WorldWideScience

Sample records for based microfluidic devices

  1. Streamline-based microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a streamline-based device and a method for using the device for continuous separation of particles including cells in biological fluids. The device includes a main microchannel and an array of side microchannels disposed on a substrate. The main microchannel has a plurality of stagnation points with a predetermined geometric design, for example, each of the stagnation points has a predetermined distance from the upstream edge of each of the side microchannels. The particles are separated and collected in the side microchannels.

  2. Electrochemical sensing in paper-based microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhihong; Nijhuis, Christian A; Gong, Jinlong; Chen, Xin; Kumachev, Alexander; Martinez, Andres W; Narovlyansky, Max; Whitesides, George M

    2010-02-21

    This paper describes the fabrication and the performance of microfluidic paper-based electrochemical sensing devices (we call the microfluidic paper-based electrochemical devices, microPEDs). The microPEDs comprise paper-based microfluidic channels patterned by photolithography or wax printing, and electrodes screen-printed from conducting inks (e.g., carbon or Ag/AgCl). We demonstrated that the microPEDs are capable of quantifying the concentrations of various analytes (e.g., heavy-metal ions and glucose) in aqueous solutions. This low-cost analytical device should be useful for applications in public health, environmental monitoring, and the developing world. PMID:20126688

  3. Electrochemical Sensing in Paper-Based Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Zhihong; Nijhuis, Christian A.; Gong, Jinlong; Chen, Xin; Kumachev, Alexander; Martinez, Andres W.; Narovlyansky, Max; Whitesides, George McClelland

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and the performance of microfluidic paper-based electrochemical sensing devices (we call the microfluidic paper-based electrochemical devices, μPEDs). The μPEDs comprise paper-based microfluidic channels patterned by photolithography or wax printing, and electrodes screen-printed from conducting inks (e.g., carbon or Ag/AgCl). We demonstrated that the μPEDs are capable of quantifying the concentrations of various analytes (e.g., heavy-metal ions and glucos...

  4. Cell-Based Biosensors: Electrical Sensing in Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Noemi Rozlosnik; Katrine Kiilerich-Pedersen

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors provide new horizons for medical diagnostics by adopting complex recognition elements such as mammalian cells in microfluidic devices that are simple, cost efficient and disposable. This combination renders possible a new range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and personalized medicine. The review looks at the most recent developments in cell-based biosensing microfluidic systems with electrical and electrochemical transduction, and relevance to medical diagn...

  5. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  6. Microcontact printing-based fabrication of digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael W L; Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Ye, George; Yonson, Neal; Trottier, Justin; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2006-11-15

    Digital microfluidics is a fluid manipulation technique in which discrete droplets are actuated on patterned arrays of electrodes. Although there is great enthusiasm for the application of this technique to chemical and biological assays, development has been hindered by the requirement of clean room fabrication facilities. Here, we present a new fabrication scheme, relying on microcontact printing (microCP), an inexpensive technique that does not require clean room facilities. In microCP, an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp is used to deposit patterns of self-assembled monolayers onto a substrate. We report three different microCP-based fabrication techniques: (1) selective etching of gold-on-glass substrates; (2) direct printing of a suspension of palladium colloids; and (3) indirect trapping of gold colloids from suspension. In method 1, etched gold electrodes are used for droplet actuation; in methods 2 and 3, colloid patterns are used to seed electroless deposition of copper. We demonstrate, for the first time, that digital microfluidic devices can be formed by microCP and are capable of the full range of digital microfluidics operations: dispensing, merging, motion, and splitting. Devices formed by the most robust of the new techniques were comparable in performance to devices formed by conventional methods, at a fraction of the fabrication time. These new techniques for digital microfluidics device fabrication have the potential to facilitate expansion of this technology to any research group, even those without access to conventional microfabrication tools and facilities. PMID:17105183

  7. Fabrication of polyimide based microfluidic channels for biosensor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zulfiqar, Azeem; Pfreundt, Andrea; Svendsen, Winnie Edith;

    2015-01-01

    fabrication of the often needed microfluidic channels, have limitations in terms of their physicochemical properties. Therefore, the use of a multipurpose biocompatible material with better resistance to the chemical, thermal and electrical environment, along with capability of forming closed channel...... microfluidics is inevitable. This paper demonstrates a novel technique of fabricating microfluidic devices using polyimide (PI) which fulfills the aforementioned properties criteria. A fabrication process to pattern microfluidic channels, using partially cured PI, has been developed by using a dry etching...... method. The etching parameters are optimized and compared to those used for fully cured PI. Moreover, the formation of closed microfluidic channel on wafer level by bonding two partially cured PI layers or a partially cured PI to glass with high bond strength has been demonstrated. The reproducibility in...

  8. Electrochemiluminescence detection in microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wenrong; Liu, Min; Zhang, Chunsun

    2016-01-15

    This work describes the first approach at combining microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. Wax screen-printing is employed to make cloth-based microfluidic chambers which are patterned with carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) to create truly disposable, simple, inexpensive sensors which can be read with a low-cost, portable charge coupled device (CCD) imaging sensing system. And, the two most commonly used ECL systems of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)/tri-n-propylamine (Ru(bpy)3(2+)/TPA) and 3-aminophthalhydrazide/hydrogen peroxide (luminol/H2O2) are applied to demonstrate the quantitative ability of the ECL μCADs. In this study, the proposed devices have successfully fulfilled the determination of TPA with a linear range from 2.5 to 2500μM with a detection limit of 1.265μM. In addition, the detection of H2O2 can be performed in the linear range of 0.05-2.0mM, with a detection limit of 0.027mM. It has been shown that the ECL emission on the wax-patterned cloth device has an acceptable sensitivity, stability and reproducibility. Finally, the applicability of cloth-based ECL is demonstrated for determination of glucose in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and artificial urine (AU) samples, with the detection limits of 0.032mM and 0.038mM, respectively. It can be foreseen, therefore, that μCADs with ECL detection could provide a new sensing platform for point-of-care testing, public health, food safety detection and environmental monitoring in remote regions, developing or developed countries. PMID:26319168

  9. Fabrication of polyimide based microfluidic channels for biosensor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ever-increasing complexity of the fabrication process of Point-of-care (POC) devices, due to high demand of functional versatility, compact size and ease-of-use, emphasizes the need of multifunctional materials that can be used to simplify this process. Polymers, currently in use for the fabrication of the often needed microfluidic channels, have limitations in terms of their physicochemical properties. Therefore, the use of a multipurpose biocompatible material with better resistance to the chemical, thermal and electrical environment, along with capability of forming closed channel microfluidics is inevitable. This paper demonstrates a novel technique of fabricating microfluidic devices using polyimide (PI) which fulfills the aforementioned properties criteria. A fabrication process to pattern microfluidic channels, using partially cured PI, has been developed by using a dry etching method. The etching parameters are optimized and compared to those used for fully cured PI. Moreover, the formation of closed microfluidic channel on wafer level by bonding two partially cured PI layers or a partially cured PI to glass with high bond strength has been demonstrated. The reproducibility in uniformity of PI is also compared to the most commonly used SU8 polymer, which is a near UV sensitive epoxy resin. The potential applications of PI processing are POC and biosensor devices integrated with microelectronics. (paper)

  10. 3D Printed Paper-Based Microfluidic Analytical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a pump-free and lightweight analytical tool, paper-based microfluidic analytical devices (μPADs attract more and more interest. If the flow speed of μPAD can be programmed, the analytical sequences could be designed and they will be more popular. This reports presents a novel μPAD, driven by the capillary force of cellulose powder, printed by a desktop three-dimensional (3D printer, which has some promising features, such as easy fabrication and programmable flow speed. First, a suitable size-scale substrate with open microchannels on its surface is printed. Next, the surface of the substrate is covered with a thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS to seal the micro gap caused by 3D printing. Then, the microchannels are filled with a mixture of cellulose powder and deionized water in an appropriate proportion. After drying in an oven at 60 °C for 30 min, it is ready for use. As the different channel depths can be easily printed, which can be used to achieve the programmable capillary flow speed of cellulose powder in the microchannels. A series of microfluidic analytical experiments, including quantitative analysis of nitrite ion and fabrication of T-sensor were used to demonstrate its capability. As the desktop 3D printer (D3DP is very cheap and accessible, this device can be rapidly printed at the test field with a low cost and has a promising potential in the point-of-care (POC system or as a lightweight platform for analytical chemistry.

  11. Exploration of microfluidic devices based on multi-filament threads and textiles: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilghaz, A; Ballerini, D R; Shen, W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we review the recent progress in the development of low-cost microfluidic devices based on multifilament threads and textiles for semi-quantitative diagnostic and environmental assays. Hydrophilic multifilament threads are capable of transporting aqueous and non-aqueous fluids via capillary action and possess desirable properties for building fluid transport pathways in microfluidic devices. Thread can be sewn onto various support materials to form fluid transport channels without the need for the patterned hydrophobic barriers essential for paper-based microfluidic devices. Thread can also be used to manufacture fabrics which can be patterned to achieve suitable hydrophilic-hydrophobic contrast, creating hydrophilic channels which allow the control of fluids flow. Furthermore, well established textile patterning methods and combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic threads can be applied to fabricate low-cost microfluidic devices that meet the low-cost and low-volume requirements. In this paper, we review the current limitations and shortcomings of multifilament thread and textile-based microfluidics, and the research efforts to date on the development of fluid flow control concepts and fabrication methods. We also present a summary of different methods for modelling the fluid capillary flow in microfluidic thread and textile-based systems. Finally, we summarized the published works of thread surface treatment methods and the potential of combining multifilament thread with other materials to construct devices with greater functionality. We believe these will be important research focuses of thread- and textile-based microfluidics in future. PMID:24086179

  12. Low-cost rapid prototyping of flexible plastic paper based microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This research presents a novel rapid prototyping method for paper-based flexible microfluidic devices. The microchannels were fabricated using laser ablation on a piece of plastic paper (permanent paper), the dimensions of the microchannels was carefully studied for various laser powers and scanning speeds. After laser ablation of the microchannels on the plastic paper, a transparent poly (methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) film was thermally bonded to the plastic paper to enclose the channels. After connection of tubing, the device was ready to use. An example microfluidic device (droplet generator) was also fabricated using this technique. Due to the flexibility of the fabricated device, this technique can be used to fabricate 3D microfluidic devices. The fabrication process was simple and rapid without any requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. High-Resolution Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices for Sub-Microliter Sample Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Keisuke Tenda; Riki Ota; Kentaro Yamada; Terence G. Henares; Koji Suzuki; Daniel Citterio

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) suitable for the analysis of sub-microliter sample volumes. The wax-printing approach widely used for the patterning of paper substrates has been adapted to obtain high-resolution microfluidic structures patterned in filter paper. This has been achieved by replacing the hot plate heating method conventionally used to melt printed wax features into paper by simple hot lamination. This patterning techn...

  14. Multilayer soft lithography of perfluoropolyether based elastomer for microfluidic device fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraju, Naga Sai Gopi Krishna; Unger, Marc Alexander

    2011-06-01

    The compatibility of microfluidic devices with solvents and other chemicals is extremely important for many applications such as organic synthesis in microreactors and drug screening. We report the successful fabrication of microfluidic devices from a novel perfluoropolyether based polymer utilizing the Multilayer Soft Lithography™ (MSL) technique with simple, straightforward processing. The perfluorinated polymer SIFEL X-71 8115 is a highly chemically resistant elastomeric material. We demonstrate fabrication of a microfluidic device using an off-ratio bonding technique to bond multiple SIFEL layers, each patterned lithographically. The mechanical properties of the SIFEL MSL valves (including actuation pressures) are similar to PDMS MSL valves of the same geometry. Chemical compatibility tests highlight SIFEL's remarkable resistance to organic solvents, acids and alkalis. PMID:21503367

  15. Fabrication of a Paper-Based Microfluidic Device to Readily Determine Nitrite Ion Concentration by Simple Colorimetric Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Lin, Zhiqiang; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices (µPAD) are a burgeoning platform of microfluidic analysis technology. The method described herein is for use in undergraduate and high school chemistry laboratories. A simple and convenient µPAD was fabricated by easy patterning of filter paper using a permanent marker pen. The usefulness of the device was…

  16. Lamination-based rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices using flexible thermoplastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debjani; Pallandre, Antoine; Miserere, Sandrine; Weber, Jérémie; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2007-04-01

    Transposing highly sensitive DNA separation methods (such as DNA sequencing with high read length or the detection of point mutations) to microchip format without loss of resolution requires fabrication of relatively long (approx. 10 cm) microchannels along with sharp injection bands. Conventional soft lithography methods, such as mold casting or hot-embossing in a press, are not convenient for fabricating long channels. We have developed a lamination-based replication technique for rapid fabrication of sealed microfluidic devices with a 10 cm long, linear separation channel. These devices are fabricated in thin cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC) plastic substrates, thus making the device flexible and capable of assuming a range of 3-D configurations. Due to the good optical properties of COC, this new family of devices combines multiple advantages of planar microfluidics and fused-silica capillaries. PMID:17330225

  17. Novel developments in mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic devices and smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2016-03-21

    Portable electronic devices and wireless communication systems enable a broad range of applications such as environmental and food safety monitoring, personalized medicine and healthcare management. Particularly, hybrid smartphone and microfluidic devices provide an integrated solution for the new generation of mobile sensing applications. Such mobile sensing based on microfluidic devices (broadly defined) and smartphones (MS(2)) offers a mobile laboratory for performing a wide range of bio-chemical detection and analysis functions such as water and food quality analysis, routine health tests and disease diagnosis. MS(2) offers significant advantages over traditional platforms in terms of test speed and control, low cost, mobility, ease-of-operation and data management. These improvements put MS(2) in a promising position in the fields of interdisciplinary basic and applied research. In particular, MS(2) enables applications to remote in-field testing, homecare, and healthcare in low-resource areas. The marriage of smartphones and microfluidic devices offers a powerful on-chip operating platform to enable various bio-chemical tests, remote sensing, data analysis and management in a mobile fashion. The implications of such integration are beyond telecommunication and microfluidic-related research and technology development. In this review, we will first provide the general background of microfluidic-based sensing, smartphone-based sensing, and their integration. Then, we will focus on several key application areas of MS(2) by systematically reviewing the important literature in each area. We will conclude by discussing our perspectives on the opportunities, issues and future directions of this emerging novel field. PMID:26899264

  18. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  19. Osteocyte culture in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Fan, Beiyuan; Chen, Deyong; Liu, Chao; Wei, Yuanchen; Huo, Bo; You, Lidan; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device (poly-dimethylsiloxane micro channels bonded with glass slides) enabling culture of MLO-Y4 osteocyte like cells. In this study, on-chip collagen coating, cell seeding and culture, as well as staining were demonstrated in a tubing-free manner where gravity was used as the driving force for liquid transportation. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured in microfluidic channels with and without collagen coating where cellular images in a time sequence were taken and analyzed, confirming the positive effect of collagen coating on phenotype maintaining of MLO-Y4 cells. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen based proliferation assay was used to study cellular proliferation, revealing a higher proliferation rate of MLO-Y4 cells seeded in microfluidic channels without collagen coating compared to the substrates coated with collagen. Furthermore, the effects of channel dimensions (variations in width and height) on the viability of MLO-Y4 cells were explored based on the Calcein-AM and propidium iodide based live/dead assay and the Hoechst 33258 based apoptosis assay, locating the correlation between the decrease in channel width or height and the decrease in cell viability. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new cell culture model enabling studies of osteocytes. PMID:25713691

  20. A Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Device for Rapid Quantification of Particulate Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Rattanarat, Poomrat; Dungchai, Wijitar; Cate, David M.; Siangproh, Weena; Volckens, John; Chailapakul, Orawon; Charles S. Henry

    2013-01-01

    Occupational exposure to Cr is concerning because of its myriad of health effects. Assessing chromium exposure is also cost and resource intensive because the analysis typically uses sophisticated instrumental techniques like Inductively-Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Here, we report a novel, simple, inexpensive microfluidic paper-based analytical device (µPAD) for measuring total Cr in airborne particulate matter. In the µPAD, tetravalent cerium (Ce(IV)) was used in a pretreatmen...

  1. Particle-Based Microfluidic Device for Providing High Magnetic Field Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Adam Y. (Inventor); Wong, Tak S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device for manipulating particles in a fluid has a device body that defines a main channel therein, in which the main channel has an inlet and an outlet. The device body further defines a particulate diverting channel therein, the particulate diverting channel being in fluid connection with the main channel between the inlet and the outlet of the main channel and having a particulate outlet. The microfluidic device also has a plurality of microparticles arranged proximate or in the main channel between the inlet of the main channel and the fluid connection of the particulate diverting channel to the main channel. The plurality of microparticles each comprises a material in a composition thereof having a magnetic susceptibility suitable to cause concentration of magnetic field lines of an applied magnetic field while in operation. A microfluidic particle-manipulation system has a microfluidic particle-manipulation device and a magnet disposed proximate the microfluidic particle-manipulation device.

  2. Fast fabrication process of microfluidic devices based on cyclic olefin copolymer

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Azouz, Aymen; Murphy, Stephen; Karazi, Shadi; Vazquez, Mercedes; Brabazon, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    A new low-cost process for fast fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices using cyclic olefin copolymer film materials is presented. This novel process consists of the fabrication of microfluidic features by xurography, followed by multilayer lamination via cyclohexane vapor exposure. Exposure time to this solvent and compression time were optimized for bond tensile strength. A three-layer microfluidic chip capable of withstanding back pressures up to 23 MPa was fabricated in less than a...

  3. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  4. High-Resolution Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices for Sub-Microliter Sample Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Tenda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the fabrication of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs suitable for the analysis of sub-microliter sample volumes. The wax-printing approach widely used for the patterning of paper substrates has been adapted to obtain high-resolution microfluidic structures patterned in filter paper. This has been achieved by replacing the hot plate heating method conventionally used to melt printed wax features into paper by simple hot lamination. This patterning technique, in combination with the consideration of device geometry and the influence of cellulose fiber direction in filter paper, led to a model µPAD design with four microfluidic channels that can be filled with as low as 0.5 µL of liquid. Finally, the application to a colorimetric model assay targeting total protein concentrations is shown. Calibration curves for human serum albumin (HSA were recorded from sub-microliter samples (0.8 µL, with tolerance against ±0.1 µL variations in the applied liquid volume.

  5. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  6. Fabrication of digital microfluidic devices on flexible paper-based and rigid substrates via screen printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafia, Mohamed; Shukla, Saurabh; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a new fabrication method is presented for digital microfluidic (DMF) devices in which the electrodes are generated using the screen printing technique. This method is applicable to both rigid and flexible substrates. The proposed screen printing approach, as a batch printing technique, is advantageous to the widely reported DMF fabrication methods in terms of fabrication time, cost and capability of mass production. Screen printing provides an effective means for printing different types of conductive materials on a variety of substrates. Specifically, screen printing of conductive silver and carbon based inks is performed on paper, glass and wax paper. As a result, the fabricated DMF devices are characterized by being flexible, disposable and incinerable. Hence, the main advantage of screen printing carbon based inks on paper substrates is more pronounced for point-of-care applications that require a large number of low cost DMF chips, and laboratory setups that lack sophisticated microfabrication facilities. The resolution of the printed DMF electrodes generated by this technique is examined for proof of concept using manual screen printing, but higher resolution screens and automated machines are available off-the-shelf, if needed. Another contribution of this research is the improved actuation techniques that facilitate droplet transport in electrode configurations with relatively large electrode spacing to alleviate the disadvantage of lower resolution screens. Thus, we were able to reduce the cost of fabrication significantly without compromising the DMF performance. The paper-based devices have already shown to be effective in continuous microfluidics domain, so the investigation of their applicability in DMF systems is worthwhile. With this in mind, successful integration of a paper-based microchannel with paper-based digital microfluidic chip is demonstrated in this work.

  7. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  8. A paper based microfluidic device for easy detection of uric acid using positively charged gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Hens, Abhiram; Arun, Ravi Kumar; Chatterjee, Monosree; Mahato, Kuldeep; Layek, Keya; Chanda, Nripen

    2015-03-21

    A paper based microfluidic device is fabricated that can rapidly detect very low concentrations of uric acid (UA) using 3,5,3',5'-tetramethyl benzidine (TMB), H2O2 and positively charged gold nanoparticles ((+)AuNPs). In the presence of (+)AuNPs, H2O2 reacts with TMB to produce a bluish-green colour which becomes colourless on reaction with UA. This colorimetric method can detect as low as 8.1 ppm of UA within <20 minutes on white filter paper. This technique provides an alternative way for UA detection. PMID:25655365

  9. Determination of Nitrite in Saliva using Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Bhakta, Samir A.; Borba, Rubiane; Taba, Mario; Garcia, Carlos D.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care platforms can provide fast responses, decrease the overall cost of the treatment, allow for in-home determinations with or without a trained specialist, and improve the success of the treatment. This is especially true for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPAD), which can enable the development of highly efficient and versatile analytical tools with applications in a variety of biomedical fields. The objective of this work was the development of μPADs to identify and...

  10. Biologically Inspired Electronic, Photovoltaic and Microfluidic Devices Based on Aqueous Soft Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyung Jun

    Hydrogels are a water-based soft material where three dimensional networks of hydrophilic polymer retain large amounts of water. We developed hydrogel based devices with new functionalities inspired by materials, structures and processes in nature. The advantages, such as softness, biocompatibility and high ionic conductivity, could enable hydrogels to be novel materials for biomimetic devices operated by ionic current. Moreover, microfluidic patterns are easily embedded in moldable hydrogels and allow for unique convective/diffusive transport mechanism in porous gel to be used for uniform delivery of reagent solution. We first developed and characterized a device with unidirectional ionic current flow across a SiO2/Gel junction, which showed highly efficient rectification of the ionic current by non-linear conductivity of SiO2 films. Addition of polyelectrolytes and salt to the gel layer significantly improved the performance of the new diode device because of the enhanced gel conductance. A soft matter based diode composed of hydrogel and liquid metal (eutectic gallium indium, EGaIn) was also presented. The ability to control the thickness, and thus resistivity, of an insulating oxide skin on the metal enables the current rectification. The effect of ionic conductivity and pH on the formation of the insulating oxide was investigated in a simple model system with liquid metal/electrolyte solution or hydrogel/Pt interfaces. Finally, we present a diode composed entirely of soft materials by replacing the platinum electrode with a second liquid metal electrode. A new type of hydrogel-based photovoltaic systems (HGPVs) was constructed. Two photosensitive ionized molecules embedded in aqueous gel served as photoactive species. The HGPVs showed performance comparable with or higher than those of some other biomimetic or ionic photovoltaic systems reported recently. We suggest a provisional mechanism of the device operation, based on a synergetic effect of the two dye

  11. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. PMID:26218523

  12. A microfluidic device with pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a microfluidic device for mixing liquid reagents, the device comprises, a chip forming at least one reaction chamber between a bottom and a top and extending between an inlet and an outlet. To enable manufacturing from less rigid materials, the device comprises pillars...

  13. A portable microfluidic fluorescence spectrometer device for {gamma}-H2AX-based biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, I.A.; Barber, P.R. [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Horn, S.; Ainsbury, E. [Health Protection Agency Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom); Rothkamm, K., E-mail: kai.rothkamm@hpa.org.uk [Health Protection Agency Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom); Vojnovic, B. [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Following a radiological incident the rapid identification of those individuals exposed to critically high radiation doses is important for initial triage and medical treatment. It has been previously demonstrated that scoring of radiation-induced foci of the phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX, which form at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks, may be used to determine radiation exposure levels from blood samples. Although faster than the 'gold standard' dicentric assay, foci scoring is still impractical in a field situation where large numbers of people may need to be screened. To deal with such a situation, an inexpensive portable device with high throughput capacity is desirable. Here we describe a portable microfluidic fluorescence spectrometer device which passes a suspension of {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence-stained lymphocytes through a focused 488 nm laser beam in a microfluidic chamber and records emission spectra over the range 495-725 nm. The recorded emission spectra are spectrally unmixed into their constituent parts from which radiation exposure levels are determined. Proof of principle is demonstrated using cultured lymphoblastoid cells, exposed to X-ray doses between 0 and 8 Gy. With the current prototype setup it takes approximately 6 min to acquire and analyse 10,000 spectra. Further effort is required to fully develop this approach into a portable triage tool that could be used to help classify people into appropriate treatment categories based on radiation exposure levels.

  14. Surface Modified Thread-Based Microfluidic Analytical Device for Selective Potassium Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenas, Miguel M; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-05-17

    This paper presents a thread-based microfluidic device (μTAD) that includes ionophore extraction chemistry for the optical recognition of potassium. The device is 1.5 cm × 1.0 cm and includes a cotton thread to transport the aqueous sample via capillary wicking to a 5 mm-long detection area, where the recognition chemistry is deposited that reaches equilibrium in 60 s, changing its color between blue and magenta. A complete characterization of the cotton thread used as well as the sensing element has been carried out. The imaging of the μTAD with a digital camera and the extraction of the H coordinate of the HSV color space used as the analytical parameter make it possible to determine K(I) between 2.4 × 10(-5) and 0.95 M with a precision better than 1.3%. PMID:27077212

  15. Development of PDMS-based Microfluidic Device for Cell-based Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chenuk-Wing; YANG Jun; TZANG Chi-Hung; YANG Meng-Su

    2004-01-01

    In a single step photolithography, muhi-level microfluidic device is fabricated by printing novel architectures on a film photomasks. The whole fabrication process is executed by classical PCB technology without the need to access clean room facilities. Different levels of protruding features on PCB master are produced by exposing a photomask with specifically arranged "windows and rims" architectures, followed by chemical wet etching. Poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) is then molded against the positive relief master to generate microfluidic device featured with multi-level sandbag structure and peripheral microchannels. This sandbag structure is an analog to traditional dam or weir for particle entrapment. The microstructure does not collapse when subjected to applied pressure, which is suitable for operation on elastic PDMS substrate.Typical immunocytochemcial staining assays were performed in the microdevice to demonstrate the applicability of the sandbag structure for cellular analysis. This simplified microfabrication process employs low-cost materials and minimal specialized equipment and can reproducibly produce mask lines with about 20 μm in width, which is sufficient for most microfluidic applications.

  16. Integrated microfluidic device for droplet manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Basova, E.

    2013-01-01

    Droplets based microfluidic systems have a big potential for the miniaturization of processes for bioanalysis. In the form of droplets, reagents are used in discrete volume, enabling high-throughput chemical reactions as well as single-cell encapsulation. Microreactors of this type can be manipulated and applied in bio-testing. In this work we present a platform for droplet generation and manipulation by using dielectrophoresis force. This platform is an integrated microfluidic device wit...

  17. INTEGRATED MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR DROPLET MANIPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Basova Evgenia; Drs Jakub; Zemanek Jiri; Hurak Zdenek; Foret František

    2013-01-01

    Droplets based microfluidic systems have a big potential for the miniaturization of processes for bioanalysis. In the form of droplets, reagents are used in discrete volume, enabling high-throughput chemical reactions as well as single-cell encapsulation. Microreactors of this type can be manipulated and applied in bio-testing. In this work we present a platform for droplet generation and manipulation by using dielectrophoresis force. This platform is an integrated microfluidic device wit...

  18. An integrated hybrid microfluidic device for oviposition-based chemical screening of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jacob C K; Hilliker, Arthur J; Rezai, Pouya

    2016-02-21

    Chemical screening using Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly) is vital in drug discovery, agricultural, and toxicological applications. Oviposition (egg laying) on chemically-doped agar plates is an important read-out metric used to quantitatively assess the biological fitness and behavioral responses of Drosophila. Current oviposition-based chemical screening studies are inaccurate, labor-intensive, time-consuming, and inflexible due to the manual chemical doping of agar. In this paper, we have developed a novel hybrid agar-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device for single- and multi-concentration chemical dosing and on-chip oviposition screening of free-flying adult stage Drosophila. To achieve this, we have devised a novel technique to integrate agar with PDMS channels using ice as a sacrificial layer. Subsequently, we have conducted single-chemical toxicity and multiple choice chemical preference assays on adult Drosophila melanogaster using zinc and acetic acid at various concentrations. Our device has enabled us to 1) demonstrate that Drosophila is capable of sensing the concentration of different chemicals on a PDMS-agar microfluidic device, which plays significant roles in determining oviposition site selection and 2) investigate whether oviposition preference differs between single- and multi-concentration chemical environments. This device may be used to study fundamental and applied biological questions in Drosophila and other egg laying insects. It can also be extended in design to develop sophisticated and dynamic chemical dosing and high-throughput screening platforms in the future that are not easily achievable with the existing oviposition screening techniques. PMID:26768402

  19. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  20. A low-cost, ultraflexible cloth-based microfluidic device for wireless electrochemiluminescence application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Liu, Rui; Wang, Dan; Liu, Cuiling; Zhang, Chunsun

    2016-08-01

    The rising need for low-cost diagnostic devices has led to the search for inexpensive matrices that allow performing alternative analytical assays. Cloth is a viable material for the development of analytical devices due to its low material and manufacture costs, ability to wick assay fluids by capillary forces, and potential for patterning multiplexed channel geometries. In this paper, we describe the construction of low-cost, ultraflexible microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) for wireless electrochemiluminescence based on closed bipolar electrodes (C-WL-ECL), employing extremely cheap materials and a manufacturing process. The C-WL-ECL μCADs are built with wax-screen-printed cloth channels and carbon ink screen-printed electrodes, and the estimated cost per device is only $0.015. To demonstrate the performance of C-WL-ECL μCADs, the two most commonly used ECL systems - tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(ii)/tri-n-propylamine (Ru(bpy)3(2+)/TPA) and 3-aminophthalhydrazide/hydrogen peroxide (luminol/H2O2) - are applied. Under optimized conditions, the C-WL-ECL method has successfully fulfilled the quantitative determination of TPA with a detection limit of 0.085 mM. In addition, on the bent μCADs (bending angle (θ) = 180°), the luminol/H2O2-based ECL system can detect H2O2 as low as 0.024 mM. Based on such an ECL system, the bent μCADs are further used for determination of glucose in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS), with the detection limit of 0.195 mM. Finally, the applicability and validity, anti-interference ability, and storage stability of the C-WL-ECL μCADs are investigated. The results indicate that the proposed device has shown potential to extend the use of microfluidic analytical devices, due to its simplicity, low cost, ultraflexibility, and acceptable analytical performance. PMID:27356231

  1. Paper-based microfluidic devices for analysis of clinically relevant analytes present in urine and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasner, Scott A; Price, Alexander K; Hoeman, Kurt W; Wilson, Rashaun S; Bell, Kayla J; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2010-07-01

    We report the use of paper-based microfluidic devices fabricated from a novel polymer blend for the monitoring of urinary ketones, glucose, and salivary nitrite. Paper-based devices were fabricated via photolithography in less than 3 min and were immediately ready for use for these diagnostically relevant assays. Patterned channels on filter paper as small as 90 microm wide with barriers as narrow as 250 microm could be reliably patterned to permit and block fluid wicking, respectively. Colorimetric assays for ketones and nitrite were adapted from the dipstick format to this paper microfluidic chip for the quantification of acetoacetate in artificial urine, as well as nitrite in artificial saliva. Glucose assays were based on those previously demonstrated (Martinez et al., Angew Chem Int Ed 8:1318-1320, 1; Martinez et al., Anal Chem 10:3699-3707, 2; Martinez et al., Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 50:19606-19611, 3; Lu et al., Electrophoresis 9:1497-1500, 4; Abe et al., Anal Chem 18:6928-6934, 5). Reagents were spotted on the detection pad of the paper device and allowed to dry prior to spotting of samples. The ketone test was a two-step reaction requiring a derivitization step between the sample spotting pad and the detection pad, thus for the first time, confirming the ability of these paper devices to perform online multi-step chemical reactions. Following the spotting of the reagents and sample solution onto the paper device and subsequent drying, color images of the paper chips were recorded using a flatbed scanner, and images were converted to CMYK format in Adobe Photoshop CS4 where the intensity of the color change was quantified using the same software. The limit of detection (LOD) for acetoacetate in artificial urine was 0.5 mM, while the LOD for salivary nitrite was 5 microM, placing both of these analytes within the clinically relevant range for these assays. Calibration curves for urinary ketone (5 to 16 mM) and salivary nitrite (5 to 2,000 microM) were

  2. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  3. A Simple Paper-Based Microfluidic Device for the Determination of the Total Amino Acid Content in a Tea Leaf Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Longfei; Wu, Yunying; Xu, Chunxiu; Chen, Zefeng

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was developed to demonstrate a microfluidic device in the analytical chemistry (instrumental analysis) laboratory. Students made the paper-based microfluidic device with a wax pen and a piece of filter paper and used it to determine the total quantity of amino acids in a green tea leaf

  4. Advances in Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices for Food and Water Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Shayne Alamo Busa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Food and water contamination cause safety and health concerns to both animals and humans. Conventional methods for monitoring food and water contamination are often laborious and require highly skilled technicians to perform the measurements, making the quest for developing simpler and cost-effective techniques for rapid monitoring incessant. Since the pioneering works of Whitesides’ group from 2007, interest has been strong in the development and application of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs for food and water analysis, which allow easy, rapid and cost-effective point-of-need screening of the targets. This paper reviews recently reported μPADs that incorporate different detection methods such as colorimetric, electrochemical, fluorescence, chemiluminescence, and electrochemiluminescence techniques for food and water analysis.

  5. Deformability and size-based cancer cell separation using an integrated microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long; Shen, Shaofei; Ma, Chao; Ma, Tongtong; Zhang, Rui; Tian, Chang; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jinyi

    2015-11-01

    Cell sorting by filtration techniques offers a label-free approach for cell separation on the basis of size and deformability. However, filtration is always limited by the unpredictable variation of the filter hydrodynamic resistance due to cell accumulation and clogging in the microstructures. In this study, we present a new integrated microfluidic device for cell separation based on the cell size and deformability by combining the microstructure-constricted filtration and pneumatic microvalves. Using this device, the cell populations sorted by the microstructures can be easily released in real time for subsequent analysis. Moreover, the periodical sort and release of cells greatly avoided cell accumulation and clogging and improved the selectivity. Separation of cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA231-LM2) with different deformability showed that the mixture of the less flexible cells (MCF-7) and the flexible cells (MDA-MB-231 and MDA231-LM2) can be well separated with more than 75% purity. Moreover, the device can be used to separate cancer cells from the blood samples with more than 90% cell recovery and more than 80% purity. Compared with the current filtration methods, the device provides a new approach for cancer cell separation with high collection recovery and purity, and also, possesses practical potential to be applied as a sample preparation platform for fundamental studies and clinical applications. PMID:26366443

  6. Fabrication of PDMS-Based Microfluidic Devices: Application for Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Vu Thi; Mai, An Ngoc; Le The Tam; Van Trung, Hoang; Thu, Phung Thi; Tien, Bui Quang; Thuat, Nguyen Tran; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we have developed a convenient approach to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles with relatively high magnetization and controllable sizes. This was realized by combining the traditional co-precipitation method and microfluidic techniques inside microfluidic devices. The device was first designed, and then fabricated using simplified soft-lithography techniques. The device was utilized to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesized nanomaterials were thoroughly characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results demonstrated that the as-prepared device can be utilized as a simple and effective tool to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles with the sizes less than 10 nm and magnetization more than 50 emu/g. The development of these devices opens new strategies to synthesize nanomaterials with more precise dimensions at narrow size-distribution and with controllable behaviors.

  7. Osteocyte culture in microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chao; Fan, Beiyuan; Chen, Deyong; Liu, Chao; Wei, Yuanchen; Huo, Bo; You, Lidan; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device (poly-dimethylsiloxane micro channels bonded with glass slides) enabling culture of MLO-Y4 osteocyte like cells. In this study, on-chip collagen coating, cell seeding and culture, as well as staining were demonstrated in a tubing-free manner where gravity was used as the driving force for liquid transportation. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured in microfluidic channels with and without collagen coating where cellular images in a time sequence were taken and ...

  8. Blood coagulation screening using a paper-based microfluidic lateral flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Han, D; Pauletti, G M; Steckl, A J

    2014-10-21

    A simple approach to the evaluation of blood coagulation using a microfluidic paper-based lateral flow assay (LFA) device for point-of-care (POC) and self-monitoring screening is reported. The device utilizes whole blood, without the need for prior separation of plasma from red blood cells (RBC). Experiments were performed using animal (rabbit) blood treated with trisodium citrate to prevent coagulation. CaCl2 solutions of varying concentrations are added to citrated blood, producing Ca(2+) ions to re-establish the coagulation cascade and mimic different blood coagulation abilities in vitro. Blood samples are dispensed into a paper-based LFA device consisting of sample pad, analytical membrane and wicking pad. The porous nature of the cellulose membrane separates the aqueous plasma component from the large blood cells. Since the viscosity of blood changes with its coagulation ability, the distance RBCs travel in the membrane in a given time can be related to the blood clotting time. The distance of the RBC front is found to decrease linearly with increasing CaCl2 concentration, with a travel rate decreasing from 3.25 mm min(-1) for no added CaCl2 to 2.2 mm min(-1) for 500 mM solution. Compared to conventional plasma clotting analyzers, the LFA device is much simpler and it provides a significantly larger linear range of measurement. Using the red colour of RBCs as a visible marker, this approach can be utilized to produce a simple and clear indicator of whether the blood condition is within the appropriate range for the patient's condition. PMID:25144164

  9. Tetrazine-based chemistry for nitrite determination in a paper microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gomez, Inmaculada; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Álvarez-Bermejo, José Antonio; Ariza-Avidad, Maria; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-11-01

    We present a new chemistry to determine nitrites implemented in a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (µPAD). The device is fabricated in cellulose paper with a sample reception area and three replicate detection areas with recognition chemistry immobilized by adsorption. The method involves the use of nitrite in an acid medium reaction to generate nitrous acid, which produces the oxidation of s-dihydrotetrazine: 1,2-dihydro-3,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DHBPTz), which change the detection zone from colorless to pink. We used a digital camera and smartphone for the quantitative analysis of nitrite with the color coordinate S of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter. Parameters such as concentration and volume of s-dihydrotetrazine, pH, sample volume and reaction time were studied. The detection limit for this method is 1.30µM nitrite. To estimate the selectivity of the method an interference study of common ions in water samples was performed. The procedure was applied to natural water and compared with reference procedures. PMID:27591668

  10. Raman Characterization of Nanoparticle Transport in Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices (μPADs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Rebecca Halvorson; Wallace, Grant C; Vikesland, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    There is great interest in the use of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for low-cost diagnostics. In this contribution, we illustrate the utility of Raman spectral imaging for both μPAD characterization and for quantification of the transport of applied reagents and analytes within these devices. We evaluated the transport of nanoscale particles within μPADs using a suite of differentially functionalized gold (AuNP) and silver (AgNP) nanoparticles with diameters of 8-64 nm. Nanoparticle transport within the cellulose matrix was characterized by collection of both Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectral maps that enabled differentiation of cellulose fibers and characterization of analyte deposition patterns. The transport of citrate (cit), BSA, PEG, PVP, and DNA functionalized AuNP and AgNP in wax-printed μPADs was primarily affected by nanoparticle surface chemistry rather than particle size or core composition. Sample pH (3-10) influenced the transport of 15 nm BSA-cit-AuNP, but not 15 nm cit-AuNP, because of the effects of solution pH on the charge and conformation of BSA. Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory (DLVO) and extended DLVO (xDLVO) theory are used to explain the collected experimental results. PMID:25853463

  11. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  12. Integrated separation of blood plasma from whole blood for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Forouzan, Omid; Brown, Theodore P; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2012-01-21

    Many diagnostic tests in a conventional clinical laboratory are performed on blood plasma because changes in its composition often reflect the current status of pathological processes throughout the body. Recently, a significant research effort has been invested into the development of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) implementing these conventional laboratory tests for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings. This paper describes the use of red blood cell (RBC) agglutination for separating plasma from finger-prick volumes of whole blood directly in paper, and demonstrates the utility of this approach by integrating plasma separation and a colorimetric assay in a single μPAD. The μPAD was fabricated by printing its pattern onto chromatography paper with a solid ink (wax) printer and melting the ink to create hydrophobic barriers spanning through the entire thickness of the paper substrate. The μPAD was functionalized by spotting agglutinating antibodies onto the plasma separation zone in the center and the reagents of the colorimetric assay onto the test readout zones on the periphery of the device. To operate the μPAD, a drop of whole blood was placed directly onto the plasma separation zone of the device. RBCs in the whole blood sample agglutinated and remained in the central zone, while separated plasma wicked through the paper substrate into the test readout zones where analyte in plasma reacted with the reagents of the colorimetric assay to produce a visible color change. The color change was digitized with a portable scanner and converted to concentration values using a calibration curve. The purity and yield of separated plasma was sufficient for successful operation of the μPAD. This approach to plasma separation based on RBC agglutination will be particularly useful for designing fully integrated μPADs operating directly on small samples of whole blood. PMID:22094609

  13. Perfused drop microfluidic device for brain slice culture-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Pan, Liping; Cheng, Xuanhong; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-06-01

    Living slices of brain tissue are widely used to model brain processes in vitro. In addition to basic neurophysiology studies, brain slices are also extensively used for pharmacology, toxicology, and drug discovery research. In these experiments, high parallelism and throughput are critical. Capability to conduct long-term electrical recording experiments may also be necessary to address disease processes that require protein synthesis and neural circuit rewiring. We developed a novel perfused drop microfluidic device for use with long term cultures of brain slices (organotypic cultures). Slices of hippocampus were placed into wells cut in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Fluid level in the wells was hydrostatically controlled such that a drop was formed around each slice. The drops were continuously perfused with culture medium through microchannels. We found that viable organotypic hippocampal slice cultures could be maintained for at least 9 days in vitro. PDMS microfluidic network could be readily integrated with substrate-printed microelectrodes for parallel electrical recordings of multiple perfused organotypic cultures on a single MEA chip. We expect that this highly scalable perfused drop microfluidic device will facilitate high-throughput drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:27194028

  14. Chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2016-06-14

    We developed microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for the chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in natural water. The μPAD consisted of ten reaction zones and ten detection zones connected through narrow channels to a sample zone located at the center. Buffer solutions with a pH of 10 or 13 were applied to all surfaces of the channels and zones. Different amounts of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were added to the reaction zones and a consistent amount of a metal indicator (Eriochrome Black T or Calcon) was added to the detection zones. The total concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (total hardness) in the water were measured using a μPAD containing a buffer solution with a pH of 10, whereas only Ca(2+) was titrated using a μPAD prepared with a potassium hydroxide solution with a pH of 13. The μPADs permitted the determination of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in mineral water, river water, and seawater samples within only a few minutes using only the naked eye-no need of instruments. PMID:27181645

  15. Detection of distributed static and dynamic loads with electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers in a polymer-based microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the use of electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers in a polymer-based microfluidic device for the detection of distributed static and dynamic loads. The core of the device is a polymer rectangular microstructure integrated with electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers. Distributed loads acting on the polymer microstructure are converted to different deflections along the microstructure length, which are further translated to electrical resistance changes by electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers. Owing to the great simplicity of the device configuration, a standard polymer-based fabrication process is employed to fabricate this device. With custom-built electronic circuits and custom LabVIEW programs, fabricated devices filled with two different electrolytes, 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide electrolyte, are characterized, demonstrating the capability of detecting distributed static and dynamic loads with a single device. As a result, the polymer-based microfluidic device presented in this paper is promising for offering the capability of detecting distributed static and dynamic loads in biomedical/surgical, manufacturing and robotics applications. (paper)

  16. Portable microfluidic and smartphone-based devices for monitoring of cardiovascular diseases at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Cui, Xingye; Gong, Yan; Xu, Xiayu; Gao, Bin; Wen, Ting; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the world where about 4 in every 5 CVD deaths happen in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Most CVDs are preventable and curable, which is largely dependent on timely and effective interventions, including diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. However, these interventions are high-cost in high income countries and are usually lacking in LMICs. Thanks to the rapid development of microfluidics and nanotechnology, lots of portable analytical devices are developed for detection of CVDs at the point-of-care (POC). In the meantime, smartphone, as a versatile and powerful handheld tool, has been employed not only as a reader for microfluidic assays, but also as an analyzer for physiological indexes. In this review, we present a comprehensive introduction of the current status and potential development direction on POC diagnostics for CVDs. First of all, we introduce some main facts about CVDs and their standard diagnostic procedures and methods. Second, we discuss about both commercially available POC devices and developed prototypes for detection of CVDs via immunoassays. Subsequently, we report the advances in smartphone-based readout for microfluidic assays. Finally, we present some examples using smartphone, individually or combined with other components or devices, for CVD monitoring. We envision an integrated smartphone-based system capable of functioning blood tests, disease examination, and imaging will come in the future. PMID:26898179

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR DIFFUSION-BASED EXTRACTION OF DMSO FROM A CELL SUSPENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming Glass, K. K.; Longmire, E. K.; Hubel, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study considers the use of a two-stream microfluidic device for extraction of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) from a cryopreserved cell suspension. The DMSO diffuses from a cell suspension stream into a neighboring wash stream flowing in parallel. The model of Fleming et al.[14] is employed to determine and discuss optimal geometry and operating conditions for a case requiring removal of 95% DMSO from suspension streams with volumetric flow rates up to 2.5 ml/min. The effects of Peclet number...

  18. Development of microfluidic-based cell collection devices for in vitro and in vivo use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Logan; Entenberg, Dave; Hemachandra, L. P. Madhubhani; Strohmayer, Matthew; Keely, Patricia; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2016-03-01

    The NANIVID - or Nano Intravital Device - is an implantable delivery tool designed to locally affect the tumor microenvironment in vivo. This technology is being redesigned and validated as a cell collection tool for the study of metastatic cancer cells. A methodology has been developed to facilitate this transition, consisting of microfluidic analysis of the device microchannels and a series of cell-related collection experiments building up to in vivo collection. Single-chamber designs were first used to qualitatively demonstrate the feasibility of cell collection ex vivo. This was followed by the development and implementation of devices containing a second, negative-control chamber for quantitative analysis. This work sets the foundation for in vivo cancer cell migration studies utilizing the NANIVID.

