  5. Clinical study on sulpyrin therapy for radiation pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Susumu; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Kimura, Masashi; Sumi, Masaru; Umeki, Shigenobu; Hara, Hiroki; Soejima, Rinzo (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for cancer, however, irradiation of the chest may cause radiation pneumonitis as a severe pulmonary complication. Although this condition is responsive to steroid therapy, it is well known that therapy is an increased vulnerability to various infections in patients receiving long-term steroid therapy and exacerbation of the disease associated with a reduction in the dose. In this study, 10 patients with radiation pneumonitis received 3 divided daily oral of 0.9{similar to}1.2 g/day (15 mg/kg) of sulpyrin. The patients' fever disappeared within a few days after the beginning of treatment. Pneumonitis was roentgenographically stabilized, although the fibrotic and atrophic changes continued. No exacerbation of the disease was observed even after discontinuation of the therapy and the outcomes of all patients was satisfactory. These results suggest that sulpyrin was clinically effective for radiation pneumonitis, probably resulting from an anti-inflammatory effect due to prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. In the acute phase of radiation pneumonitis, the introduction of steroids appears to be delayed. This sulpyrin therapy may be a useful alternative for cases in which the steroid therapy in contraindicated. (author).

  6. Radiation dermatitis following electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten patients, who had been treated for mycosis fungoides with electron beam radiation ten or more years previously, were examined for signs of radiation dermatitis. Although most patients had had acute radiation dermatitis, only a few manifested signs of mild chronic changes after having received between 1,000 and 2,800 rads

  7. Spontaneous pneumothorax after upper mantle radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1967 and 1981, 158 of 256 consecutive adult patients received upper mantle (UM) radiation therapy as part of initial treatment of Hodgkin disease at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. Chemotherapy was also part of the initial treatment in 21 of 158 patients who received UM radiation therapy. Spontaneous pneumothorax was observed in six of 158 patients during remission after UM radiation therapy in this series. Three cases were incidental findings on follow-up radiographs, but three other patients were seen initially with symptoms of spontaneous pneumothorax. The entity occurred in three of 21 patients (14%) treated with UM radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and in three of 137 (2%) treated with UM radiation therapy (P < .05). Within the range of UM doses (3,500-4,000 cGy in 4 weeks), higher dose was not associated with higher risk of spontaneous pneumothorax. Although these cases of spontaneous pneumothorax are clustered in an age range classic for this entity, the incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in this group of patients is higher than the anticipated lifetime incidence of 1:500 for the general population. This risk of spontaneous pneumothorax after UM radiation therapy may be even higher in patients who also receive chemotherapy

  8. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  9. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, AdnexaR, AdnexaL, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, FemurR, and FemurL. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  10. Radiation therapy in the treatment of macular degeneration: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macular degeneration is a major health problem. Less than 10 % of the cases can be successfully treated by laser therapy. Low dose radiation therapy (in the range of 20 Gy) appears to decrease neo-vascularization. These early results need to be confirmed through a randomized trial. (author)

  11. Therapy with 90Y microspheres: radiation protection in new medical therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary liver cancer is one of the most frequent in the world and with a low cure rate. Radioembolization using 90y spheres is a promising treatment of this pathology and involves the percutaneous vascular application of radioisotope-labeled the order of Micron size particles. The advantages of this technique include the permit administered high doses of radiation to small volumes with low relative toxicity, offer the possibility of treating all the liver including microscopic tumors, and finally, the feasibility of combined with other therapies. Radiation protection in new medical therapies requires justification and optimization, as requirements for their implementation. The application of the principle of optimization in the context of the protection of the patient must be the minimum that it can be reasonably reached compatible with the required doses of treatment dose to healthy tissue. With 90Y microspheres therapy this optimization applies to the activity of 90y which is administered to the patient, and estimation methods are postulated. in this work are analyzed comparatively these methods, described the early physicists, equations and the limitations of each. Finally, it is concluded that the optimal method to be implemented for the evaluation of the activity of 90Y manage must be based in a voxel dosimetric model specific for each patient, however, the partitional method may be a good alternative if you don't have the tools to apply the method

  12. Optimization of protection of patients in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has been one of the main modalities of cancer treatment. Cancer patients are deliberately exposed to high doses of radiation with the aim of complete cure or palliation. Radiation therapy consists of complex processes involving several professionals working in interrelated activities and requiring the use of sophisticated equipment. Optimization of patient protection aims to prevent accidental exposures at any stage of the process. In the course of the treatment, normal tissues receive considerable amount of radiation which can lead to side effects or complications. Optimum treatment is achieved by delivering maximum dose to the target but minimum dose to the critical structures thus decreasing the possibility of developing unwanted complications. There are various ways designed to achieve this objective. These includes the following: the use of customized blocks which has been the standard practice in conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy; the innovative design of the multileaf collimator which together with advancement in imaging techniques and in computer technology have revolutionized the practice of radiotherapy in the last decade leading to the growth of 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and finally the use of imaging in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). These advance techniques in radiation therapy will be discussed in the context of optimization of medical exposures. (author)

