WorldWideScience

Sample records for based laser spectroscopy

  1. Laser-based molecular spectroscopy for chemical analysis: laser fundamentals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, D.S.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Velthorst, N.H.; Schrader, B.

    1996-01-01

    This report is 15th in a series on Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis issued by IUPAC Commission V.4. It is concerned with the fundamental properties of lasers as used in analytical molecular spectroscopy in the optical wavelength region. The present report has five main sections: Introduction to

  2. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  3. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  4. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  5. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS)...

  6. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  7. Methods of laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Y.; Ben-Reuven, A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the one-atom maser and cavity quantum electrodynamics; Rydberg atoms and radiation; investigation of nonthermal population distributions with femtosecond optical pulses; intra- and intermolecular energy transfer of large molecules in solution after picosecond excitation; new techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses; spectral linewidth of semiconductor lasers; the hydrogen atom in a new light; laser frequency division and stabilization; modified optical Bloch equations for solids; CARS spectroscopy of transient species; off resonant laser induced ring emission; UV laser ionization spectroscopy and ion photochemistry; laser spectroscopy of proton-transfer in microsolvent clusters; recent advances in intramolecular electronic energy transfer; and photoionization and dissociation of the H 2 molecule near the ionization threshold

  8. Ultrasensitive photoacoustic sensor based on quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gautam, Surya; Kumar, Subodh; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivastava, Hari B.; Thakur, Surya N.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    2017-04-01

    The paper focuses on development of ultra-sonic detection system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopic technique and processing of signal for detection of very low quantity chemicals, explosive materials, and mixtures of these hazardous molecules. The detection system has been developed for the first time with specially designed one side open photo-acoustic cell having high quality factor. Explosive and Hazardous materials like RDX, DNT, PETN, Gun Powder, TATP (Tri acetone tri-peroxide) and their simulants like Acetone were detected in 7 to 9 μm wavelength band. Lock in amplifier electronic instrument was used for the detection of hazardous chemicals and mixture of explosives in very low quantity. Detection limit of the photoacoustic ultrasonic sensor was also carried out of powder, liquid and adsorbed on surfaces.

  9. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  10. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  11. Laser-based secondary neutral mass spectroscopy: Useful yield and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Joergensen, B.; Schweitzer, E.L.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of problems exist in order to optimally apply resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) to the detection of sputtered neutral atoms, however. Several of these problems and their solutions are examined in this paper. First, the possible useful yields obtainable and the dependence of useful yield on various laser parameters for this type of sputtered neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS) are considered. Second, the choice of a mass spectrometer and its effect on the instrumental useful yield is explored in light of the unique ionization region for laser based SNMS. Finally a brief description of noise sources and their effect on the instrumental sensitivity is discussed. 33 refs., 12 figs

  12. High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard; Soskind, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (∼15 MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing

  13. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  14. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  15. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  16. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  18. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  19. Laser frequency-offset locking based on the frequency modulation spectroscopy with higher harmonic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anqi; Meng, Zhixin; Feng, Yanying

    2017-10-01

    We design a fiber electro-optic modulator (FEOM)-based laser frequency-offset locking system using frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) with the 3F modulation. The modulation signal and the frequency-offset control signal are simultaneously loaded on the FEOM by a mixer in order to suppress the frequency and power jitter caused by internal modulation on the current or piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT). It is expected to accomplish a fast locking, a widely tunable frequency-offset, a sensitive and rapid detection of narrow spectral features with the 3F modulation. The laser frequency fluctuation is limited to +/-1MHz and its overlapping Allan deviation is around 10-12 in twenty minutes, which successfully meets the requirements of the cold atom interferometer.

  20. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  1. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  2. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Mathew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  3. Combined tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and monochromatic radiation thermometry in ammonium dinitramide-based thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Ou, Dongbin; Chen, Lianzhong; Li, Fei; Yu, Xilong

    2018-02-01

    Nonintrusive temperature measurements for a real ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based thruster by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and monochromatic radiation thermometry are proposed. The ADN-based thruster represents a promising future space propulsion employing green, nontoxic propellant. Temperature measurements in the chamber enable quantitative thermal analysis for the thruster, providing access to evaluate thermal properties of the thruster and optimize thruster design. A laser-based sensor measures temperature of combustion gas in the chamber, while a monochromatic thermometry system based on thermal radiation is utilized to monitor inner wall temperature in the chamber. Additional temperature measurements of the outer wall temperature are conducted on the injector, catalyst bed, and combustion chamber of the thruster by using thermocouple, respectively. An experimental ADN thruster is redesigned with optimizing catalyst bed length of 14 mm and steady-state firing tests are conducted under various feed pressures over the range from 5 to 12 bar at a typical ignition temperature of 200°C. A threshold of feed pressure higher than 8 bar is required for the thruster's normal operation and upstream movement of the heat release zone is revealed in the combustion chamber out of temperature evolution in the chamber.

  4. Laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Yamanaka, C.; Nomaru, K.; Kou, K.; Niki, H.; Izawa, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1994-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a process which uses intense pulsed lasers to selectively photoionize one isotopic species of a chemical element, after which these ions are extracted electromagnetically. The AVLIS has several advantages over the traditional methods based on the mass difference, such as high selectivity, low energy consumption, short starting time and versatility to any atoms. The efforts for atomic vapor laser isotope separation at ILT and ILE, Osaka University have been concentrated into the following items: 1) studies on laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium, 2) studies on interaction processes including coherent dynamics, propagation effects and atom-ion collision in AVLIS system, 3) development of laser systems for AVLIS. In this paper, we present experimental results on the laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium.

  5. [Gas pipeline leak detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Xing; Wang, Jin-Jun; Liu, Bing-Hai; Cai, Ting-Li; Qiao, Li-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2009-08-01

    The principle of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and harmonic detection technique was introduced. An experimental device was developed by point sampling through small multi-reflection gas cell. A specific line near 1 653. 7 nm was targeted for methane measurement using a distributed feedback diode laser as tunable light source. The linearity between the intensity of second harmonic signal and the concentration of methane was determined. The background content of methane in air was measured. The results show that gas sensors using tunable diode lasers provide a high sensitivity and high selectivity method for city gas pipeline leak detection.

  6. Absolute frequency atlas from 915 nm to 985 nm based on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölleke, Christian; Raab, Christoph; Neuhaus, Rudolf; Falke, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    This article reports on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine gas between 915 nm and 985 nm. This wavelength range is scanned utilizing a narrow linewidth and mode-hop-free tunable diode-laser whose frequency is actively controlled using a calibrated wavelength meter. This allows us to provide an iodine atlas that contains almost 10,000 experimentally observed reference lines with an uncertainty of 50 MHz. For common lines, good agreement is found with a publication by Gerstenkorn and Luc (1978). The new rich dataset allows existing models of the iodine molecule to be refined and can serve as a reference for laser frequency calibration and stabilization.

  7. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  8. Application of laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy and colorimetry for quantification of anthocyanin in hard boiled candy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, Mihály; Dóka, Ottó; Bicanic, Dane; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2017-01-01

    The analytical performance of the newly proposed laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and colorimetric method for quantification of anthocyanin (E163) in commercially available hard boiled candies are compared to that of the spectrophotometry (SP). Both LPAS and colorimetry are direct

  9. Development of a portable heavy-water leak sensor based on laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Lim; Park, Hyunmin; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kim, Minho; Jeong, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a compact and portable laser sensor for a detection of heavy water leakage. • The sensor is wearable and also easy to use to search for the leak point. • It is sensitive enough to find invisible very tiny leaks. - Abstract: A compact and portable leak sensor based on cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy has been newly developed for a detection of heavy water leakage which may happen in the facilities using heavy water such as pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). The developed portable sensor is suitable as an individual instrument for the measuring leak rate and finding the leak location because it is sufficiently compact in size and weight and operated by using an internal battery. In the performance test, the minimum detectable leak rate was estimated as 0.05 g/day from the calibration curve. This new sensor is expected to be a reliable and promising device for the detection of heavy water leakage since it has advantages on real-time monitoring and early detection for nuclear safety.

  10. Atomic spectroscopy with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tino, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Some applications of semiconductor diode lasers in atomic spectroscopy are discussed by describing different experiments performed with lasers emitting in the visible and in the near-infrared region. I illustrate the results obtained in the investigation of near-infrared transitions of atomic oxygen and of the visible intercombination line of strontium. I also describe how two offset-frequency-locked diode lasers can be used to excite velocity selective Raman transitions in Cs. I discuss the spectral resolution, the accuracy of frequency measurements, and the detection sensitivity achievable with diode lasers. (orig.)

  11. Diode laser based resonance ionization mass spectrometry for spectroscopy and trace analysis of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, the upgrade and optimization of a diode laser system for high-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry is described. A frequency-control system, based on a double-interferometric approach, allowing for absolute stabilization down to 1 MHz as well as frequency detunings of several GHz within a second for up to three lasers in parallel was optimized. This laser system was used for spectroscopic studies on uranium isotopes, yielding precise and unambiguous level energies, total angular momenta, hyperfine constants and isotope shifts. Furthermore, an efficient excitation scheme which can be operated with commercial diode lasers was developed. The performance of the complete laser mass spectrometer was optimized and characterized for the ultra-trace analysis of the uranium isotope 236 U, which serves as a neutron flux dosimeter and tracer for radioactive anthropogenic contaminations in the environment. Using synthetic samples, an isotope selectivity of ( 236 U)/( 238 U) = 4.5(1.5) . 10 -9 was demonstrated.

  12. Laser Spectroscopy : XII International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Allegrini, Maria; Sasso, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    This text includes all the recent advances in the field of laser spectroscopy. Major results span from the control of matter by electromagnetic fields (trapping and coding) to high precision measurements on simple atomic systems and to quantum optics with single atoms. It includes a report of the Bose-Einstein condensation achieved by laser-cooling of rubidium atoms. Achievements in the technology of tunable sources, in particular of miniaturized solid state devices, are also reported. Most recent advances in molecular spectroscopy are illustrated with emphasis on "cooled" spectra, clusters and high accuracy frequency references. Topics such as atomic interferometry and microcavity quantum optics are also covered.

  13. Detection and correction of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectral background based on spline interpolation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bing; Huang, Min; Zhu, Qibing; Guo, Ya; Qin, Jianwei

    2017-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique that has gained increasing attention because of many applications. The production of continuous background in LIBS is inevitable because of factors associated with laser energy, gate width, time delay, and experimental environment. The continuous background significantly influences the analysis of the spectrum. Researchers have proposed several background correction methods, such as polynomial fitting, Lorenz fitting and model-free methods. However, less of them apply these methods in the field of LIBS Technology, particularly in qualitative and quantitative analyses. This study proposes a method based on spline interpolation for detecting and estimating the continuous background spectrum according to its smooth property characteristic. Experiment on the background correction simulation indicated that, the spline interpolation method acquired the largest signal-to-background ratio (SBR) over polynomial fitting, Lorenz fitting and model-free method after background correction. These background correction methods all acquire larger SBR values than that acquired before background correction (The SBR value before background correction is 10.0992, whereas the SBR values after background correction by spline interpolation, polynomial fitting, Lorentz fitting, and model-free methods are 26.9576, 24.6828, 18.9770, and 25.6273 respectively). After adding random noise with different kinds of signal-to-noise ratio to the spectrum, spline interpolation method acquires large SBR value, whereas polynomial fitting and model-free method obtain low SBR values. All of the background correction methods exhibit improved quantitative results of Cu than those acquired before background correction (The linear correlation coefficient value before background correction is 0.9776. Moreover, the linear correlation coefficient values after background correction using spline interpolation, polynomial fitting, Lorentz

  14. [Classification of results of studying blood plasma with laser correlation spectroscopy based on semiotics of preclinical and clinical states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Musiĭchuk, Iu I; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    The usage of laser correlation spectroscopy for verification of preclinical and clinical states is substantiated. Developed "semiotic" classifier for solving the problems of preclinical and clinical states is presented. The substantiation of biological algorithms as well as the mathematical support and software for the proposed classifier for the data of laser correlation spectroscopy of blood plasma are presented.

  15. A method for the measurement of in line pistachio aflatoxin concentration based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghaleh, Soodeh Jamali [Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Mojtaba, E-mail: m_rahimi@vru.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahrampour, Ali Reza [Physics Department of Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Contamination of pistachio nuts with aflatoxin is one of the most significant issues related to pistachio health and expert. A fast pistachio aflatoxin concentration measurement method based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is proposed. The proposed method from theoretical and experimental points of view is analyzed. In our experiments XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an Ultra Violet (UV) source (λ=308 nm) and a UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrometer is used for fluorescent emission detection. Our setup is employed to measure the concentration of different type of Aflatoxins in pistachio nuts. Measurements results obtained by the LIFS method are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. Aflatoxins concentrations are in good agreement with those are obtained by the HPLC method. The proposed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as an in line aflatoxins concentrations measurement instrument for industrial applications. - Highlights: • XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an UV source for measurement of AFs in pistachio nuts. • Results are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. • LIFS is an online AFs concentration measurement method for industrial applications.

  16. A method for the measurement of in line pistachio aflatoxin concentration based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paghaleh, Soodeh Jamali; Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Rahimi, Mojtaba; Bahrampour, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of pistachio nuts with aflatoxin is one of the most significant issues related to pistachio health and expert. A fast pistachio aflatoxin concentration measurement method based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is proposed. The proposed method from theoretical and experimental points of view is analyzed. In our experiments XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an Ultra Violet (UV) source (λ=308 nm) and a UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrometer is used for fluorescent emission detection. Our setup is employed to measure the concentration of different type of Aflatoxins in pistachio nuts. Measurements results obtained by the LIFS method are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. Aflatoxins concentrations are in good agreement with those are obtained by the HPLC method. The proposed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as an in line aflatoxins concentrations measurement instrument for industrial applications. - Highlights: • XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an UV source for measurement of AFs in pistachio nuts. • Results are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. • LIFS is an online AFs concentration measurement method for industrial applications

  17. Explosive detection using infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, J.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2009-01-01

    Stand-off and extractive explosive detection methods for short distances are investigated using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. A quantum cascade laser (QCL) system for TATP-detection by open path absorption spectroscopy in the gas phase was developed. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m was achieved. For explosives with lower vapor pressure an extractive hollow fiber based measurement system was investigated. By thermal desorption gaseous TATP or TNT is introduced into a heated fiber. The small sample volume and a fast gas exchange rate enable fast detection. TNT and TATP detection levels below 100 ng are feasible even in samples with a realistic contaminant background.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J. [Advanced Photonic Crystals LLC, Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  20. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157 nm F2 laser and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925 nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1 wt% feasible.

  1. Recent advances in ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopy and imaging for reacting plasmas and flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Adamovich, Igor; Gord, James R.; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-10-01

    Reacting flows and plasmas are prevalent in a wide array of systems involving defense, commercial, space, energy, medical, and consumer products. Understanding the complex physical and chemical processes involving reacting flows and plasmas requires measurements of key parameters, such as temperature, pressure, electric field, velocity, and number densities of chemical species. Time-resolved measurements of key chemical species and temperature are required to determine kinetics related to the chemical reactions and transient phenomena. Laser-based, noninvasive linear and nonlinear spectroscopic approaches have proved to be very valuable in providing key insights into the physico-chemical processes governing reacting flows and plasmas as well as validating numerical models. The advent of kilohertz rate amplified femtosecond lasers has expanded the multidimensional imaging of key atomic species such as H, O, and N in a significant way, providing unprecedented insight into preferential diffusion and production of these species under chemical reactions or electric-field driven processes. These lasers not only provide 2D imaging of chemical species but have the ability to perform measurements free of various interferences. Moreover, these lasers allow 1D and 2D temperature-field measurements, which were quite unimaginable only a few years ago. The rapid growth of the ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopic measurements has been fueled by the need to achieve the following when measurements are performed in reacting flows and plasmas. They are: (1) interference-free measurements (collision broadening, photolytic dissociation, Stark broadening, etc), (2) time-resolved single-shot measurements at a rate of 1-10 kHz, (3) spatially-resolved measurements, (4) higher dimensionality (line, planar, or volumetric), and (5) simultaneous detection of multiple species. The overarching goal of this article is to review the current state-of-the-art ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopic

  2. Design and implementation of a laser-based absorption spectroscopy sensor for in situ monitoring of biomass gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros Salazar, David; Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert J.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2017-12-01

    Research to demonstrate in situ laser-absorption-based sensing of H2O, CH4, CO2, and CO mole fraction is reported for the product gas line of a biomass gasifier. Spectral simulations were used to select candidate sensor wavelengths that optimize sensitive monitoring of the target species while minimizing interference from other species in the gas stream. A prototype sensor was constructed and measurements performed in the laboratory at Stanford to validate performance. Field measurements then were demonstrated in a pilot scale biomass gasifier at West Biofuels in Woodland, CA. The performance of a prototype sensor was compared for two sensor strategies: wavelength-scanned direct absorption (DA) and wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lasers used had markedly different wavelength tuning response to injection current, and modern distributed feedback lasers (DFB) with nearly linear tuning response to injection current were shown to be superior, leading to guidelines for laser selection for sensor fabrication. Non-absorption loss in the transmitted laser intensity from particulate scattering and window fouling encouraged the use of normalized WMS measurement schemes. The complications of using normalized WMS for relatively large values of absorbance and its mitigation are discussed. A method for reducing adverse sensor performance effects of a time-varying WMS background signal is also presented. The laser absorption sensor provided measurements with the sub-second time resolution needed for gasifier control and more importantly provided precise measurements of H2O in the gasification products, which can be problematic for the typical gas chromatography sensors used by industry.

  3. A diode-laser optical frequency standard based on laser-cooled Ca atoms: sub-kilohertz spectroscopy by optical shelving detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, C.W.; Bondu, F.; Fox, R.W.; Hollberg, L.

    1999-01-01

    We report an optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on laser-cooled/trapped Ca atoms. The system consists of a novel, compact magneto-optic trap which uses 50 mW of frequency-doubled diode laser light at 423 nm and can trap >10 7 Ca atoms in 20 ms. High resolution spectroscopy on this atomic sample using the narrow 657 nm intercombination line resolves linewidths (FWHM) as narrow as 400 Hz, the natural linewidth of the transition. The spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude with the implementation of a ''shelving'' detection scheme on the 423 nm transition. Our present apparatus achieves a fractional frequency instability of 5 x 10 -14 in 1 s with a potential atom shot-noise-limited performance of 10 -16 τ -1/2 and excellent prospects for high accuracy. (orig.)

  4. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dell' Aglio, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gaudiuso, R., E-mail: rosalba.gaudiuso@ba.imip.cnr.it [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Santagata, A. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Potenza, Via S. Loja, Zona Ind., 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Senesi, G.S. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M.R. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy); Capitelli, F. [Institute of Crystallography - CNR, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); De Pascale, O. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas - CNR, U.O.S. Bari, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: Self-calibrated analytical techniques based on the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) have been employed for the analysis of gemstones and copper-based alloys by LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), with a special focus on LTE conditions in laser induced plasmas. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussion of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition in laser-induced plasmas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS enables elemental analysis with self-calibrated LTE-based methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Be detection in alexandrite gemstone is made possible by LIBS. - Abstract: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  5. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell’Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; Senesi, G.S.; Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M.R.; Capitelli, F.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self-calibrated analytical techniques based on the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) have been employed for the analysis of gemstones and copper-based alloys by LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), with a special focus on LTE conditions in laser induced plasmas. Highlights: ► Discussion of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition in laser-induced plasmas. ► LIBS enables elemental analysis with self-calibrated LTE-based methods. ► Be detection in alexandrite gemstone is made possible by LIBS. - Abstract: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  6. Development of a coal quality analyzer for application to power plants based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yao; Li, Yufang; Wang, Xin; Fan, Juanjuan; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    It is vitally important for a power plant to determine the coal property rapidly to optimize the combustion process. In this work, a fully software-controlled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based coal quality analyzer comprising a LIBS apparatus, a sampling equipment, and a control module, has been designed for possible application to power plants for offering rapid and precise coal quality analysis results. A closed-loop feedback pulsed laser energy stabilization technology is proposed to stabilize the Nd: YAG laser output energy to a preset interval by using the detected laser energy signal so as to enhance the measurement stability and applied in a month-long monitoring experiment. The results show that the laser energy stability has been greatly reduced from ± 5.2% to ± 1.3%. In order to indicate the complex relationship between the concentrations of the analyte of interest and the corresponding plasma spectra, the support vector regression (SVR) is employed as a non-linear regression method. It is shown that this SVR method combined with principal component analysis (PCA) enables a significant improvement in cross-validation accuracy by using the calibration set of coal samples. The root mean square error for prediction of ash content, volatile matter content, and calorific value decreases from 2.74% to 1.82%, 1.69% to 1.22%, and 1.23 MJ/kg to 0.85 MJ/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the corresponding average relative error of the predicted samples is reduced from 8.3% to 5.48%, 5.83% to 4.42%, and 5.4% to 3.68%, respectively. The enhanced levels of accuracy obtained with the SVR combined with PCA based calibration models open up avenues for prospective prediction in coal properties.

  7. Remote quantitative analysis of minerals based on multispectral line-calibrated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a feasible remote sensing technique used for mineral analysis in some unapproachable places where in situ probing is needed, such as analysis of radioactive elements in a nuclear leak or the detection of elemental compositions and contents of minerals on planetary and lunar surfaces. Here a compact custom 15 m focus optical component, combining a six times beam expander with a telescope, has been built, with which the laser beam of a 1064 nm Nd ; YAG laser is focused on remote minerals. The excited LIBS signals that reveal the elemental compositions of minerals are collected by another compact single lens-based signal acquisition system. In our remote LIBS investigations, the LIBS spectra of an unknown ore have been detected, from which the metal compositions are obtained. In addition, a multi-spectral line calibration (MSLC) method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of elements. The feasibility of the MSLC and its superiority over a single-wavelength determination have been confirmed by comparison with traditional chemical analysis of the copper content in the ore.

  8. A LabVIEW-Based Virtual Instrument System for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qijun; Wang, Lufei; Zu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    We report the design and operation of a Virtual Instrument (VI) system based on LabVIEW 2009 for laser-induced fluorescence experiments. This system achieves synchronous control of equipment and acquisition of real-time fluorescence data communicating with a single computer via GPIB, USB, RS232, and parallel ports. The reported VI system can also accomplish data display, saving, and analysis, and printing the results. The VI system performs sequences of operations automatically, and this system has been successfully applied to obtain the excitation and dispersion spectra of α-methylnaphthalene. The reported VI system opens up new possibilities for researchers and increases the efficiency and precision of experiments. The design and operation of the VI system are described in detail in this paper, and the advantages that this system can provide are highlighted.

  9. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  10. Ammonia detection using hollow waveguide enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy based on a 9.56 μm quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyi; Yang, Sen; Wang, Ruixue; Du, Zhenhui; Wei, Yingying

    2017-10-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkalescency trace gas in the atmosphere having a foul odor, which is produced by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Chinese Emission Standard for Odor Pollutants has listed NH3 as one of the eight malodorous pollutants since 1993, specifying the emission concentration less than 1 mg/m3 (1.44ppmv). NH3 detection continuously from ppb to ppm levels is significant for protection of environmental atmosphere and safety of industrial and agricultural production. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) is an increasingly important optical method for trace gas detection. TLAS do not require pretreatment and accumulation of the concentration of the analyzed sample, unlike, for example, more conventional methods such as mass spectrometry or gas chromatography. In addition, TLAS can provide high precision remote sensing capabilities, high sensitivities and fast response. Hollow waveguide (HWG) has recently emerged as a novel concept serving as an efficient optical waveguide and as a highly miniaturized gas cell. Among the main advantages of HWG gas cell compared with conventional multi-pass gas cells is the considerably decreased sample which facilitates gas exchanging. An ammonia sensor based on TLAS using a 5m HWG as the gas cell is report here. A 9.56μm, continuous-wave, distributed feed-back (DFB), room temperature quantum cascade laser (QCL), is employed as the optical source. The interference-free NH3 absorption line located at 1046.4cm-1 (λ 9556.6nm) is selected for detection by analyzing absorption spectrum from 1045-1047 cm-1 within the ν2 fundamental absorption band of ammonia. Direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) technique is utilized and the measured spectral line is fitted by a simulation model by HITRAN database to obtain the NH3 concentration. The sensor performance is tested with standard gas and the result shows a 1σ minimum detectable concentration of ammonia is about 200 ppb with 1 sec time resolution

  11. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  12. Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, G.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

    1993-12-01

    During the last year the author has (a) completed a review article that critically contrasts three methods to measure R-H bond energies, (b) finished a spectroscopic study of the phenylnitrene anion, and (c) successfully completed an overhaul of the light source of the photodetachment spectrometer. The new light source is based on an Ar III laser that provides approximately 100 W of 3.531 eV photons.