  19. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. Development of a microfluidic paper-based analytical device for the determination of salivary aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdzan, Adlin N; Almeida, M Inês G S; McCullough, Michael J; Kolev, Spas D

    2016-05-01

    A low cost, disposable and easy to use microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) was developed for simple and non-invasive determination of total aldehydes in saliva with a potential to be used in epidemiological studies to assess oral cancer risk. The μPAD is based on the colour reaction between aldehydes (e.g. acetaldehyde, formaldehyde), 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) and iron(III) to form an intense blue coloured formazan dye. The newly developed μPAD has a 3D design with two overlapping paper layers. The first layer comprises 15 circular detection zones (8 mm in diameter), each impregnated with 8 μL of MBTH, while the second layer contains 15 reagent zones (4 mm in diameter). Two μL of iron(III) chloride are added to each one of the second layer zones after the addition of sample to the detection zones in the first layer. All hydrophilic zones of the μPAD are defined by wax printing using a commercial wax printer. Due to the 2-step nature of the analytical reaction, the two paper layers are separated by a cellulose acetate interleaving sheet to allow for the reaction between the aldehydes in the saliva sample with MBTH to proceed first with the formation of an azine, followed by a blue coloured reaction between the azine and the oxidized by iron(III) form of MBTH, produced after the removal of the interleaving sheet. After obtaining a high resolution image of the detection side zone of the device using a flatbed scanner, the intensity of the blue colour within each detection zone is measured with Image J software. Under optimal conditions, the μPAD is characterised by a working range of 20.4-114.0 μM, limit of detection of 6.1 μM, and repeatability, expressed as RSD, of less than 12.7% (n = 5). There is no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between the results obtained by the μPAD and the reference method (Student's t-test: 0.090 < 0.38). The optimized μPAD is stable for more than 41 days

  1. Microfluidic device capable of sensing ultrafast chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Teck; Ko, Seok Oh; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2009-05-15

    Based on the principle of liquid core waveguide, a novel microfluidic device with micro-scale detection window capable of sensing flashlight emitted from rapid 1,1'-oxalyldi-4-methylimidazole (OD4MI) chemiluminescence (CL) reaction was fabricated. Light emitted from OD4MI CL reaction occurring in the micro-dimensional pentagonal detection window (length of each line segment: 900.0 microm, depth: 50.0 microm) of the microfluidic device with two inlets and one outlet was so bright that it was possible to take an image every 1/30 s at the optimal focusing distance (60 cm) using a commercial digital camera. Peaks obtained using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system with the micro-scale detection window and OD4MI CL detection show excellent resolution and reproducibility without any band-broadening observed in analytical devices having additional reaction channel(s) to measure light generated from slow CL reaction. Maximum height (H(max)) and area (A) of peak, reproducibility and sensitivity observed in the FIA system with the microfluidic device and OD4MI CL detection depends on (1) the mole ratio between bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) oxalate and 4-methyl imidazole yielding OD4MI, (2) the flow rate to mix OD4MI, H(2)O(2) and 1-AP in the detection window of the microfluidic device, and (3) H(2)O(2) concentration. We obtained linear calibration curves with wide dynamic ranges using H(max) and A. The detection limit of 1-AP determined with H(max) and A was as low as 0.05 fmole/injection (signal/background=3.0). PMID:19269463

  2. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm-1. To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices.

  3. Purification of microalgae from bacterial contamination using a disposable inertia-based microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Neus; Jorde, Felix; Lawlor, Daryl; Jaeger, Magnus; Duschl, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae are a promising source of bioactive ingredients for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Every microalgae research group or production facility is facing one major problem regarding the potential contamination of the algal cell with bacteria. Prior to the storage of the microalgae in strain collections or to cultivation in bioreactors, it is necessary to carry out laborious purification procedures to separate the microalgae from the undesired bacterial cells. In this work, we present a disposable microfluidic cartridge for the high-throughput purification of microalgae samples based on inertial microfluidics. Some of the most relevant microalgae strains have a larger size than the relatively small, few micron bacterial cells, so making them distinguishable by size. The inertial microfluidic cartridge was fabricated with inexpensive materials, like pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and thin plastic layers, which were patterned using a simple cutting plotter. In spite of fabrication restrictions and the intrinsic difficulties of biological samples, the separation of microalgae from bacteria reached values in excess of 99%, previously only achieved using conventional high-end and high cost lithography methods. Moreover, due to the simple and high-throughput characteristic of the separation, it is possible to concatenate serial purification to exponentially decrease the absolute amount of bacteria in the final purified sample.

  4. Purification of microalgae from bacterial contamination using a disposable inertia-based microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microalgae are a promising source of bioactive ingredients for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Every microalgae research group or production facility is facing one major problem regarding the potential contamination of the algal cell with bacteria. Prior to the storage of the microalgae in strain collections or to cultivation in bioreactors, it is necessary to carry out laborious purification procedures to separate the microalgae from the undesired bacterial cells. In this work, we present a disposable microfluidic cartridge for the high-throughput purification of microalgae samples based on inertial microfluidics. Some of the most relevant microalgae strains have a larger size than the relatively small, few micron bacterial cells, so making them distinguishable by size. The inertial microfluidic cartridge was fabricated with inexpensive materials, like pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and thin plastic layers, which were patterned using a simple cutting plotter. In spite of fabrication restrictions and the intrinsic difficulties of biological samples, the separation of microalgae from bacteria reached values in excess of 99%, previously only achieved using conventional high-end and high cost lithography methods. Moreover, due to the simple and high-throughput characteristic of the separation, it is possible to concatenate serial purification to exponentially decrease the absolute amount of bacteria in the final purified sample. (paper)

  5. Rapid and alternative fabrication method for microfluidic paper based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekghasemi, Soheil; Kahveci, Enver; Duman, Memed

    2016-10-01

    A major application of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) includes the field of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. It is important for POC diagnostics to possess properties such as ease-of-use and low cost. However, µPADs need multiple instruments and fabrication steps. In this study, two different chemicals (Hexamethyldisilazane and Tetra-ethylorthosilicate) were used, and three different methods (heating, plasma treatment, and microwave irradiation) were compared to develop µPADs. Additionally, an inkjet-printing technique was used for generating a hydrophilic channel and printing certain chemical agents on different regions of a modified filter paper. A rapid and effective fabrication method to develop µPADs within 10min was introduced using an inkjet-printing technique in conjunction with a microwave irradiation method. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used for morphology characterization and determining the surface chemical compositions of the modified filter paper, respectively. Contact angle measurements were used to fulfill the hydrophobicity of the treated filter paper. The highest contact angle value (141°±1) was obtained using the microwave irradiation method over a period of 7min, when the filter paper was modified by TEOS. Furthermore, by using this method, the XPS results of TEOS-modified filter paper revealed Si2p (23%) and Si-O bounds (81.55%) indicating the presence of Si-O-Si bridges and Si(OEt) groups, respectively. The ESEM results revealed changes in the porous structures of the papers and decreases in the pore sizes. Washburn assay measurements tested the efficiency of the generated hydrophilic channels in which similar water penetration rates were observed in the TEOS-modified filter paper and unmodified (plain) filter paper. The validation of the developed µPADs was performed by utilizing the rapid urease test as a model test system. The detection limit of

  6. Hot embossed polyethylene through-hole chips for bead-based microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jie; Du, Nan; Ou, Tina; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growth of interest in the translation of microfluidic systems into real-world clinical practice, especially for use in point-of-care or near patient settings. While initial fabrication advances in microfluidics involved mainly the etching of silicon and glass, the economics of scaling of these materials is not amendable for point-of-care usage where single-test applications forces cost considerations to be kept low and throughput high. As such, a materials base more consistent with point-of-care needs is required. In this manuscript, the fabrication of a hot embossed, through-hole low-density polyethylene ensembles derived from an anisotropically etched silicon wafer is discussed. This semi-opaque polymer that can be easily sterilized and recycled provides low background noise for fluorescence measurements and yields more affordable cost than other thermoplastics commonly used for microfluidic applications such as cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). To fabrication through-hole microchips from this alternative material for microfluidics, a fabrication technique that uses a high-temperature, high-pressure resistant mold is described. This aluminum-based epoxy mold, serving as the positive master mold for embossing, is casted over etched arrays of pyramidal pits in a silicon wafer. Methods of surface treatment of the wafer prior to casting and PDMS casting of the epoxy are discussed to preserve the silicon wafer for future use. Changes in the thickness of polyethylene are observed for varying embossing temperatures. The methodology described herein can quickly fabricate 20 disposable, single use chips in less than 30 minutes with the ability to scale up 4x by using multiple molds simultaneously. When coupled as a platform supporting porous bead sensors, as in the recently developed Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip, this bead chip system can achieve limits of detection, for the cardiac biomarker C-reactive protein, of 0.3 ng/mL, thereby

  7. Development and optimization of an integrated capillary-based opto-microfluidic device for chemiluminescence quantitative detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capillary-action driven device amenable for integration of organic photodiodes (OPDs) was developed for monitoring parallel chemiluminescence (CL) reactions. Device characterization was conducted using finite element method (FEM) simulations. Definition of the simulation setup, dimensional optimization of the reaction chamber and overall geometrical characterization of the microfluidic device were the main simulation results. Furthermore, a non-uniform filling process was observed during the final simulation of the capillary device. Validation of this result and the proposed capillary-driven filling process was later confirmed by experimental results. Experimental testing performed on a single chamber defined an optimal exposure time to the luminescent substrate of 5 min, indicating a quick analyte detection time. Further tests using one chamber presented a linear relation between the signal-to-noise ratio and increasing concentrations of the protein used. A measured limit of detection of 28 nM was obtained for streptavidin. Regarding the tests performed on the whole device, acceptable values of 39 s ± 5 s were obtained for the luminescent substrate total filling times. Also, the microfluidic device showed the capability to perform a quantitative detection of the occurring CL reactions. Weaker optical signals, due to the occurrence of CL reactions, were detected in the chambers with a later filling process, as predicted by simulation results. Notwithstanding these results, the capillary-based device is promising for quantitative detection of proteins in future point-of-care systems, presenting an unprompted filling process and parallel quantitative detection capability. (paper)

  8. Concurrent spatial mapping of the elasticity of heterogeneous soft materials via a polymer-based microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, built upon a polymer-based microfluidic device, a novel experimental technique called concurrent spatial mapping (CSM) is presented for measuring the spatially-varying elasticity of heterogeneous soft materials. Comprised of a single compliant polymer microstructure and a set of electrolyte-enabled distributed resistive transducers, this device is capable of detecting continuous distributed loads. In this experimental technique, a rigid probe is employed to press a material specimen against the device with precisely controlled displacements, and consequently the spatially-varying elasticity of the specimen translates to continuous distributed loads acting on the device, where continuous distributed loads give rise to continuous deflection of the polymer microstructure and register as discrete resistance changes at the locations of the distributed transducers. Performance characterization is first conducted on the device as a control experiment. Then, CSM is implemented on several heterogeneous and homogeneous polydimethylsiloxane specimens, as well as a rabbit tissue specimen. The associated data analysis is performed on the measured data for extracting the spatially-varying load-deflection relations of these specimens. In conjunction with its dimensions, the extracted spatially-varying load-deflection relations of a specimen result in its spatially-varying elasticity by the related theoretical formula. For the first time, this paper demonstrates the feasibility of using a single polymer-based microfluidic device to concurrently map out the spatially-varying elasticity of heterogeneous soft materials. As a result, CSM will pave the way for efficiently examining biological tissues and cell-seeded engineering scaffolds, while without excluding the interaction among neighboring compositions in such materials. (paper)

  9. Dynamic monitoring of single cell lysis in an impedance-based microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-08-01

    A microfluidic device that is capable of trapping and sensing dynamic variations in the electrical properties of individual cells is demonstrated. The device is applied to the real-time recording of impedance measurements of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) during the process of membrane lysis, with the resulting changes in the electrical properties of cells during this process being quantitatively tracked over time. It is observed that the impedance magnitude decreases dramatically after cell membrane lysis. A significant shift in the phase spectrum is also observed during the time course of this process. By fitting experimental data to physical models, the electrical parameters of cells can be extracted and parameter variations quantified during the process. In the cell lysis experiments, the equivalent conductivity of the cell membrane is found to increase significantly due to pore formation in the membrane during lysis. An increase in the specific capacitance of the membrane is also observed. On the other hand, the conductivity of the cytoplasm is observed to decrease, which may be explained the fact that excess water enters the cell through the gradual permeabilization of the membrane during lysis. Cells can be trapped in the device for periods up to several days, and their electrical response can be monitored by real-time impedance measurements in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Furthermore, due to the highly efficient single cell trapping capacity of the device, a number of cells can be trapped and held in separate wells for concurrent parallel experiments, allowing for the possibility of stepped parametric experiments and studying cell heterogeneity by combining measurements across the array. PMID:27299468

  10. Paper-based three-dimensional microfluidic device for monitoring of heavy metals with a camera cell phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Li, Ya-jie; Wei, Jun-feng; Xu, Ji-run; Wang, Yun-hua; Zheng, Guo-xia

    2014-05-01

    A 3D paper-based microfluidic device has been developed for colorimetric determination of selected heavy metals in water samples by stacking layers of wax patterned paper and double-sided adhesive tape. It has the capability of wicking fluids and distributing microliter volumes of samples from single inlet into affrays of detection zones without external pumps, thus a range of metal assays can be simply and inexpensively performed. We demonstrate a prototype of four sample inlets for up to four heavy metal assays each, with detection limits as follows: Cu (II) = 0.29 ppm, Ni(II) = 0.33 ppm, Cd (II) = 0.19 ppm, and Cr (VI) = 0.35 ppm, which provided quantitative data that were in agreement with values gained from atomic absorption. It has the ability to identify these four metals in mixtures and is immune to interferences from either nontoxic metal ions such as Na(I) and K(I) or components found in reservoir or beach water. With the incorporation of a portable detector, a camera mobile phone, this 3D paper-based microfluidic device should be useful as a simple, rapid, and on-site screening approach of heavy metals in aquatic environments. PMID:24618990

  11. Performance study of a PDMS-based microfluidic device for the detection of continuous distributed static and dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the performance of a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic device for the detection of continuous distributed static and dynamic loads. The core of this device is a single-compliant polymer microstructure integrated with a set of electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers, which are equally spaced along the microstructure length. The microstructure converts continuous distributed loads to continuous deflection, which is translated to discrete resistance changes by the distributed transducers. One potential application of this device is to measure spatially varying elasticity/viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous soft material, through quasi-static, stress relaxation and dynamic mechanical analysis tests. Thus, by controlling the displacement of a rigid probe, three types of loads (i.e., static, step and sinusoidal) are exerted on the device, and the performance of the device is experimentally characterized and analytically examined. As a result, this work establishes not only an experimental method for characterizing the performance of the device under various loading conditions, which can be directly adopted to measure the spatially varying elasticity/viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous soft material, but also the correlation of the device performance to its design parameters. (paper)

  12. Flow injection based microfluidic device with carbon nanotube electrode for rapid salbutamol detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuwan, Chanpen; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Maturos, Thitima; Phokharatkul, Disayut; Sappat, Assawapong; Jaruwongrungsee, Kata; Lomas, Tanom; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2009-09-15

    A microfabicated flow injection device has been developed for in-channel electrochemical detection (ECD) of a beta-agonist, namely salbutamol. The microfluidic system consists of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchannel and electrochemical electrodes formed on glass substrate. The carbon nanotube (CNT) on gold layer as working electrode, silver as reference electrode and platinum as auxiliary electrode were deposited on a glass substrate. Silver, platinum, gold and stainless steel catalyst layers were coated by DC-sputtering. CNTs were then grown on the glass substance by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with gravity effect and water-assisted etching. 100-microm-deep and 500-microm-wide PDMS microchannels fabricated by SU-8 molding and casting were then bonded on glass substrate by oxygen plasma treatment. Flow injection and ECD of salbutamol was performed with the amperometric detection mode for in-channel detection of salbutamol. The influences of flow rate, injection volume, and detection potential on the response of current signal were optimized. Analytical characteristics, such as sensitivity, repeatability and dynamic range have been evaluated. Fast and highly sensitive detection of salbutamol have been achieved. Thus, the proposed combination of the efficient CNT electrode and miniaturized lab-on-a-chip is a powerful platform for beta-agonists detection. PMID:19615498

  13. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  14. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  15. Rapid quantification of live cell receptors using bioluminescence in a flow-based microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramji, Ramesh; Cheong, Cheong Fook; Hirata, Hiroaki; Rahman, Abdur Rub Abdur; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-02-25

    The number of receptors expressed by cells plays an important role in controlling cell signaling events, thus determining its behaviour, state and fate. Current methods of quantifying receptors on cells are either laborious or do not maintain the cells in their native form. Here, a method integrating highly sensitive bioluminescence, high precision microfluidics and small footprint of lensfree optics is developed to quantify cell surface receptors. This method is safe to use, less laborious, and faster than the conventional radiolabelling and near field scanning methods. It is also more sensitive than fluorescence based assays and is ideal for high throughput screening. In quantifying β(1) adrenergic receptors expressed on the surface of H9c2 cardiomyocytes, this method yields receptor numbers from 3.12 × 10(5) to 9.36 × 10(5) receptors/cell which are comparable with current methods. This can serve as a very good platform for rapid quantification of receptor numbers in ligand/drug binding and receptor characterization studies, which is an important part of pharmaceutical and biological research. PMID:25336403

  16. On-chip characterization of cryoprotective agent mixtures using an EWOD-based digital microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sinwook; Wijethunga, Pavithra A L; Moon, Hyejin; Han, Bumsoo

    2011-07-01

    For tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, cryopreservation, a technique for preserving biomaterials in the frozen state with cryoprotective agents (CPAs), is critically important for preserving engineered tissues (ETs) as well as cells necessary to create ETs. As more diverse ETs are produced using various cell types, CPAs and corresponding freeze/thaw (F/T) protocols need to be developed cell/tissue-type specifically. This is because CPAs and F/T protocols that have been successful for one cell/tissue type have proven to be difficult to adapt to other cell/tissue types. The most critical barrier to address this challenge is the inability to screen and identify CPA or CPA mixtures efficiently. In this paper, we developed an "electro-wetting-on-dielectic" (EWOD) based digital microfluidic platform to characterize and screen CPA mixtures cell-type specifically. The feasibility of the EWOD platform was demonstrated by characterizing and optimizing a mixture of dimethlysulfoxide (DMSO) and PBS for human breast cancer cell line as model CPA mixture and cell line. The developed platform multiplexed droplets of DMSO and PBS to create an array of DMSO-PBS mixtures, and mapped the phase change diagram of the mixture. After loading cell suspensions on the platform, the mixture was further screened on-chip for toxicity and cryoprotection. The results were discussed to illustrate the capabilities and limitations of the EWOD platform for cell and tissue-type specific optimization of CPA mixtures and F/T protocols. PMID:21603697

  17. Two dimension (2-D) graphene-based nanomaterials as signal amplification elements in electrochemical microfluidic immune-devices: Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is a 2-D carbon nanomaterial with many distinctive properties that are electrochemically beneficial, such as large surface-to-volume ratio, lowered power usage, high conductivity and electron mobility. Graphene-based electrochemical immune-devices have recently gained much importance for detecting antigens and biomarkers responsible for cancer diagnosis. This review describes fabrication and chemical modification of the surfaces of graphene for immunesensing applications. We also present a comprehensive overview of current developments and key issues in the determination of some biological molecules with particular emphasis on evaluating the models. This review focuses mostly on new developments in the last 5years in development of chip architecture and integration, different sensing modes that can be used in conjunction with microfluidics, and new applications that have emerged or have been demonstrated; it also aims to point out where future research can be directed to in these areas. PMID:27524045

  18. Non-Linear Electrohydrodynamics in Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zeng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the inception of microfluidics, the electric force has been exploited as one of the leading mechanisms for driving and controlling the movement of the operating fluid and the charged suspensions. Electric force has an intrinsic advantage in miniaturized devices. Because the electrodes are placed over a small distance, from sub-millimeter to a few microns, a very high electric field is easy to obtain. The electric force can be highly localized as its strength rapidly decays away from the peak. This makes the electric force an ideal candidate for precise spatial control. The geometry and placement of the electrodes can be used to design electric fields of varying distributions, which can be readily realized by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS fabrication methods. In this paper, we examine several electrically driven liquid handling operations. The emphasis is given to non-linear electrohydrodynamic effects. We discuss the theoretical treatment and related numerical methods. Modeling and simulations are used to unveil the associated electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The modeling based investigation is interwoven with examples of microfluidic devices to illustrate the applications.

  19. Microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Ying Sing; Du, Fuying; Guo, Wenpeng; Ma, Tongmei; Nie, Zhou; Sun, Hui; Wu, Ruige; Zhao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidic chip (MC) devices are relatively mature technologies, but this book demonstrates how they can be integrated into a single, revolutionary device that can provide on-site analysis of samples when laboratory services are unavailable. By introducing the combination of CE and MC technology, Microfluidic Chip-Capillary Electrophoresis Devices broadens the scope of chemical analysis, particularly in the biomedical, food, and environmental sciences.The book gives an overview of the development of MC and CE technology as well as technology that now allows

  20. Tabu Search-based Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips with Dynamically Reconfigurable Non-rectangular Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maftei, Elena; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    rectangular. In this paper, we present a Tabu Search metaheuristic for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determines the allocation, resource binding, scheduling and placement of the operations in the application. In...

  1. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas G.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    " and "ene" monomers present in the microfluidic chip bulk material provides a simple and efficient way of tuning the chip's surface chemistry. Here, thiol-ene chips displaying an excess of functional thiol groups at their surfaces are functionalized with biotin and streptavidin in a controlled fashion...

  2. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    ” and “ene” monomers present in the microfluidic chip bulk material provides a simple and efficient way of tuning the chip’s surface chemistry. Here, thiol-ene chips displaying an excess of functional thiol groups at their surfaces are functionalized with biotin and streptavidin in a controlled fashion...

  3. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic components

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Suzanne; Land, Kevin; Madou, Marc; Kido, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    A centrifugal microfluidic platform to develop various microfluidic operations – the first of its kind in South Africa – is presented. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic disc devices, as well as a set-up to test the devices using centrifugal forces, is described. Preliminary results show that various microfluidic operations such as fluidic valving, transportation, and microfluidic droplet generation can be achieved. This work provides a complete centrifugal microfluidi...

  4. Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices for colorimetric detection of urinary tract infection biomarkers on adult diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaohao Chen; Tao Dong

    2015-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common infection diseases in elderly patients. The conventional method of detecting UTI involves the collection of significant urine samples from the elderly patients. However, this is a very difficult and time-consuming procedure. This paper addresses the development of a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) to detect UTI from urine collected from adult diapers. The design and fabrication for the μPAD is shown. The fabrication process involves melting solid wax on top of filter paper using a hot plate, followed by pattern transfer using a mold with rubbed wax. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, the μPAD with deposited nitrite reagent had detected different concentrations of nitrite solutions from 0.5 ppm to 100 ppm spiked in urine samples. A calibration curve was obtained by plotting the gray scale intensity values against the various nitrite concentrations. The results showed that the proposed paper-based device holds great potential as low-cost, disposable solution to sensitively detect UTI markers in urine sampled from diapers. PMID:26737632

  5. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. B.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xuan, W. P.; Chen, J. K.; Wang, X. Z.; Mayrhofer, P.; Duan, P. F.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Luo, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1‑x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices.

  6. Chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar transparent digital microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Kaidi; Pan, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ai-Qun; Fan, Shih-Kang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-07-21

    We report on a compact and portable prototype of chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar single polar transparent electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) device. The coupling ground model was proposed to build the EWOD device, which could be driven under a single polar voltage. Such a design not only simplified the chip construction and control circuit, but also had the potential for the ball-like droplet to focus the fluorescence and enhance the detection sensitivity. Simulations and experiments both confirmed that the greater the contact angle, the stronger the detected optical signal, and thus the higher the sensitivity. The sensitivity of the prototype detector to H2O2 was 5.45 mV (mmol L(-1))(-1) and the detection limit was 0.01 mmol L(-1) when the contact angle of the EWOD surface was 120°. To further increase the sensitivity and decrease the detection limit, the contact angle of the EWOD device could be increased and the dark current of the photomultiplier decreased. The prototype shows potential applications as highly sensitive, cost effective and portable immuno-detectors, especially as a blood glucose monitor. PMID:23674102

  7. Application of membrane technology in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jorrit

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of membrane technology in microfluidic systems. The word ‘microfluidic’ refers to the research field that develops methods and devices to control, manipulate, and analyze flows in sub‐millimeter dimensions. General advantages of this miniaturization strategy inc

  8. Rapid and low-cost fabrication of polystyrene-based molds for PDMS microfluidic devices using a CO2 laser

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we described a rapid and low-cost method to fabricate polystyrene molds for PDMS microfluidic devices using a CO2 laser system. It takes only several minutes to fabricate the polystyrene mold with bump pattern on top of it using a CO2 laser system. The bump pattern can be easily transferred to PDMS and fabricate microchannles as deep as 3μm on PDMS. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  9. Femtosecond laser 3D micromachining: a powerful tool for the fabrication of microfluidic, optofluidic, and electrofluidic devices based on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Koji; Xu, Jian; Wu, Dong; Hanada, Yasutaka; Wang, Zhongke; Cheng, Ya; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2014-09-21

    Femtosecond lasers have unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity; however, one of the most important features of femtosecond laser processing is that strong absorption can be induced only at the focus position inside transparent materials due to nonlinear multiphoton absorption. This exclusive feature makes it possible to directly fabricate three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic devices in glass microchips by two methods: 3D internal modification using direct femtosecond laser writing followed by chemical wet etching (femtosecond laser-assisted etching, FLAE) and direct ablation of glass in water (water-assisted femtosecond laser drilling, WAFLD). Direct femtosecond laser writing also enables the integration of micromechanical, microelectronic, and microoptical components into the 3D microfluidic devices without stacking or bonding substrates. This paper gives a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art femtosecond laser 3D micromachining for the fabrication of microfluidic, optofluidic, and electrofluidic devices. A new strategy (hybrid femtosecond laser processing) is also presented, in which FLAE is combined with femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization to realize a new type of biochip termed the ship-in-a-bottle biochip. PMID:25012238

  10. 3D origami-based multifunction-integrated immunodevice: low-cost and multiplexed sandwich chemiluminescence immunoassay on microfluidic paper-based analytical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lei; Wang, Shoumei; Song, Xianrang; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2012-09-01

    A novel 3D microfluidic paper-based immunodevice, integrated with blood plasma separation from whole blood samples, automation of rinse steps, and multiplexed CL detections, was developed for the first time based on the principle of origami (denoted as origami-based device). This 3D origami-based device, comprised of one test pad surrounded by four folding tabs, could be patterned and fabricated by wax-printing on paper in bulk. In this work, a sandwich-type chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was introduced into this 3D origami-based immunodevice, which could separate the operational procedures into several steps including (i) folding pads above/below and (ii) addition of reagent/buffer under a specific sequence. The CL behavior, blood plasma separation, washing protocol, and incubation time were investigated in this work. The developed 3D origami-based CL immunodevice, combined with a typical luminuol-H(2)O(2) CL system and catalyzed by Ag nanoparticles, showed excellent analytical performance for the simultaneous detection of four tumor markers. The whole blood samples were assayed and the results obtained were in agreement with the reference values from the parallel single-analyte test. This paper-based microfluidic origami CL detection system provides a new strategy for a low-cost, sensitive, simultaneous multiplex immunoassay and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:22763468

  11. A noble microfluidic device for protein crystallizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung-Uk; Fraden, Seth

    2006-03-01

    A high throughput, low volume microfluidic device has been constructed out of poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer. We have demonstrated that sub-nanoliter water-in-oil drops of protein solutions of different composition can be rapidly stored in individual wells, which allows screening of 1000 conditions while consuming a total of only 1 microgram protein on a 20 cm^2 chip. This reduction in protein needed for crystal screens allows high-throughput crystallization of mammalian proteins expressed in tissue culture. A significant advance over current microfluidic devices is that each pot is in contact with a reservoir through a dialysis membrane which only water and other low molecular weight organic solvents can pass, but not salt, polymer or amphiphile. This enables the concentration of all solutes in a solution to be reversibly, rapidly, and precisely varied in contrast to current microfluidic methods, which are irreversible. This microfluidic dialysis technology solves a major problem in protein crystallization, the decoupling of nucleation from growth. The device will also be useful for general studies of the phase behavior of protein solutions.

  12. Simple Check Valves for Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Harold F.; Smith, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A simple design concept for check valves has been adopted for microfluidic devices that consist mostly of (1) deformable fluorocarbon polymer membranes sandwiched between (2) borosilicate float glass wafers into which channels, valve seats, and holes have been etched. The first microfluidic devices in which these check valves are intended to be used are micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. In this application, it will be necessary to store some liquid samples in reservoirs in the devices for subsequent laboratory analysis, and check valves are needed to prevent cross-contamination of the samples. The simple check-valve design concept is also applicable to other microfluidic devices and to fluidic devices in general. These check valves are simplified microscopic versions of conventional rubber- flap check valves that are parts of numerous industrial and consumer products. These check valves are fabricated, not as separate components, but as integral parts of microfluidic devices. A check valve according to this concept consists of suitably shaped portions of a deformable membrane and the two glass wafers between which the membrane is sandwiched (see figure). The valve flap is formed by making an approximately semicircular cut in the membrane. The flap is centered over a hole in the lower glass wafer, through which hole the liquid in question is intended to flow upward into a wider hole, channel, or reservoir in the upper glass wafer. The radius of the cut exceeds the radius of the hole by an amount large enough to prevent settling of the flap into the hole. As in a conventional rubber-flap check valve, back pressure in the liquid pushes the flap against the valve seat (in this case, the valve seat is the adjacent surface of the lower glass wafer), thereby forming a seal that prevents backflow.

  13. "Off-the-shelf" microfluidic devices for the production of liposomes for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottaro, E; Nastruzzi, C

    2016-07-01

    An "off-the-shelf" microfluidic chip approach, utilizing lowcost, commercially available components, for liposome production, is presented. Microfluidic devices with different geometries have been conveniently designed and assembled, allowing the production of narrowly dispersed unilamellar and very reproducible liposomes. The presented results indicate that off-the-shelf microfluidic devices can hold great promises for the efficient preparation of different lipid based colloidal systems for biomedical applications. PMID:27127025

  14. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  15. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  16. Microwave Induced Ethanol Bath Bonding for PMMA Microfluidic Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuicui Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    High bonding strength, low deformation and convenient procedure are all very important aspects in the microfluidic device fabrication process. In this paper, an improved microwave induced bonding technology is proposed to fabricate microfluidic device based on methyl methacrylate (PMMA). This method employs pure ethanol as the bonding assisted solvent. The ethanol not only acts as the microwave absorbing material, but also works as the organic solvent in bath. The presented research work has shown that the bonding process can be completed in less than 45 s. Furthermore, the convenient bonding only applies microwave oven, beakers and binder clips. Then, we discuss effects of microwave power, bonding time on bonding strength and deformation of microstructures on PMMA microfluidic device. Finally, a 4 layers micro⁃mixer has been fabricated using the proposed bonding technique which includes 15 trapezoid micro⁃channels, 9 T⁃type mix units and an X⁃type mix unit. Experimental results show that the proposed bonding method have some advantages compared with several traditional bonding technologies, such as hot pressing bonding, ultrasonic bonding and solvent assisted bonding methods in respect of bonding strength, deformation and bonding process. The presented work would be helpful for low coat mass production of multilayer polymer microfluidic devices in lab.

  17. A disposable, roll-to-roll hot-embossed inertial microfluidic device for size-based sorting of microbeads and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Liedert, Christina; Liedert, Ralph; Papautsky, Ian

    2016-05-21

    Inertial microfluidics has been a highly active area of research in recent years for high-throughput focusing and sorting of synthetic and biological microparticles. However, existing inertial microfluidic devices always rely on microchannels with high-aspect-ratio geometries (channel width w h) to achieve size-based sorting of microparticles and cells. The simple LAR geometry of the device enables successful high-throughput fabrication using R2R hot embossing. With optimized flow conditions and channel dimensions, we demonstrate continuous sorting of a mixture of 15 μm and 10 μm diameter microbeads with >97% sorting efficiency using the low-cost and disposable R2R chip. We further demonstrate size-based sorting of bovine white blood cells, demonstrating the ability to process real cellular samples in our R2R chip. We envision that this R2R hot-embossed inertial microfluidic chip will serve as a powerful yet low-cost and disposable tool for size-based sorting of synthetic microparticles in industrial applications or cellular samples in cell biology research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27050341

  18. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Dimaki, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment of...... pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require...... microfluidic interfaces. It provides a valuable addition to the toolbox of individual and small arrays of connectors suitable for micromachined or template-based injection molded devices since it does not require protruding, threaded or glued modifications on the inlet and avoids bulky and expensive fittings....

  19. Structuration of micro-fluidic devices based on low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology

    OpenAIRE

    Birol, Hansu; Maeder, Thomas; Jacq, Caroline; Corradini, Giancarlo; Fournier, Yannick; Saglini, Igor; Straessler, Sigfrid; Ryser, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Smart packaging concept has been the driving force for the search of advanced technologies to produce multi-functional micro-scale devices for long years. In this sense, LTCC technology has been recently addressed as the suitable choice for a wide range of applications. In addition to its attractive characteristics for high-frequency applications those have been profited for a long time, it receives a growing attention for sensor applications in the recent years as well. This is due to the ea...

  20. One-step fabrication of 3D silver paste electrodes into microfluidic devices for enhanced droplet-based cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Rao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 3D microelectrodes are one-step fabricated into a microfluidic droplet separator by filling conductive silver paste into PDMS microchambers. The advantages of 3D silver paste electrodes in promoting droplet sorting accuracy are systematically demonstrated by theoretical calculation, numerical simulation and experimental validation. The employment of 3D electrodes also helps to decrease the droplet sorting voltage, guaranteeing that cells encapsulated in droplets undergo chip-based sorting processes are at better metabolic status for further potential cellular assays. At last, target droplet containing single cell are selectively sorted out from others by an appropriate electric pulse. This method provides a simple and inexpensive alternative to fabricate 3D electrodes, and it is expected our 3D electrode-integrated microfluidic droplet separator platform can be widely used in single cell operation and analysis.

  1. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  2. Fluorescent zinc and copper complexes for detection of adrafinil in paper-based microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Mehmet Gokhan; Sheykhi, Sara; Mosca, Lorenzo; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Recognition of electroneutral Lewis bases and anions in aqueous media is extremely difficult. We show that fluorescent coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes can recognize various Lewis bases while providing an easy-to-detect fluorescence response. This approach is applied to the detection of adrafinil, a banned performance-enhancing drug. PMID:27293080

  3. Optimized fabrication protocols of microfluidic devices for X-ray analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Catalano, Rossella

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidics combined with X-ray scattering techniques allows probing conformational changes or assembly processes of biological materials. Our aim was to develop a highly X-ray transparent microfluidic cell for detecting small variations of X-ray scattering involved in such processes. We describe the fabrication of a polyimide microfluidic device based on a simple, reliable and inexpensive lamination process. The implemented microstructured features result in windows with optimized X-ray transmission. The microfluidic device was characterized by X-ray microbeam scattering at the ID13 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation methodology of gas permeable characterization in a polymer-based microfluidic device by confocal fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Sakai, Keita; Kidani, Shinya; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Sato, Yohei; Hishida, Koichi

    2012-06-01

    The evaluation technique of gas permeable characterization has been developed for an increased efficiency of gas-liquid chemical reactions and high accuracy of environmental diagnosis. This technique enables us to measure spatial distributions of velocity and dissolved gas concentration by utilizing confocal micron-resolution particle image velocimetry combined with a laser-induced fluorescence technique. Microfluidic devices with gas permeability through polymer membranes are composed of a cover glass and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip with the ability to permeate various gases, since PDMS is an elastomeric material. In the chip, microchannels are manufactured using a cryogenic micromachining system. The gas permeation is dominated by several factors, such as the gas and liquid flow rates, the membrane thickness between the gas and liquid flow, and the surface area of the membranes. The advantage of the present device is to realize the control of gas permeability by changing the surface roughness of PDMS, because the cryogenic micromachining enables us to control the surface roughness of microchannels and an increase in roughness yields an increase in the surface area of membranes. The experiments were performed under several conditions with a change in the gas flow rate, the PDMS membrane thickness and the surface roughness, which affect the gas permeation phenomena. The spatial distributions of velocity and dissolved gas concentration were measured in the liquid flow fields. The results indicate that the velocity-vector distributions have similar patterns under all experimental conditions, while the dissolved gas concentration distributions have different patterns. It was observed that the gas permeability through PDMS membranes increased with an increase in gas flow rates and surface roughness and with a decrease in membrane thicknesses, which is in qualitative agreement with membrane theory. The important conclusion is that the proposed technique is

  5. Evaluation methodology of gas permeable characterization in a polymer-based microfluidic device by confocal fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation technique of gas permeable characterization has been developed for an increased efficiency of gas–liquid chemical reactions and high accuracy of environmental diagnosis. This technique enables us to measure spatial distributions of velocity and dissolved gas concentration by utilizing confocal micron-resolution particle image velocimetry combined with a laser-induced fluorescence technique. Microfluidic devices with gas permeability through polymer membranes are composed of a cover glass and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip with the ability to permeate various gases, since PDMS is an elastomeric material. In the chip, microchannels are manufactured using a cryogenic micromachining system. The gas permeation is dominated by several factors, such as the gas and liquid flow rates, the membrane thickness between the gas and liquid flow, and the surface area of the membranes. The advantage of the present device is to realize the control of gas permeability by changing the surface roughness of PDMS, because the cryogenic micromachining enables us to control the surface roughness of microchannels and an increase in roughness yields an increase in the surface area of membranes. The experiments were performed under several conditions with a change in the gas flow rate, the PDMS membrane thickness and the surface roughness, which affect the gas permeation phenomena. The spatial distributions of velocity and dissolved gas concentration were measured in the liquid flow fields. The results indicate that the velocity-vector distributions have similar patterns under all experimental conditions, while the dissolved gas concentration distributions have different patterns. It was observed that the gas permeability through PDMS membranes increased with an increase in gas flow rates and surface roughness and with a decrease in membrane thicknesses, which is in qualitative agreement with membrane theory. The important conclusion is that the proposed technique is

  6. Microfluidic devices using thiol-ene polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Simon J. M. C.; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2013-12-01

    Here, a new polymeric microfluidic platform using off-stoichiometric thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers was developed. Thiolene polymers were chosen as they afford rapid UV curing, low volume shrinkage and optical transparency for use in microfluidic devices. Three different off-stoichiometric thiol-ene polymers with 30% excess allyl, 50% excess thiol and a 90% excess thiol (OSTE Allyl-30, OSTE-50 and OSTE-90, respectively) were fabricated. Attenuated reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state cross polarisation-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed which functional groups (thiol or allyl) were present in excess in the OSTE polymers. The polymers were shown to have a more hydrophilic surface (water contact angle of 65°+/- 3) compared to polydimethylsiloxane (water contact angle of 105° +/- 5). Testing of the mechanical properties showed the glass transition temperatures to be 15.09 °C, 43.15 °C and, 57.48 °C for OSTE-90, OSTE Allyl-30 and, OSTE-50, respectively. The storage modulus was shown to be less than 10 MPa for the OSTE-90 polymer and approximately 1750 MPa for the OSTE Allyl-30 and OSTE-50 polymers. The polymers were then utilised to fabricate microfluidic devices via soft lithography practices and devices sealed using a one-step UV lamination "click" reaction technique. Finally, gold nanoparticles were used to form gold films on the OSTE-90 and OSTE-50 polymers as potential electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and sheet resistances were used to characterise the films.

  7. Magnet-assisted device-level alignment for the fabrication of membrane-sandwiched polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device is one of the most essential techniques that advance microfluidics research in recent decades. PDMS is broadly exploited to construct microfluidic devices due to its unique and advantageous material properties. To realize more functionalities, PDMS microfluidic devices with multi-layer architectures, especially those with sandwiched membranes, have been developed for various applications. However, existing alignment methods for device fabrication are mainly based on manual observations, which are time consuming, inaccurate and inconsistent. This paper develops a magnet-assisted alignment method to enhance device-level alignment accuracy and precision without complicated fabrication processes. In the developed alignment method, magnets are embedded into PDMS layers at the corners of the device. The paired magnets are arranged in symmetric positions at each PDMS layer, and the magnetic attraction force automatically pulls the PDMS layers into the aligned position during assembly. This paper also applies the method to construct a practical microfluidic device, a tunable chaotic micromixer. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the device without failure, which suggests the accurate alignment and reliable bonding achieved by the method. Consequently, the fabrication method developed in this paper is promising to be exploited to construct various membrane-sandwiched PDMS microfluidic devices with more integrated functionalities to advance microfluidics research. (paper)

  8. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  9. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices

    OpenAIRE

    Halldórsson, Skarphédinn; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan MT

    2015-01-01

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dis...

  10. Simple and cheap microfluidic devices for the preparation of monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan-Nan; Meng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Mou, Chuan-Lin; Wang, Wei; Chu, Liang-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Droplet microfluidics, which can generate monodisperse droplets or bubbles in unlimited numbers, at high speed and with complex structures, have been extensively investigated in chemical and biological fields. However, most current methods for fabricating microfluidic devices, such as glass etching, soft lithography in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or assembly of glass capillaries, are usually either expensive or complicated. Here we report the fabrication of simple and cheap microfluidic devices based on patterned coverslips and microscope glass slides. The advantages of our approach for fabricating microfluidic devices lie in a simple process, inexpensive processing equipment and economical laboratory supplies. The fabricated microfluidic devices feature a flexible design of microchannels, easy spatial patterning of surface wettability, and good chemical compatibility and optical properties. We demonstrate their utilities for generation of monodisperse single and double emulsions with highly controllable flexibility. PMID:22025190

  11. Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Issadore, David; Brown, Keith A; Sandberg, Lori; Weitz, David; Westervelt, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidi...

  12. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  13. Development of a Microfluidic-Based Optical Sensing Device for Label-Free Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs Through Their Lactic Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Keng Chiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a microfluidic-based optical sensing device for label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, a rare cell species in blood circulation. Based on the metabolic features of cancer cells, live CTCs can be quantified indirectly through their lactic acid production. Compared with the conventional schemes for CTC detection, this label-free approach could prevent the biological bias due to the heterogeneity of the surface antigens on cancer cells. In this study, a microfluidic device was proposed to generate uniform water-in-oil cell-encapsulating micro-droplets, followed by the fluorescence-based optical detection of lactic acid produced within the micro-droplets. To test its feasibility to quantify cancer cells, experiments were carried out. Results showed that the detection signals were proportional to the number of cancer cells within the micro-droplets, whereas such signals were insensitive to the existence and number of leukocytes within. To further demonstrate its feasibility for cancer cell detection, the cancer cells with known cell number in a cell suspension was detected based on the method. Results revealed that there was no significant difference between the detected number and the real number of cancer cells. As a whole, the proposed method opens up a new route to detect live CTCs in a label-free manner.

  14. Fabrication of Microstructures Embedding Controllable Particles Inside Dielectrophoretic Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yue

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of particle manipulation by dielectrophoresis (DEP and immobilization using photo‐crosslinkable resin inside microfluidic devices. High speed particle manipulation, including patterning and concentration control by DEP was demonstrated. Immovable and movable microstructures embedding particles were fabricated on‐chip. Several microelectrodes were fabricated using Indium Tin Oxides (ITO and Cr/Au. The two kinds of DEP responses of yeast cells (W303 and other particles were experimentally confirmed. Based on negative DEP phenomenon, cell traps generated by microelectrodes were demonstrated. Position control, transportation and patterning of cells were performed with cell traps. The on‐chip fabrication of arbitrary shapes of microstructures based on Poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA was reported. With cell patterning by DEP and immobilization using on‐chip fabrication, microstructures embedding line patterned cells were fabricated inside microfluidic channels. A novel microfluidic device was designed to separate patterning and fabrication areas and movable microstructures embedding concentration controllable particles were fabricated inside this device.

  15. Scintillation detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic channels obtained by SU-8 photolithography and filled with liquid scintillators were recently demonstrated to be an interesting technology for the implementation of novel particle detectors. The main advantages of this approach are the intrinsic radiation resistance resulting from the simple microfluidic circulation of the active medium and the possibility to manufacture devices with high spatial resolution and low material budget using microfabrication techniques. Here we explore a different technological implementation of this concept, reporting on scintillating detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels. A process for manufacturing microfluidic devices on silicon substrates, featuring microchannel arrays suitable for light guiding, was developed. Such process can be in principle combined with standard CMOS processing and lead to a tight integration with the readout photodetectors and electronics in the future. Several devices were manufactured, featuring microchannel geometries differing in depth, width and pitch. A preliminary characterization of the prototypes was performed by means of a photomultiplier tube coupled to the microchannel ends, in order to detect the scintillation light produced upon irradiation with beta particles from a 90Sr source. The photoelectron spectra thus obtained were fitted with the expected output function in order to extract the light yield

  16. Scintillation detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoddi, P.; Mapelli, A.; Bagiacchi, P.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Veneziano, S.; Renaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic channels obtained by SU-8 photolithography and filled with liquid scintillators were recently demonstrated to be an interesting technology for the implementation of novel particle detectors. The main advantages of this approach are the intrinsic radiation resistance resulting from the simple microfluidic circulation of the active medium and the possibility to manufacture devices with high spatial resolution and low material budget using microfabrication techniques. Here we explore a different technological implementation of this concept, reporting on scintillating detectors based on silicon microfluidic channels. A process for manufacturing microfluidic devices on silicon substrates, featuring microchannel arrays suitable for light guiding, was developed. Such process can be in principle combined with standard CMOS processing and lead to a tight integration with the readout photodetectors and electronics in the future. Several devices were manufactured, featuring microchannel geometries differing in depth, width and pitch. A preliminary characterization of the prototypes was performed by means of a photomultiplier tube coupled to the microchannel ends, in order to detect the scintillation light produced upon irradiation with beta particles from a 90Sr source. The photoelectron spectra thus obtained were fitted with the expected output function in order to extract the light yield.

  17. Simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices for the generation of monodisperse multiple emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. Polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. Here, we report the design and fabrication of simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices based on microscope glass slides and pulled glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. The advantages of our method lie in a simple manufacturing procedure, inexpensive processing equipment and flexibility in the surface modification of the designed microfluidic devices. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demonstrated their robustness for preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. (paper)

  18. Simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices for the generation of monodisperse multiple emulsions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2013-12-16

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. Polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. Here, we report the design and fabrication of simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices based on microscope glass slides and pulled glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. The advantages of our method lie in a simple manufacturing procedure, inexpensive processing equipment and flexibility in the surface modification of the designed microfluidic devices. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demonstrated their robustness for preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Capacitive Coulter counting: detection of metal wear particles in lubricant using a microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microfluidic device based on the capacitance Coulter counting principle to detect metal debris particles in lubricant oil is presented. The device scans each individual metal debris particle as they pass through a microfluidic channel by monitoring the capacitance change. We first proved the feasibility of using the capacitance Coulter counting principle for detecting metal particles in a fluidic channel. Next, we tested the microfluidic device with aluminum abrasive particles ranging from 10 to 25 µm; the testing results show the microfluidic device is capable of detecting metal wear particles in low-conductive lubricant oil. The design concept demonstrated here can be extended to a device with multiple microchannels for rapid detection of metal wear particles in a large volume of lubricant oil. (technical note)

  20. A magnetically active microfluidic device for chemiluminescence bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Highly active horseradish peroxidase functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and packed into a microfluidic channel, producing an in-line bioreactor that enabled a sensitive chemiluminescence assay of H2O2. The proposed magnetically active microfluidic device proved useful for chemiluminescence assays of biomedically interesting compounds.