  13. Focal Therapy, Differential Therapy, and Radiation Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Anudh K.; Ennis, Ronald D

    2012-01-01

    Focal and differential therapy represent an approach to improve the therapeutic ratio of prostate cancer treatments. This concept is a shift from treating the whole gland to intensely treating the portion of the gland that contains significant tumor. However, there are many challenges in the move towards focal approaches. Defining which patients are suitable candidates for focal therapy approaches is an area of significant controversy, and it is likely that additional data from imaging or det...

  14. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david_sher@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  15. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  16. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harmsen, William [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Blanchard, Miran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goetz, Matthew [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jakub, James [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stauder, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yan, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia, E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  17. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  18. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Oesophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for oesophageal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 2 meta-analyses. A total of 44 scientific articles are included, involving 5,772 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is fairly strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy does not improve the survival in patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is moderate evidence that preoperative chemo-radiotherapy has no beneficial impact on the survival of patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is no scientific evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival in patients with resectable oesophageal cancer. The documentation is, however, poor, consisting of only three randomized trials. There is fairly strong evidence that concomitant (but not sequential) chemo-radiotherapy gives significantly better survival rate than radiotherapy alone in inoperable oesophageal cancer. The results of the reported clinical trials are, however, conflicting, and no solid conclusion can be drawn. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy has been compared with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in two randomized studies with conflicting results and no firm conclusion can be drawn

  19. Preclinical imaging in animal models of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern radiotherapy benefits from precise and targeted diagnostic and pretherapeutic imaging. Standard imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) offer high morphological detail but only limited functional information on tumors. Novel functional and molecular imaging modalities provide biological information about tumors in addition to detailed morphological information. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CT or ultrasound-based perfusion imaging as well as hybrid modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET) CT or MRI-PET have the potential to identify and precisely delineate viable and/or perfused tumor areas, enabling optimization of targeted radiotherapy. Functional information on tissue microcirculation and/or glucose metabolism allow a more precise definition and treatment of tumors while reducing the radiation dose and sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. In the development of new imaging methods for planning individualized radiotherapy, preclinical imaging and research plays a pivotal role, as the value of multimodality imaging can only be assessed, tested and adequately developed in a preclinical setting, i.e. in animal tumor models. New functional imaging modalities will play an increasing role for the surveillance of early treatment response during radiation therapy and in the assessment of the potential value of new combination therapies (e.g. combining anti-angiogenic drugs with radiotherapy). (orig.)

  20. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  1. The therapy of marrowy syndrome at radiation lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter author made conclusion that cumulative data on experimental therapy of radiation affections testify to the effect that at critical radiation sickness of heavy level following hematosis oppression effective can be only that treatment regimen, which contains resources conducive to reducing processes in the marrow

  2. The Radiation Therapy Oncology in the context of oncological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the radiation therapy oncology in the context of oncological practice. The radiotherapy is a speciality within medicine that involves the generation, application and dissemination of knowledge about the biology, causes, prevention and treatment of the cancer and other pathologies by ionising radiation

  3. Dosimetric verification in intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of dosimetric verification for IMRT intensity modulated radiation therapy, we examined the selection of a dosimeter in accordance with the purpose of physical measurement and the process of data analysis. Because of the high dose conformation in the target volume and minimum dose in the organs at risk (OAR) in IMRT, dosimetric verification is essential. Because the performance of dosimetric verification in a patient is not allowed, a physical phantom and dosimeter must be used. Dose verification using a physical phantom, from which the beam data optimized for a patient slated for IMRT are transferred, may cause latent error as a result of change in the depth of each beam toward an isocenter. This effect may change the dose distribution and prescription dose. The basic methods of dosimetric verification with physical measurement are point dosimetry, when the reference dose is given at a point by planning software, and volumetric dosimetry, when planning software gives the dose as a volumetric configuration. While the most accurate dosimetry is done using a calibrated ionization chamber, IMRT requires volumetric dosimetry using some kind of portal film or a polymer gel dosimeter, because of the need for dosimetric verification for an irregular dose distribution in IMRT. The importance of indirect dosimetry using these methods is to provide calibration as a dosimeter, absolute dose, and preservation of calibration. In our study, the verification of dose distribution for IMRT using portal film and RANDO phantom could be performed with an error of less than 2% in all cases. The measurement error for the central dose using a JARP-type ionization chamber and MixDP was less than 3% in all cases except for the case with the maximum error. At the moment, IMRT requires a great deal of effort in the processes of planning, dosimetric verification, and isocenter checking in every fraction to maintain high accuracy. Although the need for a large amount of effort in the

  4. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O2 (57%), and end-tidal CO2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a short

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  6. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), based on experience at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, and reviews the procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. The dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT are discussed and the details of model based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms are examined. The paper also discusses the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patient and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. Finally, the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT is investigated. (author)

  7. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  8. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, Fleta N.; Simmons, Brian J.; Aaron H. Wolfson; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Th...