  13. Laser spectroscopy on neutron rich sodium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pinard, J; Thibault, C; Vialle, J L

    1976-01-01

    The authors describe results with single-mode dye lasers in high- resolution atomic line spectroscopy. Optical pumping and magnetic resonance detection of Na D-lines provide values of static nuclear groundstate properties.

  14. Simultaneous solution-based generation and characterization of crystalline bismuth thin film by femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liangdong; Keszler, Douglas A.; Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, 153 Gilbert Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003 (United States); Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-6507 (United States); Saha, Sumit; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Yanli [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, 153 Gilbert Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate generation and characterization of crystalline bismuth thin film from triphenyl bismuth in methanol. Upon ultraviolet (267 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation of the solution, a thin film of elemental bismuth forms on the inner side of the sample cuvette, confirmed by detection of the coherent A{sub 1g} optical phonon mode of crystalline bismuth at ∼90 cm{sup −1}. Probe pulses at 267 and 400 nm are used to elucidate the excited state potential energy surface and photochemical reaction coordinate of triphenyl bismuth in solution with femtosecond resolution. The observed phonon mode blueshifts with increasing irradiation time, likely due to the gradual thickening of nascent bismuth thin film to ∼80 nm in 90 min. From transient absorption with the 400 nm probe, we observe a dominant ∼4 ps decay time constant of the excited-state absorption signal, which is attributed to a characteristic metal-ligand bond-weakening/breaking intermediate enroute to crystalline metallic thin film from the solution precursor molecules. Our versatile optical setup thus opens an appealing avenue to characterize the laser-induced crystallization process in situ and prepare high-quality thin films and nanopatterns directly from solution phase.

  15. Noise spectroscopy measurement of 2.3μm CW GaSb based laser diodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chobola, Z.; Juránková, V.; Vaněk, J.; Hulicius, Eduard; Šimeček, Tomislav; Alibert, C.; Rouillard, Y.; Werner, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2005), s. 70-73 ISSN 0033-2089 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC510; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK1010104 Grant - others:EC Project GLADIS(XE) IST-2001-35178 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : noise spectroscopy * GaSb * laser diode * 1/f noise Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  16. GaSb based lasers operating near 2.3 .mu.m for high resolution absorption spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Horká-Zelenková, Veronika; Šimeček, Tomislav; Hulicius, Eduard; Pangrác, Jiří; Oswald, Jiří; Petříček, Otto; Rouillard, C.; Alibert, C.; Werner, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2005), s. 3066-3069 ISSN 1386-1425 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1010104; GA AV ČR IAA4040104; GA MŠk OC 715.50 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : laser diode * absorption spectroscopy * gas detection * methane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.290, year: 2005

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in water | Boudjemai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sparks were generated in water by the focused beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser Na and Cu aqueous solutions exhibited fluorescence signal on the decaying edge of plasma emission at their respective characteristic resonance lines. Potential of the laser plasma spectroscopy for in-situ pollution monitoring in natural ...

  18. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Song, Kyu Seok; Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Chul Joong; Han, Phil Soon

    1992-01-01

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  19. Resonance ionization spectroscopy using ultraviolet laser

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J M; Ko, D K; Park, H M; Rhee, Y J

    2002-01-01

    In this study, Ti:sapphire laser which is pumped by the enhanced Nd:YAG laser using laser diode, was designed and manufactured. The AO Q-switched CW Nd:YAG laser was converted into a high repetition plus-type laser using the AO Q-switch, and two heads were installed inside the cavity in order to improve the laser beam quality. The Nd:YAG laser enhancement was completed by optimization using a simulation for the cavity length, structure and thermal lens effect that greatly effected the laser beam output and quality. As the result of the enhancement, a 30W laser at 532nm and at 5k-Hz was successfully made. Also, the Ti:sapphire laser that will be used for atomic spectroscopy which is pumped by the Nd:YAG laser, was completely designed. As a basic experiment for laser oscillation. We measured the tunability of the laser, and it turned out that the wave tunability range was 730 850 nm. A self-seeding type tunable laser using grating for narrow line width, is planned to be designed due to the fact that the Ti:sapp...

  20. A Noninvasive In Vivo Glucose Sensor Based on Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Alexandra; Liakat, Sabbir; Xu, Laura; Gmachl, Claire

    Diabetes affects over 387 million people worldwide; a number which grows every year. The most common method of measuring blood glucose concentration involves a finger prick which for some can be a harrowing process. Therefore, a portable, accurate, noninvasive glucose sensor can significantly improve the quality of life for many of these diabetics who draw blood multiple times a day to monitor their glucose levels. We have implemented a noninvasive, mobile glucose sensor using a mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade laser (QCL), integrating sphere, and thermal electrically (TE) cooled detector. The QCL is scanned from 8 - 10 microns wavelength over which are distinct absorption features of glucose molecules with little competition of absorption from other molecules found in the blood and interstitial fluid. The obtained absorption spectra are analyzed using a neural network algorithm which relates the small changes in absorption to the changing glucose concentration. The integrating sphere has increased the signal-to-noise ratio from a previous design, allowing us to use the TE-cooled detector which increases mobility without loss of accuracy.

  1. Quantitative analysis of trace lead in tin-base lead-free solder by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy in air at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baozhong; Kano, Hidenori; Kuzuya, Mikio

    2008-02-01

    A quantitative analysis of trace lead in tin-base lead-free solder was carried out with laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS). In order to evaluate the applicability of the technique for rapid in situ analytical purposes, measurements were performed in air at atmospheric pressure, and the emission characteristics of the plasma produced by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser over a laser energy range of 10 - 90 mJ were investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the emission intensity of the analysis line (Pb I 405.78 nm) was maximized at a laser energy of around 30 mJ, and a time-resolved measurement of a spectrum with a delay time of 0.4 micros after the laser pulse was effective for reducing the background continuum. Based on the results, lead-free solder certified reference materials were analyzed for trace lead (concentration 174 - 1940 ppm), and a linear calibration curve was obtained with a detection limit of several tens ppm.

  2. Intensity-Stabilized Fast-Scanned Direct Absorption Spectroscopy Instrumentation Based on a Distributed Feedback Laser with Detection Sensitivity down to 4 × 10−6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel, intensity-stabilized, fast-scanned, direct absorption spectroscopy (IS-FS-DAS instrumentation, based on a distributed feedback (DFB diode laser, is developed. A fiber-coupled polarization rotator and a fiber-coupled polarizer are used to stabilize the intensity of the laser, which significantly reduces its relative intensity noise (RIN. The influence of white noise is reduced by fast scanning over the spectral feature (at 1 kHz, followed by averaging. By combining these two noise-reducing techniques, it is demonstrated that direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS can be swiftly performed down to a limit of detection (LOD (1σ of 4 × 10−6, which opens up a number of new applications.

  3. Principles of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics is an essential textbook for graduate students studying the interaction of optical fields with atoms. It also serves as an ideal reference text for researchers working in the fields of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics. The book provides a rigorous introduction to the prototypical problems of radiation fields interacting with two- and three-level atomic systems. It examines the interaction of radiation with both atomic vapors and condensed matter systems, the density matrix and the Bloch vector, and applications involving linear absorptio

  4. Laser-induced-breakdown-spectroscopy-based detection of metal particles released into the air during combustion of solid propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Morgan; Niemiec, Nicholas A; Demko, Andrew R; Petersen, Eric L; Kulatilaka, Waruna D

    2018-03-10

    Numerous metals and metal compounds are often added to propellants and explosives to tailor their properties such as heat release rate and specific impulse. When these materials combust, these metals can be released into the air, causing adverse health effects such as pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, particulate-matter-induced allergies, and cancer. Hence, robust, field-deployable methods are needed to detect and quantify these suspended metallic particles in air, identify their sources, and develop mitigation strategies. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for elemental detection, commonly used on solids and liquids. In this study, we explored nanosecond-duration LIBS for detecting airborne metals during reactions of solid propellant strands, resulting from additives of aluminum (Al), copper, lead, lead stearate, and mercury chloride. Using the second harmonic of a 10-ns-duration 10-Hz, Nd:YAG laser, plasma was generated in the gas-phase exhaust plume of burning propellant strands containing the target metals. Under the current experimental conditions, the ns-LIBS scheme was capable of detecting Al at concentrations of 5%, 10%, and 16% by weight in the propellant strand. As the weight percentage increased, the LIBS signal was detected by more laser shots, up to a point where the system transition from being nonhomogeneous to a more-uniform distribution of particles. Further measurements and increased understanding of the reacting flow field are necessary to quantify the effects of other metal additives besides Al.

  5. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  6. Spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is a well-known fact that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has emerged as one of the best analytical techniques for multi-elemental compositional analysis of samples. We report assembling and optimization of LIBS set up using high resolution and broad-range echelle spectrograph coupled to an intensified ...

  7. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  8. LASER-INDUCED BREAKDOWN SPECTROSCOPY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique, which can be used to perform ... environmental pollution by Cr results mainly from mining and smelting activities [2]. The ... mapping of large areas, for example soils around mines, for potential heavy metal pollutants. To the best of our ...

  9. Frequency-comb based collinear laser spectroscopy of Be for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A; Geppert, Ch; Blaum, K; Bissell, M L; Frömmgen, N; Hammen, M; Kreim, K; Kowalska, M; Krämer, J; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Sánchez, R; Tiedemann, D; Yordanov, D T; Zakova, M

    2016-01-01

    Absolute transition frequencies of the $2s\\,^2{\\rm{S}}_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $2p\\,^2{\\rm{P}}_{1/2,3/2}$ transitions in Be$^+$ were measured with a frequency comb in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine structure splittings were obtained from the absolute transition frequencies with accuracies better than 1\\,MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of $^{7,10-12}$Be relative to the stable isotope $^9$Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the $2p$ fine structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic un...

  10. Infrared absorption spectroscopy with color center lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, P. G.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Koester, E.; Pfeiffer, J.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    Results are presented of the application of a computer controlled color center laser combined with Stark modulation and magnetic rotation effect modulation for obtaining high resolution spectra of molecular species. The lowest electronic transition of the C2H free radical, of interest in astrophysics, is observed near 3772/cm and the high resolution spectra of methanol and hydroxylamine in the OH stretching region are obtained. It is concluded that color center laser absorption spectroscopy combined with sensitivy enhancement through modulation techniques is a sensitive and versatile means of determining the spectra of free radicals and transient molecules in the infared region.

  11. Multiheterodyne spectroscopy using interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczewski, Lukasz A.; Westberg, Jonas; Patrick, Charles Link; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Bewley, William W.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Wysocki, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    While midinfrared radiation can be used to identify and quantify numerous chemical species, contemporary broadband midinfrared spectroscopic systems are often hindered by large footprints, moving parts, and high power consumption. In this work, we demonstrate multiheterodyne spectroscopy (MHS) using interband cascade lasers, which combines broadband spectral coverage with high spectral resolution and energy-efficient operation. The lasers generate up to 30 mW of continuous-wave optical power while consuming portable and high-resolution solid-state spectroscopic chemical sensors operating in the midinfrared.

  12. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  13. Field-based stable isotope analysis of carbon dioxide by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for carbon capture and storage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin E; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A C; Jost, Hans-Jürg

    2014-12-16

    A newly developed isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a tracer experiment at the Ketzin pilot site (northern Germany) for CO2 storage. For the experiment, 500 tons of CO2 from a natural CO2 reservoir was injected in supercritical state into the reservoir. The carbon stable isotope value (δ(13)C) of injected CO2 was significantly different from background values. In order to observe the breakthrough of the isotope tracer continuously, the new instruments were connected to a stainless steel riser tube that was installed in an observation well. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10 day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 min resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within analytical precision. This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time stable isotope data directly in the field. The laser spectroscopy data revealed for the first time a prior to this experiment unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ(13)C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The short-term variances as observed in this study might have been missed during previous works that applied laboratory-based IRMS analysis. The new technique could contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long

  14. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang; Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H2O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm-1 (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm-1 (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  15. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, known also as laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, is a well-known spectrochemical elemental analysis technique. The field of LIBS has been rapidly matured as a consequence of growing interest in real-time analysis across a broad spectrum of applied sciences and recent development of commercial LIBS analytical systems. In this brief review, we introduce the contributions of the research groups in the African continent in the field of the fundamentals and applications of LIBS. As it will be shown, the fast development of LIBS in Africa during the last decade was mainly due to the broad environmental, industrial, archaeological, and biomedical applications of this technique.

  16. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating

  17. Laser spectroscopy monitoring of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyothi Lakshmi, R.; Ullas, G.; Kartha, V.B.; Alexander, Mohan

    2000-01-01

    Surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy are the major treatment modalities for many forms of cancer at present. Monitoring of the therapy, follow up studies on regression of the disease and detection of recurrence are very essential for successful treatment. Any technique which will be of assistance for these purposes will thus be of great help. This paper presents some of our results of Raman and Pulsed Laser fluorescence spectroscopy studies on tissues, body fluids and bone, in oral cancer subjects after radiation therapy

  18. Classification of red wine based on its protected designation of origin (PDO) using Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S; Rosales, J D; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R; Anzano, J; Caceres, J O

    2016-09-01

    This work reports on a simple and fast classification procedure for the quality control of red wines with protected designation of origin (PDO) by means of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique combined with Neural Networks (NN) in order to increase the quality assurance and authenticity issues. A total of thirty-eight red wine samples from different PDO were analyzed to detect fake wines and to avoid unfair competition in the market. LIBS is well known for not requiring sample preparation, however, in order to increase its analytical performance a new sample preparation treatment by previous liquid-to-solid transformation of the wine using a dry collagen gel has been developed. The use of collagen pellets allowed achieving successful classification results, avoiding the limitations and difficulties of working with aqueous samples. The performance of the NN model was assessed by three validation procedures taking into account their sensitivity (internal validation), generalization ability and robustness (independent external validation). The results of the use of a spectroscopic technique coupled with a chemometric analysis (LIBS-NN) are discussed in terms of its potential use in the food industry, providing a methodology able to perform the quality control of alcoholic beverages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-Pulse Excitation for Underwater Analysis of Copper-Based Alloys Using a Novel Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Salvador; Fortes, Francisco J; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of multi-pulse excitation has been evaluated as an effective solution to mitigate the preferential ablation of the most volatile elements, namely Sn, Pb, and Zn, observed during laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of copper-based alloys. The novel remote LIBS prototype used in this experiments featured both single-pulse (SP-LIBS) and multi-pulse excitation (MP-LIBS). The remote instrument is capable of performing chemical analysis of submersed materials up to a depth of 50 m. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis was performed at air pressure settings simulating the conditions during a real subsea analysis. A set of five certified bronze standards with variable concentration of Cu, As, Sn, Pb, and Zn were used. In SP-LIBS, signal emission is strongly sensitive to ambient pressure. In this case, fractionation effect was observed. Multi-pulse excitation circumvents the effect of pressure over the quantitative analysis, thus avoiding the fractionation phenomena observed in single pulse LIBS. The use of copper as internal standard minimizes matrix effects and discrepancies due to variation in ablated mass. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  1. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  2. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  3. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  4. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  5. Calibration of the ISOLDE acceleration voltage using a high-precision voltage divider and applying collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A.; Catherall, R.; Hochschulz, F.; Kramer, J.; Neugart, R.; Rosendahl, S.; Schipper, J.; Siesling, E.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Yordanov, D.T.; Nortershauser, W.

    2011-01-01

    A high-voltage divider with accuracy at the ppm level and collinear laser spectroscopy were used to calibrate the highvoltage installation at the radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. The accurate knowledge of this voltage is particularly important for collinear laser spectroscopy measurements. Beam velocity measurements using frequencycomb based collinear laser spectroscopy agree with the new calibration. Applying this, one obtains consistent results for isotope shifts of stable magnesium isotopes measured using collinear spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy on laser-cooled ions in a trap. The long-term stability and the transient behavior during recovery from a voltage dropout were investigated for the different power supplies currently applied at ISOLDE.

  6. Sensing cocaine in saliva with infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Kerstin M.-C.; Müller, Matthias; Gianella, Michele; Wägli, Ph.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2013-02-01

    Increasing numbers of accidents caused by drivers under the influence of drugs, raise drug tests to worldwide interest. We developed a one-step extraction technique for cocaine in saliva and analyzed reference samples with laser spectroscopy employing two different schemes. The first is based on attenuated total reflection (ATR), which is applied to dried samples. The second scheme uses transmission measurements for the analysis of liquid samples. ATR spectroscopy achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 3μg/ml. The LOD for the transmission approach in liquid samples is cocaine. An improved stabilization of the set-up should lower the limit of detection significantly.

  7. Impact of Humidity on Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based CO Detection Using a Near-IR Telecommunication Diode Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xukun; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Xiaoli; Wu, Hongpeng; Yang, Yanfang; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-27

    A near-IR CO trace gas sensor based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is evaluated using humidified nitrogen samples. Relaxation processes in the CO-N2-H2O system are investigated. A simple kinetic model is used to predict the sensor performance at different gas pressures. The results show that CO has a ~3 and ~5 times slower relaxation time constant than CH4 and HCN, respectively, under dry conditions. However, with the presence of water, its relaxation time constant can be improved by three orders of magnitude. The experimentally determined normalized detection sensitivity for CO in humid gas is 1.556 × 10(-8) W ⋅ cm (-1)/Hz(1/2).

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy-based geochemical fingerprinting for the rapid analysis and discrimination of minerals: the example of garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvey, Daniel C.; Morton, Kenneth; Harmon, Russell S.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Remus, Jeremiah J.; Collins, Leslie M.; Wise, Michael A.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique real-time geochemical analysis that is being developed for portable use outside of the laboratory. In this study, statistical signal processing and classification techniques were applied to single-shot, broadband LIBS spectra, comprising measured plasma light intensities between 200 and 960 nm, for a suite of 157 garnets of different composition from 92 locations worldwide. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was applied to sets of 25 LIBS spectra for each garnet sample and used to classify the garnet samples based on composition and geographic origin. Careful consideration was given to the cross-validation procedure to ensure that the classification algorithm is robust to unseen data. The results indicate that broadband LIBS analysis can be used to discriminate garnets of different composition and has the potential to discern geographic origin.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy-based geochemical fingerprinting for the rapid analysis and discrimination of minerals: the example of garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvey, Daniel C.; Morton, Kenneth; Harmon, Russell S.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Remus, Jeremiah J.; Collins, Leslie M.; Wise, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique real-time geochemical analysis that is being developed for portable use outside of the laboratory. In this study, statistical signal processing and classification techniques were applied to single-shot, broadband LIBS spectra, comprising measured plasma light intensities between 200 and 960 nm, for a suite of 157 garnets of different composition from 92 locations worldwide. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was applied to sets of 25 LIBS spectra for each garnet sample and used to classify the garnet samples based on composition and geographic origin. Careful consideration was given to the cross-validation procedure to ensure that the classification algorithm is robust to unseen data. The results indicate that broadband LIBS analysis can be used to discriminate garnets of different composition and has the potential to discern geographic origin.

  10. Detection of Dissolved Carbon Monoxide in Transformer Oil Using 1.567 μm Diode Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is one of the most important fault characteristic gases dissolved in power transformer oil. With the advantages of high sensitivity and accuracy, long-term stability, and short detection time, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS has been proven to be one promising sensing technology for trace gas recognition. In this investigation, a tunable PAS experimental system based on a distributed-feedback (DFB diode laser was proposed for recognizing dissolved CO in transformer oil. The molecular spectral line of CO gas detection was selected at 1.567 μm in the whole experiment. Relationships between the photoacoustic (PA signal and gas pressure, temperature, laser power, and CO gas concentration were measured and discussed in detail, respectively. Finally, based on the least square regression theory, a novel quantitative identification method for CO gas detection with the PAS experimental system was proposed. And a comparative research about the gas detection performances performed by the PAS system and gas chromatography (GC measurement was presented. All results lay a solid foundation for exploring a portable and tunable CO gas PAS detection device for practical application in future.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a widely used atomic emission spectroscopy technique for elemental analysis of materials. It is based on the use of a high-power, short pulse laser excitation. The book is divided into two main sections: the first one concerning theoretical aspects of the technique, the second one describing the state of the art in applications of the technique in different scientific/technological areas. Numerous examples of state of the art applications provide the readers an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique. The LIBS theoretical aspects are reviewed. The book helps the readers who are less familiar with the technique to understand the basic principles. Numerous examples of state of the art applications give an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique potentiality. These examples of applications may have a strong impact on future industrial utilization. The authors made important contributions to the development of this field.

  12. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  13. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, R. P. de [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Lynch, K. M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [EP Department, CERN, ISOLDE (Switzerland); Wilkins, S. G. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the CRIS collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  14. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groote, R. P.; Lynch, K. M.; Wilkins, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  15. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 −5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm −3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  16. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 -5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm -3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  17. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, H.

    1991-10-01

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C 2 . The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  18. Laser spectroscopy of neutron deficient Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the ground state properties of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes towards the doubly-magic nucleus $^{100}$Sn. Nuclear spins, changes in the rms charge radii and electromagnetic moments of $^{101-121}$Sn will be measured by laser spectroscopy using the CRIS experimental beam line. These ground-state properties will help to clarify the evolution of nuclear structure properties approaching the $\\textit{N = Z =}$ 50 shell closures. The Sn isotopic chain is currently the frontier for the application of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations. Our knowledge of the nuclear structure of the Sn isotopes will set a benchmark for the advances of many-body methods, and will provide an important test for modern descriptions of the nuclear force.

  19. Laser absorption spectroscopy using lead salt and quantum cascade tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjou-Khales, Khosrow

    A new class of analytic instruments based on the detection of chemical species through their spectroscopic absorption 'fingerprint' is emerging based on the use of tunable semiconductor lasers as the excitation source. Advantages of this approach include compact device size, in-line measurement capability, and large signal-bandwidth product. To realize these advantages will require the marriage of laser devices with broad tunability in the infrared spectral range with sophisticated signal processing techniques. Currently, commercial devices based on short wavelength telecommunications type lasers exist but there is potential for much more versatile instruments based on longer wavelength operation. This thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part I present a theoretical analysis and experimental characterization of frequency and wavelength modulation spectroscopy using long wavelength infrared tunable lasers. The experimental measurements were carried out using commercially available lead salt lasers and excellent agreement is found between theoretically predicted performance and experimental verification. The lead salt laser has several important drawbacks as a source in practical instrumentation. In the second part of the thesis I report on the use of the quantum cascade (QC) laser for use in sensitive absorption spectroscopy. The QC laser is a new type of tunable device developed at Bell Laboratories. It features broad infrared tunability, single mode distributed feedback operation, and near room temperature lasing. Using the modulation techniques developed originally for the lead salt lasers, the QC laser was used to detect Nsb2O and other small molecules with absorption features near 8 mum wavelength. The noise equivalent absorption for our measurements was 5× 10sp{-5}/sqrt{Hz} which corresponds to a detection limit of ˜0.25 ppm-m/sqrt{Hz} for Nsb2O. The QC laser sensitivity was found to be limited by excess amplitude modulation in the detection

  20. Real-time monitoring of atom vapor concentration with laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Fengying; Gao Peng; Jiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The technology of laser absorption spectroscopy was used for real-time monitoring of gadolinium atom vapor concentration measurement and the solid state laser pumped ring dye laser was used as optical source. The optical fiber was taken to improve the stability of laser transmission. The multi-pass absorption technology combined with reference optical signal avoided the influence of laser power fluctuation. The experiment result shows that the system based on this detection method has a standard error of 4%. It is proved that the monitoring system provides reliable data for atom vapor laser isotope separation process and the separation efficiency can be improved. (authors)

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Discrimination between Explosives and Plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian-Qian; Liu Kai; Zhao Hua

    2012-01-01

    A method to distinguish explosives from plastics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is discussed. A model for classification with cross-validation theory is built based on the partial least-square discriminant analysis method. Seven types of plastics and one explosive are used as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has the capacity to discriminate explosives from plastics combined with chemometrics methods. The results could be useful for prospective research of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on the differentiation of explosives and other materials. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  2. COMPLIS: COllinear spectroscopy Measurements using a Pulsed Laser Ion Source

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A Pulsed Laser spectroscopy experiment has been installed for the study of hyperfine structure and isotope shift of refractory and daughter elements from ISOLDE beams. It includes decelerated ion-implantation, element-selective laser ionization, magnetic and time-of-flight mass separation. The laser spectroscopy has been performed on the desorbed atoms in a set-up at ISOLDE-3 but later on high resolution laser collinear spectroscopy with the secondary pulsed ion beam is planned for the Booster ISOLDE set-up. During the first operation time of ISOLDE-3 we restricted our experiments to Doppler-limited resonant ionization laser and $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ nuclear spectroscopy on neutron deficient platinum isotopes of even mass number down to A~=~186 and A~=~179 respectively. These isotopes have been produced by implantation of radioactive Hg and their subsequent $\\beta$-decay.