  1. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  2. Characterisation of an Adhesive-free Packaging System for Polymeric Microfluidic Biochemical Devices and Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Reichen, M.; Super, A.; Davies, M J; Macown, R. J.; O'Sullivan, B; Kirk, T. V.; Marques, M. P. C.; Dimov, N.; Szita, N

    2014-01-01

    The development of microfluidic devices is an iterative process that involves series of improvements, which can be costly and time consuming. We present a packaging system which makes use of an accessible rapid prototyping method, and facilitates the rapid and reliable implementation of polymeric microfluidic device designs. The packaging system uses a modular design and is based on an adhesive-free connection of a reusable and stiff polymeric interface plate with a disposable, soft microflui...

  3. Fabrication of gravity-driven microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Terada, N.; Hagihara, S.; Komatsu, T.; Terasawa, A.

    2008-12-01

    We have studied the micro total analysis system as a blood test. A microfluidic device with a three-pronged microchannel and artificial capillary vessels was fabricated. The microchannel is to transport blood, focus blood cells, and line them up. The vessels are to observe red blood cell deformation. An excimer laser was used to form grooves and so on. Numbers of thermosetting resin film and fluororesin were piled up on a cover glass. A laser fabricated part of the channel at the each film every lamination, and then a three-dimensional structure microchannel was fabricated. The channel sizes have widths of 50-150 μm and depths of 45 μm. Through holes used as artificial capillary vessels are made in the fluororesin having a minimum diameter of 5 μm and a length of 100 μm. As blood and a physiological saline are injected into the microchannel, the device stands upward facing the channel, and blood cells go into the vessels by the force of gravity and sheath flow of the saline. By gravity various groove patterns were made changing the width and length for measurement of blood focusing. Moreover, the red blood cell deformation was observed in the vessels with a microscope.

  4. Microfluidic Distance Readout Sweet Hydrogel Integrated Paper-Based Analytical Device (μDiSH-PAD) for Visual Quantitative Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaofeng; Tian, Tian; Jia, Shasha; Zhu, Zhi; Ma, Yanli; Sun, Jianjun; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-02-16

    A disposable, equipment-free, versatile point-of-care testing platform, microfluidic distance readout sweet hydrogel integrated paper-based analytical device (μDiSH-PAD), was developed for portable quantitative detection of different types of targets. The platform relies on a target-responsive aptamer cross-linked hydrogel for target recognition, cascade enzymatic reactions for signal amplification, and microfluidic paper-based analytic devices (μPADs) for visual distance-based quantitative readout. A "sweet" hydrogel with trapped glucoamylase (GA) was synthesized using an aptamer as a cross-linker. When target is present in the sample, the "sweet" hydrogel collapses and releases enzyme GA into the sample, generating glucose by amylolysis. A hydrophilic channel on the μPADs is modified with glucose oxidase (GOx) and colorless 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as the substrate. When glucose travels along the channel by capillary action, it is converted to H2O2 by GOx. In addition, DAB is converted into brown insoluble poly-3,3'-diaminobenzidine [poly(DAB)] by horseradish peroxidase, producing a visible brown bar, whose length is positively correlated to the concentration of targets. The distance-based visual quantitative platform can detect cocaine in urine with high selectivity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Because the target-induced cascade reaction is triggered by aptamer/target recognition, this method is widely suitable for different kinds of targets. With the advantages of low cost, ease of operation, general applicability, and disposability with quantitative readout, the μDiSH-PAD holds great potential for portable detection of trace targets in environmental monitoring, security inspection, personalized healthcare, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26765320

  5. Transport Mechanisms of Circulating Tumor Cells in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangharajan, Kaushik; Conlisk, A. T.; Prakash, Shaurya

    2014-11-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices are becoming an essential tool for several emerging point-of-care healthcare needs and applications. Among the plethora of challenging problems in the personalized healthcare domain, early detection of cancer continues to be a challenge. For instance, identification of most tumors occurs by the time the tumor comprises approximately 1 billion cells, with poor prognosis for metastatic disease. The key obstacle in identifying and subsequent capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is that the amount of CTCs in the blood stream is ~1 in 109 cells. The fundamental challenge in design and fabrication of microfluidic devices arises due to lack of information on suitable sorting needed for sample preparation before any labeling or capture scheme can be employed. Moreover, the ability to study these low concentration cells relies on knowledge of their physical and chemical properties, of which the physical properties are poorly understood. Also, nearly all existing microfluidic mixers were developed for aqueous electrolyte solutions to enhance mixing in traditional low Re flows. However, no systematic studies have developed design rules for particle mixing. Therefore, we present a numerical model to discuss design rules for microscale mixers and sorters for particle sorting for high efficiency antibody labeling of CTCs along with presenting a pathway for a device to capture CTCs without the need for labeling based on particle electrical properties. NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices EEC-0914790.

  6. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius

    2013-10-22

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here by presentin

  7. Ionic current devices-Recent progress in the merging of electronic, microfluidic, and biomimetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyung-Jun; Velev, Orlin D

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent progress in the emerging area of devices and circuits operating on the basis of ionic currents. These devices operate at the intersection of electrochemistry, electronics, and microfluidics, and their potential applications are inspired by essential biological processes such as neural transmission. Ionic current rectification has been demonstrated in diode-like devices containing electrolyte solutions, hydrogel, or hydrated nanofilms. More complex functions have been realized in ionic current based transistors, solar cells, and switching memory devices. Microfluidic channels and networks-an intrinsic component of the ionic devices-could play the role of wires and circuits in conventional electronics. PMID:24404020

  8. A Microfluidic Device for Spatiotemporal Delivery of Stimuli to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Ningsih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Living cells encounter many stimuli from the immediate environment. Receptors recognize these environmental cues and transduce signals to produce cell responses. The frequency of a signal is now emerging as an important factor determining cell responses. As a componentry system in understanding temporal stimulation, microfluidic devices allow the observation of cell behaviour under dynamic stimulation and controllable environment. In this paper we describe the design, construction and characterization of a microfluidic device suitable for cell stimulation studies.

  9. Solvent-resistant elastomeric microfluidic devices and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Robert Michael

    Microfluidics is increasingly being used in many areas of biotechnology and chemistry to achieve reduced reagent volumes, improved performance, integration, and parallelism, among other advantages. Though early devices were based on rigid materials such as glass and silicon, elastomeric materials such as polydiznethylsiloxane (PDMS) are rapidly emerging as a ubiquitous platform for applications in biotechnology. This is due, in part, to simpler fabrication procedures and to the ability to integrate mechanical microvalves at vastly greater densities. For many applications in the areas of chemical synthesis and analysis, however, PDMS cannot replace glass and silicon due to its incompatibility with many solvents and reagents. Such areas could benefit tremendously from the development of an elastomeric microfluidic device technology that combines the advantages of PDMS with the property of solvent resistance. Simplified fabrication could increase the accessibility of microfluidics, and the possibility of dense valve integration could lead to significant advances in device sophistication. Applications could be more rapidly developed by design re-use due to the independence of mechanical valves on fluid properties (unlike electrokinetic pumping), and the property of permeability could enable novel fluidic functions for accessing a broader range of reactions than is possible in glass and silicon. The first half of this thesis describes our strategies and efforts to develop this new enabling technology. Several approaches are presented in Chapter 3, and two particularly successful ones, based on new elastomers (FNB and PFPE), are described in Chapters 4 and 5. Chapter 6 describes a novel method of fabricating devices from 3D molds that could expand the range of useful clastomers. The second half of this thesis discusses microfluidic combinatorial synthesis and high throughput screening-applications that take particular advantage of the ability to integrate thousands of

  10. A microfluidic dialysis device for complex biological mixture SERS analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a microfluidic device fabricated with a simple and inexpensive process allowing rapid filtering of peptides from a complex mixture. The polymer microfluidic device can be used for sample preparation in biological applications. The device is fabricated by micromilling and solvent assisted bonding, in which a microdialysis membrane (cut-off of 12-14 kDa) is sandwiched in between an upper and a bottom microfluidic chamber. An external frame connects the microfluidic device to external tubes, microvalves and syringe pumps. Bonding strength and interface sealing are pneumatically tested. Microfluidic protocols are also described by using the presented device to filter a sample composed of specific peptides (MW 1553.73 Da, at a concentration of 1.0 ng/μl) derived from the BRCA1 protein, a tumor-suppressor molecule which plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancer, and albumin (MW 66.5 kDa, at a concentration of 35 μg/μl), the most represented protein in human plasma. The filtered samples coming out from the microfluidic device were subsequently deposited on a SERS (surface enhanced Raman scattering) substrate for further analysis by Raman spectroscopy. By using this approach, we were able to sort the small peptides from the bigger and highly concentrated protein albumin and to detect them by using a label-free technique at a resolution down to 1.0 ng/μl.

  11. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan V. I. S. Kaler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics (DMF is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays.

  12. Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    communicate what is happening around us. Following the advances of all these communication devices as well as those in microfabrication and nanofabrication and the emergence of new materials, technologies such as lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and micro total analysis systems (microTAS) were also boosted, albeit......TAS technologies need to join forces with those behind the new communication devices which provide sources of power, detection and data transmission complementing the features that lab-on-a-chip and microTAS platforms can offer. An increasing number of microfluidic-based devices, developed both in small start...... at a slower pace. LOC and microTAS applications have principally been utilized in the biomedical, food and environmental fields. But lately they have also found their place in the synthesis of new chemical compounds and the fabrication of nanostructures. It has become obvious that the LOC and micro...

  13. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  14. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  15. Batch-reactor microfluidic device: first human use of a microfluidically produced PET radiotracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Artem; Miraghaie, Reza; Kotta, Kishore; Ball, Carroll E; Zhang, Jianzhong; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Elizarov, Arkadij

    2013-01-01

    The very first microfluidic device used for the production of (18)F-labeled tracers for clinical research is reported along with the first human Positron Emission Tomography scan obtained with a microfluidically produced radiotracer. The system integrates all operations necessary for the transformation of [(18)F]fluoride in irradiated cyclotron target water to a dose of radiopharmaceutical suitable for use in clinical research. The key microfluidic technologies developed for the device are a fluoride concentration system and a microfluidic batch reactor assembly. Concentration of fluoride was achieved by means of absorption of the fluoride anion on a micro ion-exchange column (5 μL of resin) followed by release of the radioactivity with 45 μL of the release solution (95 ± 3% overall efficiency). The reactor assembly includes an injection-molded reactor chip and a transparent machined lid press-fitted together. The resulting 50 μL cavity has a unique shape designed to minimize losses of liquid during reactor filling and liquid evaporation. The cavity has 8 ports for gases and liquids, each equipped with a 2-way on-chip mechanical valve rated for pressure up to 20.68 bar (300 psi). The temperature is controlled by a thermoelectric heater capable of heating the reactor up to 180 °C from RT in 150 s. A camera captures live video of the processes in the reactor. HPLC-based purification and reformulation units are also integrated in the device. The system is based on "split-box architecture", with reagents loaded from outside of the radiation shielding. It can be installed either in a standard hot cell, or as a self-shielded unit. Along with a high level of integration and automation, split-box architecture allowed for multiple production runs without the user being exposed to radiation fields. The system was used to support clinical trials of [(18)F]fallypride, a neuroimaging radiopharmaceutical under IND Application #109,880. PMID:23135409

  16. Wearable tactile sensor based on flexible microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Jiahao; Koh, Zhao Ming; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-08-16

    In this work, we develop a liquid-based thin film microfluidic tactile sensor of high flexibility, robustness and sensitivity. The microfluidic elastomeric structure comprises a pressure sensitive region and parallel arcs that interface with screen-printed electrodes. The microfluidic sensor is functionalized with a highly conductive metallic liquid, eutectic gallium indium (eGaIn). Microdeformation on the pressure sensor results in fluid displacement which corresponds to a change in electrical resistance. By emulating parallel electrical circuitry in our microchannel design, we reduced the overall electrical resistance of the sensor, therefore enhancing its device sensitivity. Correspondingly, we report a device workable within a range of 4 to 100 kPa and sensitivity of up to 0.05 kPa(-1). We further demonstrate its robustness in withstanding >2500 repeated loading and unloading cycles. Finally, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that the sensors may be multiplexed to detect forces at multiple regions of the hand. In particular, our sensors registered unique electronic signatures in object grasping, which could provide better assessment of finger dexterity. PMID:27438370

  17. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Brandt Andersen, Karsten; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2015-11-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment of tubing (such as polytetrafluoroethylene tubing) secured and sealed by using a small plug, without the need for additional assembly, glue or o-rings. This provides a very clean connection that does not require additional, potentially incompatible, materials. The tightly sealed connection can withstand pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require microfluidic interfaces. It provides a valuable addition to the toolbox of individual and small arrays of connectors suitable for micromachined or template-based injection molded devices since it does not require protruding, threaded or glued modifications on the inlet and avoids bulky and expensive fittings.

  18. Fabrication of silicon and glass devices for microfluidic bioanalytical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kolari, Kai

    2008-01-01

    This thesis introduces important improvements in fabrication of microfluidic devices on silicon and glass. With the main aim in surface and volume manipulation of aqueous solutions for subsequent biochemical analysis, the backbone of the work has been the development of plasma etching processes for silicon and glass. As the silicon microfabrication technologies are combined with deep anisotropic etching of glass, the processability of microfluidic applications with surface and volume manipula...

  19. Reduction of surface roughness for optical quality microfluidic devices in PMMA and COC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and low-cost technique is presented for the fabrication of optical quality microfluidic devices in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). When polymer microfluidic devices are manufactured by rapid prototyping techniques, such as micromilling, the surface roughness is typically in the region of hundreds of nanometres reducing the overall optical efficiency of many microfluidic-based systems. Here we demonstrate a novel solvent vapour treatment that is used to irreversibly bond microfluidic chips while simultaneously reducing the channel surface roughness, yielding optical grade (less than 15 nm surface roughness) channel walls. We characterize this vapour bonding method and optimize the process parameters to avoid channel collapse, while achieving reflow of polymer and uniformity of bonding. The reflow of polymer is the key to enabling a fabrication process that takes less than a day and produces optical quality surfaces with low-cost rapid prototyping tools.

  20. Interconnection blocks with minimal dead volumes permitting planar interconnection to thin microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Snakenborg, Detlef; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have previously described 'Interconnection Blocks' which are re-usable, non-integrated PDMS blocks which allowing multiple, aligned and planar microfluidic interconnections. Here, we describe Interconnection Block versions with zero dead volumes that allow fluidic interfacing to flat or thin s...... applications. Additionally, the new Interconnection Block designs demonstrate that micromilling, a practical microfabrication method, can produce useful geometries not readily made through clean room-based approaches.......We have previously described 'Interconnection Blocks' which are re-usable, non-integrated PDMS blocks which allowing multiple, aligned and planar microfluidic interconnections. Here, we describe Interconnection Block versions with zero dead volumes that allow fluidic interfacing to flat or thin...... side-walled microfluidic devices. These designs increase the number of materials, types of devices and applications for which Interconnection Blocks can be used. Average leak pressures of 4.7 bar were recorded and all individual leak pressures recorded were above the 2-bar threshold for microfluidic...

  1. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100–500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2–20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  2. A PEG-DA microfluidic device for chemotaxis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of cells in a well-defined and chemically programmable microenvironment is essential for a complete and fundamental understanding of the cell behaviors with respect to specific chemical compounds. Flow-free microfluidic devices that generate quasi-steady chemical gradients (spatially varying but temporally constant) have been demonstrated as effective chemotaxis assay platforms due to dissociating the effect of chemical cues from mechanical shear forces caused by fluid flow. In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication and characterization of a flow-free microfluidic platform made of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogel. We have demonstrated that the mass transport properties of these devices can be customized by fabricating them from PEG-DA gels of four distinct molecular weights. In contrast to microfluidic devices developed using soft lithography; this class of devices can be realized using a more cost-effective approach of direct photopolymerization with fewer microfabrication steps. This microfluidic platform was tested by conducting a quantitative study of the chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437, a model microorganism, in presence of the chemo-effector, casamino-acids. Using the microfabrication and characterization methodology presented in this work, microfluidic platforms with well-defined and customizable diffusive properties can be developed to accommodate the study of a wide range of cell types. (paper)

  3. Investigation of hot roller embossing for microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidics for most bio-related diagnostic applications typically requires single usage disposable chips to avoid bio-fouling and cross-contamination. Individual piece-wise manufacturing of polymeric microfluidic devices has been widely employed in recent years. To significantly lower the manufacturing costs, one possible way is to improve the production yield of polymer microfluidic chips via the hot roller embossing method. This paper discusses the effects of varying the process parameters such as roller temperature, applied pressure and substrate preheating during hot roller embossing (according to a systematic set of experiment designs) and its influence on the corresponding mold to pattern fidelity in terms of normalized embossed depths on the poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. Concurrently, pattern density studies on the mold were also conducted. Functional testing in terms of fluid flow and micromixing was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of using hot roller embossed PMMA substrates as microfluidic chips

  4. 3D printed microfluidic devices: enablers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Sidra; Cabot, Joan M; Macdonald, Niall P; Lewis, Trevor; Guijt, Rosanne M; Paull, Brett; Breadmore, Michael C

    2016-05-24

    3D printing has the potential to significantly change the field of microfluidics. The ability to fabricate a complete microfluidic device in a single step from a computer model has obvious attractions, but it is the ability to create truly three dimensional structures that will provide new microfluidic capability that is challenging, if not impossible to make with existing approaches. This critical review covers the current state of 3D printing for microfluidics, focusing on the four most frequently used printing approaches: inkjet (i3DP), stereolithography (SLA), two photon polymerisation (2PP) and extrusion printing (focusing on fused deposition modeling). It discusses current achievements and limitations, and opportunities for advancement to reach 3D printing's full potential. PMID:27146365

  5. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Alvankarian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process.

  6. Heterogenous integration of a thin-film GaAs photodetector and a microfluidic device on a silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, heterogeneous integration of a III–V semiconductor thin-film photodetector (PD) with a microfluidic device is demonstrated on a SiO2–Si substrate. Thin-film format of optical devices provides an intimate integration of optical functions with microfluidic devices. As a demonstration of a multi-material and functional system, the biphasic flow structure in the polymeric microfluidic channels was co-integrated with a III–V semiconductor thin-film PD. The fluorescent drops formed in the microfluidic device are successfully detected with an integrated thin-film PD on a silicon substrate. The proposed three-dimensional integration structure is an alternative approach to combine optical functions with microfluidic functions on silicon-based electronic functions.

  7. Paper-based enzymatic microfluidic fuel cell: From a two-stream flow device to a single-stream lateral flow strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Maria José; del Campo, F. Javier; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Giroud, Fabien; Minteer, Shelley D.; Sabaté, Neus

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a first approach towards the development of a cost-effective enzymatic paper-based glucose/O2 microfluidic fuel cell in which fluid transport is based on capillary action. A first fuel cell configuration consists of a Y-shaped paper device with the fuel and the oxidant flowing in parallel over carbon paper electrodes modified with bioelectrocatalytic enzymes. The anode consists of a ferrocenium-based polyethyleneimine polymer linked to glucose oxidase (GOx/Fc-C6-LPEI), while the cathode contains a mixture of laccase, anthracene-modified multiwall carbon nanotubes, and tetrabutylammonium bromide-modified Nafion (MWCNTs/laccase/TBAB-Nafion). Subsequently, the Y-shaped configuration is improved to use a single solution containing both, the anolyte and the catholyte. Thus, the electrolytes pHs of the fuel and the oxidant solutions are adapted to an intermediate pH of 5.5. Finally, the fuel cell is run with this single solution obtaining a maximum open circuit of 0.55 ± 0.04 V and a maximum current and power density of 225 ± 17 μA cm-2 and 24 ± 5 μW cm-2, respectively. Hence, a power source closer to a commercial application (similar to conventional lateral flow test strips) is developed and successfully operated. This system can be used to supply the energy required to power microelectronics demanding low power consumption.

  8. Exploiting droplet formation in microfluidic devices to create functional particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Simmons, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Microfluidic devices offer excellent capabilities for the formation of microstructured particles which have functional attributes e.g. in controlled delivery of pharmaceuticals, enhanced nutrition and flavours in food. In this work, a microfluidic device is employed to form microstructured particles in two steps: (i) by formation of single/double emulsions and (ii) solidification of the droplet by either gelation or solvent evaporation. Both may impart non-Newtonian properties to the component phases. The influence of phase flow rates (capillary number), surfactant type/concentration and the rheology of the component phases upon the particle formation and hydrodynamic behaviour are described. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10-20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook. PMID:27527231

  10. Droplet Formation via Solvent Shifting in a Microfluidic Device

    CERN Document Server

    Hajian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Solvent shifting is a process in which a non-solvent is added to a solvent/solute mixture and extracts the solvent. The solvent and the non-solvent are miscible. Because of solution supersaturation a portion of the solute transforms to droplets. In this paper, based on this process, we present an investigation on droplet formation and their radial motion in a microfluidic device in which a jet is injected in a co-flowing liquid stream. Thanks to the laminar flow, the microfluidic setup enables studying diffusion mass transfer in radial direction and obtaining well-defined concentration distributions. Such profiles together with Ternary Phase Diagram (TPD) give detailed information about the conditions for droplet formation condition as well as their radial migration in the channel. The ternary system is composed of ethanol (solvent), de-ionized water (non-solvent) and divinyle benzene (solute). We employ analytical/numerical solutions of the diffusion equation to obtain concentration profiles of the component...

  11. Hybrid Integrated Silicon Microfluidic Platform for Fluorescence Based Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Darveau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The desideratum to develop a fully integrated Lab-on-a-chip device capable ofrapid specimen detection for high throughput in-situ biomedical diagnoses and Point-of-Care testing applications has called for the integration of some of the novel technologiessuch as the microfluidics, microphotonics, immunoproteomics and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS. In the present work, a silicon based microfluidic device hasbeen developed for carrying out fluorescence based immunoassay. By hybrid attachment ofthe microfluidic device with a Spectrometer-on-chip, the feasibility of synthesizing anintegrated Lab-on-a-chip type device for fluorescence based biosensing has beendemonstrated. Biodetection using the microfluidic device has been carried out usingantigen sheep IgG and Alexafluor-647 tagged antibody particles and the experimentalresults prove that silicon is a compatible material for the present application given thevarious advantages it offers such as cost-effectiveness, ease of bulk microfabrication,superior surface affinity to biomolecules, ease of disposability of the device etc., and is thussuitable for fabricating Lab-on-a-chip type devices.

  12. On-Chip Open Microfluidic Devices for Chemotaxis Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Gus A.; Costa, Lino; Terekhov, Alexander; Jowhar, Dawit; Hofmeister, William; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic devices can provide unique control over both the chemoattractant gradient and the migration environment of the cells. Our work incorporates laser-machined micro and nanofluidic channels into bulk fused silica and cover slip-sized silica wafers. We have designed “open” chemotaxis devices that produce passive chemoattractant gradients without an external micropipette system. Since the migration area is unobstructed, cells can be easily loaded and strategically placed into the devic...

  13. Fabricating a multi-level barrier-integrated microfluidic device using grey-scale photolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most polymer-replica-based microfluidic devices are mainly fabricated by using standard soft-lithography technology so that multi-level masters (MLMs) require multiple spin-coatings, mask alignments, exposures, developments, and bakings. In this paper, we describe a simple method for fabricating MLMs for planar microfluidic channels with multi-level barriers (MLBs). A single photomask is necessary for standard photolithography technology to create a polydimethylsiloxane grey-scale photomask (PGSP), which adjusts the total amount of UV absorption in a negative-tone photoresist via a wide range of dye concentrations. Since the PGSP in turn adjusts the degree of cross-linking of the photoresist, this method enables the fabrication of MLMs for an MLB-integrated microfluidic device. Since the PGSP-based soft-lithography technology provides a simple but powerful fabrication method for MLBs in a microfluidic device, we believe that the fabrication method can be widely used for micro total analysis systems that benefit from MLBs. We demonstrate an MLB-integrated microfluidic device that can separate microparticles. (paper)

  14. Stimulus-active polymer actuators for next-generation microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilber, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic devices have not yet evolved into commercial off-the-shelf products. Although highly integrated microfluidic structures, also known as lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and micrototal-analysis-system (µTAS) devices, have consistently been predicted to revolutionize biomedical assays and chemical synthesis, they have not entered the market as expected. Studies have identified a lack of standardization and integration as the main obstacles to commercial breakthrough. Soft microfluidics, the utilization of a broad spectrum of soft materials (i.e., polymers) for realization of microfluidic components, will make a significant contribution to the proclaimed growth of the LOC market. Recent advances in polymer science developing novel stimulus-active soft-matter materials may further increase the popularity and spreading of soft microfluidics. Stimulus-active polymers and composite materials change shape or exert mechanical force on surrounding fluids in response to electric, magnetic, light, thermal, or water/solvent stimuli. Specifically devised actuators based on these materials may have the potential to facilitate integration significantly and hence increase the operational advantage for the end-user while retaining cost-effectiveness and ease of fabrication. This review gives an overview of available actuation concepts that are based on functional polymers and points out promising concepts and trends that may have the potential to promote the commercial success of microfluidics.

  15. High-throughput microfluidic device for rare cell isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daniel; Leong, Serena; Lei, Andy; Sohn, Lydia L.

    2015-06-01

    Enumerating and analyzing circulating tumor cells (CTCs)—cells that have been shed from primary solid tumors—can potentially be used to determine patient prognosis and track the progression of disease. There is a great challenge to create an effective platform that can isolate these cells, as they are extremely rare: only 1-10 CTCs are present in a 7.5mL of a cancer patient's peripheral blood. We have developed a novel microfluidic system that can isolate CTC populations label free. Our system consists of a multistage separator that employs inertial migration to sort cells based on size. We demonstrate the feasibility of our device by sorting colloids that are comparable in size to red blood cells (RBCs) and CTCs.

  16. Integrated microwave resonant device for dielectric analysis of microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D. J.; Porch, A.; Barrow, D. A.; Allender, C. J.

    2011-08-01

    Herein we present a device for performing non-contact dielectric spectroscopy upon liquids in a microfluidic environment. The device is comprised of a compression-sealed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chip with an embedded coaxial resonator, which is overmoded for dielectric measurements at six discrete frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. A novel capacitive coupling structure allows transmission measurements to be taken from one end of the resonator, and an optimised microchannel design maximises sensitivity and repeatability. The use of a PTFE substrate and a non-contact measurement gives excellent chemical and biological compatibility. A simple 'fingerprint' method for identifying solvents is demonstrated, whereby a sample is characterised by air-referenced changes in complex frequency. Complex permittivity values are also obtained via a perturbation theory-based inversion. A combination of experimental and simulated results is used to characterise the device behaviour, limits of operation and measurement uncertainty. The high stability of temporal measurements, coupled with the robustness of the design, make this device ideal for analytical chemistry and industrial process control.

  17. Integrated microwave resonant device for dielectric analysis of microfluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D J; Porch, A; Barrow, D A [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Allender, C J, E-mail: rowedj@cf.ac.uk [Welsh School of Pharmacy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3NB (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-12

    Herein we present a device for performing non-contact dielectric spectroscopy upon liquids in a microfluidic environment. The device is comprised of a compression-sealed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chip with an embedded coaxial resonator, which is overmoded for dielectric measurements at six discrete frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. A novel capacitive coupling structure allows transmission measurements to be taken from one end of the resonator, and an optimised microchannel design maximises sensitivity and repeatability. The use of a PTFE substrate and a non-contact measurement gives excellent chemical and biological compatibility. A simple 'fingerprint' method for identifying solvents is demonstrated, whereby a sample is characterised by air-referenced changes in complex frequency. Complex permittivity values are also obtained via a perturbation theory-based inversion. A combination of experimental and simulated results is used to characterise the device behaviour, limits of operation and measurement uncertainty. The high stability of temporal measurements, coupled with the robustness of the design, make this device ideal for analytical chemistry and industrial process control.

  18. Diffusionless fluid transport and routing using novel microfluidic devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Louise Mary; Shediac, Renee; Reichmuth, David S.

    2006-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have been proposed for 'Lab-on-a-Chip' applications for nearly a decade. Despite the unquestionable promise of these devices to allow rapid, sensitive and portable biochemical analysis, few practical devices exist. It is often difficult to adapt current laboratory techniques to the microscale because bench-top methods use discrete liquid volumes, while most current microfluidic devices employ streams of liquid confined in a branching network of micron-scale channels. The goal of this research was to use two phase liquid flows, creating discrete packets of liquid. Once divided into discrete packets, the packets can be moved controllably within the microchannels without loss of material. Each packet is equivalent to a minute test tube, holding a fraction from a separation or an aliquot to be reacted. We report on the fabrication of glass and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) devices that create and store packets.

  19. Chromatic analysis by monitoring unmodified silver nanoparticles reduction on double layer microfluidic paper-based analytical devices for selective and sensitive determination of mercury(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meelapsom, Rattapol; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe; Kulsing, Chadin; Shen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This study demonstrates chromatic analysis based on a simple red green blue (RGB) color model for sensitive and selective determination of mercury(II). The analysis was performed by monitoring the color change of a microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Device (µPAD). The device was fabricated by using alkyl ketene dimer (AKD)-inkjet printing and doped with unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which were disintegrated when being exposed to mercury(II). The color intensity was detected by using an apparatus consisting of a digital camera and a homemade light box generating constant light intensity. A progressive increase in color intensity of the tested area on the µPAD (3.0mm) was observed with increasing mercury(II) concentration. The developed system enabled quantification of mercury(II) at low concentration with the detection limit of 0.001mgL(-1) (3 SD blank/slope of the calibration curve) and small sample volume uptake (2µL). The linearity range of the calibration curve in this technique was demonstrated from 0.05 to 7mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with good precision (RSD less than 4.1%). Greater selectivity towards mercury(II) compared with potential interference ions was also observed. Furthermore, the percentage recoveries of spiked water samples were in an acceptable range which was in agreement with the values obtained from the conventional method utilizing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer (CVAAS). The proposed technique allows a rapid, simple, sensitive and selective analysis of trace mercury(II) in water samples. PMID:27216673

  20. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  1. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  2. Mail-Order Microfluidics: Evaluation of Stereolithography for the Production of Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Anthony K.; Lee, Wonjae; Folch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of microfluidic devices are developed in PDMS by molding (“soft lithography”) because PDMS is an inexpensive material, has physicochemical properties that are well suited for biomedical and physical sciences applications, and design cycle lengths are generally adequate for prototype development. However, PDMS molding is tediously slow and thus cannot provide the high- or medium-volume production required for the commercialization of devices. While high-throughput plastic mol...

  3. Detection of heavy metal by paper-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang; Gritsenko, Dmitry; Feng, Shaolong; Teh, Yi Chen; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-09-15

    Heavy metal pollution has shown great threat to the environment and public health worldwide. Current methods for the detection of heavy metals require expensive instrumentation and laborious operation, which can only be accomplished in centralized laboratories. Various microfluidic paper-based analytical devices have been developed recently as simple, cheap and disposable alternatives to conventional ones for on-site detection of heavy metals. In this review, we first summarize current development of paper-based analytical devices and discuss the selection of paper substrates, methods of device fabrication, and relevant theories in these devices. We then compare and categorize recent reports on detection of heavy metals using paper-based microfluidic devices on the basis of various detection mechanisms, such as colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical methods. To finalize, the future development and trend in this field are discussed. PMID:27131999

  4. A Sensitive Chemotaxis Assay Using a Novel Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing chemotaxis assays do not generate stable chemotactic gradients and thus—over time—functionally measure only nonspecific random motion (chemokinesis. In comparison, microfluidic technology has the capacity to generate a tightly controlled microenvironment that can be stably maintained for extended periods of time and is, therefore, amenable to adaptation for assaying chemotaxis. We describe here a novel microfluidic device for sensitive assay of cellular migration and show its application for evaluating the chemotaxis of smooth muscle cells in a chemokine gradient.

  5. DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A ROLLER IMPRINTING DEVICE FOR MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE MANUFACTURING

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Jayanathan, Stephen; Helu, Moneer; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are gaining popularity in a variety of applications, ranging from molecular biology to bio-defense. However, the widespread adoption of this technology is constrained by the lack of efficient and cost-effective manufacturing processes. This paper focuses on the roller imprinting process, which is being developed to rapidly and inexpensively fabricate micro-fluidic devices. In this process, a cylindrical roll with raised features on its surface creates imprints by rolling ...

  6. Microfluidic device for the assembly and transport of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Conrad D.; Kumar, Anil; Khusid, Boris; Acrivos, Andreas

    2010-06-29

    A microfluidic device comprising independently addressable arrays of interdigitated electrodes can be used to assembly and transport large-scale microparticle structures. The device and method uses collective phenomena in a negatively polarized suspension exposed to a high-gradient strong ac electric field to assemble the particles into predetermined locations and then transport them collectively to a work area for final assembly by sequentially energizing the electrode arrays.

  7. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices. (paper)

  8. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  9. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  10. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  11. A microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of metabolic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zhao, Martin M Thuo and Xinyu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as simple yet powerful platforms for performing low-cost analytical tests. This paper reports a microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of physiologically relevant metabolic biomarkers. Different from existing paper-based electrochemical devices, our device includes an array of eight electrochemical sensors and utilizes a handheld custom-made electrochemical reader (potentiostat) for signal readout. The b...

  12. Bubble inclusion and removal using PDMS membrane-based gas permeation for applications in pumping, valving and mixing in microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advancements in fluid handling applications of a gas-permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane are demonstrated. Devices for controlled pumping, bubble injection, bubble removal and mixing are demonstrated using a three-layered fabrication method. The ability of a gas-permeable membrane to control flow in glass channels is determined. Consistent flow rates ranging from approximately 1 to 14 µl min−1 were observed using control pressures from 100 to 700 mbar. Bubble injection and removal from microfluidic channels was performed in monolithic PDMS devices using several bubble trap geometries at fluid flow rates over 100 µl min−1. The rate of removal of the air in the bubble trap was determined as a function of the area of membrane exposed and the applied vacuum. The PDMS membrane was shown to be an effective tool for the injection and removal of air bubbles in a method of enhancing mixing using bubbles and branched microchannels. The amount of mixing was optically determined before and after bubbles entered the fluid channel. The ability to produce all of these compatible components using a single fabrication process is a step toward inexpensive, parallel, highly integrated microfluidic systems with minimal external controls

  13. Microfluidic structures and methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2008-04-01

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate which may include microchannels or other features.

  14. A microfluidic device with a diffusion barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a microfiuidic device for macromoiecuie amplification by sequential addition of liquid reagents. The device of the invention comprises a chip forming a plurality of reaction chambers each extending between an inlet and an outlet, each inlet being in fluid communication with...

  15. A Two-Stage Microfluidic Device for the Isolation and Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrew; Belsare, Sayali; Giorgio, Todd; Mu, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be critical for studying how tumors grow and metastasize, in addition to personalizing treatment for cancer patients. CTCs are rare events in blood, making it difficult to remove CTCs from the blood stream. Two microfluidic devices have been developed to separate CTCs from blood. The first is a double spiral device that focuses cells into streams, the positions of which are determined by cell diameter. The second device uses ligand-coated magnetic nanoparticles that selectively attach to CTCs. The nanoparticles then pull CTCs out of solution using a magnetic field. These two devices will be combined into a single 2-stage microfluidic device that will capture CTCs more efficiently than either device on its own. The first stage depletes the number of blood cells in the sample by size-based separation. The second stage will magnetically remove CTCs from solution for study and culturing. Thus far, size-based separation has been achieved. Research will also focus on understanding the equations that govern fluid dynamics and magnetic fields in order to determine how the manipulation of microfluidic parameters, such as dimensions and flow rate, will affect integration and optimization of the 2-stage device. NSF-CREST: Center for Physics and Chemistry of Materials. HRD-0420516; Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program Award W81XWH-13-1-0397.

  16. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous-Flow Magnetically Controlled Capture and Isolation of Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Yi; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic device that exploits magnetic manipulation for integrated capture and isolation of microparticles in continuous flow. The device, which was fabricated from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft-lithography techniques, consists of an incubator and a separator integrated on a single chip. The incubator is based on a novel scheme termed target acquisition by repetitive traversal (TART), in which surface-functionalized magnetic beads repetitively traverse ...

  17. Large-Scale Integration of All-Glass Valves on a Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Yaxiaer Yalikun; Yo Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a method for fabricating a microfluidic device with integrated large-scale all-glass valves and constructed an actuator system to control each of the valves on the device. Such a microfluidic device has advantages that allow its use in various fields, including physical, chemical, and biochemical analyses and syntheses. However, it is inefficient and difficult to integrate the large-scale all-glass valves in a microfluidic device using conventional glass fabricatio...

  18. Simulation of magnetic active polymers for versatile microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Binder Claudia; Kataeva Nadezhda; Bance Simon; Exl Lukas; Reichel Franz; Fischbacher Johann; Özelt Harald; Gusenbauer Markus; Brückl Hubert; Schrefl Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use a compound of magnetic nanoparticles (20-100 nm) embedded in a flexible polymer (Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS) to filter circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The analysis of CTCs is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. The combination of experiments and simulations lead to a versatile microfluidic lab-on-chip device. Simulations are essential to understand the influence of the embedde...

  19. Microfluidic Devices for Manipulation and Detection of Beads and Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Mats

    2006-01-01

    This thesis summarises work towards a Lab-on-Chip (LOC). The request for faster and more efficient chemical and biological analysis is the motivation behind the development of the LOC-concept. Microfluidic devices tend to become increasingly complex in order to include, e.g. sample delivery, manipulation, and detection, in one chip. The urge for smart and simple design of robust and low-cost microdevices is addressed and discussed. Design, fabrication and characterization of such microdevices...

  20. Development of microfluidic device for cell counting and lysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavek, Tomáš; Křenková, Jana; Foret, František

    Veszprém : Hungarian Society for Separation Sciences, 2015. s. 140-140. ISBN 978-615-5270-18-5. [Balaton Symposium on High-Performance Separation Methods /10./. 02.09.2015-04.09.2015, Siófok] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06319S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : microfluidic device * cell counting * cell lysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  1. A simple method of fabricating mask-free microfluidic devices for biological analysis.

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Xin

    2010-09-07

    We report a simple, low-cost, rapid, and mask-free method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip for biological analysis researches. In this fabrication process, a laser system is used to cut through paper to form intricate patterns and differently configured channels for specific purposes. Bonded with cyanoacrylate-based resin, the prepared paper sheet is sandwiched between glass slides (hydrophilic) or polymer-based plates (hydrophobic) to obtain a multilayer structure. In order to examine the chip\\'s biocompatibility and applicability, protein concentration was measured while DNA capillary electrophoresis was carried out, and both of them show positive results. With the utilization of direct laser cutting and one-step gas-sacrificing techniques, the whole fabrication processes for complicated 2D and 3D microfluidic devices are shorten into several minutes which make it a good alternative of poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chips used in biological analysis researches.

  2. Thermal assisted ultrasonic bonding of multilayer polymer microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to fabricating multilayer microfluidic devices of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was presented. Substrates were preheated to 20–30 °C lower than glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material by a hot plate. Then low-amplitude ultrasonic vibration was employed to generate facial heat at the interface of the PMMA layers. Two crossover micro-separation channel networks and a micro mixer were integrated in a four-layer microfluidic device using this method. The burst pressure of the bonded channel was more than 0.65 MPa. In order to demonstrate the performance of this technique, as many as 12 PMMA layers with micro-channels were successfully bonded together at one time. The average depth loss ratio of micro-channels was 0.6% and the tensile strength was 0.67 MPa. Multilayer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) substrates were also successfully bonded. This study provided a potential method for constructing complex channel networks for polymer microfluidic devices

  3. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  4. Real-time measurement of flow rate in microfluidic devices using a cantilever-based optofluidic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Latifi, Hamid; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Hajghassem, Hasan

    2014-01-21

    Real-time and accurate measurement of flow rate is an important reqirement in lab on a chip (LOC) and micro total analysis system (μTAS) applications. In this paper, we present an experimental and numerical investigation of a cantilever-based optofluidic flow sensor for this purpose. Two sensors with thin and thick cantilevers were fabricated by engraving a 2D pattern of cantilever/base on two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slabs using a CO2 laser system and then casting a 2D pattern with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The basic working principle of the sensor is the fringe shift of the Fabry-Pérot (FP) spectrum due to a changing flow rate. A Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes and structural deformation equations to simulate the pressure distribution, velocity and cantilever deflection results of the flow in the channel. The experimental results show that the thin and thick cantilevers have a minimum detectable flow change of 1.3 and 4 (μL min(-1)) respectively. In addition, a comparison of the numerical and experimental deflection of the cantilever has been done to obtain the effective Young's modulus of the thin and thick PDMS cantilevers. PMID:24291805

  5. Method for a microfluidic weaklink device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Duncan, Matthew P.

    2009-12-01

    The present invention relates to an electrokinetic (EK) pump capable of creating high pressures electroosmotically, and capable of retaining high pressures. Both pressure creation and retention are accomplished without the need for moving parts. The EK pump uses a polymerizable fluid that creates the pressure-retaining seal within the EK pump when polymerization is initiated, typically by exposure to UV radiation. Weaklink devices are advantageously constructed including such a pressure-retaining EK pump since, among other advantages, the response of the weaklink device relies on predictable and reliable chemical polymerization reactions.

  6. Generation of emulsion droplets and micro-bubbles in microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-04-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology to manipulate small amounts of liquid samples. In addition to microdroplets, microbubbles are also needed for various pro- cesses in the food, healthcare and cosmetic industries. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. In ad- dition, current methods have the limited capabilities for fabrication of microfluidic devices within three dimensional (3D) structures. Novel methods for fabrication of droplet-based microfluidic devices for the generation microdroplets and microbubbles are therefore of great interest in current research. In this thesis, we have developed several simple, rapid and low-cost methods for fabrication of microfluidic devices, especially for generation of microdroplets and mi- crobubbles. We first report an inexpensive full-glass microfluidic devices with as- sembly of glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demon- strated the robust capability of preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. Second, we propose a similar full-glass device for generation of microbubbles, but with assembly of a much smaller nozzle of a glass capillary. Highly monodisperse microbubbles with diameter range from 3.5 to 60 microns have been successfully produced, at rates up to 40 kHz. A simple scaling law based on the capillary number and liquid-to-gas flow rate ratio, successfully predicts the bubble size. Recently, the emergent 3D printing technology provides an attractive fabrication technique, due to its simplicity and low cost. A handful of studies have already demonstrated droplet production through 3D-printed microfluidic devices. However, two

  7. Simulation of magnetic active polymers for versatile microfluidic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Fischbacher, Johann; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Kataeva, Nadezhda; Binder, Claudia; Brückl, Hubert; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use a compound of magnetic nanoparticles (20-100 nm) embedded in a flexible polymer (Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS) to filter circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The analysis of CTCs is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. The combination of experiments and simulations lead to a versatile microfluidic lab-on-chip device. Simulations are essential to understand the influence of the embedded nanoparticles in the elastic PDMS when applying a magnetic gradient field. It combines finite element calculations of the polymer, magnetic simulations of the embedded nanoparticles and the fluid dynamic calculations of blood plasma and blood cells. With the use of magnetic active polymers a wide range of tunable microfluidic structures can be created. The method can help to increase the yield of needed isolated CTCs.

  8. From screen to structure with a harvestable microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic crystallization using the Crystal Former improves the identification of initial crystallization conditions relative to screening via vapour diffusion. Advances in automation have facilitated the widespread adoption of high-throughput vapour-diffusion methods for initial crystallization screening. However, for many proteins, screening thousands of crystallization conditions fails to yield crystals of sufficient quality for structural characterization. Here, the rates of crystal identification for thaumatin, catalase and myoglobin using microfluidic Crystal Former devices and sitting-drop vapour-diffusion plates are compared. It is shown that the Crystal Former results in a greater number of identified initial crystallization conditions compared with vapour diffusion. Furthermore, crystals of thaumatin and lysozyme obtained in the Crystal Former were used directly for structure determination both in situ and upon harvesting and cryocooling. On the basis of these results, a crystallization strategy is proposed that uses multiple methods with distinct kinetic trajectories through the protein phase diagram to increase the output of crystallization pipelines

  9. Microfluidic paper-based analytical device for photoelectrochemical immunoassay with multiplex signal amplification using multibranched hybridization chain reaction and PdAu enzyme mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Feifei; Sun, Guoqiang; Liang, Linlin; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2016-05-15

    Combining multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR), the photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor was fabricated with a microfluidic paper-based analytical devices using different sizes of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized flower-like 3D ZnO superstructures as photoactive materials. Firstly, 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) functioned ZnO was anchored on gold-paper working electrode. With the aid of PATP, large-sized CdTe-COOH QDs (QDs1) were conjugated onto the ZnO surface because of the formation of a strong bond (Zn-S) between the thiol of PATP molecule and the ZnO, and the remaining amino group formed an amide bond with carboxylic acid group capping CdTe. Then the small-sized CdTe-NH2 QDs (QDs2) were modified on the QDs1 by forming amide bond, which leaded to a very strong photocurrent response because of the formation of cosensitized structure. The designed mHCR produced long products with multiple branched arms, which could attached multiple PdAu nanoparticles and catalyze the oxidation of hydroquinone (HQ) using H2O2 as anoxidant. Double strands DNA with multiple branched arms (mdsDNA) was formed by mHCR. In the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), PdAu-mdsDNA conjugates-labeled CEA antibody was captured. The concentrations of CEA were measured through the decrease in photocurrent intensity resulting from the increase in steric hindrance of the immunocomplex and the polymeric oxidation product of HQ. In addition, the oxidation product of HQ deposited on the as-obtained electrode, which could efficiently inhibit the photoinduced electron transfer. Under optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance: the detection range of CEA was from 0.001 to 90ngmL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.33pgmL(-1). The as-obtained immunosensor exhibited excellent precision, prominent specificity, acceptable stability and reproducibility, and could be used for the detection of CEA in real samples. The proposed assay opens a promising

  10. 3D-printing of transparent bio-microfluidic devices in PEG-DA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrios, Arturo; Parra-Cabrera, Cesar; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Gonzalez-Suarez, Alan M; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G; Nallapatti, Umashree; Samitier, Josep; DeForest, Cole A; Posas, Francesc; Garcia-Cordero, José L; Folch, Albert

    2016-06-21

    The vast majority of microfluidic systems are molded in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography due to the favorable properties of PDMS: biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, inexpensive, and copyright-free. However, PDMS molding involves tedious manual labor, which makes PDMS devices prone to assembly failures and difficult to disseminate to research and clinical settings. Furthermore, the fabrication procedures limit the 3D complexity of the devices to layered designs. Stereolithography (SL), a form of 3D-printing, has recently attracted attention as a way to customize the fabrication of biomedical devices due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. However, existing SL resins are not biocompatible and patterning transparent resins at high resolution remains difficult. Here we report procedures for the preparation and patterning of a transparent resin based on low-MW poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (MW 250) (PEG-DA-250). The 3D-printed devices are highly transparent and cells can be cultured on PEG-DA-250 prints for several days. This biocompatible SL resin and printing process solves some of the main drawbacks of 3D-printed microfluidic devices: biocompatibility and transparency. In addition, it should also enable the production of non-microfluidic biomedical devices. PMID:27217203

  11. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-01-22

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax or acrylic glue, and characterized the affect of these and other microfluidic materials on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax or cyanoacrylate-based resin as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax or simple cyanoacrylate-based resin can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The wax bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by evacuating the channels of adhesive material in a hot-water. We applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation. Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein recombinant E. coli bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration. The chip bonded with cyanoacrylate-based resin was tested by measuring protein concentration and carrying out DNA capillary electrophoresis. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of our microfluidic chip fabrication technology, we tested the PCR compatibility of our chip materials along with various other common materials

  12. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory J. (Livermore, CA); Hatch, Anson V. (Tracy, CA); Wang, Ying-Chih (Pleasanton, CA); Singh, Anup K. (Danville, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Claudnic, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  13. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  14. Intracavity Microfluidic Laser Device for Single Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    An intracavity microfluidic laser device has been developed to study bioparticles ranging in size from 50 nm to 20 μm (virons to organelles to whole cells). The versatile device can be operated used in several modes including static or flowing fluids, with or without molecular labels, and microscopic imaging and/or spectroscopy. It enables advantageous new ways to perform analyses of bioparticles for applications including cell biology, detection of disease and pathogens, environmental monitoring, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and food processing. This talk will briefly summarize the physics of the device including its laser optics, fluid dynamics, and intracavity light interaction with cells. The talk will then focus on results of a study of mitochondria in normal and cancer liver cells. The study examines the transformation of intracellular and isolated mitochondria from the normal to disease state. The results highlight the unique utility of the device to rapidly assess biophysical changes arising from altered biomolecular states of cells and organelles.