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazato, Tomonori; Yusa, Toshiko; Onaga, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Kimio; Koyama, Yuzo; Hatano, Tadashi; Ogawa, Yoshihide [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-05-01

    Radiation therapy has widely been used for cancers in the pelvis. Radiation cystitis, one of the late complications, presents often as hemorrhagic cystitis, which is refractory to the conventional therapy and may threaten the patient`s life. We used hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with radiation cystitis to test its potential benefit. Ten patients aged from 46 to 81 years with a mean of 62 years underwent one or more courses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy according to their symptoms, consisting of 20 sessions (3 to 5 sessions a week) at the Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, the University of the Ryukyus Hospital in the 9-year period from 1985 to 1994. They included 8 patients having a history of cervical cancer, one with external genital cancer and one with vaginal cancer. During the 75 min hyperbaric oxygen therapy patients received 100% oxygen at 2 absolute atmosphere pressure in the Multiplace Hyperbaric Chamber. Hematuria subsided and subjective symptoms including urinary frequency improved in seven patients. Cystoscopic findings including mucosal edema, redness, and capillary dilation were partially improved. The procedure subjectively and objectively palliated the 10 patients in a favorable manner. To date we have not armed any active procedure to control radiation-induced refractory hemorrhagic cystitis in terms of efficacy, invasiveness, and adverse effects. Therefore, in consideration of our clinical results, hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be useful for radiation cystitis. (author)

  10. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  11. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology

  12. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity

  13. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  14. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care

  15. Reversible brachial plexopathy following primary radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salner, A.L.; Botnick, L.E.; Herzog, A.G.; Goldstein, M.A.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.; Hellman, S.

    Reversible brachial plexopathy has occurred in very low incidence in patients with breast carcinoma treated definitively with radiation therapy. Of 565 patients treated between January 1968 and December 1979 with moderate doses of supervoltage radiation therapy (average axillary dose of 5000 rad in 5 weeks), eight patients (1.4%) developed the characteristic symptoms at a median time of 4.5 months after radiation therapy. This syndrome consists of paresthesias in all patients, with weakness and pain less commonly seen. The symptom complex differs from other previously described brachial plexus syndromes, including paralytic brachial neuritis, radiation-induced injury, and carcinoma. A possible relationship to adjuvant chemotherapy exists, though the etiology is not well-understood. The cases described demonstrate temporal clustering. Resolution is always seen.

  16. A matched-pair comparison of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with cetuximab versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with platinum-based chemotherapy for locally advanced head neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively compared the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and cetuximab (IMRT/cetuximab) versus IMRT and platinum-based chemotherapy (IMRT/platinum) for locally advanced head neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC). Thirty-one IMRT/cetuximab patients were matched 1:2 with 62 IMRT/platinum patients according to primary site and clinical stage. The primary endpoint was locoregional recurrence (LRR), and secondary endpoints included distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Because of inherent selection bias, the IMRT/cetuximab cohort was significantly older and with a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. IMRT/cetuximab and IMRT/platinum did not have significantly different LRR and DM (33 vs. 23% at 2 years, P=0.22; 17 vs. 11% at 2 years, P=0.40; respectively). IMRT/cetuximab had significantly worse CSS and OS (67 vs. 84%, P=0.04; 58 vs. 83%, P=0.001; respectively). However, for the subset of elderly patients ≥65 years old, there is no difference between the two cohorts for all endpoints (all P=NS). IMRT/platinum should remain the preferred choice of chemoradiotherapy for LAHNSCC, but IMRT/cetuximab may be a reasonable alternative for elderly patients. (author)