  3. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  4. Performance testing of a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) based continuous metal emissions monitor at a pyrolytic waste treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, D.W.; Hencken, K.R.; Johnsen, H.A.

    1997-07-01

    A program was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories to develop and demonstrate an advanced continuous emissions monitor that will provide realtime measurement of metal emissions in the wastestreams of thermal treatment facilities. This effort led to the development of a prototype metals monitor based on an optical technique referred to as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurements are performed in situ, and are both noninvasive and real-time. The automated software incorporates a new conditional analysis algorithm that utilizes single particle detection. The metal emissions monitor was tested during March 1997 at a pilot scale pyrolytic waste processing facility in Santa Fe Springs, California. This report describes the field test, including the monitor installation, test cycle, and overall instrument performance. The Clean Air Act metals chromium and manganese were recorded at concentrations from approximately 2 to 5 parts per billion. Iron was recorded at concentrations from 40 to 140 parts per billion. The overall accuracy was in very good agreement with contracted EPA Reference Method 29 results. Overall, the LIBS-based metals monitor performed exceptionally well on a waste treatment facility with very low metal emissions levels. 19 refs., 12 tabs., 3 figs.

  5. Review of Tm and Ho Materials; Spectroscopy and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of Tm and Ho materials is presented, covering some fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics in both single and co-doped systems. Following an introduction to 2- m lasers, applications and historical development, the physics of quasi-four level lasers, energy transfer and modeling are discussed in some detail. Recent developments in using Tm lasers to pump Ho lasers are discussed, and seen to offer some advantages over conventional Tm:Ho lasers. This article is not intended as a complete review, but as a primer for introducing concepts and a resource for further study.

  6. Arduino based laser control

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal Muñoz, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    ARDUINO is a vey usefull platform for prototypes. In this project ARDUINO will be used for controling a Semiconductor Tuneable Laser. [ANGLÈS] Diode laser for communications control based on an Arduino board. Temperature control implementation. Software and hardware protection for the laser implementation. [CASTELLÀ] Control de un láser de comunicaciones ópticas desde el ordenador utilizando una placa Arduino. Implementación de un control de temperatura y protección software y hardware ...

  7. Quantitative measurement of Au and Fe in ferromagnetic nanoparticles with Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy using a polymer-based gel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowik, T.; Przybyło, M.; Pala, K.; Otlewski, J.; Langner, M.

    2011-01-01

    The medical applications of nanomaterials require substantial changes in the research and development stage, such as the introduction of new processes and methods, and adequate modifications of the national and international laws on the medical product registration. To accomplish this, proper parameterizations of nano-scaled products need to be developed and implemented, accompanied by suitable measuring methods. The introduction of metallic particles to medical practices requires the precise, quantitative evaluation of the production process and later quantification and characterization of the nanoparticles in biological matrices for the bioavailability and biodistribution evaluation. In order to address these issues we propose a method for the quantitative analysis of the metallic nanoparticles composition by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Au/Fe ferro-magnetic nanoparticles were used to evaluate the method applicability. Since the powder form of nanoparticles spatters upon laser ablation, first we had to develop fast, convenient and quantitative method for the nano-powdered sample preparation. The proposed method is based on the polymer gelation of nanopowders or their water suspensions. It has been shown that nanopowders compositional changes throughout the production process, along with their final characterization, can be reliable performed with LIBS technique. The quantitative values obtained were successfully correlated with those derived with ICP technique. - Highlights: ► The atomic composition of nanoparticles was analyzed with LIBS. ► The amount of gold on ferromagnetic particles was quantified by the method. ► Gel fixation was used as new way of handling powdered samples. ► LIBS results are comparable with other equivalent methods (ICP). ► There was a difference between measured and assumed nanoparticle composition.

  8. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  9. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  10. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  11. Effect of laser pulse energies in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in double-pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, P.A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of laser pulse energy on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal is studied. In particular, the energy of the first pulse has been changed, while the second pulse energy is held fixed. A systematic study of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal dependence on the interpulse delay is performed, and the results are compared with the ones obtained with a single laser pulse of energy corresponding to the sum of the two pulses. At the same time, the crater formed at the target surface is studied by video-confocal microscopy, and the variation in crater dimensions is correlated to the enhancement of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal. The results obtained are consistent with the interpretation of the double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement in terms of the changes in ambient gas pressure produced by the shock wave induced by the first laser pulse

  12. Development of Calibration-Free Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy based techniques for deposited layers diagnostics on ITER-like tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Roberta; Almaviva, Salvatore; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Popov, Andrey M.; Maddaluno, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    High temperature plasma in hydrogen isotopes is peculiar of thermonuclear fusion devices. The study of plasma-wall interaction is of paramount importance for avoiding both damage of plasma facing components (PFCs) and pollution of the plasma. To assure continuous and fault-free operation a strict control must be exerted on the amount of impurities deposited on, and of the fuel retained in the PFCs. This requirement makes Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy (LIBS) an ideal candidate for on-line quantitative monitoring of the walls of the current as well as of the next generation fusion devices like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). An experimental setup has been designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of a LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely, and it has been utilized in combination with calibration free procedures for quantitative analysis. In this work, a partial calibration free method has been developed for single shot analysis of hydrogen isotopes retention at the PFCs-like surfaces, based on the acquisition of high resolution spectra in a narrow wavelength range. Results of calibration free and partial calibration free have been obtained on suitably deuterated samples; preliminary spectroscopic considerations on tritium detection are also presented.

  13. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneve, L., E-mail: luisa.caneve@enea.i [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Diamanti, A. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Grimaldi, F. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Palleschi, G. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Spizzichino, V. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Valentini, F. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  14. LASER CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (LCS AND ITS CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karganov Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS is based on the analysis of the spectrum of quasielastic light scatter during coherent monochromatic laser irradiation of micro-particles in biological fluids (blood serum, urine, oropharyngeal washout fluid, tear fluid etc.. Spectrum provides information on dynamic processes in the analyzed system: translation motion of scattering particles and their orientation and conformation dynamics. Special procedures of cluster analysis make it possible to find out to which linkage group a particular spectrum belongs. LCS allows evaluation of sub-fractional composition of biological fluids in a wide range of molecular sizes (from 1 to 10,000 nm, which determines principal novelty of this approach in ophthalmology.

  15. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-01-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  16. Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

    Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

  17. Precision laser spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, T.; Borneis, S.; Becker, S.; Dax, A.; Engel, T.; Grieser, R.; Huber, G.; Klaft, I.; Klepper, O.; Kohl, A.; Marx, D.; Meier, K.; Neumann, R.; Schmitt, F.; Seelig, P.; Voelker, L.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, intense beams of highly charged ions have become available at heavy ion cooler rings. The obstacle for producing these highly interesting candidates is the large binding energy of K-shell electrons in heavy systems in excess of 100 keV. One way to remove these electrons is to strip them off by passing the ion through material. In the cooler ring, the ions are cooled to a well defined velocity. At the SIS/ESR complex it is possible to produce, store, and cool highly charged ions up to bare uranium with intensities exceeding 10 8 atoms in the ring. This opens the door for precision laser spectroscopy of hydrogenlike-heavy ions, e.g. 209 Bi 82+ , and allows to examine the interaction of the single electron with the large fields of the heavy nucleus, exceeding any artificially produced electric and magnetic fields by orders of magnitude. In the electron cooler the interaction of electrons and highly charged ions otherwise only present in the hottest plasmas can be studied. (orig.)

  18. Cold Antihydrogen for Precise Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gabrielse, G S; Walz, J; Hessels, E A; Tan, J; Oelert, W; George, M C; Grzonka, D J; Kossick, M; Storry, C H; Sefzick, T

    2002-01-01

    %AD-2 %title\\\\ \\\\The Antihydrogen TRAP Collaboration (ATRAP) seeks to do precise laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Comparisons of antihydrogen and hydrogen atoms should provide the most stringent test of CPT invariance involving baryons and leptons. ATRAP is an expansion of the TRAP collaboration that developed the techniques to take CERN antiprotons from an energy of 6 MeV (momentum 100 MeV/c) all the way down to thermal equilibrium at 4 K for storage. This storage energy is lower than realized previously by more than ten orders of magnitude. The TRAP techniques include slowing, capturing, electron cooling and stacking of antiprotons. ATRAP and other collaborations will use antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). This new facility makes sense for such experiments because we showed that antiprotons can be accumulated in a trap at much lower expense than was required in the earlier CERN AC-AA-LEAR complex. In the closest approach yet to the production of cold antihydrogen, collaboration members wer...

  19. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  20. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, A K; Rai, N K; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A K; Rai, Pradeep K; Rai, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail

  1. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M.; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  2. Compact High Sensitive Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a versatile tool for in situ substance characterization. Existing LIBS instruments are not compact enough for space...

  3. Classification of soft tissues using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Fan, Rongwei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Deying

    2017-07-01

    Classification of pork soft tissues, including skin, fat, loin, tenderloin and ham muscles, was achieved using combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, principal component analysis and k nearest neighbors classification.

  4. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  5. Combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy for multivariate classification of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, D.; Mazura, M.; Samek, O.; Rebrošová, K.; Pořízka, P.; Klus, J.; Prochazková, P.; Novotný, J.; Novotný, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of data provided by complementary laser-based spectroscopic methods on multivariate classification accuracy. Discrimination and classification of five Staphylococcus bacterial strains and one strain of Escherichia coli is presented. The technique that we used for measurements is a combination of Raman spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Obtained spectroscopic data were then processed using Multivariate Data Analysis algorithms. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was selected as the most suitable technique for visualization of bacterial strains data. To classify the bacterial strains, we used Neural Networks, namely a supervised version of Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). We were processing results in three different ways - separately from LIBS measurements, from Raman measurements, and we also merged data from both mentioned methods. The three types of results were then compared. By applying the PCA to Raman spectroscopy data, we observed that two bacterial strains were fully distinguished from the rest of the data set. In the case of LIBS data, three bacterial strains were fully discriminated. Using a combination of data from both methods, we achieved the complete discrimination of all bacterial strains. All the data were classified with a high success rate using SOM algorithm. The most accurate classification was obtained using a combination of data from both techniques. The classification accuracy varied, depending on specific samples and techniques. As for LIBS, the classification accuracy ranged from 45% to 100%, as for Raman Spectroscopy from 50% to 100% and in case of merged data, all samples were classified correctly. Based on the results of the experiments presented in this work, we can assume that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS significantly enhances discrimination and classification accuracy of bacterial species and strains. The reason is the complementarity in

  6. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  7. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  8. Polarization-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Singha, Sima; Liu, Yaoming; Gordon, Robert J

    2009-02-15

    It is shown that plasma polarization measurements can be used to enhance the sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The polarization of the plasma emission is used to suppress the continuum with only slight attenuation of the discrete atomic and ionic spectra. The method is demonstrated for LIBS detection of copper and carbon samples ablated by pairs of femtosecond laser pulses.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: A versatile tool for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging technique for simultaneous multi-elemental analysis of solids, liquids and gases with minute or no sample preparation and thus revolutionized the area of on-line analysis technologies. The foundation for LIBS is a solid state, short-pulsed laser that is focused on ...

  10. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  11. Discrimination of forensic trace evidence using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Candice Mae

    Elemental analysis in forensic laboratories can be tedious and many trace evidence items are not analyzed to determine their elemental composition. Presently, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) is the primary analytical tool for determining the elemental composition of trace evidence items. However, due to the time it takes to obtain the required vacuum and the limited number of samples that can be analyzed at any one time, SEM-EDS can be impractical for a high volume of evidence items. An alternative instrument that can be used for this type of analysis is laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). While LA-ICP-MS is a very precise and quantitative analytical method that determines elemental composition based on isotopic mass measurements; however, the instrumentation is relatively expensive and therefore is budgetarily prohibitive for many forensic laboratories. It is the purpose of this research to evaluate an inexpensive instrument that can potentially provide rapid elemental analysis for many forensic laboratories. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical method that meets these requirements and offers information about the elemental composition based on ionic, atomic and diatomic molecular emissions.

  12. La Spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    CERN Document Server

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-01-01

    l'etude de la forme du noyau atomique est un sujet fondamental puisqu'elle constitue un excellent laboratoire pour tester et valider les differents modeles nucleaires.La spectroscopie atomique et plus particulierement la spectroscopie laser est un moyen precis et inhabituel pour caracteriser des observables liees a la forme du noyau.

  13. Laser spectroscopies for elemental and molecular analysis in art and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Spoto, Giuseppe; Anglos, Demetrios

    2012-02-01

    Spectroscopic methods using laser sources have significantly improved our capacity to unravel the chemical composition of works of art and archaeological remains. Lasers enhance the performance of spectroscopic techniques which require intense light sources and specific analytical protocols assuring a microanalytical approach for analysis has been established. This review focuses on laser spectroscopic methods used in the field of cultural heritage diagnostics. Emphasis in this work is given to the analytical capabilities of laser-based techniques for elemental and/or molecular analysis and in-situ use, spatial resolution and microanalysis. Analytical methods are classified according to the elemental (LIBS, LA-ICP-MS) and molecular (LIF/LIDAR, time-resolved absorption spectroscopy, laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry) information they yield. For non-destructive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF/LIDAR) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, imaging applications are described. The advantages provided by combined complementary techniques including but not limited to LIBS-LIF-Raman and LIBS-XRF are presented, as are recent improvements in terms of chemical imaging. Advances and applications of THz spectroscopy, non-linear spectroscopy and imaging are outlined. Finally, laser spectroscopies are described for investigations of different materials and works of art which include Bronze Age ceramics, Minoan archaeological remains, Ancient Roman buildings, Renaissance wall paintings and sculptures, and manuscripts containing iron gall inks and colorants.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of exotic RI atoms in superfluid helium-OROCHI experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.; Fujikake, K.; Matsuura, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Shimoda, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a new laser spectroscopic technique 'OROCHI,' which is based on the combination of superfluid helium as a stopper of radioactive isotope (RI) beam and in-situ laser spectroscopy of RI atoms, for determining spins and moments of exotic RIs. By using this unique technique, it is feasible to measure nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of extremely low yield RI (estimated as less than 1 pps). Recently, we have demonstrated that nuclear spins and moments are obtained from Zeeman and hyperfine splittings of stable Rb isotopes measured using this OROCHI technique. Details of this laser spectroscopy method in He II 'OROCHI' and the summary of our development are presented.

  15. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  16. Direct analysis of δ2H and δ18O in natural and enriched human urine using laser-based, Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Elena S.F.; Fortsona, Susan L.; Snaith, Steven P.; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Chery, Isabelle; Blanc, Stephane; Melanson, Edward L.; Thomson, Peter J; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopes of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) in human urine are measured during studies of total energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method, measurement of total body water, and measurement of insulin resistance by glucose disposal among other applications. An ultrasensitive laser absorption spectrometer based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was demonstrated for simple and inexpensive measurement of stable isotopes in natural isotopic abundance and isotopically enriched human urine. Preparation of urine for analysis was simple and rapid (approx. 25 samples per hour), requiring no decolorizing or distillation steps. Analysis schemes were demonstrated to address sample-to-sample memory while still allowing analysis of 45 natural or 30 enriched urine samples per day. The instrument was linear over a wide range of water isotopes (δ2H = −454 to +1702 ‰ and δ18O= −58.3 to +265 ‰). Measurements of human urine were precise to better than 0.65 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.09 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for natural urines, 1.1 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.13 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for low enriched urines, and 1.0 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.08 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for high enriched urines. Furthermore, the accuracy of the isotope measurements of human urines was verified to better than ±0.81 ‰ in δ2H and ±0.13 ‰ in δ18O (average deviation) against three independent IRMS laboratories. The ability to immediately and inexpensively measure the stable isotopes of water in human urine is expected to increase the number and variety of experiments which can be undertaken. PMID:23075099

  17. Laser spectroscopy: Assessment of research needs for laser technologies applied to advanced spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1990-05-01

    This report is organized as follows. Section 2 summarizes the current program of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) and provides some remarks on low laser science and technology could beneficially impact most of the research programs. Section 3 provides a brief global perspective on laser technology and attempts to define important trends in the field. Similarly, Section 4 provides a global perspective on laser spectroscopy and addresses important trends. Thus, Section 5 focuses on the trends in laser technology and spectroscopy which could impact the OHER mission in significant ways and contains the basis for recommendations made in the executive summary. For those with limited familiarity with laser technology and laser spectroscopy, reference is made to Appendix 1 for a list of abbreviations and acronyms. Appendix 2 can serve a useful review or tutorial for those who are not deeply involved with laser spectroscopy. Even those familiar with laser spectroscopy and laser technology may find it useful to know precisely what the authors of this document mean by certain specialized terms and expressions. Finally, a note on the style of referencing may be appropriate. Whenever possible a book or review articles is referenced as the preferred citation. However, we frequently found it useful to reference a number of individual papers of recent origin or those which were not conveniently found in the review articles

  18. A comparative study of the laser induce breakdown spectroscopy in single- and double-pulse laser geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Duixiong; Su Maogen; Dong Chenzhong; Wen Guanhong; Cao Xiangnian

    2013-01-01

    A time resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique (LIBS) was used for the investigation of emission signal enhancement on double-pulse LIBS. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at 1064 nm wavelength have been employed to generate laser-induced plasma on aluminium-based alloys. The plasma emission signals were recorded by spectrometer with ICCD detector. Spectral response calibration was performed by using deuterium and tungsten halogen lamps. Time evolution of the plasma temperature and electron density was investigated in SP and DP experiments. Based on the investigation of plasma parameters, the enhancements of emission line intensities were investigated, and the mechanisms of it were discussed. (author)

  19. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Kuritsyn, Yu.A.; Romanovskii, Yu.V.

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review. - Highlights: • Overview of modern TDL-based sensors for combustion • TDL systems, methods of absorption detection and algorithms of data processing • Prominent examples of TDLAS diagnostics of the combustion facilities • Extension of the TDLAS on the tomographic imaging of combustion processes

  20. [Delivery of megawatts high energy laser pulse with large core diameter silica fiber and its application in dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Peng, Fei-Fei; Li, Run-Hua; Chen, Yu-Qi; Yang, Xue-Jiao

    2013-12-01

    To resolve the contradiction between spatial resolution and analysis sensitivity in single pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a study on dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) was carried out by using one Nd : YAG laser which was capable of two laser beam outputs with different wavelengths, where, the second harmonic output, 532 nm laser beam, was used as laser-ablation source, and the fundamental output, 1064 nm laser beam, was delivered with a large core diameter silica fiber to realize nanoseconds time-delay and then used to breakdown the ablated samples. Two laser beams were orthogonally arranged to realize element analysis with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Some key techniques on the coupling of 1064 nm laser beam into fiber, the collimation of laser at the fiber end and re-focusing of the laser beam were studied. The energy delivery capabilities of four fibers of different types were studied and the maximum values were determined experimentally. A Q-switched laser pulse with 15 mJ pulse energy was successfully delivered by selecting a 50 meter long silica fiber with 800 microm core diameter and 0. 39 numerical aperture. And 250 ns time-delay was realized. A copper alloy was analyzed by spectra with current established LA-LIBS system and the possibility of realizing dual-wavelength LA-LIBS analysis based on one Nd : YAG laser was demonstrated experimentally. In this technique, only one Nd: YAG laser was required to carry out spectral analysis. It has a few advantages, such as simple equipment structure, and being convenient to miniaturize the whole system etc. This dual-wavelength LA-LIBS technique was suitable for in-situ elements microanalysis for different samples with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  1. Compositional Analysis of Drugs by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldjilali, S. A.; Axente, E.; Belasri, A.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Hermann, J.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of the compositional analysis of drugs by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated using multivitamin tablets as a sample material. The plasma was produced by a frequencyquadrupled Nd:YAG laser delivering UV pulses with a duration of 5 ns and an energy of 12 mJ, operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The relative fractions of the elements composing the multivitamin drug were determined by comparing the emission spectrum of the laser-produced plume with the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. Fair agreement of the measured fractions with those given by the manufacturer was observed for all elements mentioned in the leafl et of the drug. Additional elements such as Ca, Na, Sr, Al, Li, K, and Si were detected and quantifi ed. The present investigations demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a viable technique for the quality control of drugs.

  2. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Lynch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes ^{202–206}Fr performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay-spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes ^{202–206}Fr, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of ^{202,204}Fr performed at the CRIS experiment.

  3. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, K M; Bissell, M L; Budincevic, I; Cocolios, T E; De Groote, R P; De Schepper, S; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Procter, T J; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly-sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of $^{202,204}$Fr performed at the CRIS experiment.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of gallium isotopes using the ISCOOL RFQ cooler

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Kowalska, M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2007-01-01

    We propose to study the radioisotopes of gallium (Z=31) by collinear laser spectroscopy using the ISCOOL RFQ ion cooler. The proposed measurements on $^{62-83}$Ga will span both neutron-deficient and neutron-rich isotopes. Of key interest is the suggested development of a proton-skin in the neutron-deficient isotopes. The isotope shifts measured by laser spectroscopy will be uniquely sensitive to this feature. The measurements will also provide a wealth of new information on the gallium nuclear spins, static moments and nuclear charge radii.

  5. Laser spectroscopy in an lithium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Sylvester, G.; Olivares, I.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured in a collimated and non-collimated atomic lithium beam by means of a diode laser. Spectral lines with a similar linewidth as the lines observed before in a stationary lithium vapor were observed in the non-collimated beam. The spatial structure of the gas region which emits fluorescence permits to observe in situ the hyperfine levels of lithium atoms: each level corresponds to a relatively plane and well defined region. This indicates that the atoms leave the oven following straight lines (otherwise the collisions would produce diffuse regions), which is in correspondence to the high values of the free mean path expected for the gas at this density, and the extension of the shadow left at the condensation plate. In the collimated beam (diameter D=1 mm, and divergence of 90 mrad), the absorption spectra has a width of 450 MHz (12 deg K or less), which permits the measurement of the hyperfine structure. In this case, from the absorption data we obtained ρD=2 x 10 14 atoms/m 2 . The temperature obtained from the Doppler width is consistent with the temperature obtained from the beam geometry. The lithium atom flow was measured with a quartz thickness monitor and based on estimates of the initial oven temperature and density measurements. Fluorescence measurements have better sensitivity ab do not present problems in the base line due to etalon effects. It is possible to observe the detail structure of the side wings in the line spectra

  6. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 7th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 5-6, 1999 by KAERI. Both the laser and laser beams are critically used in many most precise measurements in science and technology. We discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Cho, G. S.)

  7. High resolution laser spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, K.; Hefter, U.; Hering, P.

    1977-01-01

    The combination of high resolution laser spectroscopy with the technique of molecular beams allows a very detailed beam research since molecules or atoms in specific quantum states can be sampled yielding previously unavailable sources of data. In these experiments a Na/Na 2 beam emerges from a 0.2 mm nozzle and is collimated by a 2 mm wide slit 50 cm downstream. To probe the molecules a single mode Ar + -laser was used which can be tuned within the gain profile of the laser line (8 GHz) to several transitions between specific levels in the ground state and second electronically excited state of the Na 2 molecule. (Auth.)

  8. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  9. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with probe-laser-intensity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloy, K.

    2018-03-01

    We examine the influence of probe-laser-intensity fluctuations on hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy. We assume, as is appropriate for relevant cases of interest, that the probe-laser intensity I determines both the Rabi frequency (∝√{I } ) and the frequency shift to the atomic transition (∝I ) during probe-laser interactions with the atom. The spectroscopic signal depends on these two quantities that covary with fluctuations in the probe-laser intensity. Introducing a simple model for the fluctuations, we find that the signature robustness of the hyper-Ramsey method can be compromised. Taking the Yb+ electric octupole clock transition as an example, we quantify the clock error under different levels of probe-laser-intensity fluctuations.

  10. Development of a gated optical multichannel analyser for laser-plasma spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, Richard

    1990-01-01

    An Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) has been developed for the detection of radiation from laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The system is based on a gated image - intensified photodiode array (PDA) Software for the control of, and data acquisition from, the OMA system has been developed. A high resolution (10ns) delay generator was also designed and constructed to permit timeresolved. optical spectroscopy. The system has been tested and operated with a laser plasma source m...

  11. Spectroscopy and laser characterization of synthesized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... Recent demonstration in augmenting the efficiency of aqueous Rhodamine dye lasers using cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), a deaggregating and photostabilizing host, has drawn interest in the synthesis and characterization of spectroscopic grade CB[7] in larger quantities. Synthesis of cucurbituril group of ...