  15. Fabrication improvements for thermoset polyester (TPE) microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Gina S; Yim, Moonbin; Jeffries, Gavin D M; Schiro, Perry G; Mutch, Sarah A; Lorenz, Robert M; Chiu, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Thermoset polyester (TPE) microfluidic devices were previously developed as an alternative to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices, fabricated similarly by replica molding, yet offering stable surface properties and good chemical compatibility with some organics that are incompatible with PDMS. This paper describes a number of improvements in the fabrication of TPE chips. Specifically, we describe methods to form TPE devices with a thin bottom layer for use with high numerical aperture (NA) objectives for sensitive fluorescence detection and optical manipulation. We also describe plasma-bonding of TPE to glass to create hybrid TPE-glass devices. We further present a simple master-pretreatment method to replace our original technique that required the use of specialized equipment. PMID:17594014

  16. Fabrication and Performance of a Photonic-Microfluidic Integrated Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Watts

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and performance of a functional photonic-microfluidic flow cytometer is demonstrated. The devices are fabricated on a Pyrex substrate by photolithographically patterning the microchannels and optics in a SU-8 layer that is sealed via a poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS layer through a unique chemical bonding method. The resulting devices eliminate the free-space excitation optics through integration of microlenses onto the chip to mimic conventional cytometry excitation. Devices with beam waists of 6 μm and 12 μm in fluorescent detection and counting tests using 2.5 and 6 μm beads-show CVs of 9%–13% and 23% for the two devices, respectively. These results are within the expectations for a conventional cytometer (5%–15% and demonstrate the ability to integrate the photonic components for excitation onto the chip and the ability to maintain the level of reliable detection.

  17. Fully Integrated Microfluidic Device for Direct Sample-to-Answer Genetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin H.; Grodzinski, Piotr

    Integration of microfluidics technology with DNA microarrays enables building complete sample-to-answer systems that are useful in many applications such as clinic diagnostics. In this chapter, a fully integrated microfluidic device [1] that consists of microfluidic mixers, valves, pumps, channels, chambers, heaters, and a DNA microarray sensor to perform DNA analysis of complex biological sample solutions is present. This device can perform on-chip sample preparation (including magnetic bead-based cell capture, cell preconcentration and purification, and cell lysis) of complex biological sample solutions (such as whole blood), polymerase chain reaction, DNA hybridization, and electrochemical detection. A few novel microfluidic techniques were developed and employed. A micromix-ing technique based on a cavitation microstreaming principle was implemented to enhance target cell capture from whole blood samples using immunomagnetic beads. This technique was also employed to accelerate DNA hybridization reaction. Thermally actuated paraffin-based microvalves were developed to regulate flows. Electrochemical pumps and thermopneumatic pumps were integrated on the chip to provide pumping of liquid solutions. The device is completely self-contained: no external pressure sources, fluid storage, mechanical pumps, or valves are necessary for fluid manipulation, thus eliminating possible sample contamination and simplifying device operation. Pathogenic bacteria detection from ~mL whole blood samples and single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis directly from diluted blood were demonstrated. The device provides a cost-effective solution to direct sample-to-answer genetic analysis, and thus has a potential impact in the fields of point-of-care genetic analysis, environmental testing, and biological warfare agent detection.

  18. An electric stimulation system for electrokinetic particle manipulation in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-de la Fuente, M. S.; Moncada-Hernandez, H.; Perez-Gonzalez, V. H.; Lapizco-Encinas, B. H.; Martinez-Chapa, S. O.

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic devices have grown significantly in the number of applications. Microfabrication techniques have evolved considerably; however, electric stimulation systems for microdevices have not advanced at the same pace. Electric stimulation of micro-fluidic devices is an important element in particle manipulation research. A flexible stimulation instrument is desired to perform configurable, repeatable, automated, and reliable experiments by allowing users to select the stimulation parameters. The instrument presented here is a configurable and programmable stimulation system for electrokinetic-driven microfluidic devices; it consists of a processor, a memory system, and a user interface to deliver several types of waveforms and stimulation patterns. It has been designed to be a flexible, highly configurable, low power instrument capable of delivering sine, triangle, and sawtooth waveforms with one single frequency or two superimposed frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 40 kHz, and an output voltage of up to 30 Vpp. A specific stimulation pattern can be delivered over a single time period or as a sequence of different signals for different time periods. This stimulation system can be applied as a research tool where manipulation of particles suspended in liquid media is involved, such as biology, medicine, environment, embryology, and genetics. This system has the potential to lead to new schemes for laboratory procedures by allowing application specific and user defined electric stimulation. The development of this device is a step towards portable and programmable instrumentation for electric stimulation on electrokinetic-based microfluidic devices, which are meant to be integrated with lab-on-a-chip devices.

  19. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Maghribi, Mariam; Hamilton, Julie; Rose, Klint; Wang, Amy W.

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  20. Measurements of Elastic Moduli of Silicone Gel Substrates with a Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the d...

  1. Dielectrophoretic tweezers for examining particle-surface interactions within microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, S. W.; LI, HAIBO; Bashir, Rashid

    2007-01-01

    The authors present dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based tweezers that can be used to characterize the interactions between a particle and the surface it is attached to, within a microfluidic device. As a proof of concept, 5.4 mu m polystyrene beads functionalized by carboxyl group were attached on a bare and poly-L-lysine functionalized oxide surface. Negative dielectrophoresis force was generated using interdigitated electrodes and the peak dielectrophoresis voltage where the beads were repelled a...

  2. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-03-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  3. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-06-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  4. Integratable opto-microfluidic devices for sensitive detection of bio-analytes

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos

    2014-01-01

    The expensive fabrication of current optical microfluidic devices is a barrier to the successful implementation of these devices in low-cost, high-sensitivity biosensing systems. Organic photodiodes (OPDs) have great potential for application as photodetectors in integrated microfluidic devices due to their uncomplicated optical alignment, thin device architecture, precise control of the active area and simple device fabrication onto glass or polymer substrates. Recent developm...

  5. A microfluidic device for epigenomic profiling using 100 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhenning; Chen, Changya; He, Bing; Tan, Kai; Lu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays poses a major obstacle for epigenomic studies of low-abundance cells. Here we present a microfluidics-based ChIP-Seq protocol using as few as 100 cells via drastically improved collection of high-quality ChIP-enriched DNA. Using this technology, we uncovered many novel enhancers and super enhancers in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from mouse fetal liver, suggesting that enhancer activity is highly dynamic during early he...

  6. Fabrication of Embedded Microvalve on PMMA Microfluidic Devices through Surface Functionalization

    CERN Document Server

    Toh, A G G; Ng, S H

    2008-01-01

    The integration of a PDMS membrane within orthogonally placed PMMA microfluidic channels enables the pneumatic actuation of valves within bonded PMMA-PDMS-PMMA multilayer devices. Here, surface functionalization of PMMA substrates via acid catalyzed hydrolysis and air plasma corona treatment were investigated as possible techniques to permanently bond PMMA microfluidic channels to PDMS surfaces. FTIR and water contact angle analysis of functionalized PMMA substrates showed that air plasma corona treatment was most effective in inducing PMMA hydrophilicity. Subsequent fluidic tests showed that air plasma modified and bonded PMMA multilayer devices could withstand fluid pressure at an operational flow rate of 9 mircoliters/min. The pneumatic actuation of the embedded PDMS membrane was observed through optical microscopy and an electrical resistance based technique. PDMS membrane actuation occurred at pneumatic pressures of as low as 10kPa and complete valving occurred at 14kPa for 100 micrometers x 100 micromet...

  7. Miscible Organic Solvents Soak Bonding Method Use in a PMMA Multilayer Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a novel bonding technology to fabricate a microfluidic device based on Poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The method, which used chloroform and ethanol as miscible bonding solvent, can complete complex structures rapid assembly (10 min at 40°C. A bonding strength of 267.5 N/cm2 can be achieved, while the micro channel deformation was less than 7.26%. Then we utilized this method to produce a three layers micro mixer, which included a T-shaped inlet channel and six H-shaped mixing units. Numerical simulation indicated that, the well mixing length of the mixer was only about 6 mm when Re = 10. Finally, fluorescence microscopy was used to verify mixer performance. The method provided the potential for mass production of multilayer rigid polymer microfluidic devices.

  8. Microfluidic Organ/Body-on-a-Chip Devices at the Convergence of Biology and Microengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rubina Perestrelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomedical technologies are mostly related to the convergence of biology with microengineering. For instance, microfluidic devices are now commonly found in most research centers, clinics and hospitals, contributing to more accurate studies and therapies as powerful tools for drug delivery, monitoring of specific analytes, and medical diagnostics. Most remarkably, integration of cellularized constructs within microengineered platforms has enabled the recapitulation of the physiological and pathological conditions of complex tissues and organs. The so-called “organ-on-a-chip” technology, which represents a new avenue in the field of advanced in vitro models, with the potential to revolutionize current approaches to drug screening and toxicology studies. This review aims to highlight recent advances of microfluidic-based devices towards a body-on-a-chip concept, exploring their technology and broad applications in the biomedical field.

  9. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-11-04

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax o

  10. Review on recent and advanced applications of monoliths and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.vazquez@dcu.ie [Irish Separation Science Cluster, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Dublin (Ireland); Paull, Brett, E-mail: brett.paull@dcu.ie [Irish Separation Science Cluster, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Dublin (Ireland)

    2010-06-04

    This review critically summarises recent novel and advanced achievements in the application of monolithic materials and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices appearing within the literature over the period of the last 5 years (2005-2010). The range of monolithic materials has developed rapidly over the past decade, with a diverse and highly versatile class of materials now available, with each exhibiting distinct porosities, pore sizes, and a wide variety of surface functionalities. A major advantage of these materials is their ease of preparation in micro-fluidic channels by in situ polymerisation, leading to monolithic materials being increasingly utilised for a larger variety of purposes in micro-fluidic platforms. Applications of porous polymer monoliths, silica-based monoliths and related homogeneous porous polymer gels in the preparation of separation columns, ion-permeable membranes, preconcentrators, extractors, electrospray emitters, micro-valves, electrokinetic pumps, micro-reactors and micro-mixers in micro-fluidic devices are discussed herein. Procedures used in the preparation of monolithic materials in micro-channels, as well as some practical aspects of the micro-fluidic chip fabrication are addressed. Recent analytical/bioanalytical and catalytic applications of the final micro-fluidic devices incorporating monolithic materials are also reviewed.

  11. Review on recent and advanced applications of monoliths and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review critically summarises recent novel and advanced achievements in the application of monolithic materials and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices appearing within the literature over the period of the last 5 years (2005-2010). The range of monolithic materials has developed rapidly over the past decade, with a diverse and highly versatile class of materials now available, with each exhibiting distinct porosities, pore sizes, and a wide variety of surface functionalities. A major advantage of these materials is their ease of preparation in micro-fluidic channels by in situ polymerisation, leading to monolithic materials being increasingly utilised for a larger variety of purposes in micro-fluidic platforms. Applications of porous polymer monoliths, silica-based monoliths and related homogeneous porous polymer gels in the preparation of separation columns, ion-permeable membranes, preconcentrators, extractors, electrospray emitters, micro-valves, electrokinetic pumps, micro-reactors and micro-mixers in micro-fluidic devices are discussed herein. Procedures used in the preparation of monolithic materials in micro-channels, as well as some practical aspects of the micro-fluidic chip fabrication are addressed. Recent analytical/bioanalytical and catalytic applications of the final micro-fluidic devices incorporating monolithic materials are also reviewed.

  12. A Student-Made Microfluidic Device for Electrophoretic Separation of Food Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerasong, Saowapak; McClain, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an undergraduate laboratory activity to introduce students to microfluidics. In the activity, each student constructs their own microfluidic device using simple photolithographic techniques and then uses the device to separate a food dye mixture by electrophoresis. Dyes are used so that students are able to visually observe the…

  13. Rapid microfabrication of solvent-resistant biocompatible microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Lung-Hsin; Lin, Robert; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a rapid, simple, and low-cost fabrication method to prepare solvent resistant and biocompatible microfluidic devices with three-dimensional geometries. The devices were fabricated in thiolene and replicated from PDMS master with high molding fidelity. Good chemical compatibility for organic solvents allows volatile chemicals in synthesis and analysis applications. The surface can be processed to be hydrophobic or hydrophilic for water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. Monodisperse organic solvent droplet generation is demonstrated to be reproducible in thiolene microchannels without swelling. The thiolene surface prevents cell adhesion but normal cell growth and adhesion on glass substrates is not affected by the adjacent thiolene patterns. PMID:18497921

  14. Femtosecond Laser Micromachining Photonic and Microfluidic Devices in Transparent Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cerullo, Giulio; Ramponi, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond laser micromachining of transparent material is a powerful and versatile technology. In fact, it can be applied to several materials. It is a maskless technology that allows rapid device prototyping, has intrinsic three-dimensional capabilities and can produce both photonic and microfluidic devices. For these reasons it is ideally suited for the fabrication of complex microsystems with unprecedented functionalities. The book is mainly focused on micromachining of transparent materials which, due to the nonlinear absorption mechanism of ultrashort pulses, allows unique three-dimensional capabilities and can be exploited for the fabrication of complex microsystems with unprecedented functionalities.This book presents an overview of the state of the art of this rapidly emerging topic with contributions from leading experts in the field, ranging from principles of nonlinear material modification to fabrication techniques and applications to photonics and optofluidics.

  15. Vapor deposition of cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coatings onto pre-assembled microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Carson T; Marin, Brandon C; Malmstadt, Noah; Gupta, Malancha

    2011-09-21

    The interior surfaces of pre-assembled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices were modified with a cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coating that significantly increased the chemical compatibility of the devices. PMID:21850298

  16. Graphene-based microfluidics for serial crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Shuo; Wang, Yuxi; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schiffman, Jessica D; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Perry, Sarah L

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic strategies to enable the growth and subsequent serial crystallographic analysis of micro-crystals have the potential to facilitate both structural characterization and dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. However, adapting microfluidic crystallization platforms for micro-crystallography requires a dramatic decrease in the overall device thickness. We report a robust strategy for the straightforward incorporation of single-layer graphene into ultra-thin microfluidic devices. This architecture allows for a total material thickness of only ∼1 μm, facilitating on-chip X-ray diffraction analysis while creating a sample environment that is stable against significant water loss over several weeks. We demonstrate excellent signal-to-noise in our X-ray diffraction measurements using a 1.5 μs polychromatic X-ray exposure, and validate our approach via on-chip structure determination using hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) as a model system. Although this work is focused on the use of graphene for protein crystallography, we anticipate that this technology should find utility in a wide range of both X-ray and other lab on a chip applications. PMID:27241728

  17. Frequency dependence on the accuracy of electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication presents the dependence on frequency of the accuracy of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in microfluidic devices. For this study, a very simple microfluidic device was used, with a hydrophilic microfluidic channel in which two parallel electrodes were patterned. Glass was the preferred substrate material for the fabrication of this microfluidic device, mainly due to its excellent dielectric properties even at relatively high frequencies. The testing was performed in air, and with DI water, ethanol and solutions of silica beads suspended in ethanol. The results show that the accuracy of the measurement increases with the frequency. The variation of the average of standard deviation error was between 13% at 10 kHz and less than 1% at 100 MHz. This clearly indicates that a high frequency range must be considered for further studies using electrical impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices. (brief communication)

  18. Synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips

    OpenAIRE

    SCHWARZMANN, ANŽE

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis presents a digital microfluidic biochip that is intended for carrying out tests on various human and environmental fluids. The predecessor of the digital microfluidic biochip is the continuous-flow microfluidic biochip, which is based on mechanical components for fluid movement. The basis for developing microfluidic biochips is microfluidics and the lab-on-a-chip, which make possible small biochips and device portability. This thesis presents sequential steps of synthes...

  19. Evolution of catalysts directed by genetic algorithms in a plug-based microfluidic device tested with oxidation of methane by oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Shukhaev, Anton; Du, Wenbin; Druskin, Sasha; Daugulis, Olafs; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses microfluidics to implement genetic algorithms (GA) to discover new homogeneous catalysts using the oxidation of methane by molecular oxygen as a model system. The parameters of the GA were the catalyst, a cocatalyst capable of using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant, and ligands that could tune the catalytic system. The GA required running hundreds of reactions to discover and optimize catalyst systems of high fitness, and microfluidics enabled these numerous reactions ...

  20. All-polymer microfluidic systems for droplet based sample analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carl Esben

    , droplet packing, imaging and amplification (heating). The project has been broken into sub-projects, in which several devices of simpler application have been developed. Most of these employ gravity for concentrating and packing droplets, which has been made possible by the use of large area chambers...... energy directors for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems have been presented: 1. Tongue-and-groove energy directors. 2. Laser ablated micropillar energy directors. • Fabrication: Annealing of polymer devices for use with hydrocarbon based multiphase systems. • Experimental design and data analysis...

  1. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Rasmussen, Torben Bygvraa; Hansen, Michael Rosenlund Søndertoft; Nilsson, Daniel; Mortensen, N. Asger

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...... sandwiched between two glass substrates. The devices are defined in the 1-10 mum thick polymer film by photolithography, nanoimprinting or by electron beam lithography, and the lid is bonded using adhesive polymer bonding....

  2. Nanolaminate microfluidic device for mobility selection of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-10-10

    A microfluidic device made from nanolaminate materials that are capable of electrophoretic selection of particles on the basis of their mobility. Nanolaminate materials are generally alternating layers of two materials (one conducting, one insulating) that are made by sputter coating a flat substrate with a large number of layers. Specific subsets of the conducting layers are coupled together to form a single, extended electrode, interleaved with other similar electrodes. Thereby, the subsets of conducting layers may be dynamically charged to create time-dependent potential fields that can trap or transport charge colloidal particles. The addition of time-dependence is applicable to all geometries of nanolaminate electrophoretic and electrochemical designs from sinusoidal to nearly step-like.

  3. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  4. A microfluidic device for epigenomic profiling using 100 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenning; Chen, Changya; He, Bing; Tan, Kai; Lu, Chang

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays poses a major obstacle for epigenomic studies of low-abundance cells. Here we present a microfluidics-based ChIP-seq protocol using as few as 100 cells via drastically improved collection of high-quality ChIP-enriched DNA. Using this technology, we uncovered many new enhancers and super enhancers in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from mouse fetal liver, suggesting that enhancer activity is highly dynamic during early hematopoiesis. PMID:26214128

  5. SAW-grade SiO2 for advanced microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Andreas; Menzel, Siegfried; Schmidt, Hagen

    2009-05-01

    Acoustoelectronic devices based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology are primarily used in radio frequency filters, delay lines, duplexers, amplifiers and RFID tags. Thereby, SAW's are excited at the surface of piezoelectric materials (e.g. Quartz, LiTaO3, LiNbO3) by an RF signal applied via interdigital transducers (IDTs)1. Novel SAW applications that emerged recently in the field of microfluidics such as the handling of minimum quantities of fluids or gases2,3 require a fluid compatible design approach, high power durability and long lifetime of the devices. However, conventional SAW devices with finger electrodes arranged on top of the chip surface experience acoustomigration damage4,5 at high power input and/or higher operating temperature leading to failure of the device. Additionally, inappropriate material systems or chip surface topography can limit their performance in microfluidic application. To overcome these limitations the electrodes can be buried in an acoustically suited ("SAW-grade") functional layer which moreover should be adjustable to the specific biotechnological task. Depending on the properties of this layer, it can suppress the acoustomigration impact6 and improve the power durability of the device. Also, a reduction of the thermally-induced frequency shift is possible7. The present paper describes a novel SAW based chip technology approach using a modular concept. Here, the electrodes are buried in surface polished SAW-grade SiO2 fabricated by means of reactive RF magnetron sputtering from a SiO2- target. This approach will be demonstrated for two different metallization systems based on Al or Cu thin films on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates. We also show the application of the SiO2-layer with respect to compensation of thermallyinduced frequency shift and bio /chemical surface modification. Investigations were carried out using atomic force microscopy, laser-pulse acoustic measurement, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy

  6. Manufacturing microstructured tool inserts for the production of polymeric microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooling is critical in defining multi-scale patterns for mass production of polymeric microfluidic devices using the microinjection molding process. In the present work, fabrication of various microstructured tool inserts using stainless steel, nickel and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is discussed based on die-sinking EDM (electrical discharge machining), electroforming, focused ion beam milling and thermoplastic forming processes. Tool performance is evaluated in terms of surface roughness, hardness and tool life. Compared to stainless steel, nickel and BMGs are capable of integrating length scales from 100 to 10−8 m and are good candidates for producing polymeric microfluidics. Selection of tool materials and manufacturing technologies should consider the end-user requirements of actual applications. (paper)

  7. Monodisperse polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogel microsphere formation by oxygen-controlled photopolymerization in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutkramelis, K; Xia, B; Oakey, J

    2016-04-12

    PEG-based hydrogels have become widely used as drug delivery and tissue scaffolding materials. Common among PEG hydrogel-forming polymers are photopolymerizable acrylates such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). Microfluidics and microfabrication technologies have recently enabled the miniaturization of PEGDA structures, thus enabling many possible applications for nano- and micro- structured hydrogels. The presence of oxygen, however, dramatically inhibits the photopolymerization of PEGDA, which in turn frustrates hydrogel formation in environments of persistently high oxygen concentration. Using PEGDA that has been emulsified in fluorocarbon oil via microfluidic flow focusing within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices, we show that polymerization is completely inhibited below critical droplet diameters. By developing an integrated model incorporating reaction kinetics and oxygen diffusion, we demonstrate that the critical droplet diameter is largely determined by the oxygen transport rate, which is dictated by the oxygen saturation concentration of the continuous oil phase. To overcome this fundamental limitation, we present a nitrogen micro-jacketed microfluidic device to reduce oxygen within the droplet, enabling the continuous on-chip photopolymerization of microscale PEGDA particles. PMID:26987384

  8. Design, production and optimization of solid lipid microparticles (SLM) by a coaxial microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2012-06-28

    This paper describes a method for the production of lipid microparticles (SLM) based on microfluidics using a newly designed modular device constituted of three main parts: a temperature control, a co-flow dripping element and a congealing element. The presented data demonstrated that the microfluidic approach resulted in the production of SLM with narrow size distribution and optimal morphological characteristics in term of sphericity, surface smoothness and absence of defects (i.e. partial coalescence or irregular shape). The optimization of SLM production was performed by screening the effect of different experimental parameters and device configurations by a classical intuitive approach COST (Changing One Separate factor a Time). This process allowed selecting the proper value for a number of parameters including, (i) the congealing element geometry, (ii) the presence and concentration of a stabilizer, (iii) the temperature of water and oil phases and (iv) the water and oil flow rates. In addition, the interplay between oil phase and water phase flow rates, in controlling the size and morphology of SLM, was investigated by a statistical "Design of the Experiments" approach (DoE). The combined use of COST and DoE studies allowed the production of optimized SLM for the encapsulation of dye/drugs. The obtained results demonstrated that the guest molecules did not affect the general characteristics of SLM, confirming the robustness of the microfluidic procedure in view of the production of SLM for biopharmaceutical and biotech protocols. PMID:22542700

  9. Controlling Nonspecific Protein Adsorption in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System by Controlling Interfacial Chemistry Using Fluorous-Phase Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, L. Spencer; Song, Helen; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2005-01-01

    Control of surface chemistry and protein adsorption is important for using microfluidic devices for biochemical analysis and high-throughput screening assays. This paper describes the control of protein adsorption at the liquid-liquid interface in a plug-based microfluidic system. The microfluidic system uses multiphase flows of immiscible fluorous and aqueous fluids to form plugs, which are aqueous droplets that are completely surrounded by fluorocarbon oil and do not come into direct contac...

  10. Biofunctionalization of PDMS-based microfluidic systems

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Bergoi Ibarlucea, Cesar Fernández-Sánchez, Stefanie Demming, Stephanus Büttgenbach & Andreu Llobera ### Abstract Three simple approaches for the selective immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic systems that do not require any specific instrumentation, are described and compared. They are based in the introduction of hydroxyl groups on the PDMS surface by direct adsorption of either polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polyvinyl...

  11. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  12. Fiber free plug and play on-chip scattering cytometer module – for implementation in microfluidic point of care devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    -expert users and Point-Of-Care (POC) applications. It has been demonstrated that this device is capable of detecting and counting particles down to 1 μm at 100 particles per second. This device only depends on a single microfluidic channel. Hence, the device is easy to implement, or to use on its own.......In this paper, we report on recent progress toward the development of a plug and play on-chip cytometer based on light scattering. By developing a device that does not depend on the critical alignment and cumbersome handling of fragile optical fibers, we approach a device that is suitable for non...

  13. Fast production of microfluidic devices by CO2 laser engraving of wax-coated glass slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Eric T; Santos, Mauro F S; Jiao, Hong; do Lago, Claudimir L; Gutz, Ivano G R; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-07-01

    Glass is one of the most convenient materials for the development of microfluidic devices. However, most fabrication protocols require long processing times and expensive facilities. As a convenient alternative, polymeric materials have been extensively used due their lower cost and versatility. Although CO2 laser ablation has been used for fast prototyping on polymeric materials, it cannot be applied to glass devices because the local heating causes thermal stress and results in extensive cracking. A few papers have shown the ablation of channels or thin holes (used as reservoirs) on glass but the process is still far away from yielding functional glass microfluidic devices. To address these shortcomings, this communication describes a simple method to engrave glass-based capillary electrophoresis devices using standard (1 mm-thick) microscope glass slides. The process uses a sacrificial layer of wax as heat sink and enables the development of both channels (with semicircular shape) and pass-through reservoirs. Although microscope images showed some small cracks around the channels (that became irrelevant after sealing the engraved glass layer to PDMS) the proposed strategy is a leap forward in the application of the technology to glass. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach, the separation of dopamine, catechol and uric acid was accomplished in less than 100 s. PMID:27028724

  14. Reconfigurable micro-mould for the manufacture of truly 3D polymer microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Marson, Silvia; Attia, Usama M.; Allen, David M.; Tipler, P.; Jin, T; Hedge, J.; Alcock, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the concept, the design and the manufacturing steps for the fabrication of a precision mould for micro-injection moulding of truly three dimensional microfluidic devices. The mould was designed using the concept of replaceable cavities to enable the flexible development of the complex microfluidic device and to reduce machining time and therefore costs during the prototyping, testing and subsequent production phase. The precision machining technique used for the cavity ...

  15. Integrated Membrane Filters for Minimizing Hydrodynamic Flow and Filtering in Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Noblitt, Scott D.; Kraly, James R.; VanBuren, Jaimie M.; Hering, Susanne V.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.; Charles S. Henry

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have gained significant scientific interest due to the potential to develop portable, inexpensive analytical tools capable of quick analyses with low sample consumption. These qualities make microfluidic devices attractive for point-of-use measurements where traditional techniques have limited functionality. Many samples of interest in biological and environmental analysis, however, contain insoluble particles that can block microchannels, and manual filtration prior to a...

  16. Fabrication of polystyrene microfluidic devices using a pulsed CO2 laser system

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei

    2013-10-10

    In this article, we described a simple and rapid method for fabrication of droplet microfluidic devices on polystyrene substrate using a CO2 laser system. The effects of the laser power and the cutting speed on the depth, width and aspect ratio of the microchannels fabricated on polystyrene were investigated. The polystyrene microfluidic channels were encapsulated using a hot press bonding technique. The experimental results showed that both discrete droplets and laminar flows could be obtained in the device.

  17. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Jose M Ayuso; Basheer, Haneen A.; Rosa Monge; Pablo Sánchez-Álvarez; Manuel Doblaré; Shnyder, Steven D.; Victoria Vinader; Kamyar Afarinkia; Luis J Fernández; Ignacio Ochoa

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channe...

  18. Optofluidic Temperature and Pressure Measurements with Fiber Bragg Gratings Embedded in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cooksey, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of photonic sensors into microfluidic devices provides opportunities for dynamic measurement of chemical and physical properties of fluids in very small volumes. We previously reported on the use of commercially available Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and on-chip silicon waveguides for temperature sensing. In this report, we demonstrate the integration of FBGs into easy-to-fabricate microfluidic devices and report on their sensitivity for temperature and pressure measurement in microliter volumes. These sensors present new routes to measurement in microfluidic applications such as small-volume calorimetry and microflow metrology.

  19. Bacterial Response to Antibiotic Gradients in a Porous Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J.; Shechtman, L. A.; Sanford, R. A.; Dong, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature have evolved survival strategies to cope with a wide variety of environmental stresses, including gradients in temperature, pH, substrate availability and aqueous chemistry. Microfluidic devices provide a consistently reliable real-time means to quantitatively measure, control and reproduce the dynamic nature of these stresses. As an example, accelerated adaptation from genetic mutations have been observed in E. coli as it responds to gradients of Ciprofloxacin (Zhang et. al. 2011). However, the mechanisms by which bacteria respond to antibiotic gradients, as well as the effect of changes in how the stressor is applied, have not been systematically studied. In this study, newly designed and fabricated microfluidic devices with porous media have been utilized to determine the chemical stress fields that enhance adaptation and thus to test how E. coli bacterial communities adapt to antibiotic stresses. By applying antibiotic and nutrient into inlet channels adjacent to either side of the porous media inoculated with E. coli, a gradient of antibiotic was formed. Hydrogel barriers were selectively photo-polymerized in between of the inlet channels and the porous media to prevent any undesired convection. Hence, chemical solute can only be transported by diffusion, creating a reproducible antibiotic gradient over the porous media. The bacteria were also constrained by the hydrogel boundary barriers from escaping the porous media. Preliminary results suggest that E. coli moves freely with respect to Ciprofloxacin concentrations. In addition, and unexpectedly, the E. coli colonies exhibit a concentric pulsed growth front radiating away from the point of inoculation within the micromodel ecosystem and pulse over the porous media containing antibiotic. The bacteria at the growth front grow into long filaments (up to 100μm) while the bacteria in the inner concentric area are normal size. We hypothesize that the frontier bacteria, which are first

  20. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  1. Routing-based synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maftei, Elena; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    electrodes are considered occupied during the operation execution, although the droplet uses only one electrode at a time. Moreover, the operations can actually be performed by routing the droplets on any sequence of electrodes on the microfluidic array. Hence, in this paper, we eliminate the concept...... of virtual devices and allow the droplets to move on the chip on any route during operation execution. Thus, the synthesis problem is transformed into a routing problem. We develop an algorithm based on a Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP) and we show that routing-based synthesis leads...... to significant improvements in the application completion time compared to traditional synthesis based on virtual devices. However, the disadvantage of the routing-based approach is that it may contaminate larger areas of the biochip, when synthesizing applications containing liquids which may adsorb...

  2. Burn injury reduces neutrophil directional migration speed in microfluidic devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Butler

    Full Text Available Thermal injury triggers a fulminant inflammatory cascade that heralds shock, end-organ failure, and ultimately sepsis and death. Emerging evidence points to a critical role for the innate immune system, and several studies had documented concurrent impairment in neutrophil chemotaxis with these post-burn inflammatory changes. While a few studies suggest that a link between neutrophil motility and patient mortality might exist, so far, cumbersome assays have prohibited exploration of the prognostic and diagnostic significance of chemotaxis after burn injury. To address this need, we developed a microfluidic device that is simple to operate and allows for precise and robust measurements of chemotaxis speed and persistence characteristics at single-cell resolution. Using this assay, we established a reference set of migration speed values for neutrophils from healthy subjects. Comparisons with samples from burn patients revealed impaired directional migration speed starting as early as 24 hours after burn injury, reaching a minimum at 72-120 hours, correlated to the size of the burn injury and potentially serving as an early indicator for concurrent infections. Further characterization of neutrophil chemotaxis using this new assay may have important diagnostic implications not only for burn patients but also for patients afflicted by other diseases that compromise neutrophil functions.

  3. Biofilm Streamer Formation in a Porous Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiei, Amin

    Biofilm formation in porous media is of significant importance in many environmental and industrial processes such as bioremediation, oil recovery, and wastewater treatment. In the present study, we fabricated a porous media mimic inside a microfluidic device to observe the growth of bacteria in a porous environment. Here, we report the formation of filamentous structures between the porous structures which are known as streamers. Streamers are made from Polymeric Substance (EPS) and are tethered at one or both ends to a surface, while the rest of the structure floats in the aqueous media. We studied evolution of streamers in different flow rates and identified a tangible link between hydrodynamic conditions and development of these filamentous structures. Our results show that hydrodynamic conditions not only play a key role in determining the formation and stability of the streamers, but also influence their morphology and distribution. These observations, which reveal salient features of biofilm formation in porous media, could open up new avenues for understanding biofilm dynamics in complex natural conditions.

  4. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monuki Edwin S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  5. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Maria Chiara; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Businaro, Luca; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA) supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes. Results The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely. Conclusions Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid

  6. Micro-bioreactors for fed-batch fermentations with integrated online monitoring and microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenauer, A; Hofmann, M C; Funke, M; Büchs, J; Mokwa, W; Schnakenberg, U

    2009-01-01

    In this study an array of micro-bioreactors based on the format of 48-well microtiter plates (MTP) is presented. The process parameters pH-value and biomass are monitored online by a combination of different sensors, the biolector measurement technology and conductance measurements. A microfluidic device dispenses two fluids individually into each well for controlling the pH-value of fermentations. The micro-bioreactor consists of four wells and two reservoirs. In each well a polyimide foil with platinum electrodes for conductance measurements is integrated. The microfluidic device is fabricated using softlithographic techniques and utilizes pneumatically actuated microvalves. The device is able to dispense volumes below 5nl. Finally, fermentations of Escherichia coli are carried out in the micro-bioreactor system. During the fermentation, the pH-value is measured optically and the biomass development is monitored by the scattered light signal. Meanwhile, the pH-value is controlled by dispensing sodium hydroxide and phosphoric acid. This micro-bioreactor demonstrates the possibility of online monitored and pH-controlled fermentations in micro-scale. The pH-value in the uncontrolled culture varies within the range of 6.46-8.83 whereas the pH-value in the controlled cultures can be kept within 6.85-7.07. This results in an increase in biomass in the pH-controlled culture compared to the nearly completely inhibited pH-uncontrolled culture. PMID:18929478

  7. Fabrication of microfluidic devices using dry film photoresist for microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuan-Chien; Jen, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Kuan-Wen; Hsieh, You-Zung

    2006-04-14

    An inexpensive, disposable microfluidic device was fabricated from a dry film photoresist using a combination of photolithographic and hot roll lamination techniques. A microfluidic flow pattern was prefabricated in a dry film photoresist tape using traditional photolithographic methods. This tape became bonded to a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheet with prepouched holes when passed through a hot roll laminator. A copper working electrode and platinum decoupler was readily incorporated within this microchip. The integrated microchip device was then fixed in a laboratory-built Plexiglas holder prior to its use in microchip capillary electrophoresis. The performance of this device with amperometric detection for the separation of dopamine and catechol was examined. The separation was complete within 50 s at an applied potential of 200 V/cm. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of analyte migration times were less than 0.71%, and the theoretical plate numbers for dopamine and catechol were 3.2 x 10(4) and 4.1 x 10(4), respectively, based on a 65 mm separation channel. PMID:16384565

  8. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  9. Rapid fabrication of tooling for microfluidic devices via laser micromachining and hot embossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method for rapid fabrication of polymeric micromold masters for the manufacture of polymer microfluidic devices. The manufacturing method involves laser micromachining of the desired structure of microfluidic channels in a thin metallic sheet and then hot embossing the channel structure onto poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA substrate to form the mold master. The channeled layer of the microfluidic device is then produced by pouring the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer over the mold and curing it. The method is referred to as LHEM (laser micromachining, hot embossing and molding). Polymers like PDMS are preferred over silicon as the material for building microfluidic devices because of their biocompatibility properties as well as because of their lower cost. The proposed manufacturing method involves fewer processing steps than the conventional soft lithography process and enables manufacture of non-rectangular channels in microfluidic devices. To test the method, a mold for a micro capillary electrophoresis microfluidic chip was fabricated. The experimental results confirmed that high quality (Ra 10 to 100 nm) molds can be fabricated quickly and inexpensively. Advantages and limitations of the proposed method are discussed in the concluding section of the paper

  10. Microfluidic vias enable nested bioarrays and autoregulatory devices in Newtonian fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Kartalov, Emil P.; Walker, Christopher; Taylor, Clive R.; Anderson, W. French; Scherer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We report on a fundamental technological advance for multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics. Vertical passages (vias), connecting channels located in different layers, are fabricated monolithically, in parallel, by simple and easy means. The resulting 3D connectivity greatly expands the potential complexity of microfluidic architecture. We apply the vias to printing nested bioarrays and building autoregulatory devices. A current source is demonstrated, while a diode and a rectif...

  11. Grafting of antibodies inside integrated microfluidic-microoptic devices by means of automated microcontact printing

    OpenAIRE

    Bou Chakra, Elie; Hannes, Benjamin; Vieillard, Julien; Mansfield, Colin D.; Mazurczyk, Radoslav; Bouchard, Aude; Potempa, Jan; Krawczyk, Stanislas; Cabrera, Michel

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach to integrating biochip and microfluidic devices is reported in which microcontact printing is a key fabrication technique. The process is performed using an automated microcontact printer that has been developed as an application-specific tool. As proof-of-concept the instrument is used to consecutively and selectively graft patterns of antibodies at the bottom of a glass channel for use in microfluidic immunoassays. Importantly, feature collapse due to over compression of th...

  12. Parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis using single-layer poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Parker, William

    2009-01-01

    Improving methods for high-throughput combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a major area of research because of the importance of rapidly synthesizing large numbers of chemical compounds for drug discovery and other applications. In this investigation, a novel microfluidic chip for performing parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis was developed. Unlike past microfluidic systems designed for parallel combinatorial chemistry, the chip is a single-layer device made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) ...

  13. Microfluidic Pumping based on Traveling-Wave Dielectrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, D.; Garimella, S V

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a microfluidic pumping approach using traveling-wave dielectrophoresis (twDEP) of microparticles. With this approach, the flow is generated directly in the microfluidic devices by inducing strong electromechanical effects in the fluid using integrated microelectrodes. The fluidic driving mechanisms due to the particle-fluid and particle-particle interactions under twDEP are analyzed, and the induced flow field is obtained from numerical simulations. Experimental measurem...

  14. Portable audio electronics for impedance-based measurements in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the use of audio electronics-based signals to perform on-chip electrochemical measurements. Cell phones and portable music players are examples of consumer electronics that are easily operated and are ubiquitous worldwide. Audio output (play) and input (record) signals are voltage based and contain frequency and amplitude information. A cell phone, laptop soundcard and two compact audio players are compared with respect to frequency response; the laptop soundcard provides the most uniform frequency response, while the cell phone performance is found to be insufficient. The audio signals in the common portable music players and laptop soundcard operate in the range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz and are found to be applicable, as voltage input and output signals, to impedance-based electrochemical measurements in microfluidic systems. Validated impedance-based measurements of concentration (0.1–50 mM), flow rate (2–120 µL min−1) and particle detection (32 µm diameter) are demonstrated. The prevailing, lossless, wave audio file format is found to be suitable for data transmission to and from external sources, such as a centralized lab, and the cost of all hardware (in addition to audio devices) is ∼10 USD. The utility demonstrated here, in combination with the ubiquitous nature of portable audio electronics, presents new opportunities for impedance-based measurements in portable microfluidic systems. (technical note)

  15. Inkjet printing of UV-curable adhesive and dielectric inks for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, E M; Bilatto, S E R; Adly, N Y; Correa, D S; Wolfrum, B; Schöning, M J; Offenhäusser, A; Yakushenko, A

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of polymer-based microfluidics to polymer substrates still poses a challenge for Lab-On-a-Chip applications. Especially, when sensing elements are incorporated, patterned deposition of adhesives with curing at ambient conditions is required. Here, we demonstrate a fabrication method for fully printed microfluidic systems with sensing elements using inkjet and stereolithographic 3D-printing. PMID:26627046

  16. Electrokinetically-driven deterministic lateral displacement for particle separation in microfluidic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Diez, Javier F; Drazer, German

    2014-01-01

    An electrokinetically-driven deterministic lateral displacement (e-DLD) device is proposed for the continuous, two-dimensional fractionation of suspensions in microfluidic platforms. The suspended species are driven through an array of regularly spaced cylindrical posts by applying an electric field across the device. We explore the entire range of orientations of the driving field with respect to the array of obstacles and show that, at specific forcing-angles, particles of different size migrate in different directions, thus enabling continuous, two-dimensional separation. We discuss a number of features observed in the kinetics of the particles, including directional locking and sharp transitions between migration angles upon variations in the direction of the force, that are advantageous for high-resolution two-dimensional separation. A simple model based on individual particle-obstacle interactions accurately describes the migration angle of the particles depending on the orientation of the driving field...

  17. Foil assisted replica molding for fabrication of microfluidic devices and their application in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheal, Issac J; Vidyasagar, Aditya J; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Mekala, Naveen Kumar; Asthana, Amit; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2014-10-01

    We present a simple, rapid, benchtop, Foil Assisted Rapid Molding (FARM) method for the fabrication of microfluidic devices. This novel technique involves the use of aluminium foil, pen and an X-Y plotter to create semi-circular or plano-concave, shallow microchannels. It is an easy do-it-yourself (DIY) technique for creating a microfluidic device in three simple steps: (1) create a channel design using the CAD software, (2) plot the patterns on aluminium foil and (3) use the reverse of the engraved foil as a mold to create microfluidic devices. In this report, we present a detailed study of the proposed method by varying a range of parameters such as foil thickness, tip material, and tip sizes and by investigating their effect on the creation of channels with varying geometry. Furthermore, we demonstrated the cytocompatibility of these devices in vitro. PMID:25102283

  18. Microfluidic-SERS devices for one shot limit-of-detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Campos, Antonio R; Datt, Ashish; Gao, Zhe; Rycenga, Matthew; Burrows, Nathan D; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Mirkin, Chad A; Murphy, Catherine J; Van Duyne, Richard P; Haynes, Christy L

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic sensing platforms facilitate parallel, low sample volume detection using various optical signal transduction mechanisms. Herein, we introduce a simple mixing microfluidic device, enabling serial dilution of introduced analyte solution that terminates in five discrete sensing elements. We demonstrate the utility of this device with on-chip fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of analytes, and we demonstrate device use both when combined with a traditional inflexible SERS substrate and with SERS-active nanoparticles that are directly incorporated into microfluidic channels to create a flexible SERS platform. The results indicate, with varying sensitivities, that either flexible or inflexible devices can be easily used to create a calibration curve and perform a limit of detection study with a single experiment. PMID:24756225

  19. Co-integrated microfluidic and THz functions for biochip devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TeraHertz (THz) spectroscopy is becoming an alternative way to probe biological interactions in real-time conditions. However, accurate and reproducible THz measurements of aqueous solutions, largely represented in life sciences, remain difficult. A THz microsystem which couples both electromagnetic and microfluidic integrated functions is presented here. Its technological process is accurately detailed and enables easy designs of advanced THz and microfluidic functions. It is composed of the deposition of gold wires on a glass wafer to guide the THz waves. Then, a whole silicon wafer is bonded by using a thermosensitive-polymer thermo-compression. Silicon is deep-etched to create the microchannels which are finally covered with a second glass wafer. This bonding–etching process enables huge freedom and independence for electromagnetic and microfluidic designs. The technological process characterization has shown that the manufactured biochip is compatible with pressures up to 37 bar. First measurements with empty and water-filled channels have been carried out and have shown the ability to perform THz spectroscopy inside the chip. Then, first measurements on proteins have been performed and shown the system ability to probe protein concentration. This kind of microfluidic microsystem, allowing complex design for integrated electronic and microfluidic circuits, defines a true new instrumental way for life science investigations

  20. Acoustofluidics: theory and simulation of radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is combined with numerical simulations to optimize designs and functionalities of acoustofluidic devices, i.e. microfluidic devices in which ultrasound waves are used to anipulate biological particles. The resonance frequencies and corresponding modes of the acoustic fields a...

  1. A microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of metabolic biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhao, Martin M Thuo and Xinyu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as simple yet powerful platforms for performing low-cost analytical tests. This paper reports a microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of physiologically relevant metabolic biomarkers. Different from existing paper-based electrochemical devices, our device includes an array of eight electrochemical sensors and utilizes a handheld custom-made electrochemical reader (potentiostat for signal readout. The biosensor array can detect several analytes in a sample solution and produce multiple measurements for each analyte from a single run. Using the device, we demonstrate simultaneous detection of glucose, lactate and uric acid in urine, with analytical performance comparable to that of the existing commercial and paper-based platforms. The paper-based biosensor array and its electrochemical reader will enable the acquisition of high-density, statistically meaningful diagnostic information at the point of care in a rapid and cost-efficient way.

  2. A microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of metabolic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Thuo, Martin M.; Liu, Xinyu

    2013-10-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as simple yet powerful platforms for performing low-cost analytical tests. This paper reports a microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of physiologically relevant metabolic biomarkers. Different from existing paper-based electrochemical devices, our device includes an array of eight electrochemical sensors and utilizes a handheld custom-made electrochemical reader (potentiostat) for signal readout. The biosensor array can detect several analytes in a sample solution and produce multiple measurements for each analyte from a single run. Using the device, we demonstrate simultaneous detection of glucose, lactate and uric acid in urine, with analytical performance comparable to that of the existing commercial and paper-based platforms. The paper-based biosensor array and its electrochemical reader will enable the acquisition of high-density, statistically meaningful diagnostic information at the point of care in a rapid and cost-efficient way.