  17. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was carried out by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is based on data from 12 randomized trials and 2 meta-analyses. Data from 3 prospective studies, 29 retrospective studies and 58 other articles were also used. In total, 58 scientific articles are included, involving 27,280 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 38,362 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized thus: Solid scientific documentation shows that in patients with HL more than 80% in the early stages and 60-70% of younger patients in advanced stages of disease are now cured by the development of radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up shows that after 15 to 20 years the mortality from HL in early and intermediate stages is exceeded by other causes of death, mostly secondary malignancies and cardiac deaths, especially myocardial infarction. Convincing data show that radiotherapy plays a major role in the development of solid cancers and cardiovascular disease, but no randomized trials have been performed. During the past decade increasing awareness of fatal long-term sequelae has fundamentally changed treatment strategies in early and intermediate stages. A thorough long-term follow-up is essential to evaluate the effects of the modifications of the therapy. In early stages of disease extended field irradiation is now replaced by short periods of chemotherapy followed by limited radiotherapy to decrease late sequelae. This approach is strongly supported by early reports from randomized trials. Final results cannot be fully evaluated for many years. The optimal radiation dose and volume after chemotherapy are not defined or if irradiation is needed at all

  18. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials

  19. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  20. Recent developments in radiation therapy planning and treatment optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy of cancer is today going through a very dynamic development with the introduction of a large number of new treatment principles, new types of treatment units and new radiobiologically based optimization algorithms for treatment planning. All of these make use of the recent developments in three dimensional tumor diagnostics, molecular biology of cancer, the fractionation sensitivity of different tissues and most recently predictive assays of radiation sensitivity. The most efficient but also least developed area of treatment optimization is to use a few non uniform radiation beams directed towards the tumor. Today patient individual collimation with beam blocks or multi leaf collimators protect organs at risk laterally outside the tumor volume. Non uniform dose delivery also allows protection of normal tissues anterior, posterior and even inside the target volume by shaping the isodoses tightly around the tumor tissues and thereby also allowing longitudinal protection of normal tissues. Some of the most advanced new algorithms are even treating therapy optimization as an inverse problem where the optimal incident beam shapes are determined directly from the location of gross disease, presumed microscopic tumor spread and organs at risk. The optimization is then performed such that the probability, P+, to eradicate all clonogenic tumor cells without severely damaging healthy normal tissues is as high as possible. Already with a few non uniform beams the treatment outcome is within a few percent of what can be achieved with infinitely many co-planar beams in a dynamic mood. With such optimized non uniform treatments it should be possible to improve the treatment outcome by as much as 20% and more, particularly in patients with a local complex spread of the disease or several organs at risk. 78 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  1. Therapy palliative with 223Ra without special radiation protection measures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 2 years now as a therapy of the castration resistant prostata carcinoma a nuclide therapy with 223Ra-Dichloride (trade-mark Xofigo) is applied. Xofigo is applied by a medical specialist for nuclear medicine altogether 6 times in a monthly distance. The activity used in each case is according to the body weight (50 kBq/kg BW). This therapy is licensed by the supervisory authorities of the German federal countries as an ambulant therapy. Special radiation protection measures are only required when exceeding a given number of 17 patients per year as incorparation measurements.

  2. Definitions of biochemical failure in prostate cancer following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a consensus panel definition of biochemical failure following radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this paper, we develop a series of alternative definitions of biochemical failure. Using data from 688 patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the various definitions, with respect to a defined 'clinically meaningful' outcome. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure requires 3 consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We considered several modifications to the standard definition: to require PSA rises of a certain magnitude, to consider 2 instead of 3 rises, to require the final PSA value to be greater than a fixed cutoff level, and to define biochemical failure based on the slope of PSA over 1, 1.5, or 2 years. A clinically meaningful failure is defined as local recurrence, distant metastases, initiation of unplanned hormonal therapy, unplanned radical prostatectomy, or a PSA>25 later than 6 months after radiation. Results: Requiring the final PSA in a series of consecutive rises to be larger than 1.5 ng/mL increased the specificity of biochemical failure. For a fixed specificity, defining biochemical failure based on 2 consecutive rises, or the slope over the last year, could increase the sensitivity by up to approximately 20%, compared to the ASTRO definition. Using a rule based on the slope over the previous year or 2 rises leads to a slightly earlier detection of biochemical failure than does the ASTRO definition. Even with the best rule, only approximately 20% of true failures are biochemically detected more than 1 year before the clinically meaningful event time. Conclusion: There is potential for improvement in the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure. Further research is needed, in studies with long follow-up times, to evaluate the relationship between various definitions of biochemical failure and

  3. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN RADIATION THERAPY FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER: INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY AND HYPOXIA TARGETING

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has revolutionized radiation treatment for head and neck cancers (HNC). When compared to the traditional techniques, IMRT has the unique ability to minimize the dose delivered to normal tissues without compromising tumor coverage. As a result, side effects from high dose radiation have decreased and patient quality of life has improved. In addition to toxicity reduction, excellent clinical outcomes have been reported for IMRT. The first part of thi...

  4. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  5. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster (Germany); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mauch, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mikhaeel, N. George [Department of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expec