  12. Spectroscopy and laser characterization of synthesized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... the synthesis and characterization of spectroscopic grade CB[7] in larger quantities. Synthesis of cucurbituril group of ... high-average power aqueous dye lasers. The detailed reaction ... trations clearly indicated quantitative complex formation, and the equivalence point of two intersecting straight lines was ...

  13. Recent results on neutron rich tin isotopes by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J E; Essabaa, S; Fedosseev, V; Geithner, W; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Horn, R; Kappertz, S; Lassen, J; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Le Scornet, G; Lettry, Jacques; Mishin, V I; Neugart, R; Obert, J; Oms, J; Ouchrif, A; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Ravn, H L; Sauvage, J; Verney, D

    2001-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron rich tin isotopes using the COMPLIS experimental setup. The nuclear charge radii of the even-even isotopes from A=108 to 132 are compared to the results of macroscopic and microscopic calculations. The improvements and optimizations needed to perform the isotope shift measurement on $^{134}$Sn are presented.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: A versatile tool for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. March 2008 physics pp. 553–563. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: A versatile tool for monitoring traces in materials. SHIWANI PANDHIJA and A K .... Hg is hazardous in comparison to other heavy metals and hence its uptake by the roots and foliage of the plants is ultimately dangerous for human health.

  15. Spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: Setting up of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is a well-known fact that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has emerged as one of the best analytical techniques for multi-elemental compositional analysis of samples. We report assembling and optimization of LIBS set up using high resolution and broad-range echelle spectrograph coupled to an intensified ...

  16. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  17. Nuclear laser spectroscopy with on-line ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ohtani, S.

    1996-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of atoms informs us various static characteristics of nuclei, particularly for electro-magnetic moments and their distributions. We have been developing an experimental method to perform laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy for the hyperfine structure of Be and Ca isotopes, including unstable nuclei. The purpose and the status of the experiments are described. (orig.)

  18. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... Therefore, technologies concomitant to physical storage of CO2 such as reliable measurement, monitoring, and verification (MMV) techniques are needed to ensure that the integrity of the storage site is maintained. We propose the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical technique ...

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique, which can be used to perform elemental analysis of any material, irrespective of its physical state. In this study, the LIBS technique has been applied for quantification of total Cr in soil samples collected from polluted areas of Brits, North ...

  20. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... We propose the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical technique to detect carbon dioxide leaks to aid in the successful application of CCS. LIBS has a real-time monitoring capability and can be reliably used for the elemental and isotopic analysis of solid, liquid, and gas samples.

  1. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion source RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, Sebastian; Nörtershäuser, W

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at ISOLDE, CERN, by the addition of an all-solid state tuneable titanium: sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE, CERN, and at ISAC, TRIUMF, radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  2. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  3. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-09-24

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  4. Quantification of metals in preservatively-treated lumber using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad Gething; John Janowiak; Bob Falk

    2006-01-01

    The laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was evaluated for its capability of quantifying CCA in preservative-treated wood. The results of the study reveal that the LIBS technique can be used to predict the amount of preservative based on chromium peak analysis, but further refinement of the process is necessary before the technique is practiced. The...

  5. Examination of thermal properties and degradation of InGaN - based diode lasers by thermoreflectance spectroscopy and focused ion beam etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Pierścińska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, thermal properties of InGaN-based diode lasers are investigated. The thermoreflectance technique was employed to study temperature distributions on the front facet of device. Measurements were performed, allowing investigation of the contribution of two main heat sources to the total temperature rise observed on the facet of device. It has been found that the contribution from reabsorption of laser emission at the facet, is much smaller than the one caused by Joule heating (electrical power. Additionally, devices have been investigated by means of SEM and FIB to determine the degradation sources. Inspection of the devices confirmed the lack of mirror damage or deposits. The main source of degradation was found to be located in the region of ridge and caused by extended defects. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that injected current is the major driving force of degradation.

  6. Two-step laser ionization schemes for in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu., E-mail: yuri.kudryavtsev@fys.kuleuven.be; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    The in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy technique has been developed at the Leuven isotope separator on-line facility for the production and in-source laser spectroscopy studies of short-lived radioactive isotopes. In this article, results from a study to identify efficient optical schemes for the two-step resonance laser ionization of 18 elements are presented.

  7. Two-step laser ionization schemes for in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Vermeeren, L

    2014-02-01

    The in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy technique has been developed at the Leuven isotope separator on-line facility for the production and in-source laser spectroscopy studies of short-lived radioactive isotopes. In this article, results from a study to identify efficient optical schemes for the two-step resonance laser ionization of 18 elements are presented.

  8. Development of Advanced Seed Laser Modules for Lidar and Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rosiewicz, Alex; Coleman, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent progress made in the development of highly compact, single mode, distributed feedback laser (DFB) seed laser modules for lidar and spectroscopy applications from space based platforms. One of the intended application of this technology is in the NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The DFB laser modules operating at 1571 nm and 1262 nm have advanced current and temperature drivers built into them. A combination of temperature and current tuning allows coarse and fine adjustment of the diode wavelengths.

  9. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lijun, E-mail: lijunxu@buaa.edu.cn; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronic Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory of Precision Opto-Mechatronics Technology, Beijing 100191 (China); Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-01-15

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm{sup −1} (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm{sup −1} (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhanced by a micro torch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Huang, X; Li, S; Lu, Yao; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2015-06-01

    A commercial butane micron troch was used to enhance plasma optical emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Fast imaging and spectroscopic analyses were used to observe plasma evolution in the atmospheric pressure for LIBS without and with using a micro torch. Optical emission intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) as functions of delay time were studied. Enhanced optical emission and SNRs were obtained by using a micro torch. The effects of laser pulse energy on the emission intensities and SNRs were studied. The same spectral intensity could be obtained using micro torch with much lower laser pulse energy. The investigation of SNR evolution with delay time at different laser pulse energies showed that the SNR enhancement factor is higher for plasmas generated by lower laser pulse energies than those generated by higher laser energies. The calibration curves of emission line intensities with elemental concentrations showed that detection sensitivities of Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm were improved by around 3 times. The limits of detection for both Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm are reduced from 425 and 42 ppm to 139 and 20 ppm, respectively, after using the micro torch. The LIBS system with micro torch was demonstrated to be cost-effective, compact, and capable of sensitivity improvement, especially for LIBS system operating with low laser pulse energy.

  11. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are several analytical techniques employing laser spectroscopy - each with its own distinctive potential. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such technique which is attractive in view of its relative compactness and simplicity (in configuration), remote and online analysis (with no sample handling requirement) and high spatial resolution allowing compositional map or homogeneity analysis. In this technique, a high power pulsed (mostly nanosecond) laser is employed to irradiate the sample causing spark emission, characteristics of the sample composition, which is collected using suitable optics and analysed spectroscopically. Remote and online capability is derived from long distance delivery of laser beams and collection of emitted light by fibres or conventional optics. Since laser can be focused sharply on the target, it can facilitate compositional mapping. Beam Technology Development Group at BARC had initiated work on LIBS of nuclear materials several years ago. Recently the challenge of online monitoring of radioactive waste vitrification plant in a hot cell has been taken up. The theoretical and experimental work done by the group related to instrument development, plasma characterization, quantitative compositional analysis of ternary alloys and uranium vitrified glass samples (comprising more than dozen elements) are described. The future plans for setting up online glass homogeneity monitoring facility are also described. This should fulfill an important demand for optimization of vitrification process. Various other demands of nuclear industry are also reviewed

  12. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  13. Electrooptic modulation methods for high sensitivity tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, David A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Nadler, Shacher

    1990-01-01

    A CdTe phase modulator and low power RF sources have been used with Pb-salt tunable diode lasers operating near 8 microns to generate optical sidebands for high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy. Sweep averaged, first-derivative sample spectra of CH4 were acquired by wideband phase sensitive detection of the electrooptically (EO) generated carrier-sideband beat signal. EO generated beat signals were also used to frequency lock the TDL to spectral lines. This eliminates low frequency diode jitter, and avoids the excess laser linewidth broadening that accompanies TDL current modulation frequency locking methods.

  14. Study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, M.; Omar, M. M.; Gamal, Y. E. E.-D.

    2000-01-01

    A study of the spectral emission in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of gases was performed. The measurements were carried out on helium, argon, nitrogen, and air irradiated with ruby laser radiation at a wavelength of 694.3 nm and a pulse width of 40 ns. The study aimed to evaluate the spectral emission characteristics of these gases as well as the parameters of their formed plasmas, namely: electron temperature and electron density. The temporal behaviour of the spectral emission was also analysed for the different observed emission mechanisms (continuum, atomic, and ionic). Moreover, the effect of gas pressure on the spectral emission intensity is reported in this work.

  15. Laser-Induced-Emission Spectroscopy In Hg/Ar Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lutfollah; Blasenheim, Barry J.; Janik, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced-emission (LIE) spectroscopy used to probe low-pressure mercury/argon discharge to determine influence of mercury atoms in metastable 6(Sup3)P(Sub2) state on emission of light from discharge. LIE used to study all excitation processes affected by metastable population, including possible effects on excitation of atoms, ions, and buffer gas. Technique applied to emissions of other plasmas. Provides data used to make more-accurate models of such emissions, exploited by lighting and laser industries and by laboratories studying discharges. Also useful in making quantitative measurements of relative rates and cross sections of direct and two-step collisional processes involving metastable level.

  16. Advances in Spectroscopy for Lasers and Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Baldassare; New Development in Optics and Related Fields

    2006-01-01

    This volume presents the Proceedings of "New Development in Optics and Related Fields," held in Erice, Sicily, Italy, from the 6th to the 21st of June, 2005. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this Institute was to provide a comprehensive and coherent treatment of the new techniques and contemporary developments in optics and related fields. Several lectures of the course addressed directly the technologies required for the detection and identification of chemical and biological threats; other lectures considered the possible applications of new techniques and materials to the detection and identification of such threats. Each lecturer developed a coherent section of the program starting at a somewhat fundamental level and ultimately reaching the frontier of knowledge in the field in a systematic and didactic fashion.

  17. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of nickel isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    This proposal aims to measure the nuclear ground-state spins, moments and mean-square charge radii of $^{56-71}$Ni using collinear laser spectroscopy. This will enable direct measurements of isotopes in the region of shell closure $^{56}$Ni, structural change $^{68}$Ni and monopole migration beyond N = 40. Optical spectroscopy serves as a detailed probe not only of the changing single-particle behaviour, but also for the study of collective properties such as size and shape. Measurements of the most neutron-rich isotopes available at ISOLDE will critically test models which seek to extrapolate the data to the doubly magic region of $^{78}$Ni.

  18. A Simple Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System for Use at Multiple Levels in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, David W.; Hayes, Ryan T.; Wong, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy) spectrometer constructed by the instructor is reported for use in undergraduate analytical chemistry experiments. The modular spectrometer described here is based on commonly available components including a commercial Nd:YAG laser and a compact UV-vis spectrometer. The modular approach provides a…

  19. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  20. The use of lasers for studying ultrahigh speed phenomena (picoseconds): equipement of a picosecond spectroscopy laboratory using synchronized mode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goujon, P.; Pochon, E.; Clerc, M.

    1975-01-01

    The spectroscopy laboratory is equipped with a dye laser and a neodymium glass laser. Detection is one case is made by means of a streak picosecond camera capable of a 5 ps time interval. A second detection method uses a CS 2 Kerr cell switch based on the Duguay principle. The first qualitative results concerning the fluorescence of DODCI and chlorophyll in vivo as well as the bleaching and recovering of the absorption of the electron solvated in liquid ammonia, have shown that this equipment could effectively enable the observation of physical-chemical processes as brief as 5 ps [fr

  1. Proceedings of the sixth symposium on laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 6th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 3-4, 1998 by KAERI. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most important areas in optical science and engineering and we discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. This have a very important and very valuable lecture by Dr. William Phillips who is the 1997 Nobel Laureate in Physics. His special lecture was very wonderful and fruitful. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Cho, G. S.)

  2. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  3. Multi-pollutants sensors based on near-IR telecom lasers and mid-IR difference frequency generation: development and applications; Instruments de mesure multi-polluants par spectroscopie infrarouge bases sur des lasers fibres et par generation de difference de frequences: developpement et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousin, J

    2006-12-15

    At present the detection of VOC and other anthropic trace pollutants is an important challenge in the measurement of air quality. Infrared spectroscopy, allowing spectral regions rich in molecular absorption to be probed, is a suitable technique for in-situ monitoring of the air pollution. Thus the aim of this work was to develop instruments capable of detecting multiple pollutants for in-situ monitoring by IR spectroscopy. A first project benefited from the availability of the telecommunications lasers emitting in near-IR. This instrument was based on an external cavity diode laser (1500 - 1640 nm) in conjunction with a multipass cell (100 m). The detection sensitivity was optimised by employing a balanced detection and a sweep integration procedure. The instrument developed is deployable for in-situ measurements with a sensitivity of < 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} and allowed the quantification of chemical species such as CO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and the determination of the isotopic ratio {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO{sub 2} in combustion environment The second project consisted in mixing two near-IR fiber lasers in a non-linear crystal (PPLN) in order to produce a laser radiation by difference frequency generation in the middle-IR (3.15 - 3.43 {mu}m), where the absorption bands of the molecules are the most intense. The first studies with this source were carried out on detection of ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}). Developments, characterizations and applications of these instruments in the near and middle IR are detailed and the advantages of the 2 spectral ranges is highlighted. (author)

  4. Dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with combinations of femtosecond and nanosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pender, Jack; Pearman, William; Goode, Scott R; Colston, Bill W; Carter, J Chance; Angel, S Michael

    2003-10-20

    Nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses were combined in an orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) configuration. Even without full optimization of interpulse alignment, ablation focus, large signal, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-background ratio enhancements were observed for both copper and aluminum targets. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, these results have significant implications in the attempt to explain the sources of dual-pulse LIBS enhancements.

  5. Dual-wavelength external cavity laser device for fluorescence suppression in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuting; Cai, Zhijian; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the detection of drugs, pesticides, explosives, food additives and environmental pollutants, for its characteristics of fast measurement, easy sample preparation, and molecular structure analyzing capability. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to these applications, with strong fluorescence background covering up the weak Raman signals. Recently shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) not only can completely remove the fluorescence background, but also can be easily integrated into portable Raman spectrometers. Usually, SERDS uses two lasers with small wavelength gap to excite the sample, then acquires two spectra, and subtracts one to the other to get the difference spectrum, where the fluorescence background will be rejected. So, one key aspects of successfully applying SERDS method is to obtain a dual-wavelength laser source. In this paper, a dual-wavelength laser device design based on the principles of external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is proposed, which is low-cost and compact. In addition, it has good mechanical stability because of no moving parts. These features make it an ideal laser source for SERDS technique. The experiment results showed that the device can emit narrow-spectral-width lasers of two wavelengths, with the gap smaller than 2 nanometers. The laser power corresponding to each wavelength can be up to 100mW.

  6. Laser-powered lunar base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costen, R.; Humes, D.H.; Walker, G.H.; Williams, M.D.; Deyoung, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to compare a nuclear reactor-driven Sterling engine lunar base power source to a laser-to-electric converter with orbiting laser power station, each providing 1 MW of electricity to the lunar base. The comparison was made on the basis of total mass required in low-Earth-orbit for each system. This total mass includes transportation mass required to place systems in low-lunar orbit or on the lunar surface. The nuclear reactor with Sterling engines is considered the reference mission for lunar base power and is described first. The details of the laser-to-electric converter and mass are discussed. The next two solar-driven high-power laser concepts, the diode array laser or the iodine laser system, are discussed with associated masses in low-lunar-orbit. Finally, the payoff for laser-power beaming is summarized

  7. Laser Spark Formamide Decomposition Studied by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 44 (2011), s. 12132-12141 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FT-IR spectroscopy * high-power laser * induced dielectric-breakdown Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  8. Atomic Physics at Accelerators: Laser Spectroscopy and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letokhov, Vladilen

    From 19 to 24 September, 1999, the First European Conference Atomic Physics at Accelerators: Laser Spectroscopy and Applications (APAC'99) was held at University of Mainz and Schloss Waldhausen (Budenheim, Germany) under the chairmanship of H. Backe and G. Huber. The idea of this up-to-date conference was associated with the 65th anniversary of Professor Ernst Otten (University of Mainz) who, together with H. Kluge, contributed much to the development of this work at CERN, University of Mainz, and Darmstadt.

  9. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  10. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  11. Advanced statistical analysis of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data to discriminate sedimentary rocks based on Czerny–Turner and Echelle spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Tao; Lin, Qingyu [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Liang, Long [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Niu, Guanghui; Lai, Hongjun; Xu, Mingjun; Wang, Xu [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Hua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Duan, Yixiang, E-mail: yduan@scu.edu.cn [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2014-03-01

    The correct identification of rock types is critical for understanding the origins and history of any particular rock body. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has developed into an excellent analytical tool for geological materials research because of its numerous technical advantages compared with traditional methods. The coupling of LIBS with advanced multivariate analysis has received increasing attention because it facilitates the rapid processing of spectral information to differentiate and classify samples. In this study, we collected LIBS datasets for 16 sedimentary rocks from Triassic strata in Sichuan Basin. We compared the performance of two types of spectrometers (Czerny–Turner and Echelle) for classification of rocks using two advanced multivariate statistical techniques, i.e., partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machines (SVMs). Comparable levels of performance were achievable when using the two systems in the best signal reception conditions. Our results also suggest that SVM outperformed PLS-DA in classification performance. Then, we compared the results obtained when using pre-selected wavelength variables and broadband LIBS spectra as variable inputs. They provided approximately equivalent levels of performance. In addition, the rock slab samples were also analyzed directly after being polished. This minimized the analysis time greatly and showed improvement of classification performance compared with the pressed pellets. - Highlights: • SVM and PLS-DA were compared using two spectrometers to classify sedimentary rocks. • SVM combined with LIBS improved the classification accuracy compared with PLS-DA. • Minimal difference using pre-selected and broadband spectra as variable inputs • Improved classification performance achievable using polished rock slab samples.

  12. Recent progress of laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masaki

    2018-03-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) collaboration is currently carrying out laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium ? atoms at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. Two-photon spectroscopic techniques have been employed to reduce the Doppler width of the measured ? resonance lines, and determine the atomic transition frequencies to a fractional precision of 2.3-5 parts in 109. More recently, single-photon spectroscopy of buffer-gas cooled ? has reached a similar precision. By comparing the results with three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as ?, which agrees with the known proton-to-electron mass ratio with a precision of 8×10-10. The high-quality antiproton beam provided by the future Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility should enable further improvements in the experimental precision. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  13. Development of pulsed UV lasers and their application in laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Rosa, M I; Perez, C; Gruetzmacher, K; GarcIa, D; Bustillo, A

    2011-01-01

    The application of two-photon laser spectroscopy to plasma diagnostics requires tuneable UV-laser spectrometers providing: some mJ pulse energy at ns time scale with spectral quality close to Fourier Transform Limit, good pulse to pulse reproducibility and tuning linearity. We report about two different systems, a first laser specially optimized for the radiation at 243 nm, which is required for the 1S-2S two photon transition of atomic hydrogen, and a second one generating 205 nm suited for the transition 1S - 3S/3D.

  14. Effect of laser-induced crater depth in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Michela; Cristoforetti, Gabriele; Hidalgo, Montserrat; Iriarte, Daniela; Legnaioli, Stefano; Palleschi, Vincenzo; Salvetti, Azenio; Tognoni, Elisabetta

    2005-07-01

    The influence of crater depth on plasma properties and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emission has been evaluated. Laser-induced plasmas were generated at the surface and at the bottom of different craters in a copper sample. Plasmas produced at the sample surface and at the bottom of the craters were spatially and temporally resolved. LIBS emission, temperature, and electronic number density of the plasmas were evaluated. It is shown that the confinement effect produced by the craters enhances the LIBS signal from the laser-induced plasmas.

  15. Elemental profiling of laser cladded multilayer coatings by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Filippov, M. N.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Filichkina, V. A.; Stavertiy, A. Ya.; Tretyakov, R. S.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer tungsten carbide wear resistant coatings were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Coaxial laser cladding technique was utilized to produce tungsten carbide coating deposited on low alloy steel substrate with additional inconel 625 interlayer. EDX and LIBS techniques were used for elemental profiling of major components (Ni, W, C, Fe, etc.) in the coating. A good correlation between EDX and LIBS data was observed while LIBS provided additional information on light element distribution (carbon). A non-uniform distribution of tungsten carbide grains along coating depth was detected by both LIBS and EDX. In contrast, horizontal elemental profiling showed a uniform tungsten carbide particles distribution. Depth elemental profiling by layer-by-layer LIBS analysis was demonstrated to be an effective method for studying tungsten carbide grains distribution in wear resistant coating without any sample preparation.

  16. Laser systems for collinear spectroscopy and the charge radius of 12Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nuclear charge radii of shortlived medium- and heavy-Z nuclei for more than three decades. But it became only recently be applicable to low-Z nuclei. This region of the nuclear chart attracts attention because so-called ab-initio nuclear models, based on realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, can only be applied to the lightest elements due to the rapidly increasing calculational demands with the number of nucleons. Furthermore, strong clusterization of atomic nuclei occurs and the encountered halo nuclei are presently subject of intense research. The isotopic chain of beryllium exhibits the prime example of a one-neutron halo nucleus, 11 Be, and the two- or four-neutron halo nucleus 14 Be. 12 Be is a key isotope between these two exotic nuclei and particularly interesting because the nuclear shell model predicts a shell closure for the magic neutron number N = 8. In the course of this thesis, several frequency-stabilized laser systems for collinear laser spectroscopy have been developed. At TRIGA-SPEC a frequency-doubled diode laser system with a tapered amplifier and a frequency comb-stabilized titanium-sapphire laser with a frequency doubling stage are now available for the spectroscopy of refractory metals above molybdenum. They have already been used for test-experiments and commissioning of the TRIGA-LASER beamline. Furthermore, frequency-quadrupling of the Ti:Sa laser was demonstrated to expand the emitted wavelengths into the 200 nm region. At ISOLDE/CERN a frequency comb-stabilized and an iodine-stabilized dye laser were installed and applied for laser spectroscopy of 9,10,11,12 Be + . The improved laser system and the development of a delayed photon-ion coincidence detection improved the sensitivity of the beryllium spectroscopy by more than two orders of magnitude and, thus, the previous measurements of 7-11 Be could be extended for the first time to the short-lived isotope 12 Be. In addition

  17. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  18. Hydrogen leak detection using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A J; Hohreiter, V; Hahn, D W

    2005-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated as a technique for real-time monitoring of hydrogen gas. Two methodologies were examined: The use of a 100 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced breakdown directly in a sample gas stream, and the use of a 55 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced plasma on a solid substrate surface, with the expanding plasma sampling the gas stream. Various metals were analyzed as candidate substrate surfaces, including aluminum, copper, molybdenum, stainless steel, titanium, and tungsten. Stainless steel was selected, and a detailed analysis of hydrogen detection in binary mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was performed. Both the gaseous plasma and the plasma initiated on the stainless steel surface generated comparable hydrogen emission signals, using the 656.28 Halpha emission line, and exhibited excellent signal linearity. The limit of detection is about 20 ppm (mass) as determined for both methodologies, with the solid-initiated plasma yielding a slightly better value. Overall, LIBS is concluded to be a viable candidate for hydrogen sensing, offering a combination of high sensitivity with a technique that is well suited to implementation in field environments.

  19. Laser Ultrasound Spectroscopy Scanning for 3D Printed Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Guendalyn Kendra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-04

    One of the challenges of additive manufacturing is quality control due to the possibility of unseen flaws in the final product. The current methods of inspection are lacking in detail, too slow for practical use, or unable to validate internal structure. This report examines the use of laser ultrasound spectroscopy in layer by layer scans of 3D printed parts as they are created. The result is fast and detailed quality control. An additional advantage of this method is the ability to cancel a print as soon as a defect is detected, therefore saving materials and time. This technique, though simple in concept, has been a challenge to implement. I discuss tweaking the 3D printer configuration, and finding the optimal settings for laser scanning small parts made of ABS plastic, as well as the limits of how small of a detail the laser can detect. These settings include the frequency of the ultrasonic transducer, the speed of the laser, and the distance from the laser to the part.