  3. Field-effect flow control in a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, J S; Wang, P C; DeVoe, D L; Lee, C S

    2001-10-01

    The application of the field-effect for direct control of electroosmosis in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic system, constructed on a silicon wafer with a 2.0 microm electrically insulating layer of silicon dioxide, is demonstrated. This microfluidic system consists of a 2.0 cm open microchannel fabricated on a PDMS slab, which can reversibly adhere to the silicon wafer to form a hybrid microfluidic device. Aside from mechanically serving as a robust bottom substrate to seal the channel and support the microfluidic system, the silicon wafer is exploited to achieve field-effect flow control by grounding the semiconductive silicon medium. When an electric field is applied through the channel, a radial electric potential gradient is created across the silicon dioxide layer that allows for direct control of the zeta potential and the resulting electroosmotic flow (EOF). By configuring this microfluidic system with two power supplies at both ends of the microchannel, the applied electric potentials can be varied for manipulating the polarity and the magnitude of the radial electric potential gradient across the silicon dioxide layer. At the same time, the longitudinal potential gradient through the microchannel, which is used to induce EOF, is held constant. The results of EOF control in this hybrid microfluidic system are presented for phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 5. It is also demonstrated that EOF control can be performed at higher solution pH of 6 and 7.4 by modifying the silicon wafer surface with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) prior to assembly of the hybrid microfluidic system. Results of EOF control from this study are compared with those reported in the literature involving the use of other microfluidic devices under comparable solution conditions. PMID:11700719

  4. Fabrication of 3D Microfluidic Devices by Thermal Bonding of Thin Poly(methyl methacrylate) Films

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Paul

    2012-07-01

    The use of thin-film techniques for the fabrication of microfluidic devices has gained attention over the last decade, particularly for three-dimensional channel structures. The reasons for this include effective use of chip volume, mechanical flexibility, dead volume reduction, enhanced design capabilities, integration of passive elements, and scalability. Several fabrication techniques have been adapted for use on thin films: laser ablation and hot embossing are popular for channel fabrication, and lamination is widely used for channel enclosure. However, none of the previous studies have been able to achieve a strong bond that is reliable under moderate positive pressures. The present work aims to develop a thin-film process that provides design versatility, speed, channel profile homogeneity, and the reliability that others fail to achieve. The three building blocks of the proposed baseline were fifty-micron poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films as substrates, channel patterning by laser ablation, and device assembly by thermal-fusion bonding. Channel fabrication was characterized and tuned to produce the desired dimensions and surface roughness. Thermal bonding was performed using an adapted mechanical testing device and optimized to produce the maximum bonding strength without significant channel deformation. Bonding multilayered devices, incorporating conduction lines, and integrating various types of membranes as passive elements demonstrated the versatility of the process. Finally, this baseline was used to fabricate a droplet generator and a DNA detection chip based on micro-bead agglomeration. It was found that a combination of low laser power and scanning speed produced channel surfaces with better uniformity than those obtained with higher values. In addition, the implemented bonding technique provided the process with the most reliable bond strength reported, so far, for thin-film microfluidics. Overall, the present work proved to be versatile

  5. Microfluidic System for Solution Array Based Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, G M; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Rose, K A

    2006-02-10

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate new enabling technology for multiplex biodetection systems that are flexible, miniaturizable, highly automated, low cost, and high performance. It builds on prior successes at LLNL with particle-based solution arrays, such as those used in the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) successfully field deployed to multiple locations nationwide. We report the development of a multiplex solution array immunoassay based upon engineered metallic nanorod particles. Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} particles are fabricated by sequential electrodeposition of dissimilar metals within porous alumina templates, yielding optically encoded striping patterns that can be read using standard laboratory microscope optics and PC-based image processing software. The addition of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings and target-specific antibodies allows each encoded class of nanorod particles to be directed against a different antigen target. A prototype assay panel directed against bacterial, viral, and soluble protein targets demonstrates simultaneous detection at sensitivities comparable to state of the art immunoassays, with minimal cross-reactivity. Studies have been performed to characterize the colloidal properties (zeta potential) of the suspended nanorod particles as a function of pH, the ionic strength of the suspending solution, and surface functionalization state. Additional studies have produced means for the non-contact manipulation of the particles, including the insertion of magnetic nickel stripes within the encoding pattern, and control via externally applied electromagnetic fields. Using the results of these studies, the novel Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} based assay was implemented in a prototype automated system with the sample processing functions and optical readout performed on a microfluidic card. The unique physical properties of the nanorod particles enable the development of integrated microfluidic systems for

  6. Product qualification: a barrier to point-of-care microfluidic-based diagnostics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; van Heeren, Henne

    2013-06-21

    One of the most exciting applications of microfluidics-based diagnostics is its potential use in next generation point-of-care (POC) devices. Many prototypes are already in existence, but, as of yet, few have achieved commercialisation. In this article, we consider the issue surrounding product qualification as a potential barrier to market success. The study discusses, in the context of POC microfluidics-based diagnostics, what the generic issues are and potential solutions. Our findings underline the need for a community-based effort that is necessary to speed up the product qualification process. PMID:23652789

  7. Latex immunoagglutination assay for bovine viral diarrhea virus utilizing forward light scattering in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Brian C.; Song, Jae-Young; Han, Jin-Hee; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the utilization of particle agglutination assays using forward light scattering measurements in a microfluidic device towards detecting viral particles. The model viral target was bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Highly carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (510 nm) were coated with anti-BVDV monoclonal antibodies. This solution was in turn used to detect live modified BVDV. This assay was first performed in a two well slide for proof of concept and then in a simple y-channel microfluidic device with optical fibers arranged in a close proximity setup. Particle immunoagglutination was detected through static light scattering measurements taken at 45° to incident light. In the microfluidic device, modified live BVDV was detected with a detection limit of 0.5 TCID 50 mL -1.

  8. Microfluidic transport of photopolymerizable species for laser source integration in lab-on-a-chip photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetta, D. E.; Castagna, R.; Vita, F.; Gianni, A.; Simoni, F.

    2012-10-01

    We recently developed a novel composite photopolymerizable material which allows the holographic recording of diffraction gratings with optimal optical and mechanical properties (high diffraction efficiency, transparency and spatial resolution, low shrinkage, long time stability). This material was successfully used to produce a low cost and easy to make optically pumped, organic distributed feedback laser, working on the first diffraction order of a high quality Bragg grating doped with a photoluminescent dye. Here we show the possibility of positioning these micrometer sized light sources at any point of a generic lab-on-a-chip device by borrowing experimental techniques commonly used in the fields of microfluidics and optofluidics. In particular, a microfluidic channel has been imprinted by soft lithography in a polydimethylsiloxane substrate in order to convey the photopolymerizable mixture to a particular area of the sample, where the laser device has been holographically recorded. A characterization of the lasing properties of this device has been carried out. The proposed approach allows a better confinement of the emitted light and overcomes some physical constrains (resolution, aspect ratio) of PDMS based microfluidic laser thus opening new possibilities for the complex integration of organic laser sources in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Tommerup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a major cytogenetic technique for clinical genetic diagnosis of both inherited and acquired chromosomal abnormalities. Although FISH techniques have evolved and are often used together with other cytogenetic methods like CGH, PRINS and PNA-FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3–5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies.

  10. QR-on-a-chip: a computer-recognizable micro-pattern engraved microfluidic device for high-throughput image acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kyungwon; Lee, Hyunjae; Bang, Hyunwoo; Jeon, Noo Li

    2016-02-21

    This study proposes a novel way to achieve high-throughput image acquisition based on a computer-recognizable micro-pattern implemented on a microfluidic device. We integrated the QR code, a two-dimensional barcode system, onto the microfluidic device to simplify imaging of multiple ROIs (regions of interest). A standard QR code pattern was modified to arrays of cylindrical structures of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Utilizing the recognition of the micro-pattern, the proposed system enables: (1) device identification, which allows referencing additional information of the device, such as device imaging sequences or the ROIs and (2) composing a coordinate system for an arbitrarily located microfluidic device with respect to the stage. Based on these functionalities, the proposed method performs one-step high-throughput imaging for data acquisition in microfluidic devices without further manual exploration and locating of the desired ROIs. In our experience, the proposed method significantly reduced the time for the preparation of an acquisition. We expect that the method will innovatively improve the prototype device data acquisition and analysis. PMID:26728124

  11. The effects of heat treatment on microfluidic devices fabricated in silica glass by femtosecond lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We fabricated complex microfluidic devices in silica glass by water-assisted femtosecond laser ablation and subsequent heat treatment. The experimental results show that after heat treatment, the diameter of the microchannels is significantly reduced and the internal surface roughness is improved. The diameters of the fabricated microchannels can be modulated by changing the annealing temperature and the annealing time. During annealing, the temperature affects the diameter and shape of the protrusions in microfluidic devices very strongly, and these changes are mainly caused by uniform expansion and the action of surface tension. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. The effects of heat treatment on microfluidic devices fabricated in silica glass by femtosecond lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Qu Shi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated complex microfluidic devices in silica glass by water-assisted femtosecond laser ablation and sub-sequent heat treatment.The experimental results show that after heat treatment,the diameter of the microchannels is significantly reduced and the internal surface roughness is improved.The diameters of the fabricated microchannels can be modulated by changing the annealing temperature and the annealing time.During annealing,the temperature affects the diameter and shape of the protrusions in microfluidic devices very strongly,and these changes are mainly caused by uniform expansion and the action of surface tension.

  13. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  14. PDMS based microfluidic chips and their application in material synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiuqing

    Microfluidics is a highly interdisciplinary science which is to deal with the behavior, control and manipulation of fluids that are constrained to sub-milimeter scale. It incorporates the knowledge and technique intersecting physics, chemistry, mechanics, nanoscience and biotechnology, with practical applications to the design of systems in which small volumes of fluids will be used. In this thesis, we started our research from GER fluid synthesis which then is applied to designing different functions of microfluidic devices, valve, pump, and mixer. We built a way to correlate mechanical signal with electric signal by soft matter. The mechanical devices based GER fluid had good operating stability and mechanical performance. We studied how to improve the performance of GER fluid by increasing the yield stress while avoiding the sendimentation of nanoparticles in GER suspension. The meaning of this work is to enhance the stability and mechanical strength of GER fluid when it is applyed to the microfluidc channels. We tried different oils and studied the particle size for the GER effect. The largest yield stress which amounts to 300 kPa is achievable compared to previous GER fluid with 100 kPa. Microfluidic reactor, directing the flow of microliter volumes along microscale channels, offers the advantages of precise control of reagent loading, fast mixing and an enhanced reaction rate, cessation of the reaction at specific stages, and more. Basically, there are two microfluidic flow regimes, continuous flow and segmented flow (suspended droplets, channel-spanning slug, and wall-wetting films). Both flow regimes offer chemical reaction applications, e.g., continuous flow formation of polymer nanospheres and inorganic nanoparticles, size- and shape-control synthesis by segmented flow, and precipitate-forming reactions in droplets, wherein the segmented flow has gained more popularity in that area. The compartmentalization of segmented flow offers advantages to chemical

  15. Characterization of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell as a power generator based on a nickel electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Soheila

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) using nickel as a novel alternative for conventional electrodes and a non-phatogenic strain of Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. The feasibility of a microfluidic MFC as an efficient power generator for production of bioelectricity from glucose and urea as organic substrates in human blood and urine for implantable medical devices (IMDs) was investigated. A maximum open circuit potential of 459 mV was achieved for the batch-fed microfluidic MFC. During continuous mode operation, a maximum power density of 104 Wm(-3) was obtained with nutrient broth. For the glucose-fed microfluidic MFC, the maximum power density of 5.2 μW cm(-2) obtained in this study is significantly greater than the power densities reported previously for microsized MFCs and glucose fuel cells. The maximum power density of 14 Wm(-3) obtained using urea indicates the successful performance of a microfluidic MFC using human excreta. It features high power density, self-regeneration, waste management and a low production cost (<$1), which suggest it as a promising alternative to conventional power supplies for IMDs. The performance of the microfluidic MFC as a power supply was characterized based on polarization behavior and cell potential in different substrates, operational modes, and concentrations. PMID:26720922

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of a Microfluidic Device to Ultrapurify Blood Samples

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Marco

    2015-05-04

    The improvement of blood cell sorting techniques in recent years have attracted the attention of many researchers due to the possible benefits that these methods can lead in biology, regenerative medicine, materials science and therapeutic area. In this work a cell sorting technique based on filtration is described. The separation occurs by means of a microfluidic device, suitably designed, manufactured and tested, that is connected to an external experimental set-up. The fabrication process can be divided in two parts: at first it is described the manufacturing process of a filtering membrane, with holes of specific size that allow the passage of only certain cell types. Following the microfluidic device is fabricated through the mechanical micromilling. The membrane and the microdevice are suitably bonded and tested by means of an external connection with syringe pumps that inject blood samples at specific flow rates. The device is designed to separate blood cells and tumor cells only by using differences in size and shape. In particular during the first experiments red blood cells and platelets are sorted from white blood cells; in the other experiments red blood cells and platelets are separated from white blood cells and tumor cells. The microdevice has proven to be very efficient, in fact a capture efficiency of 99% is achieved. For this reason it could be used in identification and isolation of circulating tumor cells, a very rare cancer cell type whose presence in the bloodstream could be symptom of future solid tumor formation. The various experiments have also demonstrated that tumor cells survive even after the separation treatment, and then the suffered stress during the sorting process does not harm the biological sample.

  17. A Laminated Microfluidic Device for Comprehensive Preclinical Testing in the Drug ADME Process

    OpenAIRE

    Fan An; Yueyang Qu; Yong Luo; Ning Fang; Yang Liu; Zhigang Gao; Weijie Zhao; Bingcheng Lin

    2016-01-01

    New techniques are urgently needed to replace conventional long and costly pre-clinical testing in the new drug administration process. In this study, a laminated microfluidic device was fabricated to mimic the drug ADME response test in vivo. This proposed device was loaded and cultured with functional cells for drug response investigation and organ tissues that are involved in ADME testing. The drug was introduced from the top of the device and first absorbed by the Caco-2 cell layer, and t...

  18. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yu; Zongzheng Chen; Cheng Xiang; Bo Liu; Handi Xie; Kairong Qin

    2016-01-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the rela-tionship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the tra-ditional ones, which have been only based upon either stag-nation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addi-tion, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and con-veniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  19. Comparison of production methods of a spiral inertial microfluidic cell separation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mitchell; Marks, Haley; Coté, Gerard L.

    2016-03-01

    From the miniaturization of large sample processing machines to the creation of handheld point-of-care devices, microfluidics has the potential to be a powerful tool in the advancement of diagnostic technologies. Here, we compare different prototyping modalities towards the generation of an inertial microfluidic blood filter: i.e. a 'centrifuge-on-a-chip'. While photolithography is currently the method of choice for soft lithography mold fabrication, offering high design fidelity, we believe simpler methods, such as milling or 3D printing, will soon become equally viable options in the field of microfluidic device fabrication. Three modalities for optofluidic PDMS chip fabrication were compared: micromachining, 3D printing, and SU8 photolithography. The filtration efficiency of the chips were tested with whole blood and compared spectroscopically by monitoring the outlet absorbance at the 540 nm peak intrinsic to oxyhemoglobin at the outlet of each filter chip.

  20. Large-Scale Integration of All-Glass Valves on a Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxiaer Yalikun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a method for fabricating a microfluidic device with integrated large-scale all-glass valves and constructed an actuator system to control each of the valves on the device. Such a microfluidic device has advantages that allow its use in various fields, including physical, chemical, and biochemical analyses and syntheses. However, it is inefficient and difficult to integrate the large-scale all-glass valves in a microfluidic device using conventional glass fabrication methods, especially for the through-hole fabrication step. Therefore, we have developed a fabrication method for the large-scale integration of all-glass valves in a microfluidic device that contains 110 individually controllable diaphragm valve units on a 30 mm × 70 mm glass slide. This prototype device was fabricated by first sandwiching a 0.4-mm-thick glass slide that contained 110 1.5-mm-diameter shallow chambers, each with two 50-μm-diameter through-holes, between an ultra-thin glass sheet (4 μm thick and another 0.7-mm-thick glass slide that contained etched channels. After the fusion bonding of these three layers, the large-scale microfluidic device was obtained with integrated all-glass valves consisting of 110 individual diaphragm valve units. We demonstrated its use as a pump capable of generating a flow rate of approximately 0.06–5.33 μL/min. The maximum frequency of flow switching was approximately 12 Hz.

  1. Thermoelectric Manipulation of Aqueous Droplets in Microfluidic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Sgro, Allyson E.; Allen, Peter B.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a method for manipulating the temperature inside aqueous droplets, utilizing a thermoelectric cooler to control the temperature of select portions of a microfluidic chip. To illustrate the adaptability of this approach, we have generated an “ice valve” to stop fluid flow in a microchannel. By taking advantage of the vastly different freezing points for aqueous solutions and immiscible oils, we froze a stream of aqueous droplets that were formed on-chip. By integrating thi...

  2. Microfluidic device and method for focusing, segmenting, and dispensing of a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Stephen C [Knoxville, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    A microfluidic device and method for forming and dispensing minute volume segments of a material are described. In accordance with the present invention, a microfluidic device and method are provided for spatially confining the material in a focusing element. The device is also adapted for segmenting the confined material into minute volume segments, and dispensing a volume segment to a waste or collection channel. The device further includes means for driving the respective streams of sample and focusing fluids through respective channels into a chamber, such that the focusing fluid streams spatially confine the sample material. The device may also include additional means for driving a minute volume segment of the spatially confined sample material into a collection channel in fluid communication with the waste reservoir.

  3. Microfluidics & nanotechnology: Towards fully integrated analytical devices for the detection of cancer biomarkers

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an innovative modular microfluidic platform allowing filtering, concentration and analysis of peptides from a complex mixture. The platform is composed of a microfluidic filtering device and a superhydrophobic surface integrating surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors. The microfluidic device was used to filter specific peptides (MW 1553.73 D) derived from the BRCA1 protein, a tumor-suppressor molecule which plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancers, from albumin (66.5 KD), the most represented protein in human plasma. The filtering process consisted of driving the complex mixture through a porous membrane having a cut-off of 12-14 kD by hydrodynamic flow. The filtered samples coming out of the microfluidic device were subsequently deposited on a superhydrophobic surface formed by micro pillars on top of which nanograins were fabricated. The nanograins coupled to a Raman spectroscopy instrument acted as a SERS sensor and allowed analysis of the filtered sample on top of the surface once it evaporated. By using the presented platform, we demonstrate being able to sort small peptides from bigger proteins and to detect them by using a label-free technique at a resolution down to 0.1 ng μL-1. The combination of microfluidics and nanotechnology to develop the presented microfluidic platform may give rise to a new generation of biosensors capable of detecting low concentration samples from complex mixtures without the need for any sample pretreatment or labelling. The developed devices could have future applications in the field of early diagnosis of severe illnesses, e.g. early cancer detection. This journal is

  4. Fabrication of a hybrid plastic-silicon microfluidic device for high-throughput genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Isabelle; Sudor, J.; Fouillet, Yves; Sarrut, N.; Bory, C.; Gruss, A.

    2003-01-01

    The lab-on-a-chip approach has been increasingly present in biological research over the last ten years, high-throughput analyses being one of the promising utilization. The work presented here has consisted in developing an automated genotyping system based on a continuous flow analysis which integrates all the steps of the genotyping process (PCR, purification and sequencing). The genotyping device consists of a disposable hybrid silicon-plastic microfluidic chip, equipped with a permanent external, heating/cooling system, syringe-pumps based injection systems and on-line fluorescence detection. High throughput is obtained by performing the reaction in a continuous flow (1 reaction every 6min per channel) and in parallel (48 channels). We are presenting here the technical solutions developed to fabricate the hybrid silicon-plastic microfluidic device. It includes a polycarbonate substrate having 48 parallel grooves sealed by film lamination techniques to create the channels. Two different solutions for the sealing of the channels are compared in relation to their biocompatibility, fluidic behavior and fabrication process yield. Surface roughness of the surface of the channels is the key point of this step. Silicon fluidic chips are used for thermo-cycled reactions. A specific bonding technique has been developed to bond silicon chips onto the plastic part which ensures alignment and hermetic fluidic connexion. Surface coatings are studied to enhance the PCR biocompatibility and fluidic behavior of the two-phase liquid flow. We then demonstrate continuous operation over more than 20 hours of the component and validate PCR protocol on microliter samples in a continuous flow reaction.

  5. Enhancement of the thermo-mechanical properties of PDMS molds for the hot embossing of PMMA microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a cost-efficient and rapid prototyping technique for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microfluidic devices using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based hot embossing process. Compared to conventional hot embossing methods, this technique uses PDMS molds with enhanced thermo-mechanical properties. To improve the replication performance, increases in both PDMS stiffness and hardness were achieved through several processing and curing means. First, the amount of curing agent was increased from 1/10 to 1/5 with respect to the amount of prepolymer. Second, the cured PDMS was thermally aged either over three days at 85 °C or for 30 min at 250 °C. Those combined steps led to increases in stiffness and hardness of up to 150% and 32%, respectively, as compared to standard PDMS molds. Using these enhanced molds, structures with features of the order of 100 µm in PMMA are successfully embossed using a standard laboratory press at 150 °C. The PDMS molds and process produce identical structures through multiple embossing cycles (≥10) without any mold damage or deterioration. A Y-shaped microfluidic mixer was fabricated with this technique. The successful demonstration of this enhanced PDMS-based hot embossing technique introduces a new approach for the rapid prototyping of polymer-based microfluidic devices at low-cost. (paper)

  6. Fully Automated Quantification of Insulin Concentration Using a Microfluidic-Based Chemiluminescence Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ping; Liu, Zhu; Tung, Steve; Dong, Zaili; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    A fully automated microfluidic-based detection system for the rapid determination of insulin concentration through a chemiluminescence immunoassay has been developed. The microfluidic chip used in the system is a double-layered polydimethylsiloxane device embedded with interconnecting micropumps, microvalves, and a micromixer. At a high injection rate of the developing solution, the chemiluminescence signal can be excited and measured within a short period of time. The integral value of the chemiluminescence light signal is used to determine the insulin concentration of the samples, and the results indicate that the measurement is accurate in the range from 1.5 pM to 391 pM. The entire chemiluminescence assay can be completed in less than 10 min. The fully automated microfluidic-based insulin detection system provides a useful platform for rapid determination of insulin in clinical diagnostics for diabetes, which is expected to become increasingly important for future point-of-care applications. PMID:25824205

  7. A novel highly flexible, simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication tool for paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) using technical drawing pens and in-house formulated aqueous inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchtavorn, Nantana; Macka, Mirek

    2016-05-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) are capable of achieving rapid quantitative measurements of a variety of analytes inexpensively. μPADs rely on patterning hydrophilic-hydrophobic regions on a sheet of paper in order to create capillary channels within impermeable fluidic brakes on the paper. Here, we present a novel, highly flexible and low-cost fabrication method using a desktop digital craft plotter/cutter and technical drawing pens with tip size of 0.5 mm. The pens were used with either commercial black permanent ink for drawing fluidic brakes, or with specialty in-house formulated aqueous inks. With the permanent marker ink it was possible to create barriers on paper rapidly and in a variety of designs in a highly flexible manner. For instance, a design featuring eight reservoirs can be produced within 10 s for each μPAD with a consistent line width of brakes (%RSD < 1.5). Further, we investigated the optimal viscosity range of in-house formulated inks controlled with additions of poly(ethylene glycol). The viscosity was measured by capillary electrophoresis and the optimal viscosity was in the range of ∼3-6 mPa s. A functional test of these μPADs was conducted by the screening of antioxidant activity. Colorimetric measurements of flavonoid, phenolic compounds and DPPH free radical scavenging activity were carried out on μPADs. The results can be detected by the naked eye and simply quantified by using a camera phone and image analysis software. The fabrication method using technical drawing pens provides flexibility in the use of in-house formulated inks, short fabrication time, simplicity and low cost. PMID:27086101

  8. Thick single-layer positive photoresist mold and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) dry etching for the fabrication of a glass–PDMS–glass microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is an elastomer widely used in microfluidic devices due to desirable characteristics such as its low cost and moldability. Photoresist patterned to form microfluidic features is often used as a mold, and SU-8 is commonly used. However, negative photoresists like SU-8 are difficult to remove, as compared to positive photoresists. Here, a method of forming microfluidic structures in the PDMS with an AZ9260 thick positive (Novolak-based) photoresist using standard microfabrication technique is reported. The chip consisted of a sandwich structure with glass on the top and bottom and PDMS with microfluidic channels in the middle; these structures have PDMS sidewalls, but are free of PDMS on the bottom and top. A single layer of the positive AZ9260 photoresist was spun to controllable and uniform thicknesses of up to 49 µm and used as a sacrificial mold to create PDMS microfluidic features. Reactive ion etching (RIE) with CF4 and O2 gases and a liftoff technique was used to create these features, and subsequent irreversible bonding to glass was achieved by activation in oxygen plasma by RIE. The final depths of channels were about 20–30 µm. The effect of the gas flow rate ratios on the bonding ability was investigated, and the surfaces of etched PDMS were studied under a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the bonding strength was measured to be 0.85 MPa. The fabricated microfluidic device was tested and shown to be leak free

  9. Pump less wearable microfluidic device for real time pH sweat monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Coyle, Shirley; Byrne, Robert; Smeaton, Alan F.; O'Connor, Noel E.; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and the performance of a novel, wearable, robust, flexible and disposable microfluidic device which incorporates micro-Light Emitting Diodes (μ-LEDs) as a detection system, for monitoring in real time mode the pH of the sweat generated during an exercising period.

  10. Low-Cost Rapid Prototyping of Whole-Glass Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki; Goral, Vasiliy N.

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost, straightforward, rapid prototyping of whole-glass microfluidic devices is presented using glass-etching cream that can be easily purchased in local stores. A self-adhered vinyl stencil cut out by a desktop digital craft cutter was used as an etching mask for patterning microstructures in glass using the glass-etching cream. A specific…

  11. Student-Fabricated Microfluidic Devices as Flow Reactors for Organic and Inorganic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z. Vivian; Edelman, Kate R.; Swanson, Benjamin P.

    2015-01-01

    Flow synthesis in microfluidic devices has been rapidly adapted in the pharmaceutical industry and in many research laboratories. Yet, the cost of commercial flow reactors is a major factor limiting the dissemination of this technology in the undergraduate curriculum. Here, we present a laboratory activity where students design and fabricate…

  12. Microfluidics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Device Fabrication and an Experiment to Mimic Intravascular Gas Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Erin L.; Vogel, Brandon M.; Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Beers, Kathryn L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to fabricate microfluidic devices and an experimental protocol to model intravascular gas embolism for undergraduate laboratories are presented. The fabrication process details how to produce masters on glass slides; these masters serve as molds to pattern channels in an elastomeric polymer that can be adhered to a substrate, resulting in…

  13. Microfluidic device for generating a stepwise concentration gradient on a microwell slide for cell analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Weibull, Emilie; Matsui, Shunsuke; Sakai, Manabu; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Ohashi, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding biomolecular gradients and their role in biological processes is essential for fully comprehending the underlying mechanisms of cells in living tissue. Conventional in vitro gradient-generating methods are unpredictable and difficult to characterize, owing to temporal and spatial fluctuations. The field of microfluidics enables complex user-defined gradients to be generated based on a detailed understanding of fluidic behavior at the μm-scale. By using microfluidic gradients cre...

  14. MEMS-based flow cytometry: microfluidics-based cell identification system by fluorescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W K; Liang, C K; Huang, J Z

    2004-01-01

    This study utilizes MEMS technology to realize a novel low-cost microfluidics-based biochip system for flow-type cell handling. Powered by vacuum pump, the microfluidic driving system enables cells to move in order one by one in the biochip by an effect of sheath flow prefocus. Then, cells are guided to a fluorescent inspection region where two detection tasks such as cell image identification and cell counting are conducted. Currently, the glass-based biochip has been manufactured and all the related devices have been well set up in our laboratory. With this proposed prototype system, typical results about cell separation of yeast cell and PC-3 cell are available and their separated images are also presented, respectively. PMID:17270801

  15. Continuous Separation of Multiple Size Microparticles using Alternating Current Dielectrophoresis in Microfluidic Device with Acupuncture Needle Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Ye; REN Yukun; YAN Hui; JIANG Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    The need to continuously separate multiple microparticles is required for the recent development of lab-on-chip technology. Dielectrophoresis(DEP)-based separation device is extensively used in kinds of microfluidic applications. However, such conventional DEP-based device is relatively complicated and difficult for fabrication. A concise microfluidic device is presented for effective continuous separation of multiple size particle mixtures. A pair of acupuncture needle electrodes are creatively employed and embedded in a PDMS(poly-dimethylsiloxane) hurdle for generating non-uniform electric field thereby achieving a continuous DEP separation. The separation mechanism is that the incoming particle samples with different sizes experience different negative DEP(nDEP) forces and then they can be transported into different downstream outlets. The DEP characterizations of particles are calculated, and their trajectories are numerically predicted by considering the combined action of the incoming laminar flow and the nDEP force field for guiding the separation experiments. The device performance is verified by successfully separating a three-sized particle mixture, including polystyrene microspheres with diameters of 3μm, 10μm and 25μm. The separation purity is below 70% when the flow rate ratio is less than 3.5 or more than 5.1, while the separation purity can be up to more than 90% when the flow rate ratio is between 3.5 and 5.1 and meanwhile ensure the voltage output falls in between 120 V and 150 V. Such simple DEP-based separation device has extensive applications in future microfluidic systems.

  16. Continuous separation of multiple size microparticles using alternating current dielectrophoresis in microfluidic device with acupuncture needle electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Ren, Yukun; Yan, Hui; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-03-01

    The need to continuously separate multiple microparticles is required for the recent development of lab-on-chip technology. Dielectrophoresis(DEP)-based separation device is extensively used in kinds of microfluidic applications. However, such conventional DEP-based device is relatively complicated and difficult for fabrication. A concise microfluidic device is presented for effective continuous separation of multiple size particle mixtures. A pair of acupuncture needle electrodes are creatively employed and embedded in a PDMS(poly-dimethylsiloxane) hurdle for generating non-uniform electric field thereby achieving a continuous DEP separation. The separation mechanism is that the incoming particle samples with different sizes experience different negative DEP(nDEP) forces and then they can be transported into different downstream outlets. The DEP characterizations of particles are calculated, and their trajectories are numerically predicted by considering the combined action of the incoming laminar flow and the nDEP force field for guiding the separation experiments. The device performance is verified by successfully separating a three-sized particle mixture, including polystyrene microspheres with diameters of 3 μm, 10 μm and 25 μm. The separation purity is below 70% when the flow rate ratio is less than 3.5 or more than 5.1, while the separation purity can be up to more than 90% when the flow rate ratio is between 3.5 and 5.1 and meanwhile ensure the voltage output falls in between 120 V and 150 V. Such simple DEP-based separation device has extensive applications in future microfluidic systems.

  17. 3D-printed microfluidic device for the detection of pathogenic bacteria using size-based separation in helical channel with trapezoid cross-section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Choi, Woong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to detect pathogenic bacteria using magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) and a 3D-printed helical microchannel. Antibody-functionalized MNCs were used to capture E. coli (EC) bacteria in milk, and the free MNCs and MNC-EC complexes were separated from the milk using a permanent magnet. The free MNCs and MNC-EC complexes were dispersed in a buffer solution, then the solution was injected into a helical microchannel device with or without a sheath flow. The MNC-EC complexes were separated from the free MNCs via the Dean drag force and lift force, and the separation was facilitated in the presence of a sheath flow. The concentration of the E. coli bacteria was determined using a light absorption spectrometer, and the limit of detection was found to be 10 cfu/mL in buffer solution and 100 cfu/mL in milk. PMID:25578942

  18. A numerical study of droplet trapping in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Mathias; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic channels are powerful means of control of minute volumes such as droplets. These droplets are usually conveyed at will in an externally imposed flow which follows the geometry of the micro-channel. It has recently been pointed out by Dangla et al. ["Trapping microfluidic drops in wells of surface energy," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107(12), 124501 (2011)] that the motion of transported droplets may also be stopped in the flow, when they are anchored to grooves which are etched in the channels top wall. This feature of the channel geometry explores a direction that is usually uniform in microfluidics. Herein, this anchoring effect exploiting the three spatial directions is studied combining a depth averaged fluid description and a geometrical model that accounts for the shape of the droplet in the anchor. First, the presented method is shown to enable the capture and release droplets in numerical simulations. Second, this tool is used in a numerical investigation of the physical mechanisms at play in the capture of the droplet: a localized reduced Laplace pressure jump is found on its interface when the droplet penetrates the groove. This modified boundary condition helps the droplet cope with the linear pressure drop in the surrounding fluid. Held on the anchor the droplet deforms and stretches in the flow. The combination of these ingredients leads to recover the scaling law for the critical capillary number at which the droplets exit the anchors C a^{star} ∝ h2/R2 where h is the channel height and R the droplet undeformed radius.

  19. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  20. Designing Microfluidic Devices for Studying Cellular Responses Under Single or Coexisting Chemical/Electrical/Shear Stress Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Yuan; Sun, Yung-Shin; Hou, Hsien-San; Wu, Shang-Ying; Zhu, Yun; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are capable of creating a precise and controllable cellular micro-environment of pH, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. They have been commonly used for in vitro cell studies by providing in vivo like surroundings. Especially, how cells response to chemical gradients, electrical fields, and shear stresses has drawn many interests since these phenomena are important in understanding cellular properties and functions. These microfluidic chips can be made of glass substrates, silicon wafers, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates, or polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates. Out of these materials, PMMA substrates are cheap and can be easily processed using laser ablation and writing. Although a few microfluidic devices have been designed and fabricated for generating multiple, coexisting chemical and electrical stimuli, none of them was considered efficient enough in reducing experimental repeats, particular for screening purposes. In this report, we describe our design and fabrication of two PMMA-based microfluidic chips for investigating cellular responses, in the production of reactive oxygen species and the migration, under single or coexisting chemical/electrical/shear stress stimuli. The first chip generates five relative concentrations of 0, 1/8, 1/2, 7/8, and 1 in the culture regions, together with a shear stress gradient produced inside each of these areas. The second chip generates the same relative concentrations, but with five different electric field strengths created within each culture area. These devices not only provide cells with a precise, controllable micro-environment but also greatly increase the experimental throughput. PMID:27584698

  1. Femtosecond pulsed laser micromachining of glass substrates with application to microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridhar, Malalahalli S; Seong, Kibyung; Schülzgen, Axel; Khulbe, Pramod; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Mansuripur, Masud

    2004-08-10

    We describe a technique for surface and subsurface micromachining of glass substrates by using tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 1660 nm. A salient feature of pulsed laser micromachining is its ability to drill subsurface tunnels into glass substrates. To demonstrate a potential application of this micromachining technique, we fabricate simple microfluidic structures on a glass plate. The use of a cover plate that seals the device by making point-to-point contact with the flat surface of the substrate is necessary to prevent the evaporation of liquids in open channels and chambers. Methods for protecting and sealing the micromachined structures for microfluidic applications are discussed. PMID:15376436

  2. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous-Flow Magnetically Controlled Capture and Isolation of Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Yi; Lin, Qiao

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic device that exploits magnetic manipulation for integrated capture and isolation of microparticles in continuous flow. The device, which was fabricated from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft-lithography techniques, consists of an incubator and a separator integrated on a single chip. The incubator is based on a novel scheme termed target acquisition by repetitive traversal (TART), in which surface-functionalized magnetic beads repetitively traverse a sample to seek out and capture target particles. This is accomplished by a judicious combination of a serpentine microchannel geometry and a time-invariant magnetic field. Subsequently, in the separator, the captured target particles are isolated from nontarget particles via magnetically driven fractionation in the same magnetic field. Due to the TART incubation scheme that uses a corner-free serpentine channel, the device has no dead volume and allows minimization of undesired particle or magnetic-bead retention. Single-chip integration of the TART incubator with the magnetic-fractionation separator further allows automated continuous isolation and retrieval of specific microparticles in an integrated manner that is free of manual off-chip sample incubation, as often required by alternative approaches. Experiments are conducted to characterize the individual incubation and separation components, as well as the integrated device. The device is found to allow 90% of target particles in a sample to be captured and isolated and 99% of nontarget particles to be eliminated. With this high separation efficiency, along with excellent reliability and flexibility, the device is well suited to sorting, purification, enrichment, and detection of micro/nanoparticles and cells in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:24511214

  3. Rapid fabrication of nickel molds for prototyping embossed plastic microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Richard; Ranu, Navpreet; Mathies, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The production of hot embossed plastic microfluidic devices is demonstrated in 1–2 h by exploiting vinyl adhesive stickers as masks for electroplating nickel molds. The sticker masks are cut directly from a CAD design using a cutting plotter and transferred to steel wafers for nickel electroplating. The resulting nickel molds are used to hot emboss a variety of plastic substrates, including cyclo-olefin copolymer and THV fluorinated thermoplastic elastomer. Completed devices are formed by bon...

  4. Simulation guided design of a microfluidic device for electrophoretic stretching of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Chih-Chen; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Huang, Chiou-De

    2012-01-01

    We have used Brownian dynamics-finite element method (BD-FEM) to guide the optimization of a microfluidic device designed to stretch DNA for gene mapping. The original design was proposed in our previous study [C. C. Hsieh and T. H. Lin, Biomicrofluidics 5(4), 044106 (2011)] for demonstrating a new pre-conditioning strategy to facilitate DNA stretching through a microcontraction using electrophoresis. In this study, we examine the efficiency of the original device for stretching DNA with diff...

  5. Photoinitiated grafting of porous polymer monoliths and thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechet, Jean M. J.; Svec, Frantisek; Rohr, Thomas

    2008-10-07

    A microfluidic device preferably made of a thermoplastic polymer that includes a channel or a multiplicity of channels whose surfaces are modified by photografting. The device further includes a porous polymer monolith prepared via UV initiated polymerization within the channel, and functionalization of the pore surface of the monolith using photografting. Processes for making such surface modifications of thermoplastic polymers and porous polymer monoliths are set forth.

  6. Microwave bonding of poly(methylmethacrylate) microfluidic devices using a conductive polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.J.; McDonagh, C.; McLaughlin, J.A.D.; Mohr, S.; Goddard, N J; Fielden, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Component binding within microfluidic devices is a problem that has long been seeking a solution. In this investigation, the use of microwave radiation to seal PMMA components has been investigated using polyaniline as an absorber capable of inducting interfacial bonding. Straight microchannels were machined into PMMA using a Datron CAT3DM6 CNC machine with widths and depths across a range of 100 to 1000 microns. Prototype fluidic devices were prepared with channel pattern...

  7. Introducing natural thermoplastic shellac to microfluidics: A green fabrication method for point-of-care devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausecker, R; Badilita, V; Gleißner, U; Wallrabe, U

    2016-07-01

    We present a sustainable fabrication method for cheap point-of-care microfluidic systems, employing hot embossing of natural shellac as a key feature of an energy-efficient fabrication method that exclusively uses renewable materials as consumables. Shellac is a low-cost renewable biomaterial that features medium hydrophilicity (e.g., a water contact angle of ca. 73°) and a high chemical stability with respect to common solvents such as cyclohexane or toluene, rendering it an interesting candidate for low-cost microfluidics and a competitor to well-known systems such as paper-based or polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidics. Moreover, its high replication accuracy for small features down to 30 μm lateral feature size and its ability to form smooth surfaces (surface roughness Ra  = 29 nm) at low embossing temperatures (glass transition temperature Tg  = 42.2 °C) enable energy-efficient hot embossing of microfluidic structures. Proof-of-concept for the implementation of shellac hot embossing as a green fabrication method for microfluidic systems is demonstrated through the successful fabrication of a microfluidic test setup and the assessment of its resource consumption. PMID:27478525

  8. Numerical analysis of wave generation and propagation in a focused surface acoustic wave device for potential microfluidics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2009-03-01

    We develop a 3-D finite element model of a focused surface acoustic wave (F-SAW) device based on LiNbO(3) to analyze the wave generation and propagation characteristics for devices operating at MHz frequencies with varying applied input voltages. We compare the F-SAW device to a conventional SAW device with similar substrate dimensions and transducer finger periodicity. SAW devices with concentrically shaped focused interdigital transducer fingers (F-IDTs) are found to excite waves with high intensity and high beam-width compression ratio, confined to a small localized area. F-SAW devices are more sensitive to amplitude variations at regions close to the focal point than conventional SAW devices having uniform IDT configuration. We compute F-SAW induced streaming forces and velocity fields by applying a successive approximation technique to the Navier-Stokes equation (Nyborg's theory). The maximum streaming force obtained at the focal point varies as the square of the applied input voltage. Computed streaming velocities at the focal point in F-SAW devices are at least an order of magnitude higher than those in conventional SAW devices. Simulated frequency response indicates higher insertion losses in F-SAW devices than in conventional devices, reflecting their greater utility as actuators than as sensors. Our simulation findings suggest that F-SAW devices can be utilized effectively for actuation in microfluidic applications involving diffusion limited transport processes. PMID:19411221

  9. Applications of Microfluidics for Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan; Sant, Himanshu J.; Bruce K. Gale

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic assays implemented in microfluidic devices have developed rapidly over the past decade and are expected to become commonplace in the next few years. Hundreds of microfluidics-based approaches towards clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection have been reported with a general theme of rapid and customizable assays that are potentially cost-effective. This chapter reviews microfluidics in molecular diagnostics based on application areas with a concise review of microfluidics in gen...

  10. Low consumption single-use microvalve for microfluidic PCB-based platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a single-use and unidirectional microvalve with low consumption of energy for PCB-based microfluidic platforms is reported. Its activation is easy because it works as a fuse. The fabrication process of the device is based on PCB technology and a typical SU-8 process, using the PCB as a substrate and SU-8 for the microfluidic channels and chambers. The microvalve is intended to be used to impulse small volumes of fluids and it has been designed to be highly integrable in PCB-based microfluidic platforms. The proposed device has been fabricated, integrated and tested in a general purpose microfluidic circuit, resulting in a low activation time, of about 100 μs, and a low consumption of energy, with a maximum of 27 mJ. These results show a significant improvement because the energy consumption is about 84% lower and the time response is about four orders of magnitude shorter if compared with similar microvalves for impulsion of fluids on PCB-based platforms. (paper)

  11. Microfluidic Plastic Devices for Single-use Applications in High-Throughput Screening and DNA-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach, Andreas; Knebel, Günther; Guber, A. E.; Heckele, M.; Herrmann, D.; Muslija, A.; Schaller, T.

    2001-01-01

    Microfluidic devices fabricated by mass production offer an immense potential of applications such as high-throughput drug screening, clinical diagnostics and gene analysis [1]. The low unit production costs of plastic substrates make it possible to produce single-use devices, eliminating the need for cleaning and reuse [2]. Fabrication of microfluidic devices can be applied by microtechnical fabrication processes in combination with plastic molding techniques [3]. Basically, replication...

  12. Amperometric quantification based on serial dilution microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Khaled; Pittet, Patrick; Sigaud, Monique; Renaud, Louis; Vittori, Olivier; Morin, Pierre; Ouaini, Naim; Ferrigno, Rosaria

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a microfluidic device fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) that was employed to perform amperometric quantifications using on-chip calibration curves and on-chip standard addition methods. This device integrated a network of Au electrodes within a microfluidic structure designed for automatic preparation of a series of solutions containing an electroactive molecule at a concentration linearly decreasing. This device was first characterized by fluorescence microscopy and then evaluated with a model electroactive molecule such as Fe(CN(6))(4-). Operating a quantification in this microfluidic parallel approach rather than in batch mode allows a reduced analysis time to be achieved. Moreover, the microfluidic approach is compatible with the on-chip calibration of sensors simultaneously to the analysis, therefore preventing problems due to sensor response deviation with time. When using the on-chip calibration and on-chip standard addition method, we reached concentration estimation better than 5%. We also demonstrated that compared to the calibration curve approach, the standard addition mode is less complex to operate. Indeed, in this case, it is not necessary to take into account flow rate discrepancies as in the calibration approach. PMID:19238282

  13. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  14. Acoustofluidics: Theory and simulation of streaming and radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    During the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in applying ultrasound waves to manipulate biological particles and liquids in microfluidic devices. To obtain optimized designs and functionalities of the acoustofluidic devices, more detailed theoretical studies and numerical...... simulations are called for. The basic second-order perturbation theory is presented for acoustic fields applied at ultrasound frequencies in silicon/glass systems containing water-filled microfluidic channels and chambers. For various specific device geometries, the resonance frequencies and corresponding...... fields, which are directly related to the acoustic radiation force on single particles and to the acoustic streaming of the liquid. For the radiation pressure effects, there is good agreement between theory and simulation, while the numeric results for the acoustic streaming effects are more problematic...

  15. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic PDMS devices from reusable PDMS molds using laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiksacan, Ziya; Tahsin Guler, M.; Aydogdu, Berkan; Bilican, Ismail; Elbuken, Caglar

    2016-03-01

    The conventional fabrication methods for microfluidic devices require cleanroom processes that are costly and time-consuming. We present a novel, facile, and low-cost method for rapid fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds and devices. The method consists of three main fabrication steps: female mold (FM), male mold (MM), and chip fabrication. We use a CO2 laser cutter to pattern a thin, spin-coated PDMS layer for FM fabrication. We then obtain reusable PDMS MM from the FM using PDMS/PDMS casting. Finally, a second casting step is used to replicate PDMS devices from the MM. Demolding of one PDMS layer from another is carried out without any potentially hazardous chemical surface treatment. We have successfully demonstrated that this novel method allows fabrication of microfluidic molds and devices with precise dimensions (thickness, width, length) using a single material, PDMS, which is very common across microfluidic laboratories. The whole process, from idea to device testing, can be completed in 1.5 h in a standard laboratory.

  16. 3-D LTCC microfluidic device as a tool for studying nanoprecipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schianti, J. N.; Cerize, N. P. N.; Oliveira, A. M.; Derenzo, S.; Góngora-Rubio, M. R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticles have been used to improve the properties of many cosmetic products, mainly the sunscreens materials using nanoencapsulation or nanosuspensions, improving the contact with active molecules, enhancing the sun protection effect and facilitating formulations in industrial products. Microfluidic devices offer an important possibility in producing nanoparticles in a simple way, in one step bottom up technique, continuum process with low polidispersivity, low consumption of reagents and additives. In this work, we microfabricated a 3-D LTCC microfluidic device to study the nanoprecipitation of Benzophenone-3, used as a sunscreen in pharmaceutical products. It was observed that some parameters influence the particle size related to the total fluid flow on device, the ratio between phases, and the Benzophenone-3 initial concentration. The influence of applied voltages on particle sizes was tested also. For the processing, a high voltage was applied in a Kovar tube inserted in the 3D device. The use of microfluidic device resulted in particles with 100 up to 800 nm of size, with polispersivity index below 0.3 and offering an interesting way to obtain nanoparticles. These studies are still ongoing, but early results indicate the possibility of obtaining B-3 nanostructured material.

  17. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic PDMS devices from reusable PDMS molds using laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional fabrication methods for microfluidic devices require cleanroom processes that are costly and time-consuming. We present a novel, facile, and low-cost method for rapid fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds and devices. The method consists of three main fabrication steps: female mold (FM), male mold (MM), and chip fabrication. We use a CO2 laser cutter to pattern a thin, spin-coated PDMS layer for FM fabrication. We then obtain reusable PDMS MM from the FM using PDMS/PDMS casting. Finally, a second casting step is used to replicate PDMS devices from the MM. Demolding of one PDMS layer from another is carried out without any potentially hazardous chemical surface treatment. We have successfully demonstrated that this novel method allows fabrication of microfluidic molds and devices with precise dimensions (thickness, width, length) using a single material, PDMS, which is very common across microfluidic laboratories. The whole process, from idea to device testing, can be completed in 1.5 h in a standard laboratory. (paper)

  18. 3-D LTCC microfluidic device as a tool for studying nanoprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles have been used to improve the properties of many cosmetic products, mainly the sunscreens materials using nanoencapsulation or nanosuspensions, improving the contact with active molecules, enhancing the sun protection effect and facilitating formulations in industrial products. Microfluidic devices offer an important possibility in producing nanoparticles in a simple way, in one step bottom up technique, continuum process with low polidispersivity, low consumption of reagents and additives. In this work, we microfabricated a 3-D LTCC microfluidic device to study the nanoprecipitation of Benzophenone-3, used as a sunscreen in pharmaceutical products. It was observed that some parameters influence the particle size related to the total fluid flow on device, the ratio between phases, and the Benzophenone-3 initial concentration. The influence of applied voltages on particle sizes was tested also. For the processing, a high voltage was applied in a Kovar tube inserted in the 3D device. The use of microfluidic device resulted in particles with 100 up to 800 nm of size, with polispersivity index below 0.3 and offering an interesting way to obtain nanoparticles. These studies are still ongoing, but early results indicate the possibility of obtaining B-3 nanostructured material.

  19. Accurate and rapid micromixer for integrated microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, R. Michael; Liu, Kan; Shen, Kwang -Fu Clifton; Tseng, Hsian -Rong

    2015-09-22

    The invention may provide a microfluidic mixer having a droplet generator and a droplet mixer in selective fluid connection with the droplet generator. The droplet generator comprises first and second fluid chambers that are structured to be filled with respective first and second fluids that can each be held in isolation for a selectable period of time. The first and second fluid chambers are further structured to be reconfigured into a single combined chamber to allow the first and second fluids in the first and second fluid chambers to come into fluid contact with each other in the combined chamber for a selectable period of time prior to being brought into the droplet mixer.

  20. Volumetric measurement of human red blood cells by MOSFET-based microfluidic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhong; Ai, Ye; Cheng, Yuanbing; Li, Chang Ming; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a MOSFET-based (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) microfluidic gate to characterize the translocation of red blood cells (RBCs) through a gate. In the microfluidic system, the bias voltage modulated by the particles or biological cells is connected to the gate of MOSFET. The particles or cells can be detected by monitoring the MOSFET drain current instead of DC/AC-gating method across the electronic gate. Polystyrene particles with various standard sizes are utilized to calibrate the proposed device. Furthermore, RBCs from both adults and newborn blood sample are used to characterize the performance of the device in distinguishing the two types of RBCs. As compared to conventional DC/AC current modulation method, the proposed device demonstrates a higher sensitivity and is capable of being a promising platform for bioassay analysis. PMID:25349117

  1. Open-Source Wax RepRap 3-D Printer for Rapid Prototyping Paper-Based Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J M; Anzalone, N C; Heldt, C L

    2016-08-01

    The open-source release of self-replicating rapid prototypers (RepRaps) has created a rich opportunity for low-cost distributed digital fabrication of complex 3-D objects such as scientific equipment. For example, 3-D printable reactionware devices offer the opportunity to combine open hardware microfluidic handling with lab-on-a-chip reactionware to radically reduce costs and increase the number and complexity of microfluidic applications. To further drive down the cost while improving the performance of lab-on-a-chip paper-based microfluidic prototyping, this study reports on the development of a RepRap upgrade capable of converting a Prusa Mendel RepRap into a wax 3-D printer for paper-based microfluidic applications. An open-source hardware approach is used to demonstrate a 3-D printable upgrade for the 3-D printer, which combines a heated syringe pump with the RepRap/Arduino 3-D control. The bill of materials, designs, basic assembly, and use instructions are provided, along with a completely free and open-source software tool chain. The open-source hardware device described here accelerates the potential of the nascent field of electrochemical detection combined with paper-based microfluidics by dropping the marginal cost of prototyping to nearly zero while accelerating the turnover between paper-based microfluidic designs. PMID:26763294

  2. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading) inlet and the parallel (in-line) inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies. PMID:27314318

  3. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading inlet and the parallel (in-line inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies.

  4. A simple microfluidic device for the deformability assessment of blood cells in a continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raquel O; Pinho, Diana; Faustino, Vera; Lima, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Blood flow presents several interesting phenomena in microcirculation that can be used to develop microfluidic devices capable to promote blood cells separation and analysis in continuous flow. In the last decade there have been numerous microfluidic studies focused on the deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through geometries mimicking microvessels. In contrast, studies focusing on the deformation of white blood cells (WBCs) are scarce despite this phenomenon often happens in the microcirculation. In this work, we present a novel integrative microfluidic device able to perform continuous separation of a desired amount of blood cells, without clogging or jamming, and at the same time, capable to assess the deformation index (DI) of both WBCs and RBCs. To determine the DI of both WBCs and RBCs, a hyperbolic converging microchannel was used, as well as a suitable image analysis technique to measure the DIs of these blood cells along the regions of interest. The results show that the WBCs have a much lower deformability than RBCs when subjected to the same in vitro flow conditions, which is directly related to their cytoskeleton and nucleus contents. The proposed strategy can be easily transformed into a simple and inexpensive diagnostic microfluidic system to simultaneously separate and assess blood cells deformability. PMID:26482154

  5. Oxygen-Purged Microfluidic Device to Enhance Cell Viability in Photopolymerized PEG Hydrogel Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bingzhao; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Oakey, John

    2016-07-11

    Encapsulating cells within biocompatible materials is a widely used strategy for cell delivery and tissue engineering. While cells are commonly suspended within bulk hydrogel-forming solutions during gelation, substantial interest in the microfluidic fabrication of miniaturized cell encapsulation vehicles has more recently emerged. Here, we utilize multiphase microfluidics to encapsulate cells within photopolymerized picoliter-volume water-in-oil droplets at high production rates. The photoinitiated polymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) is used to continuously produce solid particles from aqueous liquid drops containing cells and hydrogel forming solution. It is well understood that this photoinitiated addition reaction is inhibited by oxygen. In contrast to bulk polymerization in which ambient oxygen is rapidly and harmlessly consumed, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed, photopolymerization within air permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices allows oxygen to be replenished by diffusion as it is depleted. This sustained presence of oxygen and the consequential accumulation of peroxy radicals produce a dramatic effect upon both droplet polymerization and post-encapsulation cell viability. In this work we employ a nitrogen microjacketed microfluidic device to purge oxygen from flowing fluids during photopolymerization. By increasing the purging nitrogen pressure, oxygen concentration was attenuated, and increased post-encapsulation cell viability was achieved. A reaction-diffusion model was used to predict the cumulative intradroplet concentration of peroxy radicals, which corresponded directly to post-encapsulation cell viability. The nitrogen-jacketed microfluidic device presented here allows the droplet oxygen concentration to be finely tuned during cell encapsulation, leading to high post-encapsulation cell viability. PMID:27285343

  6. Microfluidic-based metal enhanced fluorescence for capillary electrophoresis by Ag nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chenyu; Cao, Zhen; Deng, Junhong; Huang, Zhifeng; Xu, Zheng; Fu, Junxue; Yobas, Levent

    2014-06-01

    As metal nanorods show much higher metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than metal nanospheres, microfluidic-based MEF is first explored with Ag nanorod (ND) arrays made by oblique angle deposition. By measuring the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) solution sandwiched between the Ag NDs and a piece of cover slip, the enhancement factors (EFs) are found as 3.7 ± 0.64 and 6.74 ± 2.04, for a solution thickness at 20.8 μm and 10 μm, respectively. Because of the strong plasmonic coupling between the adjacent Ag NDs, only the emission of the fluorophores present in the three-dimensional NDs array gets enhanced. Thus, the corresponding effective enhancement factors (EEFs) are revealed to be relatively close, 259 ± 92 and 340 ± 102, respectively. To demonstrate the application of MEF in microfluidic systems, a multilayer of SiO2 NDs/Ag NDs is integrated with a capillary electrophoresis device. At a microchannel depth of 10 μm, an enhancement of 6.5 fold is obtained for amino acids separation detection. These results are very encouraging and open the possibility of MEF applications for the Ag ND arrays decorated microchannels. With the miniaturization of microfluidic devices, microfluidic-based MEF by Ag ND arrays will likely find more applications with further enhancement.

  7. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  8. Papers Based Electrochemical Biosensors: From Test Strips to Paper-Based Microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bingwen; Du, Dan; Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-08

    Papers based biosensors such as lateral flow test strips and paper-based microfluidic devices (or paperfluidics) are inexpensive, rapid, flexible, and easy-to-use analytical tools. An apparent trend in their detection is to interpret sensing results from qualitative assessment to quantitative determination. Electrochemical detection plays an important role in quantification. This review focuses on electrochemical (EC) detection enabled biosensors. The first part provides detailed examples in paper test strips. The second part gives an overview of paperfluidics engaging EC detections. The outlook and recommendation of future directions of EC enabled biosensors are discussed in the end.

  9. Easily Fabricated Microfluidic Devices Using Permanent Marker Inks for Enzyme Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coreen Gallibu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we describe microfluidic paper analytical devices (μPADs easily fabricated from commercially available Sharpie ink permanent markers on chromatography paper to colorimetrically detect glucose using glucose oxidase (GOx. Here, solutions of horseradish peroxidase (HRP, GOx, and potassium iodide (KIwere directly spotted onto the center of the μPAD and flowed into samples of glucose that were separately spotted on the μPAD. Using an XY plotter (Roland DGA Corporation, Irvine, CA USA, several ink marks drawn in the paper act as the hydrophobic barriers, thereby, defining the hydrophilic fluid flow paths of the solutions. Two paper devices are described that act as independent assay zones. The glucose assay is based on the enzymatic oxidation of iodide to iodine whereby a color change from clear to brownish-yellow is associated with the presence of glucose. In these experiments, two designs are highlighted that consist of circular paper test regions fabricated for colorimetric and subsequent quantification detection of glucose. The use of permanent markers for paper patterning is inexpensive and rapid and does not require special laboratory equipment or technical skill.

  10. Measurements of elastic moduli of silicone gel substrates with a microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM. Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments.

  11. Measurements of elastic moduli of silicone gel substrates with a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments. PMID:21980487

  12. From lateral flow devices to a novel nano-color microfluidic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadollahi, Saied; Reininger, Christiane; Palkovits, Roland; Pointl, Peter; Schalkhammer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Improving the performance of traditional diagnostic lateral flow assays combined with new manufacturing technologies is a primary goal in the research and development plans of diagnostic companies. Taking into consideration the components of lateral flow diagnostic test kits; innovation can include modification of labels, materials and device design. In recent years, Resonance-Enhanced Absorption (REA) of metal nano-particles has shown excellent applicability in bio-sensing for the detection of a variety of bio-molecular binding interactions. In a novel approach, we have now integrated REA-assays in a diagnostic microfluidic setup thus resolving the bottleneck of long incubation times inherent in previously existing REA-assays and simultaneously integrated automated fabrication techniques for diagnostics manufacture. Due to the roller-coating based technology and chemical resistance, we used PET-co-polyester as a substrate and a CO(2) laser ablation system as a fast, highly precise and contactless alternative to classical micro-milling. It was possible to detect biological binding within three minutes - visible to the eye as colored text readout within the REA-fluidic device. A two-minute in-situ silver enhancement was able to enhance the resonant color additionally, if required. PMID:22454573

  13. From Lateral Flow Devices to a Novel Nano-Color Microfluidic Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schalkhammer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the performance of traditional diagnostic lateral flow assays combined with new manufacturing technologies is a primary goal in the research and development plans of diagnostic companies. Taking into consideration the components of lateral flow diagnostic test kits; innovation can include modification of labels, materials and device design. In recent years, Resonance-Enhanced Absorption (REA of metal nano-particles has shown excellent applicability in bio-sensing for the detection of a variety of bio-molecular binding interactions. In a novel approach, we have now integrated REA-assays in a diagnostic microfluidic setup thus resolving the bottleneck of long incubation times inherent in previously existing REA-assays and simultaneously integrated automated fabrication techniques for diagnostics manufacture. Due to the roller-coating based technology and chemical resistance, we used PET-co-polyester as a substrate and a CO2 laser ablation system as a fast, highly precise and contactless alternative to classical micro-milling. It was possible to detect biological binding within three minutes – visible to the eye as colored text readout within the REA-fluidic device. A two-minute in-situ silver enhancement was able to enhance the resonant color additionally, if required.

  14. Applying an optical space-time coding method to enhance light scattering signals in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhe; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Qiao, Wen; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Zhiwen; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-09-01

    An "optical space-time coding method" was applied to microfluidic devices to detect the forward and large angle light scattering signals for unlabelled bead and cell detection. Because of the enhanced sensitivity by this method, silicon pin photoreceivers can be used to detect both forward scattering (FS) and large angle (45-60°) scattering (LAS) signals, the latter of which has been traditionally detected by a photomultiplier tube. This method yields significant improvements in coefficients of variation (CV), producing CVs of 3.95% to 10.05% for FS and 7.97% to 26.12% for LAS with 15 μm, 10 μm, and 5 μm beads. These are among the best values ever demonstrated with microfluidic devices. The optical space-time coding method also enables us to measure the speed and position of each particle, producing valuable information for the design and assessment of microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices such as flow cytometers and complete blood count devices. PMID:21915241

  15. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  16. Thermoelectric manipulation of aqueous droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgro, Allyson E; Allen, Peter B; Chiu, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a method for manipulating the temperature inside aqueous droplets, utilizing a thermoelectric cooler to control the temperature of select portions of a microfluidic chip. To illustrate the adaptability of this approach, we have generated an "ice valve" to stop fluid flow in a microchannel. By taking advantage of the vastly different freezing points for aqueous solutions and immiscible oils, we froze a stream of aqueous droplets that were formed on-chip. By integrating this technique with cell encapsulation into aqueous droplets, we were also able to freeze single cells encased in flowing droplets. Using a live-dead stain, we confirmed the viability of cells was not adversely affected by the process of freezing in aqueous droplets provided cryoprotectants were utilized. When combined with current droplet methodologies, this technology has the potential to both selectively heat and cool portions of a chip for a variety of droplet-related applications, such as freezing, temperature cycling, sample archiving, and controlling reaction kinetics. PMID:17542555

  17. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. PMID:27272910

  18. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  19. Microfluidic devices for investigation of biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna

    The term biomimetic membrane denotes membrane that mimics biological cell membrane. Artificially made membranes are powerful tools for the fundamental biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Moreover, they may be used in biomedicine, serving as biosensors in high-throughput screening of potential...... mentioned difficulties. First, a device that facilitates atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of biomimetic membranes is presented. The microfluidic device was specifically designed and fabricated to accommodate the AFM probes that were used to study micrometer-sized fluid polymeric membranes. Second...... to microfluidic designs involving protein delivery to biomimetic membranes developed for sensor and separation applications. Finally, an OMP functionality modulation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was shown and revealed the protein potential application as a sensor. Moreover, the β-CD blocker may be used...

  20. Rapid fabrication of nickel molds for prototyping embossed plastic microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Richard; Ranu, Navpreet; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-04-21

    The production of hot embossed plastic microfluidic devices is demonstrated in 1-2 h by exploiting vinyl adhesive stickers as masks for electroplating nickel molds. The sticker masks are cut directly from a CAD design using a cutting plotter and transferred to steel wafers for nickel electroplating. The resulting nickel molds are used to hot emboss a variety of plastic substrates, including cyclo-olefin copolymer and THV fluorinated thermoplastic elastomer. Completed devices are formed by bonding a blank sheet to the embossed layer using a solvent-assisted lamination method. For example, a microfluidic valve array or automaton and a droplet generator were fabricated with less than 100 μm x-y plane feature resolution, to within 9% of the target height, and with 90 ± 11% height uniformity over 5 cm. This approach for mold fabrication, embossing, and bonding reduces fabrication time and cost for research applications by avoiding photoresists, lithography masks, and the cleanroom. PMID:23450308

  1. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Ayuso

    Full Text Available We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it.

  2. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  3. Parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis using single-layer poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Parker, William

    2009-01-01

    Improving methods for high-throughput combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a major area of research because of the importance of rapidly synthesizing large numbers of chemical compounds for drug discovery and other applications. In this investigation, a novel microfluidic chip for performing parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis was developed. Unlike past microfluidic systems designed for parallel combinatorial chemistry, the chip is a single-layer device made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) that is extremely easy and inexpensive to fabricate. Using the chip, a 2×2 combinatorial series of amide-formation reactions was performed. The results of this combinatorial synthesis indicate that the new device is an effective platform for running parallel organic syntheses at significantly higher throughput than with past methodologies. Additionally, a design algorithm for scaling up the 2×2 combinatorial synthesis chip to address more complex cases was developed. PMID:20216962

  4. Fabrication of microfluidic devices in silica glass by water-assisted ablation with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated a microdiverter with a protrusion and a complicated micromixer with grid-like structures in silica glass by using water-assisted femtosecond laser ablation. When distilled water is introduced into the fabricated microchannel, the blocking and redepositing effects of ablated debris can be reduced greatly. The total length of the fabricated microfluidic devices is 6 mm without any deformation. The diameters of the fabricated microchannels can be controlled by changing the used pulse energies and the width of the laser-scanning region inside the sample. The experimental results show that it is possible to fabricate high-quality and high-aspect-ratio complicated microfluidic devices in single step without the need of using photosensitive glass or post-processing

  5. Applying an optical space-time coding method to enhance light scattering signals in microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Zhe; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Qiao, Wen; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Zhiwen; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    An “optical space-time coding method” was applied to microfluidic devices to detect the forward and large angle light scattering signals for unlabelled bead and cell detection. Because of the enhanced sensitivity by this method, silicon pin photoreceivers can be used to detect both forward scattering (FS) and large angle (45–60°) scattering (LAS) signals, the latter of which has been traditionally detected by a photomultiplier tube. This method yields significant improvements in coefficients ...

  6. A novel passive microfluidic device for preprocessing whole blood for point of care diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy to sort the cells of interest (White Blood Cells (leukocytes)) by selectively lysing the Red Blood Cells (erythrocytes) in a miniaturized microfluidic device is presented. Various methods to lyse cells on a chip exist i.e. electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal but they need...... on the principle of mixing whole blood with pure water in time controlled manner to lyse erythrocytes osmotically on a chip....

  7. Experimental evidence of slippage breakdown for a superhydrophobic surface in a microfluidic device

    OpenAIRE

    BOLOGNESI, GUIDO; Cottin-Bizonne, Cecile; Pirat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    A full characterization of the water flow past a silicon superhydrophobic surface with longitudinal micro-grooves enclosed in a microfluidic device is presented. Fluorescence microscopy images of the flow seeded with fluorescent passive tracers were digitally processed to measure both the velocity field and the position and shape of the liquid-air interfaces at the superhydrophobic surface. The simultaneous access to the meniscus and velocity profiles allows us to put under a strict test the ...

  8. “Flow valve” microfluidic devices for simple, detectorless and label-free analyte quantitation

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Debolina; Mansfield, Danielle S.; Anderson, Neil G.; Subedi, Sudeep; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    Simplified analysis systems that offer the performance of benchtop instruments but the convenience of portability are highly desirable. We have developed novel, miniature devices that feature visual inspection readout of a target’s concentration from a ~1 μL volume of solution introduced into a microfluidic channel. Microchannels are constructed within an elastomeric material, and channel surfaces are coated with receptors to the target. When a solution is flowed into the channel, the target ...

  9. Two-dimensional open microfluidic devices by tuning the wettability on patterned superhydrophobic polymeric surface

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Neto, Ana I.; Song, Wenlong; Mano, J.F

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple and economical method to produce a potential open microfluidic polymeric device. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared on polystyrene using a phase separation methodology. Patterned two-dimensional channels were imprinted on the superhydrophobic substrates by exposing the surface to plasma or UV–ozone radiation. The wettability of the channels could be precisely controlled between the superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states by changing the exposure time. ...

  10. Patterned superhydrophobic paper for microfluidic devices obtained by writing and printing

    OpenAIRE

    M.P Sousa; Mano, J.F

    2013-01-01

    This work outlines inexpensive patterning methodologies to create open-air microfluidic paperbased devices. A phase-separation methodology was used to obtain biomimetic superhydrophobic paper, hierarchically composed by micro and nano topographies. Writing and printing are simple actions that can be used to pattern flat superhydrophobic paper with more wettable channels. In particular, inkjet printing permits controlling the wettability of the surface by changing th...

  11. Nematic Director Reorientation at Solid and Liquid Interfaces under Flow: SAXS Studies in a Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Bruno F. B.; Zepeda-Rosales, Miguel; Venkateswaran, Neeraja; Fletcher, Bretton J.; Carter, Lester G.; MATSUI, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Han, Jun; Li, Youli; Olsson, Ulf; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate the interplay between flow and boundary condition effects on the orientation field of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal under flow and confinement in a microfluidic device. Two types of experiments were performed using synchrotron small-angle X-ray-scattering (SAXS). In the first, a nematic liquid crystal flows through a square-channel cross section at varying flow rates, while the nematic director orientation projected onto the velocity/velocity gradient plane...

  12. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled,renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a “brick wall”-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length X 50 μm width X 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide X 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a “bed” or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical onchip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beadstrapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based biosensor immunoassays for clinical and othervarious applications.

  13. Hydrodynamic Flow Confinement Technology in Microfluidic Perfusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Jesorka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamically confined flow device technology is a young research area with high practical application potential in surface processing, assay development, and in various areas of single cell research. Several variants have been developed, and most recently, theoretical and conceptual studies, as well as fully developed automated systems, were presented. In this article we review concepts, fabrication strategies, and application areas of hydrodynamically confined flow (HCF devices.

  14. Coalescing drops in microfluidic parking networks: A multifunctional platform for drop-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bithi, Swastika S; Wang, William S; Sun, Meng; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Vanapalli, Siva A

    2014-05-01

    Multiwell plate and pipette systems have revolutionized modern biological analysis; however, they have disadvantages because testing in the submicroliter range is challenging, and increasing the number of samples is expensive. We propose a new microfluidic methodology that delivers the functionality of multiwell plates and pipettes at the nanoliter scale by utilizing drop coalescence and confinement-guided breakup in microfluidic parking networks (MPNs). Highly monodisperse arrays of drops obtained using a hydrodynamic self-rectification process are parked at prescribed locations in the device, and our method allows subsequent drop manipulations such as fine-gradation dilutions, reactant addition, and fluid replacement while retaining microparticles contained in the sample. Our devices operate in a quasistatic regime where drop shapes are determined primarily by the channel geometry. Thus, the behavior of parked drops is insensitive to flow conditions. This insensitivity enables highly parallelized manipulation of drop arrays of different composition, without a need for fine-tuning the flow conditions and other system parameters. We also find that drop coalescence can be switched off above a critical capillary number, enabling individual addressability of drops in complex MPNs. The platform demonstrated here is a promising candidate for conducting multistep biological assays in a highly multiplexed manner, using thousands of submicroliter samples. PMID:25379078

  15. Fluorescence Time-lapse Imaging of the Complete S. venezuelae Life Cycle Using a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging of biological processes at the single cell level has been instrumental to our current understanding of the subcellular organization of bacterial cells. However, the application of time-lapse microscopy to study the cell biological processes underpinning development in the sporulating filamentous bacteria Streptomyces has been hampered by technical difficulties. Here we present a protocol to overcome these limitations by growing the new model species, Streptomyces venezuelae, in a commercially available microfluidic device which is connected to an inverted fluorescence widefield microscope. Unlike the classical model species, Streptomyces coelicolor, S. venezuelae sporulates in liquid, allowing the application of microfluidic growth chambers to cultivate and microscopically monitor the cellular development and differentiation of S. venezuelae over long time periods. In addition to monitoring morphological changes, the spatio-temporal distribution of fluorescently labeled target proteins can also be visualized by time-lapse microscopy. Moreover, the microfluidic platform offers the experimental flexibility to exchange the culture medium, which is used in the detailed protocol to stimulate sporulation of S. venezuelae in the microfluidic chamber. Images of the entire S. venezuelae life cycle are acquired at specific intervals and processed in the open-source software Fiji to produce movies of the recorded time-series. PMID:26967231

  16. Mapping the Salinity Gradient in a Microfluidic Device with Schlieren Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-li Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of the schlieren imaging to quantify the salinity gradients in a microfluidic device. By partially blocking the back focal plane of the objective lens, the schlieren microscope produces an image with patterns that correspond to spatial derivative of refractive index in the specimen. Since salinity variation leads to change in refractive index, the fluid mixing of an aqueous salt solution of a known concentration and water in a T-microchannel is used to establish the relation between salinity gradients and grayscale readouts. This relation is then employed to map the salinity gradients in the target microfluidic device from the grayscale readouts of the corresponding micro-schlieren image. For saline solution with salinity close to that of the seawater, the grayscale readouts vary linearly with the salinity gradient, and the regression line is independent of the flow condition and the salinity of the injected solution. It is shown that the schlieren technique is well suited to quantify the salinity gradients in microfluidic devices, for it provides a spatially resolved, non-invasive, full-field measurement.

  17. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated elastomeric components for autonomous regulation of sequential and oscillatory flow switching in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Tavana, Hossein; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-06-01

    A critical need for enhancing the usability and capabilities of microfluidic technologies is the development of standardized, scalable and versatile control systems. Electronically controlled valves and pumps typically used for dynamic flow regulation, although useful, can limit convenience, scalability and robustness. This shortcoming has motivated the development of device-embedded non-electrical flow-control systems. Existing approaches to regulate operation timing on-chip, however, still require external signals such as timed generation of fluid flow, bubbles, liquid plugs or droplets or an alteration of chemical compositions or temperature. Here, we describe a strategy to provide device-embedded flow switching and clocking functions. Physical gaps and cavities interconnected by holes are fabricated into a three-layer elastomer structure to form networks of fluidic gates that can spontaneously generate cascading and oscillatory flow output using only a constant flow of Newtonian fluids as the device input. The resulting microfluidic substrate architecture is simple, scalable and should be applicable to various materials. This flow-powered fluidic gating scheme brings the autonomous signal processing ability of microelectronic circuits to microfluidics where there is the added diversity in current information of having distinct chemical or particulate species and richness in current operation of having chemical reactions and physical interactions.

  19. Handmade microfluidic device for biochemical applications in emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzabaev, Marsel; Kojima, Takaaki; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Kobayashi, Isao; DeKosky, Brandon J; Georgiou, George; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive flow-focusing device has been developed to make uniform droplets for biochemical reactions, such as in vitro transcription and cell-free protein synthesis. The device was fabricated from commercially available components without special equipment. Using the emulsion droplets formed by the device, a class I ligase ribozyme, bcI 23, was successfully synthesized from DNA attached to magnetic microbeads by T7 RNA polymerase. It was also ligated with an RNA substrate on the same microbeads, and detected using flow cytometry with a fluorescent probe. In addition, a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein was expressed using an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system in emulsion, which was prepared using the flow-focusing device. In both emulsified reactions, usage of the flow-focusing device was able to greatly reduce the coefficient of variation for the amount of RNA or protein displayed on the microbeads, demonstrating the device is advantageous for quantitative analysis in high-throughput screening. PMID:26386750

  20. Microfluidic paper-based biomolecule preconcentrator based on ion concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Il; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kwak, Rhokyun; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2016-06-21

    Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for molecular detection have great potential in the field of point-of-care diagnostics. Currently, a critical problem being faced by μPADs is improving their detection sensitivity. Various preconcentration processes have been developed, but they still have complicated structures and fabrication processes to integrate into μPADs. To address this issue, we have developed a novel paper-based preconcentrator utilizing ion concentration polarization (ICP) with minimal addition on lateral-flow paper. The cation selective membrane (i.e., Nafion) is patterned on adhesive tape, and this tape is then attached to paper-based channels. When an electric field is applied across the Nafion, ICP is initiated to preconcentrate the biomolecules in the paper channel. Departing from previous paper-based preconcentrators, we maintain steady lateral fluid flow with the separated Nafion layer; as a result, fluorescent dyes and proteins (FITC-albumin and bovine serum albumin) are continuously delivered to the preconcentration zone, achieving high preconcentration performance up to 1000-fold. In addition, we demonstrate that the Nafion-patterned tape can be integrated with various geometries (multiplexed preconcentrator) and platforms (string and polymer microfluidic channel). This work would facilitate integration of various ICP devices, including preconcentrators, pH/concentration modulators, and micro mixers, with steady lateral flows in paper-based platforms. PMID:27199301

  1. Droplet-based Biosensing for Lab-on-a-Chip, Open Microfluidics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Dak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Low cost, portable sensors can transform health care by bringing easily available diagnostic devices to low and middle income population, particularly in developing countries. Sample preparation, analyte handling and labeling are primary cost concerns for traditional lab-based diagnostic systems. Lab-on-a-chip (LoC platforms based on droplet-based microfluidics promise to integrate and automate these complex and expensive laboratory procedures onto a single chip; the cost will be further reduced if label-free biosensors could be integrated onto the LoC platforms. Here, we review some recent developments of label-free, droplet-based biosensors, compatible with “open” digital microfluidic systems. These low-cost droplet-based biosensors overcome some of the fundamental limitations of the classical sensors, enabling timely diagnosis. We identify the key challenges that must be addressed to make these sensors commercially viable and summarize a number of promising research directions.

  2. Quasi-Optical Terahertz Microfluidic Devices for Chemical Sensing and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We first review the development of a frequency domain quasi-optical terahertz (THz chemical sensing and imaging platform consisting of a quartz-based microfluidic subsystem in our previous work. We then report the application of this platform to sensing and characterizing of several selected liquid chemical samples from 570–630 GHz. THz sensing of chemical mixtures including isopropylalcohol-water (IPA-H2O mixtures and acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O mixtures have been successfully demonstrated and the results have shown completely different hydrogen bond dynamics detected in different mixture systems. In addition, the developed platform has been applied to study molecule diffusion at the interface between adjacent liquids in the multi-stream laminar flow inside the microfluidic subsystem. The reported THz microfluidic platform promises real-time and label-free chemical/biological sensing and imaging with extremely broad bandwidth, high spectral resolution, and high spatial resolution.

  3. A microfluidic device providing continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction heating and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to describe a new type of microfluidic device that could be used to manipulate fluid temperature in many microfluidic applications. The key component is a composite material containing a thermally conductive phase placed in a purposeful manner to manipulate heat flow into and out of an embedded microchannel. In actual use, the device is able to vary temperature along a defined flow path with remarkable precision. As a demonstration of capability, a functional prototype was designed and fabricated using four layers of patterned copper laminated between alternating layers of polyimide and acrylic. The key fabrication steps included laser micromachining, acid etching, microchannel formation, and hot lamination. In order to achieve the desired temperature variations along the microchannel, an outer optimization loop and an inner finite element analysis loop were used to iteratively obtain a near-optimal copper pattern. With a minor loss of generality, admissible forms were restricted to comb-like patterns. For a given temperature profile, the pattern was found by refining a starting guess based on a deterministic rubric. Thermal response was measured using fine thermocouples placed at critical locations along the microchannel wall. At most of these points, the agreement between measured and predicted temperatures was within 1 °C, and temperature gradients as high as ±45 °C mm−1 (equivalent to ±90 °C s−1 at 2 μl min−1 flow rate) were obtained within the range of 59–91 °C. The particular profile chosen for case study makes it possible to perform five cycles of continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in less than 15 s, i.e. it entails five successive cycles of cooling from 91 to 59 °C, rapid reheating from 59 to 73 °C, slow reheating from 73 to 76 °C, and a final reheating from 73 to 91 °C, using a resistively heated source at 100 °C at and a thermoelectrically cooled sink at 5

  4. A microfluidic device providing continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, A.; Farquhar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a new type of microfluidic device that could be used to manipulate fluid temperature in many microfluidic applications. The key component is a composite material containing a thermally conductive phase placed in a purposeful manner to manipulate heat flow into and out of an embedded microchannel. In actual use, the device is able to vary temperature along a defined flow path with remarkable precision. As a demonstration of capability, a functional prototype was designed and fabricated using four layers of patterned copper laminated between alternating layers of polyimide and acrylic. The key fabrication steps included laser micromachining, acid etching, microchannel formation, and hot lamination. In order to achieve the desired temperature variations along the microchannel, an outer optimization loop and an inner finite element analysis loop were used to iteratively obtain a near-optimal copper pattern. With a minor loss of generality, admissible forms were restricted to comb-like patterns. For a given temperature profile, the pattern was found by refining a starting guess based on a deterministic rubric. Thermal response was measured using fine thermocouples placed at critical locations along the microchannel wall. At most of these points, the agreement between measured and predicted temperatures was within 1 °C, and temperature gradients as high as ±45 °C mm-1 (equivalent to ±90 °C s-1 at 2 μl min-1 flow rate) were obtained within the range of 59-91 °C. The particular profile chosen for case study makes it possible to perform five cycles of continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in less than 15 s, i.e. it entails five successive cycles of cooling from 91 to 59 °C, rapid reheating from 59 to 73 °C, slow reheating from 73 to 76 °C, and a final reheating from 73 to 91 °C, using a resistively heated source at 100 °C at and a thermoelectrically cooled sink at 5 °C.

  5. Development of an integrated microfluidic solid-phase extraction and electrophoresis device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sahore, Vishal; Rogers, Chad I; Woolley, Adam T

    2016-02-15

    This study focuses on the design and fabrication of a microfluidic platform that integrates solid-phase extraction (SPE) and microchip electrophoresis (μCE) on a single device. The integrated chip is a multi-layer structure consisting of polydimethylsiloxane valves with a peristaltic pump, and a porous polymer monolith in a thermoplastic layer. The valves and pump are fabricated using soft lithography to enable pressure-based fluid actuation. A porous polymer monolith column is synthesized in the SPE unit using UV photopolymerization of a mixture consisting of monomer, cross-linker, photoinitiator, and porogens. The hydrophobic, porous structure of the monolith allows protein retention with good through flow. The functionality of the integrated device in terms of pressure-controlled flow, protein retention and elution, on-chip enrichment, and separation is evaluated using ferritin (Fer). Fluorescently labeled Fer is enriched ∼80-fold on a reversed-phase monolith from an initial concentration of 100 nM. A five-valve peristaltic pump produces higher flow rates and a narrower Fer elution peak than a three-valve pump operated under similar conditions. Moreover, the preconcentration capability of the SPE unit is demonstrated through μCE of enriched Fer and two model peptides in the integrated system. FA, GGYR, and Fer are concentrated 4-, 12-, and 50-fold, respectively. The loading capacity of the polymer monolith is 56 fmol (25 ng) for Fer. This device lays the foundation for integrated systems that can be used to analyze various disease biomarkers. PMID:26820409

  6. Digital microfluidic magnetic separation for particle-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Choi, Kihwan; Luoma, Robert P; Robinson, John M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-10-16

    We introduce a new format for particle-based immunoassays relying on digital microfluidics (DMF) and magnetic forces to separate and resuspend antibody-coated paramagnetic particles. In DMF, fluids are electrostatically controlled as discrete droplets (picoliters to microliters) on an array of insulated electrodes. By applying appropriate sequences of potentials to these electrodes, multiple droplets can be manipulated simultaneously and various droplet operations can be achieved using the same device design. This flexibility makes DMF well-suited for applications that require complex, multistep protocols such as immunoassays. Here, we report the first particle-based immunoassay on DMF without the aid of oil carrier fluid to enable droplet movement (i.e., droplets are surrounded by air instead of oil). This new format allowed the realization of a novel on-chip particle separation and resuspension method capable of removing greater than 90% of unbound reagents in one step. Using this technique, we developed methods for noncompetitive and competitive immunoassays, using thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and 17β-estradiol (E2) as model analytes, respectively. We show that, compared to conventional methods, the new DMF approach reported here reduced reagent volumes and analysis time by 100-fold and 10-fold, respectively, while retaining a level of analytical performance required for clinical screening. Thus, we propose that the new technique has great potential for eventual use in a fast, low-waste, and inexpensive instrument for the quantitative analysis of proteins and small molecules in low sample volumes. PMID:23013543

  7. Passive micro-assembly of modular, hot embossed, polymer microfluidic devices using exact constraint design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-cost microfluidic platforms have the potential to change accepted practices in many fields, including biology and medicine, in the near future. Micro-assembly of molded polymer microfluidic devices is one approach to cost-effective mass production of modular, microfluidic instruments. Polymer, passive alignment structures were used to precisely assemble molded polymer components to prevent infinitesimal motions and minimize the misalignment between assembled components and devices. The motion and constraint of the assemblies were analyzed using screw theory to identify combinations of passive alignment structures that would provide exact constraint of all degrees of freedom of the two mating parts without over-constraint. One option identified by kinematic analysis was a set of three v-groove and hemisphere-tipped pin joints, which are well known from precision engineering and suitable for microfabrication. To validate the passive alignment scheme, brass mold inserts containing alignment structures were micro-milled and used to hot emboss components in polycarbonate (PC). Dimensional and location variations of prototype alignment structures were measured to quantify the difference between the as-designed and actual dimensions and the locations of the alignment structures. The dimensional variation was 0.2–3% less than the designed dimensions and the location variation was 0.7% less. The alignment accuracy of an assembly was characterized by measuring the mismatch and vertical variation between molded alignment standards embossed on each pair of mating plates. With molded, polymer alignment structures the mean mismatch and mean vertical variation were as low as 13 ± 3 µm in the lateral plane along the x- and y-axes and −6 ± 15 µm with respect to the nominal value of 107 µm. This micro-assembly technology is applicable to the integration of all microsystems including the interconnection of microfluidic devices, the assembly of hybrid microsystems

  8. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters

  9. Topology optimization of flexible micro-fluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreissl, Sebastian; Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton;

    2010-01-01

    A multi-objective topology optimization formulation for the design of dynamically tunable fluidic devices is presented. The flow is manipulated via external and internal mechanical actuation, leading to elastic deformations of flow channels. The design objectives characterize the performance in t...

  10. How to embed three-dimensional flexible electrodes in microfluidic devices for cell culture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Andrea; Piraino, Francesco; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Farino, Kevin M; Moretti, Matteo; Rasponi, Marco

    2011-05-01

    This communication describes a simple, rapid and cost effective method of embedding a conductive and flexible material within microfluidic devices as a means to realize uniform electric fields within cellular microenvironments. Fluidic channels and electrodes are fabricated by traditional soft-lithography in conjunction with chemical etching of PDMS. Devices can be deformable (thus allowing for a combination of electro-mechanical stimulation), they are made from inexpensive materials and easily assembled by hand; this method is thus accessible to a wide range of laboratories and budgets. PMID:21437315

  11. Hydrogel Embedding of Precision-Cut Liver Slices in a Microfluidic Device Improves Drug Metabolic Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Verweij, Niek; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Merema, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    A microfluidic-based biochip made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) was recently reported for the first time by us for the incubation of precision-cut liver slices (PCLS). In this system, PCLS are continuously exposed to flow, to keep the incubation environment stable over time. Slice behavior in the biochi

  12. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s−1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  13. TiO2 coated microfluidic devices for recoverable hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Sang Kyung; Park, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Tae Song

    2015-03-01

    We report a simple method for modifying the surfaces of plastic microfluidic devices through dynamic coating process with a nano-colloidal TiO2 sol. The surface of the thermoplastic, cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) was coated with the TiO2 film, that displayed an effective photocatalytic property. The hydrophilic surface is obtained in the TiO2-coated zone of a microfluidic channel, and TiO2 coated surface degradation can be reversed easily by UV irradiation. The present work shows a photocatalytic activity concerning the effect of TiO2 coating density, which is controlled by the number of coating cycles. The hydrophilized surface was characterized by the contact angle of water and the TiO2 coated COC surface reduced the water contact angle from 85° to less than 10° upon UV irradiation. The photocatalytic effect of the layer that was coated five times with TiO2 was excellent, and the super-hydrophilicity of the TiO2 surface could be promptly recovered after 10 months of storage at atmospheric conditions. The COC microfluidic devices, in which TiO2 has been freshly deposited and aged for 10 months, were capable of generating water-in oil-in water (W/O/W) double emulsions easily and uniformly by simple control of the flow rates for demonstration of excellent hydrophilic patterning and recovery of the TiO2 coated in the microchannels.

  14. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  15. A Supramolecular Sensing Platform for Phosphate Anions and an Anthrax Biomarker in a Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurriaan Huskens

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A supramolecular platform based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs has been implemented in a microfluidic device. The system has been applied for the sensing of two different analyte types: biologically relevant phosphate anions and aromatic carboxylic acids, which are important for anthrax detection. A Eu(III-EDTA complex was bound to β-cyclodextrin monolayers via orthogonal supramolecular host-guest interactions. The self-assembly of the Eu(III-EDTA conjugate and naphthalene β-diketone as an antenna resulted in the formation of a highly luminescent lanthanide complex on the microchannel surface. Detection of different phosphate anions and aromatic carboxylic acids was demonstrated by monitoring the decrease in red emission following displacement of the antenna by the analyte. Among these analytes, adenosine triphosphate (ATP and pyrophosphate, as well as dipicolinic acid (DPA which is a biomarker for anthrax, showed a strong response. Parallel fabrication of five sensing SAMs in a single multichannel chip was performed, as a first demonstration of phosphate and carboxylic acid screening in a multiplexed format that allows a general detection platform for both analyte systems in a single test run with µM and nM detection sensitivity for ATP and DPA, respectively.

  16. Performance study of microfluidic devices for blood plasma separation—a designer’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Siddhartha; Bala Varun Kumar, Y. V.; Prabhakar, Amit; Joshi, Suhas S.; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-08-01

    In this work, design and experiments on various blood plasma microdevices based on hydrodynamic flow separation techniques is carried out. We study their performance as a function of dependent governing parameters such as flow rate, feed hematocrit, and microchannel geometry. This work focuses on understanding separation phenomena in simple geometries; subsequently, individual simple geometrical parameters and biophysical effects are combined to fabricate hybridized designs, resulting in higher separation efficiencies. The distinctive features of our microfluidic devices are that they employ elevated dimensions (of the order of hundreds of microns), and thereby can be operated continuously over sufficient duration without clogging, while simplicity of fabrication makes them cost effective. The microdevices have been experimentally demonstrated over the entire range of hematocrit (i.e. from Hct 7% to Hct 45%). A high separation efficiency of about (78.34  ±  2.7)% with pure blood is achieved in our best hybrid design. We believe that the theory and experimental results presented in this study will aid designers and researchers working in the field of blood plasma separation microdevices.

  17. A microfluidic device for on-chip agarose microbead generation with ultralow reagent consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Linda; Padirac, Adrien; Kaneda, Shohei; Genot, Anthony J; Rondelez, Yannick; Hober, Didier; Collard, Dominique; Fujii, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Water-in-oil microdroplets offer microreactors for compartmentalized biochemical reactions with high throughput. Recently, the combination with a sol-gel switch ability, using agarose-in-oil microdroplets, has increased the range of possible applications, allowing for example the capture of amplicons in the gel phase for the preservation of monoclonality during a PCR reaction. Here, we report a new method for generating such agarose-in-oil microdroplets on a microfluidic device, with minimized inlet dead volume, on-chip cooling, and in situ monitoring of biochemical reactions within the gelified microbeads. We used a flow-focusing microchannel network and successfully generated agarose microdroplets at room temperature using the "push-pull" method. This method consists in pushing the oil continuous phase only, while suction is applied to the device outlet. The agarose phase present at the inlet is thus aspirated in the device, and segmented in microdroplets. The cooling system consists of two copper wires embedded in the microfluidic device. The transition from agarose microdroplets to microbeads provides additional stability and facilitated manipulation. We demonstrate the potential of this method by performing on-chip a temperature-triggered DNA isothermal amplification in agarose microbeads. Our device thus provides a new way to generate microbeads with high throughput and no dead volume for biochemical applications. PMID:24106525

  18. Development of optical sensing system for detection of Fe ions using conductive polymer actuator based microfluidic pump

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Ho; Lau, King-Tong; Fay, Cormac; Diamond, Dermot

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel microfluidic optical sensing system by combining a low-power conductive polymer -based microfluidic pump and a microfluidic chip integrated with an optical sensor. A self priming microfluidic pump is developed using a polypyrrole. A microfluidic chip- optical detector module that contained an optical cuvette with LED and photo-diode optical sensing module was fabricated. Integration of the micro pump and the microfluidic chips complete...

  19. Experimental and numerical studies of a microfluidic device with compliant chambers for flow stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports experimental and numerical studies of a passive microfluidic device that stabilizes a pulsating incoming flow and delivers a steady flow at the outlet. The device employs a series of chambers along the flow direction with a thin polymeric membrane (of thickness 75–250 µm) serving as the compliant boundary. The deformation of the membrane allows accumulation of fluid during an overflow and discharge of fluid during an underflow for flow stabilization. Coupled fluid-structure simulations are performed using Mooney–Rivlin formulations to account for a thin hyperelastic membrane material undergoing large deformations to accurately predict the device performance. The device was fabricated with PDMS as the substrate material and thin PDMS membrane as the compliant boundary. The performance of the device is defined in terms of a parameter called ‘Attenuation Factor (AF)’. The effect of various design parameters including membrane thickness, elastic modulus, chamber size and number of chambers in series as well as operating conditions including the outlet pressure, mean input flow rate, fluctuation amplitude and frequency on the device performance were studied using experiments and simulations. The simulation results successfully confront the experimental data (within 10%) which validates the numerical simulations. The device was used at the exit of a PZT actuated valveless micropump to take pulsating flow at the upstream and deliver steady flow downstream. The amplitude of the pulsating flow delivered by the micropump was significantly reduced (AF = 0.05 for a device with three 4 mm chambers) but at the expense of a reduction in the pressure capability (<20%). The proposed device could potentially be used for reducing flow pulsations in practical microfluidic circuits. (paper)

  20. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Fabrication and Manipulation of Nonspherical Polymer Particles in Ferrofluid-Based Droplet Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Sheppard, Gareth R; Locklin, Jason; Mao, Leidong

    2015-08-11

    We report a novel magnetic-field-assisted method for the fabrication and manipulation of nonspherical polymer particles within a ferrofluid-based droplet microfluidic device. Shape control and chain assembly of droplets with tunable lengths have been achieved. PMID:26212067

  1. Microfluidic devices for analysis of spatial orientation behaviors in semi-restrained Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E McCormick

    Full Text Available This article describes the fabrication and use of microfluidic devices for investigating spatial orientation behaviors in nematode worms (Caenorhabditis elegans. Until now, spatial orientation has been studied in freely moving nematodes in which the frequency and nature of encounters with the gradient are uncontrolled experimental variables. In the new devices, the nematode is held in place by a restraint that aligns the longitudinal axis of the body with the border between two laminar fluid streams, leaving the animal's head and tail free to move. The content of the fluid streams can be manipulated to deliver step gradients in space or time. We demonstrate the utility of the device by identifying previously uncharacterized aspects of the behavioral mechanisms underlying chemotaxis, osmotic avoidance, and thermotaxis in this organism. The new devices are readily adaptable to behavioral and imaging studies involving fluid borne stimuli in a wide range of sensory modalities.