  20. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon laser plasma ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon laser plasma generated by an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 7 ns, fluence 4-52 J cm-2) is studied by optical emission spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight. Up to C4+ ions are detected with the ion flux strongly dependent on the laser fluence. The increase in ion charge with the laser fluence is accompanied by observation of multicharged ion lines in the optical spectra. The time-integrated electron temperature Te is calculated from the Boltzmann plot using the C II lines at 392.0, 426.7, and 588.9 nm. Te is found to increase from ∼0.83 eV for a laser fluence of 22 J cm-2 to ∼0.90 eV for 40 J cm-2. The electron density ne is obtained from the Stark broadened profiles of the C II line at 392 nm and is found to increase from ∼ 2 . 1 × 1017cm-3 for 4 J cm-2 to ∼ 3 . 5 × 1017cm-3 for 40 J cm-2. Applying an external electric field parallel to the expanding plume shows no effect on the line emission intensities. Deconvolution of ion time-of-flight signal with a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for each charge state results in an ion temperature Ti ∼4.7 and ∼6.0 eV for 20 and 36 J cm-2, respectively.

  1. Chemical sensors based on quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Rochat, Michel; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2002-09-01

    There is an increasing need in many chemical sensing applications ranging from industrial process control to environmental science and medical diagnostics for fast, sensitive, and selective gas detection based on laser spectroscopy. The recent availability of novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers as mid-infrared spectroscopic sources address this need. A number of spectroscopic techniques have been demonstrated. For example, the authors have employed QC-DFB lasers for the monitoring and quantification of several trace gases and isotopic species in ambient air at ppmv and ppbv levels by means of direct absorption, wavelength modulation, cavity enhanced and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. In this work, pulsed thermoelectrically cooled QC-DFB lasers operating at ~15.6 μm were characterized for spectroscopic gas sensing applications. A new method for wavelength scanning based on the repetition rate modulation was developed. A non-wavelength-selective pyroelectric detector was incorporated in the gas sensor giving an advantage of room-temperature operation and low cost. Absorption lines of CO2 and H2O were observed in ambient air providing information about the concentration of these species.

  2. Determination of elemental composition of coffee using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondal, M. A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa; Baig, Umair; Dastageer, M. A.; Sarwar, Mohsin [Laser Research Group, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O Box 5047, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-10

    A detection system based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was built using 266 nm wavelength pulsed laser from the fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser, 500 mm spectrograph and gated ICCD camera with built-in delay generator. The LIBS system was used to study the elemental composition in coffee available in the local market of Saudi Arabia for the detection of elements in coffee samples. The LIBS spectrum of coffee sample revealed the presence magnesium, calcium, aluminum, copper, sodium, barium, bromine, cobalt, chromium, cerium manganese and molybdenum. Atomic transition line of sodium is used to study the parametric dependence of LIBS signal. The study of the dependence of LIBS signal on the laser pulse energy is proven to be linear and the dependence of LIBS signal on the time delay between the excitation and data acquisition showed a typical increase, a peak value and a decrease with the optimum excitation – acquisition delay at 400 ns.

  3. Determination of elemental composition of coffee using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondal, M. A.; Baig, Umair; Dastageer, M. A.; Sarwar, Mohsin

    2016-01-01

    A detection system based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was built using 266 nm wavelength pulsed laser from the fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser, 500 mm spectrograph and gated ICCD camera with built-in delay generator. The LIBS system was used to study the elemental composition in coffee available in the local market of Saudi Arabia for the detection of elements in coffee samples. The LIBS spectrum of coffee sample revealed the presence magnesium, calcium, aluminum, copper, sodium, barium, bromine, cobalt, chromium, cerium manganese and molybdenum. Atomic transition line of sodium is used to study the parametric dependence of LIBS signal. The study of the dependence of LIBS signal on the laser pulse energy is proven to be linear and the dependence of LIBS signal on the time delay between the excitation and data acquisition showed a typical increase, a peak value and a decrease with the optimum excitation – acquisition delay at 400 ns.

  4. Effect of laser irradiation on cell function and its implications in Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Song, Yanqing; Song, Yizhi; Xu, Jiabao; Wu, Yinhu; Glidle, Andrew; Cusack, Maggie; Ijaz, Umer Z; Cooper, Jonathan M; Huang, Wei E; Yin, Huabing

    2018-02-02

    Lasers are instrumental in advanced bioimaging and Raman spectroscopy. However, they are also well known for their destructive effects on living organisms, leading to concerns about the adverse effects of laser technologies. To implement Raman spectroscopy for cell analysis and manipulation, such as Raman activated cell sorting, it is crucial to identify non-destructive conditions for living cells. Here, we evaluated quantitatively the effect of 532 nm laser irradiation on bacterial cell fate and growth at the single-cell level. Using a purpose-built microfluidic platform, we were able to quantify the growth characteristics i.e. specific growth rate and lag time of individual cells as well as the survival rate of a population in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. Representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive species show a similar trend in response to laser irradiation dose. Laser irradiation could compromise physiological function of cells and the degree of destruction is both dose and strain dependent, ranging from reduced cell growth to a complete loss of cell metabolic activity and finally to physical disintegration. Gram-positive bacterial cells are more susceptible than Gram-negative bacterial strains to irradiation-induced damage. By directly correlating Raman acquisition with single cell growth characteristics, we provide evidence of non-destructive characteristics of Raman spectroscopy on individual bacterial cells. However, while strong Raman signals can be obtained without causing cell death, the variety of responses from different strains and from individual cells justify careful evaluation of Raman acquisition conditions if cell viability is critical. IMPORTANCE In Raman spectroscopy, the use of powerful monochromatic light in laser-based systems facilitates detection of the inherently weak signals. This allows environmentally and clinically relevant microorganisms to be measured at the single cell level. The significance of being able to perform

  5. Development of a pulsed laser system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, J.; Lang, T.; Huss, R.; Ernst, M.; Moalem, A.; Kolleck, C.; Kracht, D.

    2017-11-01

    A prototype of a compact light-weight passively Q-switched diode pumped Nd:YLF solid-state laser system for harsh environments has been developed. It emits 2ns pulses at a wavelength of 1053nm with a repetition rate of up to 50Hz and an energy of 1.5mJ. The beam propagation factor M2-has a value of 1.2. The total mass of the prototype electronics, consisting of an electronic board including pump diodes and thermal control to be accommodated with other electronics in a shared electronics box, and the complete solid-state laser head is 189g with further potential for mass reduction with respect to a flight model development. Applications of this laser system are amongst others laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for planetary surface exploration or short range altimetry.

  6. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been established as a powerful method for identifying trace elemental contaminants by analyzing the atomic spectral emission lines that result subsequent to plasmas generated by laser power...

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO 2 : N 2 : He), O 2 , N 2 , and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis

  9. Stark Effect of Alkali Atoms by Laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masayuki; Jin, Wei-Guo; Minowa, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2009-03-01

    Stark effect of alkali atoms has been studied by means of high-resolution atomic-beam laser spectroscopy. A compact electrode apparatus has been developed in order to produce a stable and strong electric field. The Stark shifts and splittings of the D lines have been measured for K, Rb and Cs atoms. The scalar polarizabilities of the K and Rb D1 lines and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the K and Cs D2 lines have been determined, providing a crosscheck of the previously reported values.

  10. Atomic Physics at Accelerators Laser Spectroscopy and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Letokhov, V

    2003-01-01

    From 19 to 24 September, 1999, the First European Conference Atomic physics at Accelerators: Laser Spectroscopy and Applications (APAC'99) was held at University of Mainz and Schloss Waldhausen (Budenheim, Germany) under the chairmanship of H. Backe and G. Huber. The idea of this up-to-date conference was associated with the 65th anniversary of Professor Ernst Otten (University of Mainz) who, together with H. Kluge, contributed much to the development of this work at CERN, University of Mainz, and Darmstadt. (17 refs).

  11. Range extension in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using femtosecond-nanosecond dual-beam laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Li, Ziting; Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2017-06-01

    We extend the detection range of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with high-energy nanosecond CO2 laser pulses. The femtosecond laser pulses ionize the molecules and generate filament in air. The free electrons generated in the self-confined plasma channel by the femtosecond laser serve as the seed electrons which cause efficient avalanche ionization in the nanosecond CO2 laser field. We show that the detection distance has been extended by three times with the assistance of femtosecond laser filamentation.

  12. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance.

  13. Plasma-enhanced antibody immobilization for the development of a capillary-based carcinoembryonic antigen immunosensor using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaoling; Zhan, Xuefang; Liu, Kunping; Lv, Hao; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-05-07

    In this study, antibody immobilization using a microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment was achieved for the first time. Plasma was used to activate the surface of a capillary-based immunosensor by increasing the density of silicon hydroxyls and dangling bonds to ensure better silanization. The capture antibodies were covalently immobilized after the silanized surface reacted with glutaraldehyde and antibodies. A Cy3-labeled detection antibody was used in combination with the antigen captured by the immunosensor to complete the sandwich-type immunoassay, and the signals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence system. Microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) immunosensor improved the antibody immobilization, and there was an obvious improvement in the linear detection range, i.e., 1 order of magnitude compared with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This novel immobilization method dramatically improved the detection limit (0.5 pmol/L CEA) and sensitivity. Assay validation studies indicated that the correlation coefficient reached 0.9978, and the relative standard deviations were Ar plasma was demonstrated to be a sensitive tool for CEA diagnostics.

  14. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  15. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy - ICOLS 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Häffner, Hartmut; Müller, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy (ICOLS) took place at Berkeley, California on 9-14 June 2013. Following the tradition of previous meetings in this series, the conference featured about thirty invited talks broadly covering this burgeoning field of science that refuses to show any sign of saturation after more than half a century of continuous boom. In addition to the invited talks, there were two informative poster sessions, where the more than 300 ICOLS participants had an opportunity to exchange the latest scientific news and ideas while enjoying the gorgeous view of the San Francisco Bay from the vista of the Claremont Hotel, the meeting's venue. The heights of the cultural program of the meeting were excursions to several of the Bay Area gems (including the Lick observatory), as well as the conference banquet where the participants were treated to addresses by an inventor of the laser Professor Charles H Townes, a nonlinear optics pioneer Professor Erwin L Hahn, and one of the previous ICOLS chairs Professor Y R Shen. While the field of Laser Spectroscopy and the series of the bi-annual ICOLS meetings are as 'healthy' as one could imagine, the same cannot be said about the concept of published conference proceedings. With new ways to publish scientific articles and preprints, submitting papers to conference proceedings seems to be rapidly losing popularity. For this meeting, the great interest in attendance and opportunities to present is sharply contrasted with a somewhat sluggish response to the call for submission of the proceedings papers. The present collection represents a dozen or so contributions from the 'hero' invited speakers, to whom we are deeply grateful for submitting their work. We hope that this selection will faithfully convey to the readers the excitement of modern laser spectroscopy. In addition to these papers, we draw the reader's attention to the audio recordings and selected viewgraphs from the invited talks, and

  16. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). NIF and Photon Sciences; Thomas, A. G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences; Mangles, S. P.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Corde, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flacco, A. [ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Neely, D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Viera, J. [Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). GoLP-Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Lab. Associado; Najmudin, Z. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Bingham, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Katsouleas, T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Platt School of Engineering

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  17. Laser-based instrumentation for the detection of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, A. Jr.; Sander, R.K.; Quigley, G.P.; Radziemski, L.J.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Several laser-based techniques are being evaluated for the remote, point, and surface detection of chemical agents. Among the methods under investigation are optoacoustic spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence (SDLIF). Optoacoustic detection has already been shown to be capable of extremely sensitive point detection. Its application to remote sensing of chemical agents is currently being evaluated. Atomic emission from the region of a laser-generated plasma has been used to identify the characteristic elements contained in nerve (P and F) and blister (S and Cl) agents. Employing this LIBS approach, detection of chemical agent simulants dispersed in air and adsorbed on a variety of surfaces has been achieved. Synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence provides an attractive alternative to conventional LIF, in that an artificial narrowing of the fluorescence emission is obtained. The application of this technique to chemical agent simulants has been successfully demonstrated. 19 figures

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  19. Q-switched Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip 1338 nm laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2017-12-01

    Q-switched microchip laser emitting radiation at wavelength 1338nm was tested as a radiation source for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This laser used sandwich crystal which combined in one piece the cooling part (undoped YAG crystal 4mm long), the active laser part (Nd:YAG crystal 12mm long), and the saturable absorber (V:YAG crystal 0.7mm long). The diameter of this crystal was 5 mm. The microchip resonator consisted of dielectric mirrors directly deposited on the monolith crystal surfaces. The pump mirror (HT @ 808 nm, HR @ 1.3 ¹m) was placed on the undoped YAG part. The output coupler (R = 90% @ 1338 nm) was placed on the V:YAG part. The fibre-coupled 808nm pumping laser diode was operating in pulsed regime (rep. rate 250 Hz, pulse width 300 ¹s, pulse energy 6 mJ). Using this pumping, stable and high reproducible Q-switched pulses were generated at wavelength 1338 nm. Pulse length was 6.2 ns (FWHM) and the mean output power was 33mW. The single pulse energy and peak power was 0.13mJ and 21kW, respectively. Laser was operating in fundamental TEM00 mode. The laser radiation was focused on a tested sample using single plano-convex lens (focal length 75 mm). The focal spot radius was 40 ¹m. The corresponding peak-power density was 0.83GW/cm2. The laser induced break-down was successfully reached and corresponding laser-induced plasma spectra were recorded for set of metallic elements (Cu, Ag, Au, In, Zn, Al, Fe, Ni, Cr) and alloys (Sn-Pb solder, duralumin, stainless-steel, brass). To record the spectra, StellarNet BLACK-Comet concave grating CCD-based spectrometer was used without any special collimation optics. Thanks to used laser wavelength far from the detector sensitivity, no special filtering was needed to overcome the CCD dazzling. The constructed laser could significantly improve repletion-rate of up-to-date LIBS devices.

  20. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  1. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  2. Spectroscopy of L-series transitions for X-ray laser photopumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Newman, D. A.; Hailey, C. J.; Rockett, P. D.; Charatis, G.

    1985-12-01

    Several transition metals considered for resonant photoexcitation X-ray laser applications were examined by high-precision X-ray spectroscopy to determine spectral line positions and radiant line intensity. A cylindrically focused 0.527-micron laser was used to generate the plasma source emission by irradiating thin foil targets; selected wave regions in the 10-17-A range were studied for possible line coincidences between K-series transitions in F, Ne, and O with emission from transition-metal targets. Exact spectral coincidences were found for Mn with the F H-beta line at 12.643 A and for both Mn and Cr with the F He-beta line at 14.458 A. The data obtained from this study have been used to design X-ray laser targets based on an F-gas lasant and a Mn-foil pump.

  3. Using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on vacuum alloys-production process for elements concentration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianzhuo; Fan, Zhongwei; Lian, Fuqiang; Liu, Yang; Lin, Weiran; Mo, Zeqiang; Nie, Shuzhen; Wang, Pu; Xiao, Hong; Li, Xin; Zhong, Qixiu; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizing an echelle spectrograph-ICCD system is employed for on-line analysis of elements concentration in a vacuum induction melting workshop. Active temperature stabilization of echelle spectrometer is implemented specially for industrial environment applications. The measurement precision is further improved by monitoring laser parameters, such as pulse energy, spatial and temporal profiles, in real time, and post-selecting laser pulses with specific pulse energies. Experimental results show that major components of nickel-based alloys are stable, and can be well detected. By using internal standard method, calibration curves for chromium and aluminum are obtained for quantitative determination, with determination coefficient (relative standard deviation) to be 0.9559 (< 2.2%) and 0.9723 (< 2.8%), respectively.

  4. Laser spectroscopy and photochemistry on metal surfaces, pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, HL

    1995-01-01

    Using lasers to induce and probe surface processes has the advantages of quantum state specificity, species selectivity, surface sensitivity, fast time-resolution, high frequency resolution, and accessibility to full pressure ranges. These advantages make it highly desirable to use light to induce, control, or monitor surface chemical and physical processes. Recent applications of laser based techniques in studying surface processes have stimulated new developments and enabled the understanding of fundamental problems in energy transfer and reactions. This volume will include discussions on sp

  5. Laser spectroscopy and photochemistry on metal surfaces, pt.1

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, HL

    1995-01-01

    Using lasers to induce and probe surface processes has the advantages of quantum state specificity, species selectivity, surface sensitivity, fast time-resolution, high frequency resolution, and accessibility to full pressure ranges. These advantages make it highly desirable to use light to induce, control, or monitor surface chemical and physical processes. Recent applications of laser based techniques in studying surface processes have stimulated new developments and enabled the understanding of fundamental problems in energy transfer and reactions. This volume will include discussions on sp

  6. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  7. Pico-second laser spectroscopy and reaction dynamics in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic relaxation of excited singlet states of molecules and ions in liquid solution is investigated using picosecond laser spectroscopy. The more efficient process for the deactivation of the first excited singlet state of pinacyanol is internal conversion S 1 → S 0 between iso-energetic states. At low viscosity, the rate constant is inversely proportional to the macroscopic viscosity and depends on the relaxation of the angle between the quinoline end groups around the polymethinic chain. Electron photodetachment by 265 nm excitation of the ferrocyanide and phenolate anions and photoionisation of neutral molecules, phenol, indole and tryptophan in polar solvents give rise to the solvated electron formation. The mono-or bi-photonic nature of the ejection process and the solvent relaxation around the excess electron are analyzed. (author) [fr

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive source of the fundamentals, process parameters, instrumental components and applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The effect of multiple pulses on material ablation, plasma dynamics and plasma emission is presented. A heuristic plasma modeling allows to simulate complex experimental plasma spectra. These methods and findings form the basis for a variety of applications to perform quantitative multi-element analysis with LIBS. These application potentials of LIBS have really boosted in the last years ranging from bulk analysis of metallic alloys and non-conducting materials, via spatially resolved analysis and depth profiling covering measuring objects in all physical states: gaseous, liquid and solid. Dedicated chapters present LIBS investigations for these tasks with special emphasis on the methodical and instrumental concepts as well as the optimization strategies for a quantitative analysis. Requirements, concepts, design and characteristic features of LI...

  9. High-resolution in-source laser spectroscopy in perpendicular geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinke, R., E-mail: reinhard.heinke@uni-mainz.de; Kron, T. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany); Raeder, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Reich, T.; Schönberg, P. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Kernchemie (Germany); Trümper, M.; Weichhold, C.; Wendt, K. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Operation of the novel laser ion source unit LIST (Laser Ion Source and Trap), operating at the on-line radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN allowed for the production of ultra-pure beams of exotic isotopes far-off stability as well as direct isobar-free laser spectroscopy, giving access to the study of atomic and nuclear properties of so far inaccessible nuclides. We present a specific upgrade and adaption of the LIST targeted for high resolution spectroscopy with a Doppler-reduced perpendicular atom - laser beam geometry. With this PI-LIST (Perpendicularly Illuminated Laser Ion Source and Trap) setup, experimental linewidths below 100 MHz could be demonstrated in optical laser spectroscopy off-line, applying a pulsed injection-locked high repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser. A dual repeller configuration ensured highest suppression of isobaric interferences and almost background-free measurements on small samples in the order of 10{sup 11} atoms.

  10. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  11. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-comb-assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this Letter, we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers...

  12. Forensic comparative glass analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Candice M.; Powell, Joseph; Steele, Katie L.; Sigman, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Glass samples of four types commonly encountered in forensic examinations have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the purpose of discriminating between samples originating from different sources. Some of the glass sets were also examined by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Refractive index (RI) measurements were also made on all glass samples and the refractive index data was combined with the LIBS and with the LA-ICP-MS data to enhance discrimination. The glass types examined included float glass taken from front and side automobile windows (examined on the non-float side), automobile headlamp glass, automobile side-mirror glass and brown beverage container glass. The largest overall discrimination was obtained by employing RI data in combination with LA-ICP-MS (98.8% discrimination of 666 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence), while LIBS in combination with RI provided a somewhat lower discrimination (87.2% discrimination of 1122 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence). Samples of side-mirror glass were less discriminated by LIBS due to a larger variance in emission intensities, while discrimination of side-mirror glass by LA-ICP-MS remained high

  13. Remote metal analysis by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique by which the composition of irradiated or inaccessible reactor components can be determined remotely. The technique uses very short duration, high energy laser pulses at a wavelength which can be transmitted down an optical fibre to ablate a tiny plasma from the surface of a metal component. Light from the plasma is collected by a second fibre and returned to a spectrometer where it is split into the characteristic emission wavelengths of the elements in the sample. Comparison of the emission line amplitude for a particular element with that of a chosen calibrationline can be used to deduce the concentration of the element in the sample. The technique has been used successfully to differentiate between highly radioactive control rod batches at Sizewell 'A' and Hinkley Point 'A Power Stations. The material analysis accuracy is comparable with that obtained from electron microprobe analysis and other direct spectroscopic methods. However, by analysing the mild steel control rod casing material remotely, difficult sample removal becomes unnecessary and the integrity of the component remains essentially unaltered. In addition, removal of deposits or surface corrosion is incorporated very neatly into the process. These factors make remote laser induced breakdown spectroscopy an ideal tool for material analysis in the nuclear environment. (Author)

  14. Remote metal analysis by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique by which the composition of irradiated or inaccessible reactor components can be determined remotely. The technique uses very short duration, high energy laser pulses at a wavelength which can be transmitted down an optical fibre to ablate a tiny plasma from the surface of a metal component. Light from the plasma is collected by a second fibre and returned to a spectrometer where it is split into the characteristic emission wavelengths of the elements in the sample. Comparison of the emission line amplitude for a particular element with that of a chosen calibration line can be used to deduce the concentration of the element in the sample. The technique has been used successfully to differentiate between different highly radioactive control rod batches at Sizewell ''A'' and Hinkley Point ''A'' Power Stations. The material analysis accuracy is comparable with that obtained from electron microphobe analysis and other direct spectroscopic methods. However, by analysing the mild steel control rod casing material remotely, difficult sample removal becomes unneccessary and the integrity of the component remains essentially unaltered. In addition, removal of deposits or surface corrosion is incorporated very neatly into the process. These factors make remote laser induced breakdown spectroscopy an ideal tool for material analysis in the nuclear environment. (UK)

  15. Laser Spectroscopy Studies in the Neutron-Rich Sn Region

    CERN Multimedia

    Obert, J

    2002-01-01

    We propose to use the powerful laser spectroscopy method to determine the magnetic moment $\\mu$ and the variation of the mean square charge radius ($\\delta\\,\\langle$r$_{c}^{2}\\,\\rangle$) for ground and long-lived isomeric states of the Sn isotopes from A=125 to the doubly-magic $^{132}$Sn isotope and beyond. For these neutron-rich Sn nuclei, numerous $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ curves have already been calculated and the predictions depend upon the effective interactions used. Therefore, a study of the effect of the shell closure N=82 on the $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ values in the Z=50 magic nuclei is of great interest, especially because $^{132}$Sn is located far from the stability valley. It will help to improve the parameters of the effective interactions and make them more suitable to predict the properties of exotic nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The neutron-rich Sn isotopes produced with an uranium carbide target, are ionized using either a hot plasma ion source or the resonant ionization laser ion ...

  16. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  17. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for polymer identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Sylvain; Boudinet, Marjorie; Pelascini, Frédéric; Surma, Fabrice; Detalle, Vincent; Holl, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This study aims at differentiating several organic materials, particularly polymers, by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The goal is to apply this technique to the fields of polymer recycling and cultural heritage conservation. We worked with some usual polymers families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylene, (POM), poly(vinyl chloride), polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxyethylene (POE), and polyamide for the aliphatic ones, and poly(butylene terephthalate), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polystyrene, and polycarbonate for the aromatic ones. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used. A careful analysis of the C(2) Swan system (0,0) band in polymers containing no C-C (POM), few C-C (POE), or aromatic C-C linkages led us to the conclusion that the C(2) signal might be native, i.e., the result of direct ablation from the sample. With use of these results, aliphatic and aromatic polymers could be differentiated. Further data treatments, such as properly chosen line ratios, principal component analysis, and partial least squares regression, were evaluated. It was shown that many polymers could be separated, including PE and PP, despite their similar chemical structures.

  19. Hardness determination of bio-ceramics using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowpe, J.S.; Moorehead, R.D.; Moser, D.; Astin, J.S.; Karthikeyan, S.; Kilcoyne, S.H.; Crofts, G.; Pilkington, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to the analysis of bio-ceramic samples. The relationship between sample hardness and LIBS plasma properties was investigated, with comparison to conventional Vickers hardness measurements. The plasma excitation temperature T e was determined using the line-to-continuum ratio for the Si (I) 288.16 nm emission line; we have demonstrated a linear relationship between sample surface hardness and plasma temperature. Results indicate that hardness determination based on measurements of T e offers greater reproducibility than Vickers hardness measurements, under the conditions considered here. The validity of spectroscopic diagnostics based on LTE was confirmed.