  2. Microfluidic device to study cell transmigration under physiological shear stress conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Moresco, Jacob Lange;

    2011-01-01

    the membrane under flow conditions. The 3D environment of migrating cells is imitated by injecting cell adhesion proteins to coat the membrane in the device. We tested the developed device with Jurkat cells migration towards medium supplemented with serum, and with chemokine induced lymphocytes...... natural migration process. Here we describe a novel in vitro cell transmigration microfluidic assay, which mimicks physiological shear flow conditions in blood vessels. The device was designed to incorporate the principles of both the Boyden chamber and the shear flow chamber assay, i.e. migration through...... migration. The applied continuous flow of cell suspension and chemoattractant ensures that the concentration gradient is maintained in time and space. The cell adhesion proteins used to enhance cell migration in the device were fibronectin and VCAM-1. We successfully observed a multistep transmigration...

  3. Micro-PIT/V --- Simultaneous temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottebaum, Tait

    2008-11-01

    The use of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices has been demonstrated. Implementation of TLC thermometry at the micro-scale is significantly different than at the macro-scale due to the constraints on imaging and illumination configurations and the proximity of the measurements to interfaces and surfaces from which light will scatter. Unlike in micro-PIV, wavelength filtering (such as with fluorescent particles) cannot be used to remove undesired reflections, because the temperature information is carried by the particle color. Therefore, circular polarization filtering is used, exploiting the circular dichroism of TLC. Micro-PIT/V will enable new investigations into the physics of microfluidic devices involving temperature gradients, such as thermocapillary actuated devices and many ``lab-on-a-chip'' applications involving temperature sensitive chemical and biological processes. In addition, the design of operational devices can be improved by applying micro-PIT/V to the characterization of prototypes.

  4. A spring-driven press device for hot embossing and thermal bonding of PMMA microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2010-08-01

    A novel spring-driven press device was designed and manufactured for hot embossing and thermal bonding of PMMA microfluidic chips in this work. This simple device consisted of two semi-cylinder silicone rubber press heads, three steel clamping plates, and three compression springs that were assembled together using two screw bolts and two butterfly nuts. The three springs were clamped between the upper and the middle clamping plates, whereas the two press heads were assembled between the middle and the lower clamping plates. After an epoxy template covered by a PMMA plate or a PMMA channel plate together with a cover were sandwiched between two microscopic glass slides for embossing or bonding, respectively, they were clamped between the two elastic press heads of the press device by fastening the screw nuts on the upper clamping plate. Because the convex press heads applied pressure along the middle line of the glass slides, they would deform resulting in a negative pressure gradient from the middle to the sides so that air bubbles between the sandwiched parts could be squeezed out during embossing and bonding processes. High-quality PMMA microfluidic chips were prepared by using this unique device and were successfully applied in the electrophoretic separation of several cations. PMID:20665912

  5. Microfluidic CARS cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Han-Wei; Bao, Ning; Le, Thuc T.; Lu, Chang; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) flow cytometry was demonstrated by combining a laser-scanning CARS microscope with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device. Line-scanning across the hydrodynamically focused core stream was performed for detection of flowing objects. Parameters were optimized by utilizing polystyrene beads as flowing particles. Population measurements of adipocytes isolated from mouse fat tissues demonstrated the viability of microfluidic CARS cytom...

  6. Low-temperature bonded glass-membrane microfluidic device for in vitro organ-on-a-chip cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organson- a-chip", which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass based devices have long been utilised in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multi-layered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimised on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650 °C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050 °C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150 °C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 hours, indicating sufficient bond strength for long term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  7. HistoFlex-a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David;

    2011-01-01

    for performing in the HistoFlex. The hybridization step was significantly enhanced using flow based incubations due to improved hybridization efficiency. The HistoFlex device enabled a fast miRNA ISH assay (3 hours) which provided higher hybridization signal intensity compared to using conventional techniques (5......A microfluidic device (the HistoFlex) designed to perform and monitor molecular biological assays under dynamic flow conditions on microscope slide-substrates, with special emphasis on analyzing histological tissue sections, is presented. Microscope slides were reversibly sealed onto a cast...... h 40 min). We further demonstrate that the improved hybridization efficiency using the HistoFlex permits more complex assays e. g. those comprising sequential hybridization and detection of two miRNAs to be performed with significantly increased sensitivity. The HistoFlex provides a new histological...

  8. Microfluidics-based laser cell-micropatterning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to place individual cells into an engineered microenvironment in a cell-culture model is critical for the study of in vivo relevant cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Microfluidics provides a high-throughput modality to inject various cell types into a microenvironment. Laser guided systems provide the high spatial and temporal resolution necessary for single-cell micropatterning. Combining these two techniques, the authors designed, constructed, tested and evaluated (1) a novel removable microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip and (2) a combined system that uses the novel biochip coupled with a laser guided cell-micropatterning system to place individual cells into both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays. Cell-suspensions of chick forebrain neurons and glial cells were loaded into their respective inlet reservoirs and traversed the microfluidic channels until reaching the outlet ports. Individual cells were trapped and guided from the outlet of a microfluidic channel to a target site on the cell-culture substrate. At the target site, 2D and 3D pattern arrays were constructed with micron-level accuracy. Single-cell manipulation was accomplished at a rate of 150 μm s−1 in the radial plane and 50 μm s−1 in the axial direction of the laser beam. Results demonstrated that a single-cell can typically be patterned in 20–30 s, and that highly accurate and reproducible cellular arrays and systems can be achieved through coupling the microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip with the laser guided system. (paper)

  9. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  10. Novel Polymer Microfluidics Technology for In Situ Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a novel microfluidic device that combines rigid monolithic porous polymer based micro-capillary electrochromatography...

  11. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based ...

  12. Room-temperature intermediate layer bonding for microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J.; Tiggelaar, R.; Yang, M.L.; Schlautmann, S.; Zuilhof, H.; Gardeniers, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a novel room-temperature bonding technique based on chemically activated Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) sheet as an intermediate between chemically activated substrates is presented. Surfaces of silicon and glass substrates are chemically modified with APTES bearing amine terminal

  13. Micro-chemical synthesis of molecular probes on an electronic microfluidic device

    OpenAIRE

    Keng, Pei Yuin; Chen, Supin; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Shah, Gaurav J.; Dooraghi, Alex; Michael E. Phelps; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; van Dam, R. Michael

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an all-electronic digital microfluidic device for microscale chemical synthesis in organic solvents, operated by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). As an example of the principles, we demonstrate the multistep synthesis of [18F]FDG, the most common radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET), with high and reliable radio-fluorination efficiency of [18F]FTAG (88 ± 7%, n = 11) and quantitative hydrolysis to [18F]FDG (> 95%, n = 11). We furthermore show that batches of...

  14. High-stringency screening of target-binding partners using a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Hyongsok; Lou, Xinhui; Lagally, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides a method of screening a library of candidate agents by contacting the library with a target in a reaction mixture under a condition of high stringency, wherein the target includes a tag that responds to a controllable force applied to the tag, and passing the members of the library through a microfluidic device in a manner that exposes the library members to the controllable force, thereby displacing members of the library that are bound to the target relative to their unbound counterparts. Kits and systems for use with the methods of the invention are also provided.

  15. Integrated Microfluidic System for Size-Based Selection and Trapping of Giant Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazayama, Yuki; Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-19

    Vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) have attracted interest as artificial cell models and have been widely studied to explore lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions. However, the size dispersity of liposomes prepared by conventional methods was a major problem that inhibited their use in high-throughput analyses based on monodisperse liposomes. In this study, we developed an integrative microfluidic device that enables both the size-based selection and trapping of liposomes. This device consists of hydrodynamic selection and trapping channels in series, which made it possible to successfully produce an array of more than 60 monodisperse liposomes from a polydisperse liposome suspension with a narrow size distribution (the coefficient of variation was less than 12%). We successfully observed a size-dependent response of the liposomes to sequential osmotic stimuli, which had not clarified so far, by using this device. Our device will be a powerful tool to facilitate the statistical analysis of liposome dynamics. PMID:26691855

  16. A microfluidic device for simple and rapid evaluation of multidrug efflux pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota eIino

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, multidrug resistant pathogens have disseminated widely owing essentially to their increased multidrug efflux pump activity. Presently, there is a scarcity of new antibacterial agents, and hence, inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND family appear useful in the treatment of infections by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Moreover, recent progress in microfabrication technologies has expanded the application of nano/micro-devices to the field of human healthcare, such as the detection of infections and diagnosis of diseases. We developed a microfluidic channel device for a simple and rapid evaluation of bacterial drug efflux activity. By combining the microfluidic device with a fluorogenic compound, fluorescein-di-β-D-galactopyranoside, which is hydrolyzed to a fluorescent dye in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, we successfully evaluated the effects of inhibitors on the RND-type multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in E. coli. Our new method successfully detected the MexB-specific inhibitory effect of D13-9001 and revealed an unexpected membrane-permeabilizing effect of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, which has long been used as an inhibitor.

  17. Magnetophoresis 'meets' viscoelasticity: deterministic separation of magnetic particles in a modular microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Madadi, Hojjat; Villone, Massimiliano M; D'Avino, Gaetano; Cusano, Angela M; Vecchione, Raffaele; Ventre, Maurizio; Maffettone, Pier Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-04-21

    The deflection of magnetic beads in a microfluidic channel through magnetophoresis can be improved if the particles are somehow focused along the same streamline in the device. We design and fabricate a microfluidic device made of two modules, each one performing a unit operation. A suspension of magnetic beads in a viscoelastic medium is fed to the first module, which is a straight rectangular-shaped channel. Here, the magnetic particles are focused by exploiting fluid viscoelasticity. Such a channel is one inlet of the second module, which is a H-shaped channel, where a buffer stream is injected in the second inlet. A permanent magnet is used to displace the magnetic beads from the original to the buffer stream. Experiments with a Newtonian suspending fluid, where no focusing occurs, are carried out for comparison. When viscoelastic focusing and magnetophoresis are combined, magnetic particles can be deterministically separated from the original streamflow to the buffer, thus leading to a high deflection efficiency (up to ~96%) in a wide range of flow rates. The effect of the focusing length on the deflection of particles is also investigated. Finally, the proposed modular device is tested to separate magnetic and non-magnetic beads. PMID:25732596

  18. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension-confined microfluidic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angshuman Nag; Biswa Ranjan Panda; Arun Chattopadhyay

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we report a new method of fabrication of surface tension-confined microfluidic devices on glass. We have also successfully carried out some well-known chemical reactions in these fluidic channels to demonstrate the usefulness of these wall-less microchannels. The confined flow path of liquid was achieved on the basis of extreme differences in hydrophobic and hydrophilic characters of the surface. The flow paths were fabricated by making parallel lines using permanent marker pen ink or other polymer on glass surfaces. Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary forces, confined to the hydrophilic areas without wetting the hydrophobic lines, achieving liquid confinement without physical side-walls. We have shown that the microfluidic devices designed in such a way can be very useful due to their simplicity and low fabrication cost. More importantly, we have also demonstrated that the minimum requirement of such a working device is a hydrophilic line surrounded by hydrophobic environment, two walls of which are constituted of air and the rest is made of a hydrophobic surface.

  19. Immobilization Techniques and Integrated Signal Enhancement for POC Nanocolor Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies Schlauf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonance enhanced absorption (REA nanocolor microfluidic devices are new promising bioassay platforms, which employ nanoparticle- (NP- protein conjugates for the immunodetection of medically relevant markers in biologic samples such as blood, urine, and saliva. The core component of a REA test device is a PET chip coated with aluminum and SiO2 thin layers, onto which biorecognitive molecules are immobilized. Upon addition of a sample containing the analyte of interest, a NP-protein-analyte complex is formed in the test device that is captured on the REA chip, for example, via streptavidin-biotin interaction. Thereby, a colored symbol is generated, which allows optical readout. Silver enhancement of the bound nanoparticles may be used to increase the sensitivity of the assay. Herein, we demonstrate that adsorptive immobilization via a cationic polymeric interlayer is a competitive and fast technique for the binding of the capture protein streptavidin onto planar SiO2 surfaces such as REA biochips. Moreover, we report the development of a silver enhancement technology that operates even in the presence of high chloride concentrations as may be encountered in biologic samples. The silver enhancement reagents may be integrated into the microfluidic assay platform to be released upon sample addition. Hereby, a highly sensitive one-step assay can be realized.

  20. Electric Characterization and Modeling of Microfluidic-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sacco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric response to an external periodic voltage of small amplitude of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs made up with an alternative architecture has been investigated. DSCs have been fabricated with a reversible sealing structure, based on microfluidic concepts, with a precise control on the geometric parameters of the active chamber. Cells with different electrolyte thicknesses have been characterized, without varying the thickness of the TiO2 layer, both under illumination and in dark conditions. Measurements of the electric impedance have been performed in the presence of an external bias ranging from 0 V to 0.8 V. The experimental data have been analyzed in terms of a transmission line model, with two transport channels. The results show that the photovoltaic performances of the microfluidic cell are comparable with those obtained in irreversibly sealed structures, actually demonstrating the reliability of the proposed device.

  1. A fluorescence-based centrifugal microfluidic system for parallel detection of multiple allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. L.; Ho, H. P.; Cheung, K. L.; Kong, S. K.; Suen, Y. K.; Kwan, Y. W.; Li, W. J.; Wong, C. K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports a robust polymer based centrifugal microfluidic analysis system that can provide parallel detection of multiple allergens in vitro. Many commercial food products (milk, bean, pollen, etc.) may introduce allergy to people. A low-cost device for rapid detection of allergens is highly desirable. With this as the objective, we have studied the feasibility of using a rotating disk device incorporating centrifugal microfluidics for performing actuationfree and multi-analyte detection of different allergen species with minimum sample usage and fast response time. Degranulation in basophils or mast cells is an indicator to demonstrate allergic reaction. In this connection, we used acridine orange (AO) to demonstrate degranulation in KU812 human basophils. It was found that the AO was released from granules when cells were stimulated by ionomycin, thus signifying the release of histamine which accounts for allergy symptoms [1-2]. Within this rotating optical platform, major microfluidic components including sample reservoirs, reaction chambers, microchannel and flow-control compartments are integrated into a single bio-compatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The flow sequence and reaction time can be controlled precisely. Sequentially through varying the spinning speed, the disk may perform a variety of steps on sample loading, reaction and detection. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using centrifugation as a possible immunoassay system in the future.

  2. Ligation-based mutation detection and RCA in surface un-modified OSTE+ polymer microfluidic chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saharil, Farizah; Ahlford, Annika; Kuhnemund, Malte; Skolimowski, Maciej; Conde, Alvaro; Dufva, Martin; Nilsson, Mats; Brivio, Monica; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Haraldsson, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate DNA mutation detection in surface un-modified polymeric microfluidic chambers without suffering from bubble trapping or bubble formation. Microfluidic devices were manufactured in off-stoichiometry thiol-ene epoxy (OSTE+) polymer using an uncomplicated and rapid...

  3. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones. PMID:27416111

  4. A ferrofluid guided system for the rapid separation of the non-magnetic particles in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmatulu, R; Zhang, B; Nuraje, N

    2010-10-01

    A microfluidic device was fabricated via UV lithography technique to separate non-magnetic fluoresbrite carboxy microspheres (approximately 4.5 microm) in the pH 7 ferrofluids made of magnetite nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm). A mixture of microspheres and ferrofluid was injected to a lithographically developed Y shape microfluidic device, and then by applying the external magnet fields (0.45 T), the microspheres were clearly separated into different channels because of the magnetic force acting on those non-magnetic particles. During this study, various pumping speeds and particle concentrations associated with the various distances between the magnet and the microfluidic device were investigated for an efficient separation. This study may be useful for the separation of biological particles, which are very sensitive to pH value of the solutions. PMID:21137734

  5. A frequency reconfigurable antenna based on digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaci, Yasin; Cetiner, Bedri A

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel antenna reconfiguration mechanism relying on electrowetting based digital microfluidics to implement a frequency reconfigurable antenna operating in the X-band. The antenna built on a quartz substrate (εr = 3.9, tan δ = 0.0002) is a coplanar waveguide fed annular slot antenna, which is monolithically integrated with a microfluidic chip. This chip establishes an electrowetting on dielectric platform with a mercury droplet placed in it. The base contact area of the mercury droplet can be spread out by electrostatic actuation resulting in a change of loading capacitance. This in turn changes the resonant frequency of the antenna enabling a reversible reconfigurable impedance property. This reconfigurable antenna has been designed, fabricated and measured. The frequency of operation is tuned from around 11 GHz to 13 GHz as demonstrated by simulations and measurements. The design methodology, fabrication processes and the experimental results are given and discussed. PMID:23752978

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Micro-fluidic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clague, D S

    2002-01-28

    The results to date do indeed show that the lattice Boltzmann method accurately solves relevant, non-trivial flow problems. The parallelization of both the fluid and the mobile species in flow has enhanced this capability such that it is useful for solving relevant problems in a timely fashion. The initial studies of stationary or capture species revealed evidence of hydrodynamic screening between upstream and downstream particles. Numerical studies reveal that the critical length for which the test particle is hydrodynamically decoupled from upstream and downstream particles is on the order of 30 sphere radii. For mobile species, the LB capability was shown to be naturally suited for predicting the hydrodynamic lift phenomenon (inertial lift). A conversion factor was developed based on scaling arguments to include relevant forces generated by external fields. Using this conversion, an analytic solution for the Dielectrophoretic force was included into the LB capability which enabled the study of Dielectrophoretic particle capture. The Non-Newtonian enhancements have expanded the applicability of the LB capability to more physical systems. Specifically, with the bead-n-spring representation of macromolecules researchers will be able to study chain dynamics in micro-, physiological and Bio-MEMS environments. Furthermore, the ability to capture the shear thinning behavior, without any increase in computational time, positions this capability to be applied to a whole host of new problems involving biofluids.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Micro-fluidic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results to date do indeed show that the lattice Boltzmann method accurately solves relevant, non-trivial flow problems. The parallelization of both the fluid and the mobile species in flow has enhanced this capability such that it is useful for solving relevant problems in a timely fashion. The initial studies of stationary or capture species revealed evidence of hydrodynamic screening between upstream and downstream particles. Numerical studies reveal that the critical length for which the test particle is hydrodynamically decoupled from upstream and downstream particles is on the order of 30 sphere radii. For mobile species, the LB capability was shown to be naturally suited for predicting the hydrodynamic lift phenomenon (inertial lift). A conversion factor was developed based on scaling arguments to include relevant forces generated by external fields. Using this conversion, an analytic solution for the Dielectrophoretic force was included into the LB capability which enabled the study of Dielectrophoretic particle capture. The Non-Newtonian enhancements have expanded the applicability of the LB capability to more physical systems. Specifically, with the bead-n-spring representation of macromolecules researchers will be able to study chain dynamics in micro-, physiological and Bio-MEMS environments. Furthermore, the ability to capture the shear thinning behavior, without any increase in computational time, positions this capability to be applied to a whole host of new problems involving biofluids

  8. Comprehensive study of an optical fiber plasmonic microsensor in a microfluidic device

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the last decade, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a very sensitive technique for real-time detection of chemical and biochemical targets in many application areas. Considering the important needs for analyzing biomolecular reactions through automated and miniaturized components, optical fiber sensors based on the SPR effects are presently considered as an alternative in the development of microsensors. In the present work, a microfluidic system associated with...

  9. Comprehensive study of an optical fiber plasmonic microsensor in a microfluidic device

    OpenAIRE

    Makiabadi, T.; Le Nader, V.; Kanso, M.; Louarn, G.

    2011-01-01

    International audience In the last decade, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a very sensitive technique for real-time detection of chemical and biochemical targets in many application areas. Considering the important needs for analyzing biomolecular reactions through automated and miniaturized components, optical fiber sensors based on the SPR effects are presently considered as an alternative in the development of microsensors. In the present work, a microfluidic system associate...

  10. Quasi-Optical Terahertz Microfluidic Devices for Chemical Sensing and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Liu; Zhenguo Jiang; Syed (Shawon) Rahman; Md. Itrat Bin Shams; Benxin Jing; Akash Kannegulla; Li-Jing Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We first review the development of a frequency domain quasi-optical terahertz (THz) chemical sensing and imaging platform consisting of a quartz-based microfluidic subsystem in our previous work. We then report the application of this platform to sensing and characterizing of several selected liquid chemical samples from 570–630 GHz. THz sensing of chemical mixtures including isopropylalcohol-water (IPA-H2O) mixtures and acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O) mixtures have been successfully demonstrate...

  11. Challenges in the Use of Compact Disc-Based Centrifugal Microfluidics for Healthcare Diagnostics at the Extreme Point of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordon Gilmore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Compact Disc (CD-based centrifugal microfluidic technology has drawn a great deal of interest within research communities due to its potential use in biomedical applications. The technology has been referred to by different names, including compact-disc microfluidics, lab-on-a-disk, lab-on-a-CD and bio-disk. This paper critically reviews the state-of-the-art in CD-based centrifugal microfluidics devices and attempts to identify the challenges that, if solved, would enable their use in the extreme point of care. Sample actuation, manufacturing, reagent storage and implementation, target multiplexing, bio-particle detection, required hardware and system disposal, and sustainability are the topics of focus.

  12. Microfluidic enzymatic DNA extraction on a hybrid polyester-toner-PMMA device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brandon L; Birch, Christopher; Li, Jingyi; DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Le Roux, Delphine; Nelson, Daniel A; Tsuei, An-Chi; Mills, Daniel L; Krauss, Shannon T; Root, Brian E; Landers, James P

    2016-08-01

    To date, the forensic community regards solid phase extraction (SPE) as the most effective methodology for the purification of DNA for use in short tandem repeat (STR) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. While a dominant methodology, SPE protocols generally necessitate the use of PCR inhibitors (guanidine, IPA) and, in addition, can demand timescales of up to 30 min due to the necessary load, wash and elution steps. The recent discovery and characterization of the EA1 protease has allowed the user to enzymatically extract (not purify) DNA, dramatically simplifying the task of producing a PCR-ready template. Despite this, this procedure has yet to make a significant impact on microfluidic technologies. Here, we describe a microfluidic device that implements the EA1 enzyme for DNA extraction by incorporating it into a hybrid microdevice comprising laminated polyester (Pe) and PMMA layers. The PMMA layer provides a macro-to-micro interface for introducing the biological sample into the microfluidic architecture, whilst also possessing the necessary dimensions to function as the swab acceptor. Pre-loaded reagents are then introduced to the swab chamber centrifugally, initiating DNA extraction at 75 °C. The extraction of DNA occurs in timescales of less than 3 min and any external hardware associated with the transportation of reagents by pneumatic pumping is eliminated. Finally, multiplexing is demonstrated with a circular device containing eight separate chambers for the simultaneous processing of eight buccal swab samples. The studies here provide DNA concentrations up to 10 ng μL(-1) with a 100% success rate in less than 3 minutes. The STR profiles generated using these extracted samples demonstrate that the DNA is of PCR forensic-quality and adequate for human identification. PMID:27250903

  13. Out-of-focus effects on microscale schlieren measurements of mass transport in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Tuan; Sun, Chen-li

    2016-08-01

    The microscale schlieren technique provides a means for a non-invasive, full-field measurement for mixing microfluidics with excellent sensitivity and resolution. Nevertheless, an out-of-focus effect due to microscopic optics may lead to undesirable errors in quantifying the gradient information at high degrees of magnification. If the channel in the microfluidic device under study is too deep, light deflection caused by inhomogeneity located far from the focal plane may contributes little to the intensity change on the image plane. To address this issue, we propose the use of a weighting function that approximates a Gaussian profile with an optical-system-dependable width. We assume that the resultant intensity change is proportional to a weighted sum of the gradient across the channel depth and acquire micro-schlieren images of fluid mixing in a T-junction microchannel at various positions along the optical axis. For each objective, the width of the weighting function is then determined iteratively by curve fitting the ratio of changes in grayscale readouts for out-of-focus and focus micro-schlieren images. The standard deviation in the Gaussian distribution facilitates the quantification of the out-of-focus effect. In addition, we measure the sensitivities of a microscale schlieren system equipped with different objectives and compare the values to the model. Despite its better resolution, we find that an objective with higher magnification suffers from a more severe out-of-focus effect and a loss of sensitivity. Equations are proposed for estimations of the standard deviation and the sensitivity of microscale schlieren measurements. The outcome will facilitate the selection of proper microchannel depths for various microscale schlieren systems or vice versa, thus improving the precision of micro-schlieren measurements in microfluidic devices.

  14. A polymeric waveguide resonant mirror (RM) device for detection in microfluidic flow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi; Goddard, Nick J

    2013-06-01

    A novel resonant mirror (RM) device, which consisted of silica sol-gel spacer and polystyrene waveguide layers on a standard microscope slide glass substrate, was developed in this work. The device was successfully used to measure the absorption spectrum of methylene blue with a limit of detection (LOD) of at most 20.8 μM at 635 nm and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 0.94 cm(-1). A RM device consisting of dye-doped polystyrene waveguide layer was then demonstrated to be suitable to monitor antibody-antigen (in this case, anti-IgG and IgG) binding and was shown to be capable of detecting at least 100 nM IgG. The sensitivity of the device was estimated to be 17.27° per refractive index unit (RIU), which corresponds to a resolution of 1.45 × 10(-4) RIU for the set-up used. The RM device developed in this work can be easily integrated with microfluidic devices to identify and quantify (bio) chemical species by either absorption spectroscopy or measurement of effective optical thickness or both. In addition, the device was fabricated using a simple and low cost fabrication technique, spin coating. Hence, it can be easily mass produced. PMID:23595031

  15. Biologically-inspired Microfluidic Platforms and Aptamer-based Nanobiosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hansang

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in micro/nano- technologies have shown high potentials in the field of quantitative biology, biomedical science, and analytical chemistry. However, micro/nano fluidics still requires multi-layered structures, complex plumbing/tubing, and external equipments for large-scale applications and nanotechnology-based sensors demand high cost. Interestingly, nature has much simpler and more effective solutions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop novel microfluidic platforms a...

  16. Effect of thermal treatment on the chemical resistance of polydimethylsiloxane for microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the use of thermally treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for chemically-resistant microchannels. When the PDMS underwent the thermal treatment at 300 °C, swelling was reduced and the surface of the PDMS microfluidic channel endured well in the extracting media such as dichloromethane. Furthermore, despite the small decrease in size after thermal treatment, both the channel shape and transparency were maintained without showing fluid leakage. The thermally treated PDMS had more hydrophilic properties compared to the untreated PDMS. A single step post-casting process described in this work does not require complex chemical treatments or introduction of foreign materials to the host PDMS substrate, thus expanding the application area of PDMS-based microfluidics. (paper)

  17. Fabrication of robust tooling for mass production of polymeric microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer microfluidic devices are gaining popularity for bio-applications. In both commonly used methods for the fabrication of polymer microfluidic devices, i.e. injection molding and hot-embossing, the quality of a mold insert is of high importance. Micro powder injection molding (μPIM) provides a suitable option for metal mold insert fabrication. In this paper, two mold inserts with micro-features of different patterns and sizes were produced using 316L stainless steel powder and an in-house binder system. The mold inserts were successfully used to produce cyclic olefin copolymer (COC, trade name TOPAS) micromixer plates with micro-channels of widths 100 µm and 50 µm. Compared with CNC-machined hot work steel mold inserts, the quality of the micro-channels is better as far as geometrical quality and dimensional tolerance are concerned. However, surface finish and flatness of the μPIM mold inserts are inferior to those of CNC-machined mold inserts.

  18. Advanced cleanup process of the free-flow microfluidic device for protein analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of samples preparation is generally recognized as a bottleneck for the rapid analysis of protein because of the off-chip performance in many cases. In this study, we used the charge characteristics of protein to develop a simple and rapid electro-microfluidic desalting system as an effective means of cleaning up protein sample. When we loaded a urea-rich protein sample and a buffer solution into a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber, the microfluidic device was able to separate the charged protein sample and the non-charged urea. With a 90 V electric field in the FFZE chamber, the removal efficiency of the urea was about 88% and the recovery of the protein was 78%. In addition, the desalted protein sample used in this device showed significant improvement with respect to the MALDI-TOF-MS spectrum signal of a fusion protein, which was fused to the gold-binding polypeptide with enhanced green fluorescent protein, as a model protein. The inflow of the purified fusion protein sample can be successfully immobilized on the gold surface and analyzed by confocal fluorescence microscopy and surface plasmon resonance for biotechnological sensors

  19. An optimised detector for in-situ high-resolution NMR in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Graeme; Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Integration of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices is challenging due to limited sensitivity and line broadening caused by magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneities. We present a novel double-stripline NMR probe head that accommodates planar microfluidic devices, and obtains the NMR spectrum from a rectangular sample chamber on the chip with a volume of 2 μ l. Finite element analysis was used to jointly optimise the detector and sample volume geometry for sensitivity and RF homogeneity. A prototype of the optimised design has been built, and its properties have been characterised experimentally. The performance in terms of sensitivity and RF homogeneity closely agrees with the numerical predictions. The system reaches a mass limit of detection of 1.57 nmol √{ s } , comparing very favourably with other micro-NMR systems. The spectral resolution of this chip/probe system is better than 1.75 Hz at a magnetic field of 7 T, with excellent line shape.

  20. Microfluidic biosensing device for controlled trapping and detection of magnetic microparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2013-05-01

    A magnetic microfluidic device is proposed to transport and trap magnetic microparticles (MPs) to a sensing area. Once the MPs are concentrated in the vicinity of the sensing area, a spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor is used to detect their presence. The device is used for the detection of biological targets once they are labeled with functionalized MPs. Manipulation of the MPs is achieved by employing a microstructure which consists of planar ringshaped conducting microloops. These microloops are designed to produce high magnetic field gradients which are directly proportional to the force applied to manipulate the MPs. Upon sequential application of current, starting from the outermost loop, MPs are directed to move from the outermost to the innermost loop. The speed with which the MPs move towards the sensing area is controlled by the speed with which current is switched between the loops. On top of the microstructure, a microfluidic channel is fabricated using a standard photolithography technique and a dry film resist layer (Ordyl SY355). Experimental results showed that MPs of different diameters were successfully trapped at the sensing area and detected by the GMR sensor located directly under the innermost square loop. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. Nanomaterial based detection and degradation of biological and chemical contaminants in a microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan

    Monitoring and remediation of environmental contaminants (biological and chemical) form the crux of global water resource management. There is an extant need to develop point-of-use, low-power, low-cost tools that can address this problem effectively with minimal environmental impact. Nanotechnology and microfluidics have made enormous advances during the past decade in the area of biosensing and environmental remediation. The "marriage" of these two technologies can effectively address some of the above-mentioned needs. In this dissertation, nanomaterials were used in conjunction with microfluidic techniques to detect and degrade biological and chemical pollutants. In the first project, a point-of-use sensor was developed for detection of trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. A self-organizing nanotubular titanium dioxide (TNA) synthesized by electrochemical anodization and functionalized with photocatalytically deposited platinum (Pt/TNA) was applied to the detection. The morphology and crystallinity of the Pt/TNA sensor was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dis- persive x-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor could detect TCE in the concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 ppm. The room-temperature operation capability of the sensor makes it less power intensive and can potentially be incorporated into a field-based sensor. In the second part, TNA synthesized on a foil was incorporated into a flow-based microfluidic format and applied to degradation of a model pollutant, methylene blue. The system was demonstrated to have enhanced photocatalytic performance at higher flow rates (50-200 muL/min) over the same microfluidic format with TiO2 nanoparticulate (commercial P25) catalyst. The microfluidic format with TNA catalyst was able to achieve 82% fractional conversion of 18 mM methylene blue in comparison to 55% in the case of the TiO2 nanoparticulate layer at a flow rate of 200 L/min. The microfluidic device was

  2. A High Power-Density Mediator-Free Microfluidic Biophotovoltaic Device for Cyanobacterial Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Bombelli, Paolo; Herling, Therese W; Howe, Christopher J; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2014-01-01

    Biophotovoltaics has emerged as a promising technology for generating renewable energy since it relies on living organisms as inexpensive, self-repairing and readily available catalysts to produce electricity from an abundant resource - sunlight. The efficiency of biophotovoltaic cells, however, has remained significantly lower than that achievable through synthetic materials. Here, we devise a platform to harness the large power densities afforded by miniaturised geometries. To this effect, we have developed a soft-lithography approach for the fabrication of microfluidic biophotovoltaic devices that do not require membranes or mediators. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells were injected and allowed to settle on the anode, permitting the physical proximity between cells and electrode required for mediator-free operation. We demonstrate power densities of above 100 mW/m2 for a chlorophyll concentration of 100 {\\mu}M under white light, a high value for biophotovoltaic devices without extrinsic supply of additional...

  3. Crystallization Kinetics of Partially Crystalline Emulsion Droplets in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prileszky, Tamás A; Furst, Eric M

    2016-05-24

    We measure the crystallization kinetics of petrolatum-hexadecane emulsion droplets as they are produced in a microfluidic device. After droplets form, they are cooled, causing an interior network of wax crystallites to grow. Polarized light microscopy is used to quantify the droplet crystallinity as a function of residence time in the device. Two wavelengths and two polarization orientations are used to decouple the wavelength dependence of the optical retardation, the crystallite orientation, and the crystallite number density. The droplet crystallinity follows the Avrami kinetic model with parameter values in agreement with the theoretically expected values. These results provide a means to engineer the crystallization kinetics, stability, and arrested coalescence of partially crystalline emulsion droplets. PMID:27137839

  4. Inexpensive, rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices using overhead transparencies and a laser print, cut and laminate fabrication method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brandon L; Ouyang, Yiwen; Duarte, Gabriela R M; Carrilho, Emanuel; Krauss, Shannon T; Landers, James P

    2015-06-01

    We describe a technique for fabricating microfluidic devices with complex multilayer architectures using a laser printer, a CO2 laser cutter, an office laminator and common overhead transparencies as a printable substrate via a laser print, cut and laminate (PCL) methodology. The printer toner serves three functions: (i) it defines the microfluidic architecture, which is printed on the overhead transparencies; (ii) it acts as the adhesive agent for the bonding of multiple transparency layers; and (iii) it provides, in its unmodified state, printable, hydrophobic 'valves' for fluidic flow control. By using common graphics software, e.g., CorelDRAW or AutoCAD, the protocol produces microfluidic devices with a design-to-device time of ∼40 min. Devices of any shape can be generated for an array of multistep assays, with colorimetric detection of molecular species ranging from small molecules to proteins. Channels with varying depths can be formed using multiple transparency layers in which a CO2 laser is used to remove the polyester from the channel sections of the internal layers. The simplicity of the protocol, availability of the equipment and substrate and cost-effective nature of the process make microfluidic devices available to those who might benefit most from expedited, microscale chemistry. PMID:25974096

  5. Effect of gold nanoparticles on thermal gradient generation and thermotaxis of E. coli cells in microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Nithya; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria responds to changing chemical and thermal environment by moving towards or away from a particular location. In this report, we looked into thermal gradient generation and response of E. coli DH5α cells to thermal gradient in the presence and in the absence of spherical gold nanoparticles (size: 15 to 22 nm) in a static microfluidic environment using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) made microfluidic device. A PDMS-agarose based microfluidic device for generating thermal gradient has been developed and the thermal gradient generation in the device has been validated with the numerical simulation. Our studies revealed that the presence of gold nanoparticles, AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL) has no effect on the thermal gradient generation. The E. coli DH5α cells have been treated with AuNPs of two different concentrations (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL). The thermotaxis behavior of cells in the presence of AuNPs has been studied and compared to the thermotaxis of E.coli DH5α cells in the absence of AuNPs. In case of thermotaxis, in the absence of the AuNPs, the E. coli DH5α cells showed better thermotaxis towards lower temperature range, whereas in the presence of AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL) thermotaxis of the E. coli DH5α cells has been inhibited. The results show that the spherical AuNPs intervenes in the themotaxis of E. coli DH5α cells and inhibits the cell migration. The reason for the failure in thermotaxis response mechanism may be due to decreased F-type ATP synthase activity and collapse of membrane potential by AuNPs, which, in turn, leads to decreased ATP levels. This has been hypothesized since both thermotaxis and chemotaxis follows the same response mechanism for migration in which ATP plays critical role. PMID:27246690

  6. Design and fabrication of a screw-driven multi-channel peristaltic pump for portable microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel peristaltic pump for portable microfluidic devices has been recently designed and fabricated. The operation principle is based on the peristaltic motion of eight elastic pumping channels that are occluded by a screw shaft. The screw shaft rotating inside the pumping channel unit has a spirally arranged projection which deforms and closes down the channels as a normally closed valve. While the shaft rotates, the pinched locations in the channels move either way according to the direction of rotation, squeezing out the fluid inside. It features unlimited and quantitative fluid feeding with a wide range of flow rates for one channel from 3.5 µL min−1 at 3 rpm to 280.2 µL min−1 at 180 rpm. It was demonstrated that pulsation can be drastically reduced by merging two anti-phase channels.

  7. An embedded microretroreflector-based microfluidic immunoassay platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Balakrishnan; Pascente, Carmen; Knoop, Jennifer; Shakarisaz, David; Sherlock, Tim; Kemper, Steven; Kourentzi, Katerina; Renzi, Ronald F; Hatch, Anson V; Olano, Juan; Peng, Bi-Hung; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard

    2016-04-26

    We present a microfluidic immunoassay platform based on the use of linear microretroreflectors embedded in a transparent polymer layer as an optical sensing surface, and micron-sized magnetic particles as light-blocking labels. Retroreflectors return light directly to its source and are highly detectable using inexpensive optics. The analyte is immuno-magnetically pre-concentrated from a sample and then captured on an antibody-modified microfluidic substrate comprised of embedded microretroreflectors, thereby blocking reflected light. Fluidic force discrimination is used to increase specificity of the assay, following which a difference imaging algorithm that can see single 3 μm magnetic particles without optical calibration is used to detect and quantify signal intensity from each sub-array of retroreflectors. We demonstrate the utility of embedded microretroreflectors as a new sensing modality through a proof-of-concept immunoassay for a small, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, Rickettsia conorii, the causative agent of Mediterranean Spotted Fever. The combination of large sensing area, optimized surface chemistry and microfluidic protocols, automated image capture and analysis, and high sensitivity of the difference imaging results in a sensitive immunoassay with a limit of detection of roughly 4000 R. conorii per mL. PMID:27025227

  8. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-01

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10-15 M to 10-11 M.

  9. A capillary-based microfluidic instrument suitable for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Michael C; Phillips, Terry M; Karnes, H Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples to produce clinical or research data often requires measurement of analytes from complex biological matrices and limited volumes. Miniaturized analytical systems capable of minimal sample consumption and reduced analysis times have been employed to meet this need. The small footprint of this technology offers the potential for portability and patient point-of-care testing. A prototype microfluidic system has been developed and is presented for potential rapid assessment of clinical samples. The system has been designed for immunoaffinity chromatography as a means of separating analytes of interest from biological matrices. The instrument is capable of sub-microliter sample injection and detection of labeled antigens by long wavelength laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The laboratory-constructed device is assembled from an array of components including two syringe pumps, a nano-gradient mixing chip, a micro-injector, a diode laser, and a separation capillary column made from a polymer/silica (PEEKsil) tube. An in-house program written with LabVIEW software controls the syringe pumps to perform step gradient elution and collects the LIF signal as a chromatogram. Initial columns were packed with silica beads to evaluate the system. Optimization of the device has been achieved by measuring flow accuracy with respect to column length and particle size. Syringe size and pressure effects have also been used to characterize the capability of the pumps. Based on test results, a 200-microm x 25-mm column packed with 1-microm silica beads was chosen for use with a 500-microL syringe. The system was tested for mixer proportioning by pumping different compositions of buffer and fluorescent dye solutions in a stepwise fashion. A linear response was achieved for increasing concentrations of fluorescent dye by online mixing (R2=0.9998). The effectiveness of an acidic gradient was confirmed by monitoring pH post-column and measuring premixed

  10. Development of microfluidic devices for in situ investigation of cells using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yu-Han; Galvan, Daniel D.; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has immerged as a power analytical and sensing technique for many applications in biomedical diagnosis, life sciences, food safety, and environment monitoring because of its molecular specificity and high sensitivity. The inactive Raman scattering of water molecule makes SERS a suitable tool for studying biological systems. Microfluidic devices have also attracted a tremendous interest for the aforementioned applications. By integrating SERS-active substrates with microfluidic devices, it offers a new capability for in situ investigation of biological systems, their dynamic behaviors, and response to drugs or microenvironment changes. In this work, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with SERS-active substrates surrounding by cell traps in microfluidic channels for in situ study of live cells using SERS. The SERS-active substrates are quasi-3D plasmonic nanostructure array (Q3D-PNA) made in h-PDMS/PMDS with physically separated gold film with nanoholes op top and gold nanodisks at the bottom of nanowells. 3D finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) electromagnetic simulations were performed to design Q3D-PNAs with the strongest local electric fields (hot spots) at the top or bottom water/Au interfaces for sensitive analysis of cells and small components, respectively. The Q3D-PNAs with the hot spots on top and bottom were placed at the up and down stream of the microfluidic channel, respectively. Each Q3D-PNA pattern was surrounded with cell trapping structures. The microfluidic device was fabricated via soft lithography. We demonstrated that normal (COS-7) and cancer (HpeG2) cells were captured on the Q3D-PNAs and investigated in situ using SERS.

  11. A Laminated Microfluidic Device for Comprehensive Preclinical Testing in the Drug ADME Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fan; Qu, Yueyang; Luo, Yong; Fang, Ning; Liu, Yang; Gao, Zhigang; Zhao, Weijie; Lin, Bingcheng

    2016-01-01

    New techniques are urgently needed to replace conventional long and costly pre-clinical testing in the new drug administration process. In this study, a laminated microfluidic device was fabricated to mimic the drug ADME response test in vivo. This proposed device was loaded and cultured with functional cells for drug response investigation and organ tissues that are involved in ADME testing. The drug was introduced from the top of the device and first absorbed by the Caco-2 cell layer, and then metabolized by the primary hepatocyte layer. It subsequently interacted with the MCF-7 cell layer, distributed in the lung, heart and fat tissues, and was finally eliminated through the dialysis membrane. Throughout this on-chip ADME process, the proposed device can be used as a reliable tool to simultaneously evaluate the drug anti-tumor activity, hepatotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, this device was proven to be able to reflect the hepatic metabolism of a drug, drug distribution in the target tissues, and the administration method of a drug. Furthermore, this microdevice is expected to reduce the number of drug candidates and accelerate the pre-clinical testing process subject to animal testing upon adaptation in new drug discovery. PMID:27122192

  12. A Laminated Microfluidic Device for Comprehensive Preclinical Testing in the Drug ADME Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fan; Qu, Yueyang; Luo, Yong; Fang, Ning; Liu, Yang; Gao, Zhigang; Zhao, Weijie; Lin, Bingcheng

    2016-01-01

    New techniques are urgently needed to replace conventional long and costly pre-clinical testing in the new drug administration process. In this study, a laminated microfluidic device was fabricated to mimic the drug ADME response test in vivo. This proposed device was loaded and cultured with functional cells for drug response investigation and organ tissues that are involved in ADME testing. The drug was introduced from the top of the device and first absorbed by the Caco-2 cell layer, and then metabolized by the primary hepatocyte layer. It subsequently interacted with the MCF-7 cell layer, distributed in the lung, heart and fat tissues, and was finally eliminated through the dialysis membrane. Throughout this on-chip ADME process, the proposed device can be used as a reliable tool to simultaneously evaluate the drug anti-tumor activity, hepatotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, this device was proven to be able to reflect the hepatic metabolism of a drug, drug distribution in the target tissues, and the administration method of a drug. Furthermore, this microdevice is expected to reduce the number of drug candidates and accelerate the pre-clinical testing process subject to animal testing upon adaptation in new drug discovery. PMID:27122192

  13. Microfluidic actuation of insulating liquid droplets in a parallel-plate device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In droplet-based microfluidics, the simultaneous movement and manipulation of dielectric and aqueous droplets on a single platform is important. The actuation forces on both dielectric and aqueous droplets can be calculated with an electromechanical model using an equivalent RC circuit. This model predicts that dielectric droplet actuation can be made compatible with electrowetting-based water droplet manipulation if the oil droplet is immersed in water. Operations such as transporting, splitting, merging, and dispensing of dielectric droplets at voltages less than 100 V are demonstrated in a parallel-plate structure. Such capability opens the way to fully automated assembly line formation of single-emulsion droplets.

  14. Highly efficient adenoviral transduction of pancreatic islets using a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pamuditha N; Atto, Zaid; Regeenes, Romario; Tufa, Uilki; Chen, Yih Yang; Chan, Warren C W; Volchuk, Allen; Kilkenny, Dawn M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V

    2016-08-01

    Tissues are challenging to genetically manipulate due to limited penetration of viral particles resulting in low transduction efficiency. We are particularly interested in expressing genetically-encoded sensors in ex vivo pancreatic islets to measure glucose-stimulated metabolism, however poor viral penetration biases these measurements to only a subset of cells at the periphery. To increase mass transfer of viral particles, we designed a microfluidic device that holds islets in parallel hydrodynamic traps connected by an expanding by-pass channel. We modeled viral particle flow into the tissue using fluorescently-labelled gold nanoparticles of varying sizes and showed a penetration threshold of only ∼5 nm. To increase this threshold, we used EDTA to transiently reduce cell-cell adhesion and expand intercellular space. Ultimately, a combination of media flow and ETDA treatment significantly increased adenoviral transduction to the core of the islet. As proof-of-principle, we used this protocol to transduce an ER-targeted redox sensitive sensor (eroGFP), and revealed significantly greater ER redox capacity at core islet cells. Overall, these data demonstrate a robust method to enhance transduction efficiency of islets, and potentially other tissues, by using a combination of microfluidic flow and transient tissue expansion. PMID:27378588

  15. Self-regenerating and hybrid irreversible/reversible PDMS microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Letícia S.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Duarte-Junior, Gerson F.; Coltro, Wendell K. T.; Carrilho, Emanuel; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Lima, Renato S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper outlines a straightforward, fast, and low-cost method to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chips. Termed sandwich bonding (SWB), this method requires only a laboratory oven. Initially, SWB relies on the reversible bonding of a coverslip over PDMS channels. The coverslip is smaller than the substrate, leaving a border around the substrate exposed. Subsequently, a liquid composed of PDMS monomers and a curing agent is poured onto the structure. Finally, the cover is cured. We focused on PDMS/glass chips because of their key advantages in microfluidics. Despite its simplicity, this method created high-performance microfluidic channels. Such structures featured self-regeneration after leakages and hybrid irreversible/reversible behavior. The reversible nature was achieved by removing the cover of PDMS with acetone. Thus, the PDMS substrate and glass coverslip could be detached for reuse. These abilities are essential in the stages of research and development. Additionally, SWB avoids the use of surface oxidation, half-cured PDMS as an adhesive, and surface chemical modification. As a consequence, SWB allows surface modifications before the bonding, a long time for alignment, the enclosure of sub-micron channels, and the prototyping of hybrid devices. Here, the technique was successfully applied to bond PDMS to Au and Al.

  16. RNA Extraction from a Mycobacterium under Ultrahigh Electric Field Intensity in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sai; Bryson, Bryan D; Sun, Chen; Fortune, Sarah M; Lu, Chang

    2016-05-17

    Studies of transcriptomes are critical for understanding gene expression. Release of RNA molecules from cells is typically the first step for transcriptomic analysis. Effective cell lysis approaches that completely release intracellular materials are in high demand especially for cells that are structurally robust. In this report, we demonstrate a microfluidic electric lysis device that is effective for mRNA extraction from mycobacteria that have hydrophobic and waxy cell walls. We used a packed bed of microscale silica beads to filter M. smegmatis out of the suspension. 4000-8000 V/cm field intensity was used to lyse M. smegmatis with long pulses (i.e., up to 30 pulses that were 5 s long each). Our quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR results showed that our method yielded a factor of 10-20 higher extraction efficiency than the current state-of-the-art method (bead beating). We conclude that our electric lysis technique is an effective approach for mRNA release from hard-to-lyse cells and highly compatible with microfluidic molecular assays. PMID:27081872

  17. Preparing mono-dispersed liquid core PDMS microcapsules from thiol–ene–epoxy-tailored flow-focusing microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skolimowski, Maciej; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    of compositions in relation to high hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity. An obtained microfluidic device was subsequently used in order to produce PDMS microcapsules of very narrow size distribution and which contained various common liquids, such as water and ethanol, as well as an ionic liquid 2...

  18. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  19. Femtosecond laser fabrication for the integration of optical sensors in microfluidic lab-on-chip devices

    OpenAIRE

    Osellame, R.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Pollnau, M.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers enable the fabrication of both optical waveguides and buried microfluidic channels on a glass substrate. The waveguides are used to integrate optical detection in a commercial microfluidic lab-on-chip for capillary electrophoresis

  20. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based assay. Using probes of different sequences, we interrogate a target DNA molecule for polymorphisms. With a larger probe set, additional polymorphisms can be interrogated as well as targets of arbitrary sequence. PMID:24185402

  1. Stimuli-responsive materials: developing integrated opto-molecular systems as sensors and actuators in micro-fluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Florea, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Micro-fluidic platforms have been conferred with inherent optical sensing capabilities by coating the walls of micro-fluidic channels or micro-capillaries with stimuli-responsive materials. These adaptive materials respond optically to environmental stimuli, such as changes in pH, solvent polarity, the presence of certain metal ions and light. This approach confers sensing capabilities along the entire length of the coated micro-channel or micro-capillary. Adaptive coatings based on two types...

  2. IFSA: a microfluidic chip-platform for frit-based immunoassay protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Bangert, Michael; Miethe, Peter; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics (POC) is one of the key application fields for lab-on-a-chip devices. While in recent years much of the work has concentrated on integrating complex molecular diagnostic assays onto a microfluidic device, there is a need to also put comparatively simple immunoassay-type protocols on a microfluidic platform. In this paper, we present the development of a microfluidic cartridge using an immunofiltration approach. In this method, the sandwich immunoassay takes place in a porous frit on which the antibodies have immobilized. The device is designed to be able to handle three samples in parallel and up to four analytical targets per sample. In order to meet the critical cost targets for the diagnostic market, the microfluidic chip has been designed and manufactured using high-volume manufacturing technologies in mind. Validation experiments show comparable sensitivities in comparison with conventional immunofiltration kits.

  3. Ice matrix in reconfigurable microfluidic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic devices find many applications in biotechnologies. Here, we introduce a flexible and biocompatible microfluidic ice-based platform with tunable parameters and configuration of microfluidic patterns that can be changed multiple times during experiments. Freezing and melting of cavities, channels and complex relief structures created and maintained in the bulk of ice by continuous scanning of an infrared laser beam are used as a valve action in microfluidic systems. We demonstrate that pre-concentration of samples and transport of ions and dyes through the open channels created can be achieved in ice microfluidic patterns by IR laser-assisted zone melting. The proposed approach can be useful for performing separation and sensing processes in flexible reconfigurable microfluidic devices. (paper)

  4. Production of Fluconazole-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Using Membrane and Microfluidic Dispersion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric micelles with a controlled size in the range between 41 and 80 nm were prepared by injecting the organic phase through a microengineered nickel membrane or a tapered-end glass capillary into an aqueous phase. The organic phase was composed of 1 mg·mL−1 of PEG-b-PCL diblock copolymers with variable molecular weights, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (THF or acetone. The pore size of the membrane was 20 μm and the aqueous/organic phase volumetric flow rate ratio ranged from 1.5 to 10. Block copolymers were successfully synthesized with Mn ranging from ~9700 to 16,000 g·mol−1 and polymeric micelles were successfully produced from both devices. Micelles produced from the membrane device were smaller than those produced from the microfluidic device, due to the much smaller pore size compared with the orifice size in a co-flow device. The micelles were found to be relatively stable in terms of their size with an initial decrease in size attributed to evaporation of residual solvent rather than their structural disintegration. Fluconazole was loaded into the cores of micelles by injecting the organic phase composed of 0.5–2.5 mg·mL−1 fluconazole and 1.5 mg·mL−1 copolymer. The size of the drug-loaded micelles was found to be significantly larger than the size of empty micelles.

  5. Characterisation of oxygen permeation into a microfluidic device for cell culture by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-05-24

    A compact microfluidic device for perfusion culture of mammalian cells under in situ metabolomic observation by NMR spectroscopy is presented. The chip is made from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and uses a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane to allow gas exchange. It is integrated with a generic micro-NMR detector developed recently by our group [J. Magn. Reson., 2016, 262, 73-80]. While PMMA is an excellent material in the context of NMR, PDMS is known to produce strong background signals. To mitigate this, the device keeps the PDMS away from the detection area. The oxygen permeation into the device is quantified using a flow chemistry approach. A solution of glucose is mixed on the chip with a solution of glucose oxidase, before flowing through the gas exchanger. The resulting concentration of gluconate is measured by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a function of flow rate. An oxygen equilibration rate constant of 2.4 s(-1) is found for the device, which is easily sufficient to maintain normoxic conditions in a cell culture at low perfusion flow rates. PMID:27149932

  6. Direct current insulator based dielectrophoresis (DC-iDEP) microfluidic chip for blood plasma separation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) integrated microfluidics has been a powerful tool for new developments in analytical chemistry. These microfluidic systems enable the miniaturization, integration and automation of complex biochemical assays through the reduction of reagent use and enabling portability.Cell and particle separation in microfluidic systems has recently gained significant attention in many sample preparations for clinical procedures. Direct-current insulator-based dielectrophoresis (DC-iDEP) ...

  7. Experimental evidence of slippage breakdown for a superhydrophobic surface in a microfluidic device

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, Guido; Pirat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    A full characterization of the water flow past a silicon superhydrophobic surface with longitudinal micro-grooves enclosed in a microfluidic device is presented. Fluorescence microscopy images of the flow seeded with fluorescent passive tracers were digitally processed to measure both the velocity field and the position and shape of the liquid-air interfaces at the superhydrophobic surface. The simultaneous access to the meniscus and velocity profiles allows us to put under a strict test the no-shear boundary condition at the liquid-air interface. Surprisingly, our measurements show that air pockets in the surface cavities can sustain non-zero interfacial shear stresses, thereby hampering the friction reduction capabilities of the surface. The effects of the meniscus position and shape as well as of the liquid-air interfacial friction on the surface performances are separately assessed and quantified.

  8. A novel simple preparation method of a hydrogel mold for PDMS micro-fluidic device fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method to prepare a very thick master mold for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) casting was investigated by using a hydrogel ultraviolet (UV) curing process through a film mask. A simple process of dispensing of hydrogel, UV curing through a photomask and rinsing enabled the construction of micro-hydrogel structures in a fast manner. These hydrogel structures can be used as a mold for PDMS casting for PDMS fluidic chip fabrication. This method allows the fast construction of very thick micro-structures more than 1 mm. The characterizations about vertical sidewall and adhesion enhancement between the substrate and micro-structures were studied. The application of a PDMS fluidic chip, which was prepared from the hydrogel mold by PDMS casting, to some fluidic flow rate tests was demonstrated. This method is fast and simple to prepare a PDMS casting mold at low cost and can be applied in micro-fabrication of biochemical chips and micro-fluidic devices. (paper)

  9. A microfluidic device for practical label-free CD4+ T cell counting of HIV-infected subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Irimia, Daniel; Dixon, Meredith; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Demirci, Utkan; Zamir, Lee; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rodriguez, William; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Practical HIV diagnostics are urgently needed in resource-limited settings. While HIV infection can be diagnosed using simple, rapid, lateral flow immunoassays, HIV disease staging and treatment monitoring require accurate counting of a particular white blood cell subset, the CD4+ T lymphocyte. To address the limitations of current expensive, technically demanding and/or time-consuming approaches, we have developed a simple CD4 counting microfluidic device. This device uses cell affinity chro...

  10. Flexible free-standing SU-8 microfluidic impedance spectroscopy sensor for 3-D molded interconnect devices application

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Marc-Peter; Oseev, Aleksandr; Engel, Christian; Brose, Andreas; Schmidt, Bertram; Hirsch, Sören

    2016-01-01

    The current contribution reports about the fabrication technology for the development of novel microfluidic impedance spectroscopy sensors that are directly attachable on 3-D molded interconnect devices (3D-MID) that provides an opportunity to create reduced-scale sensor devices for 3-D applications. Advantages of the MID technology in particular for an automotive industry application were recently discussed (Moser and Krause, 2006). An ability to integrate electrical and fluid...

  11. PMMA to Polystyrene bonding for polymer based microfluidic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-03-29

    A thermal bonding technique for Poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) to Polystyrene (PS) is presented in this paper. The PMMA to PS bonding was achieved using a thermocompression method, and the bonding strength was carefully characterized. The bonding temperature ranged from 110 to 125 C with a varying compression force, from 700 to 1,000 N (0.36-0.51 MPa). After the bonding process, two kinds of adhesion quantification methods were used to measure the bonding strength: the double cantilever beam method and the tensile stress method. The results show that the bonding strength increases with a rising bonding temperature and bonding force. The results also indicate that the bonding strength is independent of bonding time. A deep-UV surface treatment method was also provided in this paper to lower the bonding temperature and compression force. Finally, a PMMA to PS bonded microfluidic device was fabricated successfully. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  12. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  13. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  14. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Smith, Richard D

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  15. Fabrication of a three dimensional particle focusing microfluidic device using a 3D printer, PDMS, and glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Robyn; Rosen, Daniel; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidic devices have high importance in fields such as bioanalysis because they can manipulate volumes of fluid in the range of microliters to picoliters. Small samples can be quickly and easily tested using complex microfluidic devices. Typically, these devices are created through lithography techniques, which can be costly and time consuming. It has been shown that inexpensive microfluidic devices can be produced quickly using a 3D printer and PDMS. However, a size limitation prohibits the fabrication of precisely controlled microchannels. By using shrinking materials in combination with 3D printing of flow-focusing geometries, this limitation can be overcome. This research seeks to employ these techniques to quickly fabricate an inexpensive, working device with three dimensional particle focusing capabilities. By modifying the channel geometry, colloidal particles in a solution will be focused into a single beam when passed through this device. The ability to focus particles is necessary for a variety of biological applications which requires precise detection and characterization of particles in a sample. We would like to thank the Shippensburg University Undergraduate Research Grant Program for their generous funding.

  16. Microfluidic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  17. Quantitative multiplexed simulated-cell identification by SERS in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonejani, M. R.; Pallaoro, A.; Braun, G. B.; Moskovits, M.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    A reliable identification of cells on the basis of their surface markers is of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We present a multiplexed labeling and detection strategy that is applied to four microparticle populations, each mimicking cellular or bacterial samples with varying surface concentrations of up to four epitopes, using four distinct biotags that are meant to be used in conjunction with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) instead of fluorescence, together with microfluidics. Four populations of 6 μm polystyrene beads were incubated with different mixtures, ``cocktails'' of four SERS biotags (SBTs), simulating the approach that one would follow when seeking to identify multiple biomarkers encountered in biological applications. Populations were flowed in a microfluidic flow-focusing device and the SERS signal from individual beads was acquired during continuous flow. The spectrally rich SERS spectra enabled us to separate confidently the populations by utilizing principal component analysis (PCA). Also, using classical least squares (CLS), we were able to calculate the contributions of each SBT to the overall signal in each of the populations, and showed that the relative SBT contributions are consistent with the nominal percentage of each marker originally designed into that bead population, by functionalizing it with a given SBT cocktail. Our results demonstrate the multiplexing capability of SBTs in potential applications such as immunophenotyping.A reliable identification of cells on the basis of their surface markers is of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We present a multiplexed labeling and detection strategy that is applied to four microparticle populations, each mimicking cellular or bacterial samples with varying surface concentrations of up to four epitopes, using four distinct biotags that are meant to be used in conjunction with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) instead of

  18. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  19. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies. (paper)

  20. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-11

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  1. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  2. “Flow valve” microfluidic devices for simple, detectorless and label-free analyte quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debolina; Mansfield, Danielle S.; Anderson, Neil G.; Subedi, Sudeep; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    Simplified analysis systems that offer the performance of benchtop instruments but the convenience of portability are highly desirable. We have developed novel, miniature devices that feature visual inspection readout of a target’s concentration from a ~1 μL volume of solution introduced into a microfluidic channel. Microchannels are constructed within an elastomeric material, and channel surfaces are coated with receptors to the target. When a solution is flowed into the channel, the target crosslinks multiple receptors on the surface, resulting in constriction of the first few millimeters of the channel and stopping of flow. Quantitation is performed by measuring the distance traveled by the target solution in the channel before flow stops. A key advantage of our approach is that quantitation is accomplished by simple visual inspection of the channel, without the need for complex detection instrumentation. We have tested these devices using the model system of biotin as a receptor and streptavidin as the target. We have also characterized three factors that influence flow distance: solution viscosity, device thickness, and channel height. We found that solution capillary flow distance scales with the negative logarithm of target concentration and have detected streptavidin concentrations as low as 1 ng/mL. Finally, we have identified and evaluated a plausible mechanism wherein time-dependent channel constriction in the first few millimeters leads to concentration-dependent flow distances. Their simplicity coupled with performance makes these “flow valve” systems especially attractive for a host of analysis applications. PMID:22881075

  3. A novel and simplified procedure for patterning hydrophobic and hydrophilic SAMs for microfluidic devices by using UV photolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Eric; Gue, Anne-Marie; Sudor, Jan; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa; Jaffrezic, Nicole; Tardy, Jacques

    2006-09-26

    This work describes how selective patterning of hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas inside microchannels of microfluidic devices can be achieved by combining well-known chemical protocols and standard photolithography equipment (365 nm). Two techniques have been performed and compared. The first technique is based on the preparation of self-assembled monolayers of photocleavable organosilane and the second one on photoassisted grafting (365 nm) of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a silicon or glass substrate. In the first case, we begin with monolayers carrying an o-nitrobenzyl function (hydrophobic area) that is photochemically cleaved, revealing a carboxylic acid group (hydrophilic area). The problem is that the energy necessary to cleave this monolayer is too high and the reaction time is more than 1 h with 50 mW/cm(2) irradiation flux. To overcome this practical disadvantage, we propose another approach that is based on the thiol-ene reaction with benzophenone as photoinitiator. In this approach, a monolayer of mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) is prepared first. Subsequently, a hydrocarbon chain is photografted locally onto the thiol layer, forming a hydrophobic surface while the reminding unmodified thiol surface is oxidized into sulfonic acid (hydrophilic area). We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach and synthesized high-quality self-assembled monolayers by UV grafting with an irradiation time of 30 s at 365 nm (50 mW/cm(2)). The modified surfaces have been characterized by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), AFM, and multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy (MIR-FTIR). The difference in the contact angles on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces reached a remarkable 77 degrees. We have also demonstrated that this method is compatible with selective surface grafting inside microfluidic channels. PMID:16981747

  4. A Digitally Controllable Polymer-Based Microfluidic Mixing Module Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond H. W. Lam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an integrated digitally controllable microfluidic system for continuous solution supply with a real-time concentration control. This system contains multiple independently operating mixing modules, each integrated with two vortex micropumps, two Tesla valves and a micromixer. The interior surface of the system is made of biocompatible materials using a polymer micro-fabrication process and thus its operation can be applied to chemicals and bio-reagents. In each module, pumping of fluid is achieved by the vortex micropump working with the rotation of a micro-impeller. The downstream fluid mixing is based on mechanical vibrations driven by a lead zirconate titanate ceramic diaphragm actuator located below the mixing chamber. We have conducted experiments to prove that the addition of the micro-pillar structures to the mixing chamber further improves the mixing performance. We also developed a computer-controlled automated driver system to control the real-time fluid mixing and concentration regulation with the mixing module array. This research demonstrates the integration of digitally controllable polymer-based microfluidic modules as a fully functional system, which has great potential in the automation of many bio-fluid handling processes in bio-related applications.

  5. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  6. Microfluidic droplet-based liquid-liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Pascaline; Studer, Vincent; Tabeling, Patrick

    2008-04-15

    We study microfluidic systems in which mass exchanges take place between moving water droplets, formed on-chip, and an external phase (octanol). Here, no chemical reaction takes place, and the mass exchanges are driven by a contrast in chemical potential between the dispersed and continuous phases. We analyze the case where the microfluidic droplets, occupying the entire width of the channel, extract a solute-fluorescein-from the external phase (extraction) and the opposite case, where droplets reject a solute-rhodamine-into the external phase (purification). Four flow configurations are investigated, based on straight or zigzag microchannels. Additionally to the experimental work, we performed two-dimensional numerical simulations. In the experiments, we analyze the influence of different parameters on the process (channel dimensions, fluid viscosities, flow rates, drop size, droplet spacing, ...). Several regimes are singled out. In agreement with the mass transfer theory of Young et al. (Young, W.; Pumir, A.; Pomeau, Y. Phys. Fluids A 1989, 1, 462), we find that, after a short transient, the amount of matter transferred across the droplet interface grows as the square root of time and the time it takes for the transfer process to be completed decreases as Pe-2/3, where Pe is the Peclet number based on droplet velocity and radius. The numerical simulation is found in excellent consistency with the experiment. In practice, the transfer time ranges between a fraction and a few seconds, which is much faster than conventional systems. PMID:18351786

  7. Investigation of Dendrimer-based nanoparticles cellular uptake and cell tracking in a semiautomated microfluidic platform

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mariana Rodrigues; Maia, Fátima Raquel; Reis, R. L.; Oliveira, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic device such as Kima Pump and Vena8 biochip is able to realize functions that are not easily imaginable in conventional biological analysis, such as highly parallel, sophisticated high-throughput analysis and single-cell analysis in a well-defined manner [1]. Cancer cell tracking within the microfluidic model will be achieved by grafting fluorescent label probe Fluorescein-5(6)-isothiocyanate (FITC) to dendrimer nanoparticles allowing cell visualization by immunofluorescen...

  8. TECHNICAL NOTE: Portable audio electronics for impedance-based measurements in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul; Sinton, David

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of audio electronics-based signals to perform on-chip electrochemical measurements. Cell phones and portable music players are examples of consumer electronics that are easily operated and are ubiquitous worldwide. Audio output (play) and input (record) signals are voltage based and contain frequency and amplitude information. A cell phone, laptop soundcard and two compact audio players are compared with respect to frequency response; the laptop soundcard provides the most uniform frequency response, while the cell phone performance is found to be insufficient. The audio signals in the common portable music players and laptop soundcard operate in the range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz and are found to be applicable, as voltage input and output signals, to impedance-based electrochemical measurements in microfluidic systems. Validated impedance-based measurements of concentration (0.1-50 mM), flow rate (2-120 µL min-1) and particle detection (32 µm diameter) are demonstrated. The prevailing, lossless, wave audio file format is found to be suitable for data transmission to and from external sources, such as a centralized lab, and the cost of all hardware (in addition to audio devices) is ~10 USD. The utility demonstrated here, in combination with the ubiquitous nature of portable audio electronics, presents new opportunities for impedance-based measurements in portable microfluidic systems.

  9. 3D imaging of flow patterns in an internally-pumped microfluidic device: redox magnetohydrodynamics and electrochemically-generated density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D

    2013-05-01

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction and adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode and reaches a plateau across the center of the cell. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV, and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices. PMID:23537496

  10. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of pharmaceuticals in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V; Clarke, Graham S; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-01

    The poor aqueous solubility of many active pharmaceutical ingredients presents challenges for effective drug delivery. In this study, the combination of attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR spectroscopic imaging with specifically designed polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic devices to study drug release from pharmaceutical formulations has been developed. First, the high-throughput analysis of the dissolution of micro-formulations studied under flowing conditions has been introduced using a model formulation of ibuprofen and polyethylene glycol. The behaviour and release of the drug was monitored in situ under different pH conditions. In contrast to the neutral solution, where both the drug and excipient dissolved at a similar rate, structural change from the molecularly dispersed to a crystalline form of ibuprofen was characterised in the obtained spectroscopic images and the corresponding ATR-FTIR spectra for the experiments carried out in the acidic medium. Further investigations into the behaviour of the drug after its release from formulations (i.e., dissolved drug) were also undertaken. Different solutions of sodium ibuprofen dissolved in a neutral medium were studied upon contact with acidic conditions. The phase transition from a dissolved species of sodium ibuprofen to the formation of solid crystalline ibuprofen was revealed in the microfluidic channels. This innovative approach could offer a promising platform for high-throughput analysis of a range of micro-formulations, which are of current interest due to the advent of 3D printed pharmaceutical and microparticulate delivery systems. Furthermore, the ability to study dissolved drug in solution under flowing conditions can be useful for the studies of the diffusion of drugs into tissues or live cells. PMID:27158293

  11. A microfluidic chemical/biological sensing system based on membrane dissolution and optical absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharamurthy, Sudheer S.; Dong, Liang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2007-01-01

    A microfluidic system to sense chemical and biological analytes using membranes dissolvable by the analyte is demonstrated. The scheme to detect the dissolution of the membrane is based on the difference in optical absorption of the membrane and the fluidic sample being assayed. The presence of the analyte in the sample chemically cleaves the membrane and causes the sample to flow into the membrane area. This causes a change in the optical absorption of the path between the light source and detector. A device comprising the microfluidic channels and the membrane is microfabricated using liquid-phase photopolymerization. A light emitting diode (LED) and a detector with an integrated amplifier are positioned and aligned on either side of the device. The state of the membrane is continuously monitored after introducing the sample. The temporal dissolution characteristics of the membrane are extracted in terms of the output voltage of the detector as a function of time. This is used to determine the concentration of the analyte. The absorption spectra of the membrane and fluidic sample are studied to determine the optimal wavelength that provides the maximum difference in absorbance between the membrane and the sample. In this work, the dissolution of a poly(acrylamide) hydrogel membrane in the presence of a reducing agent (dithiothreitol—DTT) is used as a model system. For this system, with 1 M DTT, complete membrane dissolution occurred after 65 min.

  12. A microfluidic device for the automated electrical readout of low-density glass-slide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-González, María; Salvador, J Pablo; Bonilla, Diana; Marco, M Pilar; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Baldi, Antoni

    2015-12-15

    Microarrays are a powerful platform for rapid and multiplexed analysis in a wide range of research fields. Electrical readout systems have emerged as an alternative to conventional optical methods for microarray analysis thanks to its potential advantages like low-cost, low-power and easy miniaturization of the required instrumentation. In this work an automated electrical readout system for low-cost glass-slide microarrays is described. The system enables the simultaneous conductimetric detection of up to 36 biorecognition events by incorporating an array of interdigitated electrode transducers. A polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic structure has been designed that creates microwells over the transducers and incorporates the microfluidic channels required for filling and draining them with readout and cleaning solutions, thus making the readout process fully automated. Since the capture biomolecules are not immobilized on the transducer surface this readout system is reusable, in contrast to previously reported electrochemical microarrays. A low-density microarray based on a competitive enzymatic immunoassay for atrazine detection was used to test the performance of the readout system. The electrical assay shows a detection limit of 0.22±0.03 μg L(-1) similar to that obtained with fluorescent detection and allows the direct determination of the pesticide in polluted water samples. These results proved that an electrical readout system such as the one presented in this work is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to fluorescence scanners for the analysis of low-density microarrays. PMID:26210466

  13. Mixed thread/paper-based microfluidic chips as a platform for glucose assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ariana; Estala, Lissette; Gaines, Michelle; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-07-01

    A novel microfluidic thread/paper-based analytical device (μTPAD) to detect glucose through a colorimetric assay is described. The μTPAD was fabricated from nylon thread trifurcated into three channels terminating at analysis sites comprised of circular zones of chromatography paper, which have previously been spotted with glucose of different concentrations. A solution of glucose oxidase (GOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and potassium iodide (KI) is transported via capillary action to the analysis sites where a yellow-brown color is observed indicating oxidation of iodide to iodine. The device was then dried, scanned, and analyzed yielding a correlation between yellow intensity and glucose concentrations. Both a flat platform constructed mainly of tape, and a cone platform constructed from tape and polyvinyl chloride, are described. Studies to quantitate glucose in artificial urine showed good correlation using the μTPAD. PMID:27060975

  14. Development of a microfluidic-based assay on a novel nitrocellulose platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrastia, Mary; Avoundjian, Ani; Ehrlich, Paul Said; Eropkin, Micah; Levine, Leanna; Gomez, Frank A

    2015-03-01

    A novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) utilizing a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane to detect IgG antibodies through a colorimetric analysis is described. The μPAD was constructed using layered polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSA). The biotin labeled Goat Anti-Mouse IgG antibody was spotted and dried on the NC channel prior to subjecting it to a series of wash solutions (Tris-tween), increasing concentrations of alkaline phosphatase conjugated to streptavidin (Strep-ALP), and para-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) realizing a vibrant yellow color. The reaction proceeds for 10 min before applying the p-NPP stop solution. The device was then dried, scanned, and analyzed yielding a linear range of inverse yellow color intensities versus Strep-ALP concentrations. The development of this simple μPAD should further facilitate the use of NC in colorimetric assays to detect and quantitate antibodies. PMID:25545783

  15. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and...

  16. Microfluidic Analytical Separator for Proteomics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SHOT proposes an innovative microfluidic device designed to effect a 2-dimensional resolution of a mixture of proteins based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular...

  17. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); School of Engineering and Technology, ITM University, Gurgaon-122017 (India); Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Malhotra, Bansi Dhar, E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2015-05-11

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic–based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium–tin–oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10{sup −15} M to 10{sup −11} M.

  18. Enzyme-based microfluidic chip coupled to graphene electrodes for the detection of D-amino acid enantiomer-biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, Pilar; Martín, Aída; López, Miguel Ángel; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical microfluidic strategy for the separation and enantiomeric detection of D-methionine (D-Met) and D-leucine (D-Leu) is presented. These D-amino acids (D-AAs) act as biomarkers involved in relevant diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae. On a single layout microfluidic chip (MC), highly compatible with extremely low biological sample consumption, the strategy allowed the controlled microfluidic D-AA separation and the specific reaction between D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) and each D-AA biomarker avoiding the use of additives (i.e., cyclodextrins) for enantiomeric separation as well as any covalent immobilization of the enzyme into the wall channels or on the electrode surface such as in the biosensor-based approaches. Hybrid polymer/graphene-based electrodes were end-channel coupled to the microfluidic system to improve the analytical performance. D-Met and D-Leu were successfully detected becoming this proof-of-the-concept a promising principle for the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for in situ screening of V. cholerae related diseases. PMID:25870911

  19. Analytical optimization of nanocomposite surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scattering detection in microfluidic separation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connatser, R Maggie; Cochran, Malcolm; Harrison, Robert J; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Adding vibrational spectroscopies to the arsenal of detection modes for microfluidics (mufluidics) offers benefits afforded by structurally descriptive identification of separated electrophoretic bands. We have previously applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection with nanocomposite metal-elastomer substrates as a detection mode in mufluidic channels. To create these mufluidic-SERS devices, silver-PDMS substrate regions are integrated into the architecture of a separation chip fabricated from PDMS or glass. Herein, we investigate analytical figures of merit for integrated mufluidic-SERS devices by implementing improvements in fluidic and SERS substrate fabrication as well as data collection strategies. Improvements are achieved by chemical modification of the PDMS channel, increasing effective detection efficiency by minimizing analyte partitioning into nonsensing walls rendering more analyte available to the metallized cover slide of channels and also by uniquely fabricating deep channels that have larger volume to SERS surface area ratios than conventional channels. A method is developed to exploit the inherent concentration profile of analyte material within an electrophoretic band in order to extend the linear dynamic range of detection on the SERS nanostructured surface. This is accomplished by spatially interrogating the Gaussian concentration profile of said bands. The subtleties of this technique give insight into the analytical utility of SERS detection in general. Finally, SERS substrates uniquely created via electron beam lithography with controllable morphologies are integrated into mufluidic-SERS devices to prove feasibility of such a coupling for future work. A separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a hybrid SERS nanocomposite-glass device is the capstone of this work. PMID:18386301

  20. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping....... Both devices were fabricated by injection moulding with a nickel master. CTC isolation was realised using PFF, which is a passive, size-based microfluidic technique. The focus was mainly on experimental work; however designs were based on flow calculations and analysed with numerical simulations to...

  1. Large-area, high-aspect-ratio SU-8 molds for the fabrication of PDMS microfluidic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively low-cost fabrication method using soft lithography and molding for large-area, high-aspect-ratio microfluidic devices, which have traditionally been difficult to fabricate, has been developed and is presented in this work. The fabrication process includes novel but simple modifications of conventional microfabrication steps and can be performed in any standard microfabrication facility. Specifically, the fabrication and testing of a microfluidic device for continuous flow deposition of bio-molecules in an array format are presented. The array layout requires high-aspect-ratio elastomeric channels that are 350 µm tall, extend more than 10 cm across the substrate and are separated by as little as 20 µm. The mold from which these channels were fabricated consisted of high-quality, 335 µm tall SU-8 structures with a high-negative aspect ratio of 17 on a 150 mm silicon wafer and was produced using spin coating and UV-lithography. Several unique processing steps are introduced into the lithographic patterning to eliminate many of the problems experienced when fabricating tall, high-aspect-ratio SU-8 structures. In particular, techniques are used to ensure uniform molds, both in height and quality, that are fully developed even in the deep negative-aspect-ratio areas, have no leftover films at the top of the structures caused by overexposure and no bowing or angled sidewalls from diffraction of the applied UV light. Successful microfluidic device creation was demonstrated using these molds by casting, curing and bonding a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer. A unique microfluidic device, requiring these stringent geometries, for continuous flow printing of a linear array of 16 protein and antibody spots has been demonstrated and validated by using surface plasmon resonance imaging of printed arrays

  2. A microfluidic device to determine dielectric properties of a single cell : a combined dielectrophoresis and electrorotation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Trainito, Claudia; Francais, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Electric fields interaction with living cells is commonly used in lab-on-chips. Indeed AC electrokinetic techniques (dielectrophoresis, electrorotation and traveling wave dielectrophoresis) are used to handle, trap or separate biological entities (eukaryotic cells, bacteria, yeasts, algae) in microfluidic devices.Several studies have shown how electric fields can be used to discriminate cell depending on their dielectric properties, which represents a growing interest for many biomedical appl...

  3. Droplet synthesis of well-defined block copolymers using solvent-resistant microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phan Huy; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Perumal, Jayakumar; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2011-01-21

    Well-defined diblock copolymers were synthesized via an exothermic RAFT route by a droplet microfluidic process using a solvent-resistant and thermally stable fluoropolymer microreactor fabricated by a non-lithographic embedded template method. The resulting polymers were compared to products obtained from continuous flow capillary reactor and conventional bulk synthesis. The droplet based microreactor demonstrated superior molecular weight distribution control by synthesizing a higher molecular weight product with higher conversion and narrow polydispersity in a much shorter reaction time. The high quality of the as-synthesized block copolymer PMMA-b-PS led to a generation of micelles with a narrow size distribution that could be used as a template for well-ordered mesoporous silica with regular frameworks and high surface areas. PMID:21072416

  4. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  5. Laser vibrometry characterisation of a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device: a preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since their original inception as ultrasound contrast agents, potential applications of microbubbles have evolved to encompass molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery. As these areas develop, so does the need to understand the mechanisms behind the interaction of microbubbles both with biological tissue and with other microbubbles. There is therefore a metrological requirement to develop a controlled environment in which to study these processes. Presented here is the design and characterisation of such a system, which consists of a microfluidic chip, specifically developed for manipulating microbubbles using both optical and acoustic trapping. A laser vibrometer is used to observe the coupling of acoustic energy into the chip from a piezoelectric transducer bonded to the surface. Measurement of the velocity of surface waves on the chip is investigated as a potential method for inferring the nature of the acoustic fields excited within the liquid medium of the device. Comparison of measured surface wavelengths with wave types suggests the observation of anti-symmetric Lamb or Love-Kirchhoff waves. Further visual confirmation of the acoustic fields through bubble aggregation highlights differences between the model and experimental results in predicting the position of acoustic pressure nodes in relation to excitation frequency.

  6. Automated sample preparation in a microfluidic culture device for cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Laura A; Sanders, Katherine L; Filla, Robert T; Edwards, James L

    2016-06-21

    Sample pretreatment in conventional cellular metabolomics entails rigorous lysis and extraction steps which increase the duration as well as limit the consistency of these experiments. We report a biomimetic cell culture microfluidic device (MFD) which is coupled with an automated system for rapid, reproducible cell lysis using a combination of electrical and chemical mechanisms. In-channel microelectrodes were created using facile fabrication methods, enabling the application of electric fields up to 1000 V cm(-1). Using this platform, average lysing times were 7.12 s and 3.03 s for chips with no electric fields and electric fields above 200 V cm(-1), respectively. Overall, the electroporation MFDs yielded a ∼10-fold improvement in lysing time over standard chemical approaches. Detection of multiple intracellular nucleotides and energy metabolites in MFD lysates was demonstrated using two different MS platforms. This work will allow for the integrated culture, automated lysis, and metabolic analysis of cells in an MFD which doubles as a biomimetic model of the vasculature. PMID:27118418

  7. Fully automated and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection on an integrated centrifugal microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Jun; Park, Byung Hyun; Choi, Goro; Seo, Ji Hyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-05-21

    This work describes fully automated and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection on an integrated centrifugal microfluidic device, which is called a lab-on-a-disc. All the processes for molecular diagnostics including DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and amplicon detection were integrated on a single disc. Silica microbeads incorporated in the disc enabled extraction and purification of bacterial genomic DNA from bacteria-contaminated milk samples. We targeted four kinds of foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and performed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to amplify the specific genes of the targets. Colorimetric detection mediated by a metal indicator confirmed the results of the LAMP reactions with the colour change of the LAMP mixtures from purple to sky blue. The whole process was conducted in an automated manner using the lab-on-a-disc and a miniaturized rotary instrument equipped with three heating blocks. We demonstrated that a milk sample contaminated with foodborne pathogens can be automatically analysed on the centrifugal disc even at the 10 bacterial cell level in 65 min. The simplicity and portability of the proposed microdevice would provide an advanced platform for point-of-care diagnostics of foodborne pathogens, where prompt confirmation of food quality is needed. PMID:27112702

  8. PMMA microfluidic devices with three-dimensional features for blood cell filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) microfluidic device with filtration features fabricated by hot embossing and thermal bonding was used to separate RBCs (red blood cells) from whole rat blood. The filtration features are composed of 20 µm deep and 300 µm wide main channels, 15 µm high and 25 µm wide micro-dams which were fabricated in main channels and an array of orthogonal side channels for perfusion flow to collect RBCs. As rat blood advances through the main channels, a perfusion flow through the side channels washes away RBCs which are sufficiently small to enter the gaps between the micro-dams and the cover plate. A silicon mold fabricated by dry etching was used to produce three-dimensional filtration features on PMMA substrates. Oxygen plasma treatment was used to increase the adhesive ability of PMMA surfaces, which enables thermal bonding at 86 °C and 0.75 MPa. The distortion of microchannels and micro-dams has been minimized, which makes the value of the gap between the micro-dam and the cover plate appropriate for cell filtration

  9. Patterned hydrogel microfibers prepared using multilayered microfluidic devices for guiding network formation of neural cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayered microfluidic devices with a micronozzle array structure have been developed to prepare unique hydrogel microfibers with highly complex cross-sectional morphologies. Hydrogel precursor solutions with different compositions are introduced through vertical micronozzles, united and focused, and continuously gelled to form hydrogel fibers with multiple regions of different physicochemical composition. We prepared alginate hydrogel microfibers with diameters of 60 ∼ 130 μm and 4/8 parallel regions in the periphery. Neuron-like PC12 cells encapsulated in the parallel region, which was made of a soft hydrogel matrix, proliferated and formed linear intercellular networks along the fiber length because of the physical restrictions imposed by the relatively rigid regions. After cultivation for 14 days, one-millimeter-long intercellular networks that structurally mimic complex nerve bundles found in vivo were formed. The proposed fibers should be useful for producing various in vivo linear tissues and should be applicable to regenerative medicine and physiological studies of cells. (papers)

  10. Stochastic Analysis of Antibody-antigen Binding in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Shauna; Zhang, Cong; Zambrano, Harvey; Conlisk, A. T.

    2012-11-01

    Over the last decade, microfluidic ``Labs on a Chip'' (LOC) have evolved from a single microchannel to micro-total analysis systems (TAS) capable of integrating thousands of reaction vessels, conduits and valves-the contents of an entire chemical laboratory-on a single chip. These systems have several advantages in biomedical applications, including lower equipment and personnel costs, reduced power requirements, faster separations, and smaller sample and reagent volume requirements. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are cancer cells found in the blood stream indicating the presence of a tumor in the body. We consider the population of magnetically tagged antibodies to be characterized by a collection of stochastic trajectories; the probability of finding an antibody at a given position is assumed to be defined by the Fokker-Planck equation. The first objective is to determine the probability that one or more magnetically labeled antibodies will assume a trajectory that is within the neighborhood of a given cancer cell. Once this occurs the binding process can be described using a deterministic analysis and the modeling of this process is the second objective of the paper. Supported by the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering center (NSEC) for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices EEC-0914790.

  11. Microfluidic device for the formation of optically excitable, three-dimensional, compartmentalized motor units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Sebastien G M; Platt, Randall J; Subramanian, Vidya; Pearl, Taylor M; Rowlands, Christopher J; Chan, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie A; So, Peter T C; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-08-01

    Motor units are the fundamental elements responsible for muscle movement. They are formed by lower motor neurons and their muscle targets, synapsed via neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The loss of NMJs in neurodegenerative disorders (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscle atrophy) or as a result of traumatic injuries affects millions of lives each year. Developing in vitro assays that closely recapitulate the physiology of neuromuscular tissues is crucial to understand the formation and maturation of NMJs, as well as to help unravel the mechanisms leading to their degeneration and repair. We present a microfluidic platform designed to coculture myoblast-derived muscle strips and motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) within a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel. The device geometry mimics the spinal cord-limb physical separation by compartmentalizing the two cell types, which also facilitates the observation of 3D neurite outgrowth and remote muscle innervation. Moreover, the use of compliant pillars as anchors for muscle strips provides a quantitative functional readout of force generation. Finally, photosensitizing the ESC provides a pool of source cells that can be differentiated into optically excitable motor neurons, allowing for spatiodynamic, versatile, and noninvasive in vitro control of the motor units. PMID:27493991

  12. The influence of polydimethylsiloxane curing ratio on capillary pressure in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, Ilenia, E-mail: ilenia.viola@nano.cnr.it [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Zacheo, Antonella [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, Valentina [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arico, Antonino S. [CNR-ITAE Institute, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse, I-98126 Messina (Italy); Cortese, Barbara [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Manca, Michele [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies (Italy); Zocco, Anna [STMicroelectronics, MFD Division, Application Laboratory Lecce, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, Antonietta [CNR, Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Rinaldi, Ross [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Investigations on surface properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are justified by its large application ranges especially as coating polymer in fluidic devices. At a micrometer scale, the liquid dynamics is strongly modified by interactions with a solid surface. A crucial parameter for this process is microchannel wettability that can be tuned by acting on surface chemistry and topography. In literature, a number of multi-step, time and cost consuming chemical and physical procedures are reported. Here we selectively modify both wetting and mechanical properties by a single step treatment. Changes of PDMS surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy and the effects of interface properties on the liquid displacement inside a microfluidic system were evaluated. The negative capillary pressure obtained tailoring the PDMS wettability is believed to be promising to accurately control sample leakage inside integrated lab-on-chip by acting on the liquid confinement and thus to reduce the sample volume, liquid drying as well as cross-contamination during the operation.

  13. Optimization of a microfluidic based electromagnetic energy harvester for shoe insoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Atkin, R.; Kim, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports improved performance of the 4th generation microfluidic based energy harvester by finding global optimization among various geometric parameters, resulting in the increase of power density by 6.89 times. Specifically, the power output was optimized by varying diameters and spans of a coil at different frequencies. To verify the optimization, a custom testing platform was constructed, which mimicked the periodic linear movement caused by a human foot. The final device produced total power of 455.77mW from a volume of 20×3.74×0.75cm3, resulting in a power density of 8.13mW/cm3 that was identified as one of the highest power densities among human-body-induced vibration based energy harvesters.

  14. A microfluidic device for the continuous culture and analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans in a toxic aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) receives attention as a bioindicator, and the C. elegans condition has been recently analyzed using microfluidic devices equipped with an imaging system. To establish a method without an imaging system, we have proposed a novel microfluidic device with which to analyze the condition of C. elegans from the capacitance change using a pair of micro-electrodes. The device was designed to culture C. elegans, to expose C. elegans to an external stimulus, such as a chemical or toxicant, and to measure the capacitance change which indicates the condition of C. elegans. In this study, to demonstrate the capability of our device in a toxic aqueous environment, the device was applied to examine the effect of cadmium on C. elegans. Thirty L4 larval stage C. elegans were divided into three groups. One group was a control group and the other groups were exposed to cadmium solutions with concentrations of 5% and 10% LC50 for 24 h. The capacitance change and the body volume of C. elegans as a reference were measured four times and we confirmed the correlation between them. It shows that our device can analyze the condition of C. elegans without an imaging system. (paper)

  15. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  16. Microfluidic assessment of swimming media for motility-based sperm selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamer, Lise; Nosrati, Reza; Vollmer, Marion; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2015-07-01

    Selection medium is important in sperm isolation for assisted reproductive technologies. Contrary to the naturally occurring human cervical mucus which has a high viscosity, most current practices for motility based sperm selection use a low viscosity medium. In this study, we used a microfluidic device to assess the effects of high viscosity media made with hyaluronic acid (HA) and methyl cellulose (MC) on bovine and human sperm motility and viability (sperm transferred directly from cryoprotectant). The microfluidic penetration test, viability, and motility were compared for sperm swimming in both HA and MC media with about 20cp viscosity (measured at 20 °C). Our resulted indicate that MC medium resulted in a significantly higher number of viable bovine sperm penetrating the medium as compared to HA. Furthermore, MC resulted in the selection of a sperm subpopulation with a 274% increase in sperm viability in comparison to the raw semen, while HA increased viability by only 133%. In addition to viability, bovine sperm motility parameters were significantly higher in the MC medium as compared with HA. Experiments with human sperm swimming in MC indicate that sperm swim slower and straighter at higher viscosities. In conclusion, the results indicate that in a micro-confined environment representative of the in vivo environment, MC is a preferred high viscosity medium to ensure the highest concentration of motile and viable sperm. PMID:26339314

  17. Microfluidic sieve valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  18. Detection of specific DNA using a microfluidic device featuring tethered poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) on a silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Li, Jun-Yan

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we grafted thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) onto a Si substrate as the medium in a microfluidic device to detect specific DNA molecules [human genomic DNA (hgDNA528), 528 bp] at extremely low concentrations (down to 2 ng/μl). After using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify the released human gDNA signal from the tethered PNIPAAm on the substrate, the amplified human gDNA molecules were characterized through agarose gel electrophoresis. The tethered PNIPAAm in the fluid device allowed the precise detection of the human gDNA.

  19. 基于棉纤维的微流控通道装置的研制与应用%Development and application of the cotton fiber microfluidic channel device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐; 闫宏涛

    2014-01-01

    A thread-based microfluidic channel device was firstly designed and manufactured by our-selves .The device is composed of a support ,loading systems ,reservoir devices and a microfluidic terminal fixer .They can be assembled and moved freely ,and fit any microfluidic pattern and the wicking rate of the fluid can be controlled .This microfluidic channel device was applied to the separation of mixed dyes by sin-gle channel ,the determination of nitrite in soil and water by Y-shaped channel and the simultaneous deter-mination of copper and zinc in soil by triple-channel . The self-made microfluidic device is low-cost and portable .%研制了一种基于棉纤维的线段微流控分离/分析通道装置,包括支架、加样系统、储液装置以及微流控线端固定器,可自由灵活组合,以适应各种实验需要的微流控分离/分析通道,并可控制液体流速,满足多通道进样的微流控分离/分析体系。应用于单通道混合染料分离、“Y”型通道测定土壤样品和水样中亚硝酸根含量以及复合线三通道同时测定土壤样品中铜和锌的含量,结果令人满意。自制的微流控通道装置制作成本低、携带方便、实用性强。

  20. A Microfluidic Device for the Investigation of Rapid Gold Nanoparticle Formation in Continuous Turbulent Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, G.; Tofighi, G.; Rinke, G.; Baier, S.; Ewinger, A.; Urban, A.; Wenka, A.; Heideker, S.; Jahn, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    A new setup with an integrated microfluidic chip with small dead time, high time resolution and compatibility with in situ X-ray absorption (XAS) measurements is presented. It can also be combined with a free liquid jet. By using the microfluidic chip the short reaction times from 2 to 20 milliseconds can be observed, beyond that an external cyclone mixer for extended observation times was applied. The reduction of gold ions with tetrakis(hydroxy-methyl)phosphonium (THPC) has been investigated in the microfluidic setup to monitor this reaction yielding small gold nanoparticles, requiring preferentially a free liquid jet.