  20. Laser systems for collinear spectroscopy and the charge radius of {sup 12}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, Andreas

    2012-03-30

    Collinear laser spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nuclear charge radii of shortlived medium- and heavy-Z nuclei for more than three decades. But it became only recently be applicable to low-Z nuclei. This region of the nuclear chart attracts attention because so-called ab-initio nuclear models, based on realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, can only be applied to the lightest elements due to the rapidly increasing calculational demands with the number of nucleons. Furthermore, strong clusterization of atomic nuclei occurs and the encountered halo nuclei are presently subject of intense research. The isotopic chain of beryllium exhibits the prime example of a one-neutron halo nucleus, {sup 11}Be, and the two- or four-neutron halo nucleus {sup 14}Be. {sup 12}Be is a key isotope between these two exotic nuclei and particularly interesting because the nuclear shell model predicts a shell closure for the magic neutron number N = 8. In the course of this thesis, several frequency-stabilized laser systems for collinear laser spectroscopy have been developed. At TRIGA-SPEC a frequency-doubled diode laser system with a tapered amplifier and a frequency comb-stabilized titanium-sapphire laser with a frequency doubling stage are now available for the spectroscopy of refractory metals above molybdenum. They have already been used for test-experiments and commissioning of the TRIGA-LASER beamline. Furthermore, frequency-quadrupling of the Ti:Sa laser was demonstrated to expand the emitted wavelengths into the 200 nm region. At ISOLDE/CERN a frequency comb-stabilized and an iodine-stabilized dye laser were installed and applied for laser spectroscopy of {sup 9,10,11,12}Be{sup +}. The improved laser system and the development of a delayed photon-ion coincidence detection improved the sensitivity of the beryllium spectroscopy by more than two orders of magnitude and, thus, the previous measurements of {sup 7-11}Be could be extended for the first time to the short

  1. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  2. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  3. Effect of sample preparation on the discrimination of bacterial isolates cultured in liquid nutrient media using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between 2 genera of gram-negative bacteria and 2 genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination relies primarily ...

  4. [The error analysis and experimental verification of laser radar spectrum detection and terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Terahertz waves (THz, T-ray) lie between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Many chemical agent explosives show characteristic spectral features in the terahertz. Compared with conventional methods of detecting a variety of threats, such as weapons and chemical agent, THz radiation is low frequency and non-ionizing, and does not give rise to safety concerns. The present paper summarizes the latest progress in the application of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to chemical agent explosives. A kind of device on laser radar detecting and real time spectrum measuring was designed which measures the laser spectrum on the bases of Fourier optics and optical signal processing. Wedge interferometer was used as the beam splitter to wipe off the background light and detect the laser and measure the spectrum. The result indicates that 10 ns laser radar pulse can be detected and many factors affecting experiments are also introduced. The combination of laser radar spectrum detecting, THz-TDS, modern pattern recognition and signal processing technology is the developing trend of remote detection for chemical agent explosives.

  5. Investigation of natural frequencies of laser inertial confinement fusion capsules using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaojun [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Xing; Wang, Zongwei [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chen, Qian; Qian, Menglu [Institute of Acoustic, Tongji University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Meng, Jie [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zou, Yaming; Shen, Hao [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gao, Dangzhong, E-mail: dgaocn@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The frequency equation of isotropic multi-layer hollow spheres was derived using three-dimension (3D) elasticity theory and transfer matrix method. • The natural frequencies of the capsules with a millimeter-sized diameter are determined experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) system. • The predicted natural frequencies of the frequency equation accord well with the observed results. • The theoretical and experimental investigation has proved the potential applicability of RUS to both metallic and non-metallic capsules. - Abstract: The natural frequency problem of laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules is one of the basic problems for determining non-destructively the elasticity modulus of each layer material using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). In this paper, the frequency equation of isotropic one-layer hollow spheres was derived using three dimension (3D) elasticity theory and some simplified frequency equations were discussed under axisymmetric and spherical symmetry conditions. The corresponding equation of isotropic multi-layer hollow spheres was given employing transfer matrix method. To confirm the validity of the frequency equation and explore the feasibility of RUS for characterizing the ICF capsules, three representative capsules with a millimeter-sized diameter were determined by piezoelectric-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (PZT-RUS) and laser-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (LRUS) techniques. On the basis of both theoretical and experimental results, it is proved that the calculated and measured natural frequencies are accurate enough for determining the ICF capsules.

  6. Identification of standard explosive traces by infrared laser spectroscopy: PCA on LPAS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, G.; Colao, F.; Puiu, A.

    2012-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy based methods are promising in the design of an integrated optical system for the real time detection and identification of explosive species to support homeland security. Infrared laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) analysis of explosive compounds (DNT; TNT; RDX; HMX; TATP; PETN; TETRYL) and TOLUENE was reported. Standard commercial samples of the explosive species were analyzed in solid phase by a home made PAS apparatus equipped with a stabilized 10 W continuous wave CO2 laser source. A very small amount (less than 100 μg) of the sample was sufficient to produce a clear signal in a 3 cc volume PA cell. The spectral data were treated by a principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithm. In a three principal components representation of the results, every explosive species resulted to be very well distinguishable from each other, as well as from toluene and other solvents. The reported experimental activity was performed in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory of ENEA Research Centre in Frascati in the frame of ISOTREX European Project.

  7. Procedure for Matrix Effect Reduction in Metal Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eshaikh, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    A procedure for matrix effect reduction is proposed to enhance the precision of quantitative analysis of metal alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This procedure is based on a number of successive steps in order to correct the signal fluctuations caused by plasma interaction and the matrix effect. The first step is the selection of optimum parameter settings of the detection system, such as laser power, delay time, and focal distance. The second step is the estimation of the absolute or relative values of impurities on the basis of the internal standard calibration. The third step is the analysis of the metal basis of the alloy used as an internal standard, which requires spectrum averaging, whole integral spectrum normalization, and self-absorption correction. Three sets of metal-based alloys (aluminum, steel, and copper) are used in this investigation as reference standards for calibration and validation. Successive improvements of the quality of calibration curves are observed during the proposed procedure.

  8. [Hyperfine structure and isotope shift measurements of short lived elements by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine nuclear moments and charge distributions of short-lived isotopes produced both on-line and off-line to a nuclear facility. These measurements give detailed information on the nuclear force and are used to test current nuclear models. The small amounts of nuclei which can be produced off stability constitute the challenge in these experiments. Presently mainly neutron-rich isotopes are being studied by three ultrasensitive high-resolution laser techniques. These are collinear fast ion-beam laser spectroscopy, stored-ion laser spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. 5 figs

  9. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  10. Optical Nerve Detection by Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Feedback Controlled Oral and Maxillofacial Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Laser surgery lacks haptic feedback, which is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. It was the aim of this study to investigate diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for tissue differentiation as the base of a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Methods Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, salivary gland and bone (8640 spectra) of the mid-facial region of ex vivo domestic pigs were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed using principal component (PC) analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Results Five PCs were found to be adequate for tissue differentiation with diffuse reflectance spectra using LDA. Nerve tissue could be differed from bone as well as from salivary gland with AUC results of greater than 88%, sensitivity of greater than 83% and specificity in excess of 78%. Conclusions Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is an adequate technique for nerve identification in the vicinity of bone and salivary gland. The results set the basis for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage when performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. PMID:21310023

  11. Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: A New Approach for Nanoparticle's Mapping and Quantification in Organ Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Kotb, Shady; Wang, Xiaochun; Lux, François; Panczer, Gérard; Yu, Jin; Tillement, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasma was applied to elemental analysis of biological samples. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) performed on thin sections of rodent tissues: kidneys and tumor, allows the detection of inorganic elements such as (i) Na, Ca, Cu, Mg, P, and Fe, naturally present in the body and (ii) Si and Gd, detected after the injection of gadolinium-based nanoparticles. The animals were euthanized 1 to 24 hr after intravenous injection of particles. A two-dimensional scan of the sample, performed using a motorized micrometric 3D-stage, allowed the infrared laser beam exploring the surface with a lateral resolution less than 100 μm. Quantitative chemical images of Gd element inside the organ were obtained with sub-mM sensitivity. LIBS offers a simple and robust method to study the distribution of inorganic materials without any specific labeling. Moreover, the compatibility of the setup with standard optical microscopy emphasizes its potential to provide multiple images of the same biological tissue with different types of response: elemental, molecular, or cellular. PMID:24962015

  12. Control of stopping position of radioactive ion beam in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.F., E-mail: yangxf@ribf.riken.jp [School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Wakui, T. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Imamura, K. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, T. [Dept. of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dept. of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yoshida, N.; Shirai, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Y.; Hayasaka, M. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, S.; Muramoto, S. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Wada, M.; Sonoda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei with extremely low yields by measuring nuclear spins and moments, a new laser spectroscopy technique – “OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher) has been proposed in recent years. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated by means of a considerable amount of offline and online studies of various atoms in superfluid helium. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, trapping atoms in the observation region of laser is a key step. Therefore, a method which enables us to trap accelerated atoms at a precise position in He II is highly needed for performing experiment. In this work, a technique making use of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is established for checking the stopping position of beam based on the LISE++ calculation. The method has been tested and verified by on-line experiments with the {sup 84,85,87}Rb beam. Details of the experimental setup, working procedure and testing results of this method are presented.

  13. Optical nerve detection by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for feedback controlled oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Zam, Azhar; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Douplik, Alexandre; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael

    2011-02-10

    Laser surgery lacks haptic feedback, which is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. It was the aim of this study to investigate diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for tissue differentiation as the base of a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, salivary gland and bone (8640 spectra) of the mid-facial region of ex vivo domestic pigs were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed using principal component (PC) analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Five PCs were found to be adequate for tissue differentiation with diffuse reflectance spectra using LDA. Nerve tissue could be differed from bone as well as from salivary gland with AUC results of greater than 88%, sensitivity of greater than 83% and specificity in excess of 78%. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is an adequate technique for nerve identification in the vicinity of bone and salivary gland. The results set the basis for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage when performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy determination of toxic metals in fresh fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, L V; Flores, T; Sosa-Saldaña, M; Alvira, F C; Bilmes, G M

    2016-01-10

    A method based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for monitoring lead and copper accumulation in edible fish, particularly "tilapia del Nilo" (Oreochromis niloticus) is presented. The capability of this analytical method is compared with results obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry. Detection limits by LIBS are 25 parts per million (ppm) for Pb and 100 ppm for Cu, values that are below the maximum permissible levels of some international standards. Application of LIBS detection allows the development of portable instruments for contamination control of edible fish.

  15. Micro spatial analysis of seashell surface using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Yuandong; Li, Ying [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin [Life Science College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The seashell has been studied as a proxy for the marine researches since it is the biomineralization product recording the growth development and the ocean ecosystem evolution. In this work a hybrid of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy was introduced to the composition analysis of seashell (scallop, bivalve, Zhikong). Without any sample treatment, the compositional distribution of the shell was obtained using LIBS for the element detection and Raman for the molecule recognition respectively. The elements Ca, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Sr were recognized by LIBS; the molecule carotene and carbonate were identified with Raman. It was found that the LIBS detection result was more related to the shell growth than the detection result of Raman. The obtained result suggested the shell growth might be developing in both horizontal and vertical directions. It was indicated that the LIBS–Raman combination could be an alternative way for the shell researches. - Highlights: • A LIBS–Raman hybrid system was developed. • A seashell has been analyzed for the elementary and molecular distribution with a system. • The shell growth development was studied on the surface and in the depth.

  16. On the elemental analysis of different cigarette brands using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation time of flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar; Umar, Zeshan A.; Ahmed, Rizwan; Aslam Baig, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present qualitative and quantitative analysis of the trace elements present in different brands of tobacco available in Pakistan using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (LA-TOFMS). The compositional analysis using the calibration free LIBS technique is based on the observed emission spectra of the laser produced plasma plume whereas the elemental composition analysis using LA-TOFMS is based on the mass spectra of the ions produced by laser ablation. The optical emission spectra of these samples contain spectral lines of calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, silicon, strontium, barium, lithium and aluminum with varying intensities. The corresponding mass spectra of the elements were detected in LA-TOF-MS with their composition concentration. The analysis of different brands of cigarettes demonstrates that LIBS coupled with a LA-TOF-MS is a powerful technique for the elemental analysis of the trace elements in any solid sample.

  17. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  18. On-line iron ore slurry monitoring using laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrette, L.; Turmel, S.; Boivin, J.-A.; Sabsabi, M.; Martinovic, T.I.; Ouellet, G.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the need for a better control [Lb1] of the various additives used in the iron ore pellet making process, Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) has been tested for the on-line monitoring of Si, AI, Ca, Mg, and C. This work shows that factors such as laser beam focusing, particle size, slurry density and mineralogical composition have to be taken into account to meet precision and accuracy requirements. An internal standardization (peak ratio) and an original multivariate calibration technique based on fuzzy logic concepts [Lb2] are [Lb3] used to minimize the effect of these factors. This paper describes the experimental set-up, the effect of influence factors and the results obtained both in the laboratory and in an iron ore plant. (author)

  19. Phosphate ore beneficiation via determination of phosphorus-to-silica ratios by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimellis, George; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2006-12-01

    We report development and application of an in-situ applicable method to determine phosphate ore rock quality based on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). This is an economically viable method for real-time evaluation of ore phosphate rocks in order to separate high-silica pebbles prior to deep beneficiation. This is achieved by monitoring relative emission line intensities from key probe elements via single laser ablation shots: the ratio of the phosphorous to silica line intensities (P/Si ratio) provides a simple and reliable indicator of ore rock quality. This is a unique LIBS application where no other current analytical spectroscopic method (ICP or XRF) can be applied. Method development is discussed, and results with actual ore samples are presented.

  20. Far infrared submillimeter spectroscopy with an optically pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, B.L.; Perkowitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    The pumped laser theory of operation is discussed along with the availability of submillimeter lines and media. Spectroscopic systems are described including a pump laser, far infrared laser, and system electronics for laser stabilization and FIR detection. Emphasis is placed on system performance and spectroscopic applications

  1. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  2. Quantum interference in laser spectroscopy of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Pedro; Loureiro, Ulisses; Safari, Laleh; Fratini, Filippo; Indelicato, Paul; Stöhlker, Thomas; Santos, José Paulo

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the quantum interference induced shifts between energetically close states in highly charged ions, with the energy structure being observed by laser spectroscopy. In this work, we focus on hyperfine states of lithiumlike heavy-Z isotopes and quantify how much quantum interference changes the observed transition frequencies. The process of photon excitation and subsequent photon decay for the transition 2 s →2 p →2 s is implemented with fully relativistic and full-multipole frameworks, which are relevant for such relativistic atomic systems. We consider the isotopes 79+207Pb and 80+209Bi due to experimental interest, as well as other examples of isotopes with lower Z , namely 56+141Pr and 64+165Ho. We conclude that quantum interference can induce shifts up to 11% of the linewidth in the measurable resonances of the considered isotopes, if interference between resonances is neglected. The inclusion of relativity decreases the cross section by 35%, mainly due to the complete retardation form of the electric dipole multipole. However, the contribution of the next higher multipoles (e.g., magnetic quadrupole) to the cross section is negligible. This makes the contribution of relativity and higher-order multipoles to the quantum interference induced shifts a minor effect, even for heavy-Z elements.

  3. Tuneable diode laser spectroscopy correction factor investigation on ammonia measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nilton; El-Hamalawi, Ashraf; Baxter, Jim; Barrett, Richard; Wheatley, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Current diesel engine aftertreatment systems, such as Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR) use ammonia (NH3) to reduce Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) into Nitrogen (N2) and water (H2O). However, if the reaction between NH3 and NOx is unbalanced, it can lead either NH3 or NOx being released into the environment. As NH3 is classified as a dangerous compound in the environment, its accurate measurement is essential. Tuneable Diode Laser (TDL) spectroscopy is one of the methods used to measure raw emissions inside engine exhaust pipes, especially NH3. This instrument requires a real-time exhaust temperature, pressure and other interference compounds in order to adjust itself to reduce the error in NH3 readings. Most researchers believed that exhaust temperature and pressure were the most influential factors in TDL when measuring NH3 inside exhaust pipes. The aim of this paper was to quantify these interference effects on TDL when undertaking NH3 measurement. Surprisingly, the results show that pressure was the least influential factor when compared to temperature, H2O, CO2 and O2 when undertaking NH3 measurement using TDL.

  4. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiphoton Ionization Detection in Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of Isolde Beams

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The experiments using the multiphoton ionization technique have been continued in the beginning of 1990 with stable beam tests on the modified apparatus and with another radioactive beam time on Yb. Higher laser power and an increased vacuum in the ionization region (see figure) yielded a further gain in sensitivity, mainly due to the better suppression of the background ions produced in rest gas collisions. For even Yb isotopes we have now reached a detection efficiency of $\\epsilon$~=~1~x~10$^{-5}$ ions per incoming atom at a background count rate of 30~ions from a beam of 5~x~10$^9$. This sensitivity was high enough for spectroscopy on $^{157}$Yb, where the typical ISOLDE yield of 5~x~10$^7$Yb ions is covered by an isobaric contamination of more than 10$^{10}$ ions. Measurements have also been performed on $^{175}$Yb. These give the first precise value for the magnetic moment of this isotope, $\\mu$~=~0.766(8)$ mu _{N} $, which agrees rather well with the magnetic moment of the isotone $^{177}$Hf. The isoto...

  6. Differential laser-induced perturbation Raman spectroscopy: a comparison with Raman spectroscopy for analysis and classification of amino acids and dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Erman K; Smith, Sarah E; Hahn, David W

    2015-04-01

    Differential-laser induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) is a new spectral analysis technique for classification and identification, with key potential applications for analysis of complex biomolecular systems. DLIPS takes advantage of the complex ultraviolet (UV) laser–material interactions based on difference spectroscopy by coupling low intensity UV laser perturbation with a traditional spectroscopy probe. Here, we quantify the DLIPS performance using a Raman scattering probe in classification of basic constituents of collagenous tissues, namely, the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, and the dipeptides glycine–glycine, glycine–alanine and glycine–proline and compare the performance to a traditional Raman spectroscopy probe via several multivariate analyses. We find that the DLIPS approach yields an ~40% improvement in discrimination among these tissue building blocks. The effects of the 193-nm perturbation laser are further examined by assessing the photodestruction of targeted material molecular bonds. The DLIPS method with a Raman probe holds promise for future tissue diagnosis, either as a stand-alone technique or as part of an orthogonal biosensing scheme.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  8. Mapping chemical bonding of reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wernet, Ph.; Beye, Martin; Kunnus, K.; Leitner, T.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nordlund, D.; Odelius, M.; Quevedo, W.; Radcliffe, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Schlotter, B.; de Groot, F.; Scholz, Mirko; Schreck, S.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the pathways in the photo-dissociation reactions of Fe(CO)$_5$ both in the gas phase and in solution by mapping the valence electronic structure of the reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy.

  9. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity.

  10. Silver nanoparticle based surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissue under near-infrared laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H; Shi, H; Chen, W; Yu, Y; Lin, D; Xu, Q; Feng, S; Lin, J; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Chen, R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of high spatial resolution silver nanoparticle based near-infrared surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from rat pancreatic tissue to obtain biochrmical information about the tissue. A high quality SERS signal from a mixture of pancreatic tissues and silver nanoparticles can be obtained within 10 s using a Renishaw micro-Raman system. Prominent SERS bands of pancreatic tissue were assigned to known molecular vibrations, such as the vibrations of DNA bases, RNA bases, proteins and lipids. Different tissue structures of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissues have characteristic features in SERS spectra. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for using SERS imaging to distinguish diabetic and normal pancreatic tissues on frozen sections without using dye labeling of functionalized binding sites. (letter)

  11. High speed engine gas thermometry by Fourier-domain mode-locked laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Laura A; An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Herold, Randy E; Sanders, Scott T; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G; Okura, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuhiro

    2007-11-12

    We present a novel method for low noise, high-speed, real-time spectroscopy to monitor molecular absorption spectra. The system is based on a rapidly swept, narrowband CW Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source for spectral encoding in time and an optically time-multiplexed split-pulse data acquisition system for improved noise performance and sensitivity. An acquisition speed of ~100 kHz, a spectral resolution better than 0.1 nm over a wavelength range of ~1335-1373 nm and a relative noise level of ~5 mOD (~1% minimum detectable base-e absorbance) are achieved. The system is applied for crank-angle-resolved gas thermometry by H(2)O absorption spectroscopy in an engine motoring at 600 and 900 rpm with a precision of ~1%. Influences of various noise sources such as laser phase and intensity noise, trigger and synchronization jitter in the electronic detection system, and the accuracy of available H(2)O absorption databases are discussed.

  12. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based ion specific sensor for quantifying io levels in haemodialysis; an innovation of the Van 't Hoff program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, A.; Westerlaken, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Van ‘t Hoff program is a new collaborative research and innovation program, initiated by TNO, in the field of biomedical optics. The Van ‘t Hoff program aims to improve medical diagnosis and therapy through development of innovative medical devices based on photonics and biomedical technologies.

  13. Element-specific determination of chlorine in gases by Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, C; Niessner, R; Matveev, O I; Panne, U; Omenetto, N

    1996-08-01

    An experimental set-up for the detection of elemental chlorine in chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) is described based on a miniaturized system, which could be used for on-line monitoring of chlorinated compounds. With an optimized time-resolved detection chlorine from CHCs like CCl(4) can be determined by Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy (LIBS) with microg/g-detection limits in the gas phase. The application of a miniaturized Nd : YAG laser resulted only in a minor loss in performance, hence it could be used for designing a rugged and small on-line sensor. In addition, preliminary results for the detection of chlorine via the formation of CuCl in the plasma formed by focussing the laser on a copper surface are reported. Utilizing the luminescence of the CuCl D-system at 440 nm, a tenfold improvement in the detection limits was obtained. It appears that the formation of "ad hoc" selected, small molecules in a laser plasma could be a promising alternative for the selective and sensitive analysis of gaseous chlorinated and other species.

  14. Verification of a characterization method of the laser-induced selective activation based on industrial lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, laser-induced selective activation (LISA) for subsequent autocatalytic copper plating is performed by several types of industrial scale lasers, including a Nd:YAG laser, a UV laser, a fiber laser, a green laser, and a short pulsed laser. Based on analysis of all the laser...

  15. A high-peak-power UV picosecond-pulse light source based on a gain-switched 1.55 microm laser diode and its application to time-resolved spectroscopy of blue-violet materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aya; Kono, Shunsuke; Saito, Kyosuke; Sato, Ki-ichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2010-02-01

    We generated sub-kilowatt peak-power and 6-ps duration 390-nm optical pulses via the fourth harmonic generation of amplified optical output from a gain-switched 1.55-microm laser diode. We obtained a power-conversion-efficiency of 12% from 1.55-microm to 390-nm light, and subsequently applied the ultraviolet pulses to time-resolved spectroscopy of blue-violet luminescent materials, including a Coumarine dye solution and nitride semiconductor materials using single-photon and two-photon excitation schemes.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, F.J.; Cabalin, L.M.; Laserna, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of particles ejected by optical catapulting is discussed for the first time. For this purpose, materials deposited on a substrate were ejected and transported from the surface in the form of a solid aerosol by optical catapulting using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm was used for chemical characterization of the particles by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Both lasers were synchronized in order to perform suitable spectral detection. The optical catapulting was optimized and evaluated using aluminum silicate particles, nickel spheres, and quartz and stainless steel particles. Experimental parameters such as the interpulse delay time, the sampling distance, the laser fluence, the sampling rate and the particle size have been studied. A correlation between these parameters and the particle size is reported and discussed.

  17. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  18. Laser Plasma Plume Kinetic Spectroscopy of the Nitrogen and Carbon Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinger, Zdeněk; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Kubát, Pavel; Jelínek, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 43, - (2003), s. 426-432 ISSN 0863-1042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : laser ablation * laser plasma * emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.863, year: 2003

  19. First collinear laser spectroscopy measurements of radioisotopes from an IGISOL ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Liukkonen, E; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, P; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    The standard Doppler-free technique of collinear laser spectroscopy has been successfully applied to radioisotopes from the ion-guide isotope separator (IGISOL) at the Universiry of Jyvaskyla. The laser resonance fluorescence signals for the Ba-140.142,Ba-144 radioisotopes show that the ion beam

  20. First measurement of radioisotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy at an ion-guide separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, JL; Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Griffith, JAR; Grant, IS; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The first successful application of an ion-guide separator (IGISOL) for collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes has achieved an efficiency comparable with the best obtained with catcher-ionizer facilities. The ion beam energy spread was determined to be less than 6 eV, allowing laser

  1. Peculiarities of plasma homeostasis in the patients with rectal cancer according to laser correlation spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byilenko, O.A.; Bazhora, Yu.Yi.; Sokolov, V.M.; Andronov, D.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Laser correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate plasma homeostasis in 82 patients with rectal cancer. The spectra of the blood plasma from 21 donors of the transfusion station were used as the control. The blood plasma homeostasis changes reheated with laser correlation spectrometry in the patients with rectal cancer allow to use them for diagnosis of this pathology

  2. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakovský, Jozef; Čermák, P.; Musset, O.; Veis, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, NOV 2014 (2014), s. 269-287 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11635S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fiber laser * Fieldable LIBS * Laser -induced breakdown spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2014

  3. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  4. Laser Doppler spectroscopy of testes after unilateral orchiopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laffolie, Jan; Engel, Veronika; Turial, Salmai

    2015-04-01

    Undescended testes are the most common urogenital malformation in boys. Impaired microcirculation is among other factors addressed as a potential complication of surgery and scar formation, leading to long-term suboptimal results. Our aim was to compare the postoperative microcirculation in operated versus non-operated contralateral testis groups after unilateral orchiopexies versus a healthy control cohort. Ninety-nine consecutive patients were included after unilateral orchiopexy procedures at the age of 3.5 years (±2.9 years) at a single center for pediatric surgery. Eight-five patients were examined with a combination of laser Doppler (blood flow determination) and white-light spectroscopy (oxygen saturation and hemoglobin amount determinations) to determine the microcirculation at two different depth levels non-invasively. All relevant surgery data were obtained retrospectively. The right side was operated in 53.5% of cases. Previous hormone treatment had been prescribed in 46.5%. There were no significant differences in perfusion measurements between patients with previous hormone therapy and patients without. There was no significant difference in age and clinical pubertal stage between groups; however, 65% of patients underwent surgery after their second birthday. When comparing oxygen saturation (So2), relative hemoglobin (rHb), flow, and velocity in the operated testis with the contralateral testis of the same patients, we found significantly higher flows and velocities for the contralateral testes (p = 0.041, p = 0.022). Similar higher flows and velocities were found in the healthy controls (p problem for both testes in the affected patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  6. Theoretical analysis of laser-locked spectroscopy employing a confocal Fabry-Perot cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Linfeng; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of laser-locked enhanced absorption spectroscopy employing a confocal Fary-Perot cavity (CFPC) is presented. The signal-to-noise ratio and the minimum detectable absorbance, which are limited by either the shot noise or the amplitude noise due to the loose laser lock loop, are also discussed in detail. The results show that the effective absorption path length of a CFPC configuration is the same as that of the conventional nonconfocal Fary-Perot cavity configuration, with the CFPC configuration being more convenient to align without deliberate mode matching. Thus, the CFPC configuration should greatly simplify the complications of conventional laser-locked spectroscopy.

  7. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser and laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Hu, Qi; Xie, Jiecheng; Fu, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a controllable laboratory environment. Hence, this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment in short and long standoff distances demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for chemical detection in an open environment.

  8. Medical diagnostics by laser-based analysis of exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    IMany trace gases can be found in the exhaled breath, some of them giving the possibility of a non invasive diagnosis of related diseases or allowing the monitoring of the disease in the course of its therapy. In the present lecture the principle of medical diagnosis based on the breath analysis will be introduced and the detection of trace gases in exhaled breath by high- resolution molecular spectroscopy in the IR spectral region will be discussed. A number of substrates and the optical systems for their laser detection will be reported. The following laser based experimental systems has been realised in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in ENEA in Frascati for the analysis of specific substances in the exhaled breath. A tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) appartus for the measurement of 13C/12C isotopic ratio in carbon dioxide, a TDLAS apparatus for the detection of CH4 and a CO2 laser based photoacoustic system to detect trace ethylene at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up for each one of the a.m. optical systems will be shown and the related medical applications will be illustrated. The concluding remarks will be focuses on chemical species that are of major interest for medical people today and their diagnostic ability.

  9. Collinear resonant ionization laser spectroscopy of rare francium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Le blanc, F M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a programme of collinear resonant ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) of the francium isotopes up to and including $^{201}$Fr and $^{218,219}$Fr. This work aims at answering questions on the ordering of quantum states, and effect of the ($\\pi s_{1/2}^{-1}$)1/2$^{+}$ intruder state, which is currently believed to be the ground state of $^{199}$Fr. This work will also study the edge of the region of reflection asymmetry through measurement of the moments and radii of $^{218,219}$Fr. This proposal forms the first part of a series of experiments that will study nuclei in this region of the nuclear chart. Based on the success of this initial proposal it is the intention of the collaboration to perform high resolution measurements on the isotopes of radium and radon that surround $^{201}$Fr and $^{218}$Fr and thus providing a comprehensive description of the ground state properties of this region of the nuclear chart. Recent in-source spectroscopy measurements of lead, bismuth and polonium have demonstrated a...

  10. Laser-based coatings removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D ampersand D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings

  11. High-resolution three-dimensional compositional imaging by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavo, C.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Poggialini, F.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.; Menichetti, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a new instrument specifically realized for high-resolution three-dimensional compositional analysis and mapping of materials. The instrument is based on the coupling of a Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument with an optical microscope. The compositional mapping of the samples is obtained by scanning the laser beam across the surface of the sample, while the in depth analysis is performed by sending multiple laser pulses on the same point. Depths of analysis of several tens of microns can be obtained. The instrument presented has definite advantages with respect to Laser Ablation-ICP Mass Spectrometry in many applications related to material analysis, biomedicine and environmental diagnostics. An application to the diagnostics of industrial ceramics is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of Double-Pulse LIBS Imaging and its advantages with respect to conventional single-pulse LIBS imaging.

  12. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  13. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  14. Ag clustering investigation in laser irradiated ion-exchanged glasses by optical and vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trave, E., E-mail: enrico.trave@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Cattaruzza, E.; Gonella, F.; Calvelli, P. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Quaranta, A. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Rahman, A.; Mariotto, G. [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modify the properties of Ag{sup +} exchanged glasses by thermal and laser treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced microstructural changes are analyzed by optical and Raman spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-based species in the glass show a peculiar PL activity in the UV-Vis range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and OA analysis allow for determining the Ag cluster size evolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser processing leads to different cluster formation and fragmentation mechanisms. - Abstract: Ion exchange process is widely used to dope silicate glass layers with silver for several applications, ranging from light waveguide to nanostructured composite glass fabrication. The silver-doped structure and its physical properties depend on the preparation parameters as well as on subsequent treatments. In particular, laser irradiation of the ion exchanged glasses has been demonstrated to be an effective tool to control cluster size and size distribution. Nevertheless, a complete comprehension of the basic phenomena and a systematic characterization of these systems are still lacking. In this paper, an extended optical characterization is presented for soda-lime glass slides, doped with silver by Ag{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange, thermally treated and irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser beam at different wavelengths, and for different energy density. The samples were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques, namely, optical absorption, photoluminescence and micro-Raman analysis. The availability of all these characterization techniques allowed pointing out a suitable scenario for the Ag clustering evolution as a function of the ion exchange, annealing and laser irradiation parameters.

  15. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we obta...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz.......We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...

  16. Ro-vibrational laser spectroscopy of ESD neutrals from chemisorbed species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, A.R.; Stechel, E.B.; Jennison, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of intense tunable laser radiation, the fields of molecular spectroscopy and dynamics have expanded tremendously. Indeed, with each technical improvement in laser resolution and output power, new applications have emerged with correspondingly increased levels of sophistication and information. In the field of electron-stimulated desorption (ESD), not only has the utilization of lasers resulted in the detection of neutral species, which were previously difficult to observe without specially-designed analyzers, but also the quantum-specific nature of the resonant laser interaction with the neutrals has yielded valuable information concerning internal energies. In this article, we will discuss some of the experimental methods in the application of laser resonance-ionization spectroscopy (RIS) to the study of the ESD of neutrals, in particular, chemisorbed NO and CO desorption from Pt(111). We will also show how the detailed information obtained in these experiments has identified a new desorption mechanism

  17. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  18. Influence of metal substrates on the detection of explosive residues with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a promising approach for explosive residue detection, but several limitations to its widespread use remain. One issue is that the emission spectra of the residues are dependent on the substrate composition because some of the substrate is usually entrained in the laser-induced plasma and the laser-material interaction can be significantly affected by the substrate type. Here, we have demonstrated that despite the strong spectral variation in cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) residues applied to various metal substrates, classification of the RDX residue independent of substrate type is feasible. Several approaches to improving the chemometric models based on partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) have been described: classifying the RDX residue spectra together in one class independent of substrate, using selected emission intensities and ratios to increase the true positive rate (TPR) and decrease the false positive rate (FPR), and fusing the results from two PLS-DA models generated using the full broadband spectra and selected intensities and ratios. The combination of these approaches resulted in a TPR of 97.5% and a FPR of 1.0% for RDX classification on metal substrates.

  19. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of potassium for in-situ geochronology on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B., E-mail: stipec@seattleu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Guevara, Edward; Brown, Jonathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is explored for the development of an in-situ K-Ar geochronology instrument for Mars. Potassium concentrations in standard basaltic glasses and equivalent rock samples in their natural form are quantified using the potassium doublet at 766.49 and 769.90 nm. Measurement precision varies from 0.5 to 5.5 (% RSD) over the 3.63% to 0.025% potassium by weight for the standard samples, and little additional precision is achieved above 20 laser shots at 5 locations. For the glass standards, the quantification limits are 920 and 66 ppm for non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. For the basaltic rocks, the quantification limits are 2650 and 328 ppm for the non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. The heterogeneity of the rock samples leads to larger variations in potassium signal; however, normalizing the potassium peak by base area at 25 locations on the rock improved calibration accuracy. Including only errors in LIBS measurements, estimated age errors for the glasses range from approximately {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma samples to {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma samples. For the basaltic rocks, the age errors are approximately {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma samples and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of basaltic glasses and rocks by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of potassium for K-Ar dating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an instrument for in-situ geochronology on Mars. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit is 35 ppm, relative standard deviations range from 0.5% to 5.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated errors for the glass standards range from {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma; estimated errors for the basaltic rocks range from {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma.

  20. Airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy to map forest trait diversity and guide conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G P; Martin, R E; Knapp, D E; Tupayachi, R; Anderson, C B; Sinca, F; Vaughn, N R; Llactayo, W

    2017-01-27

    Functional biogeography may bridge a gap between field-based biodiversity information and satellite-based Earth system studies, thereby supporting conservation plans to protect more species and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. We used airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy with environmental modeling to derive large-scale, multivariate forest canopy functional trait maps of the Peruvian Andes-to-Amazon biodiversity hotspot. Seven mapped canopy traits revealed functional variation in a geospatial pattern explained by geology, topography, hydrology, and climate. Clustering of canopy traits yielded a map of forest beta functional diversity for land-use analysis. Up to 53% of each mapped, functionally distinct forest presents an opportunity for new conservation action. Mapping functional diversity advances our understanding of the biosphere to conserve more biodiversity in the face of land use and climate change. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Comparing predictive ability of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Near Infrared Spectroscopy for soil texture and organic carbon determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Gislum, René

    and texture was tested and compared with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique and traditional laboratory analysis. Calibration models were developed on 50 topsoil samples. For all properties except silt, higher predictive ability of LIBS than NIRS models was obtained. Successful calibrations indicate......Soil organic carbon (SOC) and texture have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to supplement or substitute for the expensive conventional analysis of soil are developed. Here the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine SOC...

  2. Comparing predictive ability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to visible near-infrared spectroscopy for soil property determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Gislum, René; Hermansen, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and particle size fractions have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to replace the expensive conventional analyses of soil are needed. Visible near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (viseNIRS) has already shown potential...... for becoming an alternative method for soil analysis since it is faster and cheaper than conventional methods. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is another cost-effective technique with potential for rapid analysis of elements present in the soil. In this study, the feasibility of using LIBS...

  3. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, S., E-mail: s.raeder@gsi.de [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bastin, B. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Block, M. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Creemers, P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Ferrer, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Fléchard, X. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Franchoo, S. [Institute de Physique Nucléaire (IPN) d’Orsay, 91406 Orsay, Cedex (France); Ghys, L. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Gaffney, L.P.; Granados, C. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heinke, R. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hijazi, L. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); and others

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  4. Selective laser spectroscopy of molecules and ions in solids: a history, fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Michael

    2018-03-01

    A history of the development of selective laser spectroscopy is presented, beginning with a pioneering work by Yu. V. Denisov and V. A. Kizel in 1967, who were the first to demonstrate the possibility of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of luminescence spectra of impurity ions in glasses upon monochromatic resonance excitation. Selective excitation of optical centers can be achieved due to existence of zero-phonon transitions corresponding to narrow homogeneous zero-phonon lines in the spectra of impurity centers in solids, which are hidden in broad inhomogeneous optical bands upon usual nonselective excitation. The fundamentals of zero-phonon transition spectroscopy are considered and the mechanism of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of optical spectra of ions and molecules in crystals and amorphous solids under selective laser excitation of luminescence and persistent hole burning in absorption spectra is presented in detail. Various applications of selective laser spectroscopy for fundamental and applied studies are discussed.

  5. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified.

  6. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified

  7. The laser spectroscopy for the quality and safety food of vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falconieri, Mauro; Sighicelli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    ENEA has long been engaged in research in order to the development of instrumentation and application of spectroscopic methods for monitoring and diagnostics early and non-destructive state of health of plants and the quality of food products. In addition to the most common spectroscopic techniques (such as the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the spectroscopy transmittance and reflectance in the visible and near infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence), the use of which in the agro-industry is well documented in the scientific literature, particular attention has recently been paid to the Raman spectroscopy and reflectance spectroscopy Time resolved (time-resolved reflectivity spectroscopy, TRRS) with ultrashort laser pulses (in the domain of hundreds of femto seconds, 10 -15 s). [it

  8. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  9. Detection of diamond in ore using pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lamprecht, GH

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available characteristics of the signals, and the linearity of the signals with laser power. The relative signal to noise ratios expected with pulsed and cw systems was also investigated theoretically and experimentally. The measurements were done in order to arrive... suggests a distinct advantage of using pulsed rather than cw lasers in a detection apparatus. 4.3. Comparison of cw and pulsed signal detection The characteristics of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) as an amplifier of the primary electrons generated...

  10. Application of the mass-spectrometer MASHA for mass-spectrometry and laser-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, A. M.; Belozerov, A. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Salamatin, V. S.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Vanin, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    We report the present status of the mass-spectrometer MASHA (Mass-Analyzer of Supper Heavy Atoms) designed for determination of the masses of superheavy elements. The mass-spectrometer is connected to the U-400M cyclotron of the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) JINR, Dubna. The first experiments on mass-measurements for 112 and 114 elements will be performed in the upcoming 2010. For this purpose a hot catcher, based on a graphite stopper, is constructed. The α-decay of the superheavy nuclides or spontaneous fission products will be detected with a silicon 192 strips detector. The experimental program of future investigations using the technique of a gas catcher is discussed. It should be regarded as an alternative of the classical ISOL technique. The possibilities are considered for using this mass-spectrometer for laser spectroscopy of nuclei far off-stability.

  11. Multivariate analysis of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy chemical signatures for geomaterial classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L., E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@us.army.mi [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Harmon, Russell S. [ARL Army Research Office, PO Box 12211, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 (United States); De Lucia, Frank C.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    A large suite of natural carbonate, fluorite and silicate geological materials was studied using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Both single- and double-pulse LIBS spectra were acquired using close-contact benchtop and standoff (25 m) LIBS systems. Principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to identify the distinguishing characteristics of the geological samples and to classify the materials. Excellent discrimination was achieved with all sample types using PLS-DA and several techniques for improving sample classification were identified. The laboratory double-pulse LIBS system did not provide any advantage for sample classification over the single-pulse LIBS system, except in the case of the soil samples. The standoff LIBS system provided comparable results to the laboratory systems. This work also demonstrates how PCA can be used to identify spectral differences between similar sample types based on minor impurities.

  12. Multivariate analysis of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy chemical signatures for geomaterial classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Harmon, Russell S.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2009-01-01

    A large suite of natural carbonate, fluorite and silicate geological materials was studied using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Both single- and double-pulse LIBS spectra were acquired using close-contact benchtop and standoff (25 m) LIBS systems. Principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to identify the distinguishing characteristics of the geological samples and to classify the materials. Excellent discrimination was achieved with all sample types using PLS-DA and several techniques for improving sample classification were identified. The laboratory double-pulse LIBS system did not provide any advantage for sample classification over the single-pulse LIBS system, except in the case of the soil samples. The standoff LIBS system provided comparable results to the laboratory systems. This work also demonstrates how PCA can be used to identify spectral differences between similar sample types based on minor impurities.

  13. Quantitative mixture fraction measurements in combustion system via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to quantitative mixture fraction measurements in flames. The measured spectra of different mixtures of natural gas and air are used to obtain the calibration parameters for local elemental mass fraction measurements and hence calculate the mixture fraction. The results are compared with the mixture fraction calculations based on the ratios of the spectral lines of H/N elements, H/O elements and C/(N+O) and they show good agreement within the reaction zone of the flames. Some deviations are observed outside the reaction zone. The ability of LIBS technique as a tool for quantitative mixture fraction as well as elemental fraction measurements in reacting and non-reacting of turbulent flames is feasible. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy applications to meteorites: Chemical analysis and composition profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, M.; De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; de Pascale, O.; Senesi, G. S.; Longo, S.

    2010-12-01

    A fast procedure for chemical analysis of different meteorites is presented, based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy). The technique is applied to several test cases (Dhofar 019, Dhofar 461, Sahara 98222, Toluca, Sikhote Alin and Campo del Cielo) and can be useful for rapid meteorite identification providing geologists with specific chemical information for meteorite classification. Concentration profiles of Fe, Ni and Co are simultaneously detected across the Widmanstätten structure of the iron meteorite Toluca with a view to determining cooling rates. The LIBS analysis of meteorites is also used as a laboratory test for analogous studies on the respective parent bodies (Mars, asteroids) in space exploration missions where one clear advantage of the proposed technique is that no direct contact with the sample is required.

  15. Classification of steel materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy coupled with support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Long; Zhang, Tianlong; Wang, Kang; Tang, Hongsheng; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Duan, Yixiang; Li, Hua

    2014-02-01

    The feasibility of steel materials classification by support vector machines (SVMs), in combination with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology, was investigated. Multi-classification methods based on SVM, the one-against-all and the one-against-one models, and a combination model, are applied to classify nine types of round steel. Due to the inhomogeneity of steel composition, the data obtained using the one-against-all and one-against-one models were ambiguous and difficult to discriminate; whereas, the combination model, was able to successfully distinguish most of the ambiguous data and control the computation cost within an acceptable range. The studies presented here demonstrate that LIBS-SVM is a useful technique for the identification and discrimination of steel materials, and would be very well-suited for process analysis in the steelmaking industry.

  16. Determination of the postmortem interval by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy using swine skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Roldan, A.; Manzoor, S.; Moncayo, S.; Navarro-Villoslada, F.; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R. C.; Caceres, J. O.

    2013-10-01

    Skin and muscle samples are useful to discriminate individuals as well as their postmortem interval (PMI) in crime scenes and natural or caused disasters. In this study, a simple and fast method based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed to estimate PMI using swine skeletal muscle samples. Environmental conditions (moisture, temperature, fauna, etc.) having strong influence on the PMI determination were considered. Time-dependent changes in the emission intensity ratio for Mg, Na, Hα and K were observed, as a result of the variations in their concentration due to chemical reactions in tissues and were correlated with PMI. This relationship, which has not been reported previously in the forensic literature, offers a simple and potentially valuable means of estimating the PMI.

  17. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  18. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  19. Analysis of the absorption layer of CIGS solar cell by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok H; Shim, Hee S; Kim, Chan K; Yoo, Jong H; Russo, Richard E; Jeong, Sungho

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the elemental analysis of the thin copper indium gallium diselenide (CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se(2) [CIGS]) absorption layer deposited on Mo-coated soda-lime glass by the co-evaporation technique. The optimal laser and detection parameters for LIBS measurement of the CIGS absorption layer (1.23 μm) were investigated. The calibration results of Ga/In ratio with respect to the concentration ratios measured by x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy showed good linearity. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  20. Plasma emission spectroscopy of solids irradiated by intense XUV pulses from a free electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzelzainis, T.W.J.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Fajardo, M.; Fäustlin, R.; Heimann, P.A.; Hájková, Věra; Juha, Libor; Jurek, Karel; Khattak, F.Y.; Kozlová, Michaela; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Nagler, B.; Nelson, A.J.; Rosmej, F.B.; Soberierski, R.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Vinko, S.M.; Wark, J. S.; Whitcher, T.; Riley, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), 109-112 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : XUV emission spectroscopy * free-electron laser * warm dense matter Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.206, year: 2010

  1. Chemical Kinetics of Triplet Methylene from Infrared Diode Laser Flash Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin, David Charles

    A flash kinetic spectrometer based on a tunable infrared diode laser has been constructed. This spectrometer can measure Doppler limited spectra in the frequency region from 300-3000 cm^{-1}, allowing for the detection of nearly any molecular species. The spectrometer can be used in a spectroscopy mode to obtain the high resolution (<=q10^ {-3} cm^{-1})^ectrum of the species, or in a kinetic mode to detect time resolved behavior of events as fast as 20 ns. Using this spectrometer, room temperature, triplet methylene removal rate constants have been measured for NO_2, NO, SO_2, O_2, and H_2S (in order of decreasing reaction rate). For less reactive species, upper bounds to the removal rate constants were established. When no reactive gas is present, triplet methylene is removed from the system by self reaction. The triplet methylene self reaction rate constant was found to be faster than gas kinetic. To further study the self reaction of triplet methylene, the technique of product appearance kinetic spectroscopy (PAKS) was developed. Using PAKS, time resolved appearance of ground state acetylene was monitored with the diode laser spectrometer. The appearance rate of acetylene from triplet methylene self reaction was found to be equal to the removal rate of triplet methylene. This establishes that acetylene is a direct product of triplet methylene self reaction. Over the range of 2 to 10 torr ketene, a falloff in the quantum yield of acetylene produced by triplet methylene self reaction is observed. Rate constants for collision-induced intersystem crossing of singlet methylene to triplet methylene with the collision partners He and Ar were measured using flash kinetic spectroscopy with a visible probe laser. The rate constants for individual quantum states show small but definite variations. These variations are due to different degrees of singlet-triplet coupling for different levels. One singlet methylene state which is highly coupled to the triplet methylene

  2. External cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for protein analysis in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Julia; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta Raquel; Quintás, Guillermo; Mayer, Helmut; Vento, Máximo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-04-22

    The analytical determination of bovine milk proteins is important in food and non-food industrial applications and yet, rather labour-intensive wet-chemical, low-throughput methods have been employed since decades. This work proposes the use of external cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for the simultaneous quantification of the most abundant bovine milk proteins and the total protein content based on the chemical information contained in mid-infrared (IR) spectral features of the amide I band. Mid-IR spectra of protein standard mixtures were used for building partial least squares (PLS) regression models. Protein concentrations in commercial bovine milk samples were calculated after chemometric compensation of the matrix contribution employing science-based calibration (SBC) without sample pre-processing. The use of EC-QCL spectroscopy together with advanced multivariate data analysis allowed the determination of casein, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and total protein content within several minutes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  4. A method of reducing background fluctuation in tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rendi; Dong, Xiaozhou; Bi, Yunfeng; Lv, Tieliang

    2018-03-01

    Optical interference fringe is the main factor that leads to background fluctuation in gas concentration detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The interference fringes are generated by multiple reflections or scatterings upon optical surfaces in optical path and make the background signal present an approximated sinusoidal oscillation. To reduce the fluctuation of the background, a method that combines dual tone modulation (DTM) with vibration reflector (VR) is proposed in this paper. The combination of DTM and VR can make the unwanted periodic interference fringes to be averaged out and the effectiveness of the method in reducing background fluctuation has been verified by simulation and real experiments in this paper. In the detection system based on the proposed method, the standard deviation (STD) value of the background signal is decreased to 0.0924 parts per million (ppm), which is reduced by a factor of 16 compared with that of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The STD value of 0.0924 ppm corresponds to the absorption of 4 . 328 × 10-6Hz - 1 / 2 (with effective optical path length of 4 m and integral time of 0.1 s). Moreover, the proposed method presents a better stable performance in reducing background fluctuation in long time experiments.

  5. Spectral analysis of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Fox, Robert V.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.; DeLucia, Frank C.; André, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  6. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Fox, Dr. Richard V [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Miziolek, Andrzej W [United States Army Research Laboratory; DeLucia, Frank C [United States Army Research Laboratory; Andre, Nicolas O [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in real-world complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  7. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Fox, Dr. Richard V [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Miziolek, Andrzej W [United States Army Research Laboratory; DeLucia, Frank C [United States Army Research Laboratory; Andre, Nicolas O [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  8. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhavi Z. Martin; Robert V. Fox; Andrzej W. Miziolek; Frank C. DeLucia, Jr.; Nicolas Andre

    2001-05-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  9. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  10. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  11. Characterization of laser-treated Opuntia using FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías Díaz, K. D.; Flores Reyes, T.; Ponce Cabrera, L.; Domínguez Sánchez, M.; Arronte García, M.; de Posada Piñán, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the characterization of Opuntia samples whose thorns were removed by laser pulses. The characterization was performed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this study we performed a comparative analysis of samples before and after treatment by using a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with an energy variable of up to 0.9 J. It was determined that no significant morphological or compositional changes had taken place in the cactus epidermis due to the laser treatment.

  12. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushitani, Mizuho; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I 2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N 2 molecules.

  13. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F.

    2011-01-01

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  14. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  15. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F. [LNE-SYRTE, UMR 8630 CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2011-12-15

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  16. Review of x-ray spectroscopy from laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    Recent progress in x-ray spectroscopy from laser plasmas is reviewed. Advances in the use of K-shell spectra as a diagnostic tool is discussed. Much activity in understanding complex spectra especially from Ne I and Ni I isoelectronic series have been made. Much of the progress has been due to observation of amplification from Δn = O transitions from these configurations. The spectroscopy will be discussed and examples of spectra of the amplified lines will be shown. Finally, recent work on using x-ray spectroscopy to diagnose high density implosions will be discussed. 33 refs

  17. Determination of Different Metals in Steel Waste Samples Using laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Bakry

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Elemental analysis of waste samples collected from steel products manufacturing plant (SPS located at industrial city of Jeddah, Saudi-Arabia has been carried out using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS. The 1064 nm laser radiations from a Nd:YAG laser at an irradiance of 7.6  1010 W cm –2 were used. Atomic emission spectra of the elements present in the waste samples were recorded in the 200 – 620 nm region. Elements such as Fe, W, Ti, Al, Mg, Ca, S, Mn, and Na were detected in these samples. Quantitative determination of the elemental concentration was obtained for these metals against certified standard samples. Parametric dependences of LIBS signal intensity on incident laser energy and time delay between the laser pulse and data acquisition system were also carried out.

  18. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy with a modeless dye laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, J W; Park, C W; Park, S N

    1997-09-20

    We develop a modeless dye laser for broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and investigate the operational characteristics of the modeless laser. The energy efficiency of the modeless laser is 6%, and the beam divergence is 0.65 mrad. We construct a compact movable CARS system with the modeless laser and a graphite tube furnace to assess the accuracy of the CARS temperature. It is found that the difference between the averaged CARS temperature and the radiation temperature measured with an optical pyrometer is <2% at a temperature range from 1000 to 2400 K. We also measure the averaged CARS temperature drift owing to the variation of the spectral distribution of the modeless laser, which is <1.5% during 5 h of operation.

  19. Analysis of magnesium and copper in aluminum alloys with high repetition rate laser-ablation spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyong; Dong, Bo; Chen, Yuqi; Li, Runhua; Wang, Fujuan; Li, Jiaoyang; Cai, Zhigang

    2018-03-01

    In order to improve the analytical speed and performance of laser-ablation based atomic emission spectroscopy, high repetition rate laser-ablation spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (HRR LA-SIBS) was first developed. Magnesium and copper in aluminum alloys were analyzed with this technique. In the experiments, the fundamental output of an acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at 1 kHz repetition rate with low pulse energy and 120 ns pulse width was used to ablate the samples and the plasma emission was enhanced by spark discharge. The spectra were recorded with a compact fiber spectrometer with non-intensified charge-coupled device in non-gating mode. Different parameters relative with analytical performance, such as capacitance, voltage, laser pulse energy were optimized. Under current experimental conditions, calibration curves of magnesium and copper in aluminum alloys were built and limits of detection of them were determined to be 14.0 and 9.9 ppm by HRR LA-SIBS, respectively, which were 8-12 folds better than that achieved by HRR LA under similar experimental condition without spark discharge. The analytical sensitivities are close to those obtained with conventional LIBS but with improved analytical speed as well as possibility of using compact fiber spectrometer. Under high repetition rate operation, the noise level can be decreased and the analytical reproducibility can be improved obviously by averaging multiple measurements within short time. High repetition rate operation of laser-ablation spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy is very helpful for improving analytical speed. It is possible to find applications in fast elements analysis, especially fast two-dimension elemental mapping of solid samples.

  20. Standoff detection of chemical and biological threats using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L; De Lucia, Frank C; Munson, Chase A; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a promising technique for real-time chemical and biological warfare agent detection in the field. We have demonstrated the detection and discrimination of the biological warfare agent surrogates Bacillus subtilis (BG) (2% false negatives, 0% false positives) and ovalbumin (0% false negatives, 1% false positives) at 20 meters using standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) and linear correlation. Unknown interferent samples (not included in the model), samples on different substrates, and mixtures of BG and Arizona road dust have been classified with reasonable success using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). A few of the samples tested such as the soot (not included in the model) and the 25% BG:75% dust mixture resulted in a significant number of false positives or false negatives, respectively. Our preliminary results indicate that while LIBS is able to discriminate biomaterials with similar elemental compositions at standoff distances based on differences in key intensity ratios, further work is needed to reduce the number of false positives/negatives by refining the PLS-DA model to include a sufficient range of material classes and carefully selecting a detection threshold. In addition, we have demonstrated that LIBS can distinguish five different organophosphate nerve agent simulants at 20 meters, despite their similar stoichiometric formulas. Finally, a combined PLS-DA model for chemical, biological, and explosives detection using a single ST-LIBS sensor has been developed in order to demonstrate the potential of standoff LIBS for universal hazardous materials detection.

  1. Transient laser spectroscopy of protein folding: detection and characterization of slow annealing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vinod; Bergenhem, Nils; Gafni, Ari; Steel, Duncan G.

    1995-09-01

    The unique structure of a protein is encoded in its characteristic sequence of amino acids; the processes by which this linear sequence collapses into a unique 3D structure remains an unsolved problem that represents one of the most challenging issues in fundamental biomolecular science. This so-called protein folding problem is the second half of the genetic code. Studies of this biological problem are complicated by the need to study dynamic behavior involving small populations of transient species in a solution environment. However, the use of advanced transient laser spectroscopy techniques based on intrinsic chromophores provides a powerful means to study this problem. Specifically, time-resolved phosphorescence of tryptophan (Trp) provides a means to study the dynamics associated with different regions of the protein surrounding the emitting Trp residue. Using these methodologies, we are able to study, in real time, the later stages of unfolding and refolding of the bacterial protein alkaline phosphatase, a nonspecific monoesterase. Results show the presence of several intermediate states, including states with significantly altered core structure that still exhibit complete biological activity. Moreover, the refolding of alkaline phosphatase following denaturation in either chaotropic denaturants or low pH reveals a relatively fast refolding leading to the biologically active state, while laser spectroscopy measurements show a soft core which is annealing to the native-like state on a time-scale long compared to the return of activity. The active refolded protein is also initially characterized by an increase in susceptibility to denaturant. The slow annealing of the core is consistent with the presence of high energy barriers that separate fully active, long-lived, kinetic intermediate states along the folding pathway, a description suggested in the rugged energy landscape model.

  2. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project''s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies

  3. Bacterial Suspensions Deposited on Microbiological Filter Material for Rapid Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, Dylan J; Gillies, Derek J; Rehse, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    Four species of bacteria, E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa, were harvested from agar nutrient medium growth plates and suspended in water to create liquid specimens for the testing of a new mounting protocol. Aliquots of 30 µL were deposited on standard nitrocellulose filter paper with a mean 0.45 µm pore size to create highly flat and uniform bacterial pads. The introduction of a laser-based lens-to-sample distance measuring device and a pair of matched off-axis parabolic reflectors for light collection improved both spectral reproducibility and the signal-to-noise ratio of optical emission spectra acquired from the bacterial pads by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. A discriminant function analysis and a partial least squares-discriminant analysis both showed improved sensitivity and specificity compared to previous mounting techniques. The behavior of the spectra as a function of suspension concentration and filter coverage was investigated, as was the effect on chemometric cell classification of sterilization via autoclaving. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Detection and Classification of Live and Dead Escherichia coli by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, P.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Taleh, L.; Biddle, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity. Key Words: E. coli—Trace elements—Live and dead cells—Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy—Atomic force microscopy. Astrobiology 15, 144–153. PMID:25683088

  5. Non-invasive gas monitoring in newborn infants using diode laser absorption spectroscopy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Patrik; Svanberg, Emilie K.; Cocola, Lorenzo; Lewander, Märta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Jahr, John; Fellman, Vineta; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    2012-03-01

    Non-invasive diode laser spectroscopy was, for the first time, used to assess gas content in the intestines and the lungs of a new-born, 4 kg, baby. Two gases, water vapor and oxygen, were studied with two low-power tunable diode lasers, illuminating the surface skin tissue and detecting the diffusely emerging light a few centimeters away. The light, having penetrated into the tissue, had experienced absorption by gas located in the lungs and in the intestines. Very distinct water vapor signals were obtained from the intestines while imprint from oxygen was lacking, as expected. Detectable, but minor, signals of water vapor were also obtained from the lungs, illuminating the armpit area and detecting below the collar bone. Water vapor signals were seen but again oxygen signals were lacking, now due to the difficulties of penetration of the oxygen probing light into the lungs of this full-term baby. Ultra-sound images were obtained both from the lungs and from the stomach of the baby. Based on dimensions and our experimental findings, we conclude, that for early pre-term babies, also oxygen should be detectable in the lungs, in addition to intestine and lung detection of water vapor. The present paper focuses on the studies of the intestines while the lung studies will be covered in a forthcoming paper.

  6. Recognition of spectral identifier from green coffee beans of arabica and robusta varieties using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, Karina; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee is one of the world's commodity that is cultivated in more than 50 countries. Production of coffee in Indonesia is positioned of fourth rank in the world, after Brazil, Vietnam, and Colombia. There are two varieties of coffee grown in Indonesia, i.e. the arabica and robusta. The chemical compositions between arabica and robusta are different each other. A trained coffee tester can distinguish these differences from its taste, but it is very subjective. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique based on the analysis of micro-plasma induced on the surface sample after being shot with a laser pulse. In this study, elemental spectra acquired using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique were analysed to differentate between green coffee beans of arabica and robusta, which are collected from plantations in Malang, Bondowoso, Prigen, and Pasuruan. Results show that optimum conditions for acquiring spectra from green coffee beans using LIBS are at 120 mJ of laser energy and 1,0 μs of delay time. Green coffee beans of arabica and robusta contain some elements such as Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Be, Na, H, N, K, Rb, and O. Discriminant analysis method was then applied to distinguish the green beans of arabica and robusta coffee. Element identifiers of green coffee beans are Ca, W, Mg, Be, Na, and Sr. The abundant element in green coffee beans is Calcium (Ca), and depth-profile testing shows that Ca is homogeneous inside the beans.

  7. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIBS) for quantitative analysis of materials, illustrated by CF-LIBS applied to a brass sample of known composition, is presented in this paper. The LIBS plasma is produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed ...

  8. Standoff high energy laser induced oxidation spectroscopy (HELIOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, J.-F.; Pudo, D.; Théberge, F.

    2017-11-01

    High Energy Lasers (HELs) used for defense applications require operational distances ranging from few hundred meters to several kilometers. As the distance increases, the incident beam properties and, consequently, the anticipated effect delivered to the sample become less predictable. Therefore, the direct observation of the event induced by the laser can become an asset. In this paper, we propose a novel spectroscopic method that analyses in real time the spectral components present in the flames produced during the interaction of a HEL with a metallic piece at a long distance. This method was used on aluminum and carbon steel samples placed 200 m away from the laser system. It was discovered that the aluminum and iron oxides created as a by-product of the HEL reaction with the samples emitted clear fingerprint signatures that could be detected remotely using a spectroscopic receiver placed beside the HEL beam director. The real-time assessment of the laser-induced effect can be achieved by monitoring the temporal evolution of the oxide signatures, hence providing information to the operator about the reaction and the nature of the sample illuminated.

  9. Iron-Doped Zinc Selenide: Spectroscopy and Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    p. CMDD5. [Online]. Available: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=CLEO-2010-CMDD5 [7] J. T. Seo , U. Hömmerich, H. Zong, S. B. Trivedi, S...Infrared Laser Sources,” no. AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2010-1107, 2010. [Online]. Available: http://oai.dtic.mil/oai/oai?verb=getRecord&metadataPrefix= html &identifier

  10. Fast quantification of bovine milk proteins employing external cavity-quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Kuligowski, Julia; Quintás, Guillermo; Mayer, Helmut K; Lendl, Bernhard

    2018-06-30

    Analysis of proteins in bovine milk is usually tackled by time-consuming analytical approaches involving wet-chemical, multi-step sample clean-up procedures. The use of external cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) based IR spectroscopy was evaluated as an alternative screening tool for direct and simultaneous quantification of individual proteins (i.e. casein and β-lactoglobulin) and total protein content in commercial bovine milk samples. Mid-IR spectra of protein standard mixtures were used for building partial least squares (PLS) regression models. A sample set comprising different milk types (pasteurized; differently processed extended shelf life, ESL; ultra-high temperature, UHT) was analysed and results were compared to reference methods. Concentration values of the QCL-IR spectroscopy approach obtained within several minutes are in good agreement with reference methods involving multiple sample preparation steps. The potential application as a fast screening method for estimating the heat load applied to liquid milk is demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultra-short laser pulse ablation using shear-force feedback: Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samek, Ota; Kurowski, Andre; Kittel, Silke; Kukhlevsky, Sergei; Hergenroeder, Roland

    2005-01-01

    This work reports on a feasibility study of proximity ablation using femtosecond pulses. Ultra-short pulses were launched to a bare tapered optical fiber and delivered to the sample. The tip-sample distance was controlled by means of shear-force feedback. Consequently, ablation craters with submicrometer dimensions were obtained. Potential analytical applications for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, such as e.g. inclusions in steel or bio cells, are suggested

  12. Semiconductors Investigated by Time Resolved Spectroscopy Using Femtosecond and Picosecond Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-08

    Measured by a Streak Camera, H. Zarrabi , R. R. Alfano, Phys. Rev. B32, 3947 (1985). Picosecond Pulses Produced by Mode Locking an Nd:Glass Laser with Kodak...Excitation" by Hassan J. Zarrabi , 1985, AFOSR General Optronics 3. "Picosecond and Steady State Spectroscopy of Defects in Semi-Insulating CdSe" by David L

  13. Assaying total carotenoids in flours of corn and sweet potato flours by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luterotti, S.; Bicanic, D.D.; Kijak, K.; Grbesa, D.; Martinez, E.; Spruijt, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the application of the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) for quantification of total carotenoids (TC) in corn flours and sweetpotato flours. Overall, thirty-three different corn flours and nine sweetpotato flours were investigated. All PAS measurements were performed at

  14. Speciation of actinides in aqueous solution by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takaumi; Kato, Yoshiharu; Meinrath, G.; Yoshida, Zenko; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as a sensitive and selective method has been applied to the speciation of actinides in aqueous solution. Studies on hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of U(VI) and on determination of hydration number of Cm(III) are reported. (author)

  15. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  16. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Plasma in Hybrid Pulsed Laser Deposition System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Jelínek, Miroslav; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl. D (2002), s. 292-298 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * pulsed laser deposition * RF discharge Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  17. Roughness effects on the hydrogen signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, W.; Bousquet, B.; Lasue, J.

    2017-01-01

    On Mars, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as performed by the ChemCam instrument can be used to measure the hydrogen content of targets in situ, under a low pressure CO2 atmosphere. However, unexpected variations observed in the Martian dataset suggest an effect related to target...

  18. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  19. Fast single-photon avalanche diode arrays for laser Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksberg, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate newly developed solid-state detector technology into time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the ability to distinguish spectra from Raman and fluorescence processes. As a proof of concept, we show fluorescence rejection on highly fluorescent mineral samples willemite

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for quantification of heavy metals in soils and sediments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ambushe, AA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) will be used to determine the contents of heavy metals in soils and sediments. LIBS results will be compared with the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP...

  1. Calculation and optimization of sample identification by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy via correlation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentjes, M.; Dickmann, K.; Meijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Linear correlation analysis may be used as a technique for the identification of samples with a very similar chemical composition by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The spectrum of the “unknown” sample is correlated with a library of reference spectra. The probability of identification by

  2. Status of the laser-microwave spectroscopy experiment for the hyperfine structure of 7Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, K.; Katayama, I.; Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ohtani, S.; Marx, G.; Fujitaka, S.; Tanaka, J.; Kawakami, H.

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the nuclear magnetic moments and the magnetization distributions in the unstable nuclei of 7,11 Be, laser-microwave spectroscopy experiments using an ion-trap are under progress at IPNS, KEK-Tanashi. Status of the experiment for the first unstable isotope 7 Be is reported

  3. Picosecond and Femtosecond Spectroscopic Instrumentation for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-10

    Harry Diamond Laboratory of the US Army; Mr. Ray Tsu has joined the General Electric Research Lab; Dr. P. Lu has joined IBM; Dr. H. Zarrabi has joined...Excitation" by Hassan J. Zarrabi , 1985, AFOSR General Optronics 3. "Picosecond and Steady State Spectroscopy of Defects in Semi-Insulating CdSe" by David L

  4. Shape of gold and platinum exotic isotopes by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Blanc, F.; Obert, J.; Oms, J.; Putaux, J.C.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J.; Pinard, J.; Cabaret, L.; Duong, H.T.; Hubert, G.; Krieg, M.; Sebastian, V.; Crawford, J.; Lee, J.K.P.; Genevey, J.; Ibrahim, F.

    1997-01-01

    Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (RIS) was performed on desorbed 184 Au g,m as well as on platinum isotopes and isomers from A = 189 to A 178. The complete hyperfine structure of both isomer and ground state was obtained for 184 Au. In the platinum isotopes, 14 hyperfine structures were measured. (authors)

  5. Accuracy enhancement of a multivariate calibration for lead determination in soils by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Krylov, Ivan N.; Popov, Andrey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Labutin, Timur A.

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated matrix effects and spectral interferences on example of lead determination in different types of soils by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Comparison between analytical performances of univariate and multivariate calibrations with the use of different laser wavelength for ablation (532, 355 and 266 nm) have been reported. A set of 17 soil samples (Ca-rich, Fe-rich, lean soils etc., 8.5-280 ppm of Pb) was involved into construction of the calibration models. Spectral interferences from main components (Ca, Fe, Ti, Mg) and trace components (Mn, Nb, Zr) were estimated by spectra modeling, and they were a reason for significant differences between the univariate calibration models obtained for a three different soil types (black, red, gray) separately. Implementation of 3rd harmonic of Nd:YAG laser in combination with multivariate calibration model based on PCR with 3 principal components provided the best analytical results: the RMSEC has been lowered down to 8 ppm. The sufficient improvement of the relative uncertainty (up to 5-10%) in comparison with univariate calibration was observed at the Pb concentration level > 50 ppm, while the problem of accuracy still remains for some samples with Pb concentration at the 20 ppm level. We have also discussed a few possible ways to estimate LOD without a blank sample. The most rigorous criterion has resulted in LOD of Pb in soils being 13 ppm. Finally, a good agreement between the values of lead content predicted by LIBS (46 ± 5 ppm) and XRF (42.1 ± 3.3 ppm) in the unknown soil sample from Lomonosov Moscow State University area was demonstrated.

  6. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  7. Collinear laser spectroscopy of manganese isotopes using optical pumping in ISCOOL

    CERN Multimedia

    Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Reponen, M; Campbell, P; Procter, T J

    Recently, optical pumping of ions has been achieved inside an ion beam cooler-buncher. By illuminating the central axis of the cooler with laser light, subsequent decay populates selected ionic metastable states. This population enhancement is retained as the ion beam is delivered to an experimental station. In the case of collinear laser spectroscopy, transitions can then be excited from a preferred metastable level, rather than the ground-state. This proposal seeks to establish and develop the technique for ISCOOL. As a test of efficiency, this will be applied to the study of $^{55-66}$Mn isotopes using collinear laser spectroscopy-expanding an earlier study where the benefit of the technique was demonstrated. This will provide nuclear spins, magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii across N = 40 shell closure candidate and into a region where an onset of deformation, and a new "island of inversion" is predicted.

  8. Identification of inks and structural characterization of contemporary artistic prints by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vila, A. [Departament de Pintura, Conservacio-Restauracio, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rebollar, E. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Conservacio-Restauracio, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Castillejo, M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es

    2005-08-31

    Identification of the inks used in artistic prints and the order in which different ink layers have been applied on a paper substrate are important factors to complement the classical stylistic aspects for the authentication of this type of objects. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated to determine the chemical composition and structural distribution of the constituent materials of model prints made by applying one or two layers of several blue and black inks on an Arches paper substrate. By using suitable laser excitation conditions, identification of the inks was possible by virtue of emissions from key elements present in their composition. Analysis of successive spectra on the same spot allowed the identification of the order in which the inks were applied on the paper. The results show the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the chemical and structural characterization of artistic prints.

  9. Stand-off laser Raman spectroscopy and its advancement in explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-run; Xue, Bin; Li, Yi-zhe; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The explosives detection has been a hot and difficult issue in the field of security it is particularly important to detect explosives quickly and reliably. There are many methods to detect explosives currently, stand-off Raman spectroscopy is one of the most promising and practical technologies, this technique can be used for non-contact and nondestructive detection, ensure the safety of attendants, at the same time the precision and speed of detection are also very high and be characterized by rapid response. This paper mainly gives an account of the fundamental principle of Raman spectroscopy, as well as recount major challenges of Standoff Laser Raman Spectroscopy applied in explosives detection and corresponding solutions. From the perspective of the system, this paper sums up related theories and techniques of the excitation laser and telescopic system etc.. Ultimately, a brief analysis and summary of the development trend of this technology is given.

  10. Laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Young, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Three different instruments using laser ionization techniques will be described. Results from the SARISA instrument with a demonstrated figure of merit of .05 (atoms detected/atoms sputtered) for resonance ionization; detection of Fe at the sub-part-per-billion level in ultrapure Si; and features of the instrument such as energy and angle refocusing time-of-flight (EARTOF) mass spectrometer and multiplexing for simultaneous detection of secondary ions and neutrals. 12 refs., 3 figs

  11. Spectroscopy Stress Evaluation of Translucid Polymers Using Laser Photoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Marciano Vargas; Gil, Aarón Flores; Rodríguez-Lelis, J. M.; González, Antonio Hernández; Arvizo, Dagoberto Vela; Alarcón, Manuel May; Pliego, Arturo Abundez

    2008-04-01

    Several studies can be found where the mechanical strength of fiber composites is evaluated, but not much can be found regarding the influence of voids, as a second phase, in the same mechanical behavior of materials. In the present work, the influence of bubble presence into translucid polymeric bars is investigated. For this purpose, cubic probes with an anisotropic distribution of bubbles were casted, and other were casted controlling the manufacture process to avoid the bubble formation. Each probe was placed in a He-Ne laser-photoelastic arrangement and subjected to compression by an static load. The transmitted 630 nm, He-Ne laser beam was captured by a single mode fiber optic sensor and then transmitted to a spectrometer and PC. Analysis of the spectrometer signals showed that the maximum stresses are concentrated on the bubbles reducing the surface stresses and inducing damping on the probe. The amount of damping depends on the size of the bubbles formed within the probe and their arrangement, thus it can be anticipated that stresses can be directed for specific arrangements in size of bubbles. A white light was also employed in substitution of the laser to investigated the effect of wave length on the results previously obtained. The effect of damping was also experienced but although more information could be obtained caused of the non-coherent nature of the light, it was no possible to obtain full information of the structure of the probes.

  12. ;Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Valérie; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane; Béchade, Jean-Luc; Raepsaet, Caroline; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Bayon, Guy; Ott, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000-4000 wt ppm and 1.0-1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant.

  13. Adaptive sampling dual terahertz comb spectroscopy using dual free-running femtosecond lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Hayashi, Kenta; Cahyadi, Harsono; Hindle, Francis; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Minoshima, Kaoru; Inaba, Hajime

    2015-06-02

    Terahertz (THz) dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising method for high-accuracy, high-resolution, broadband THz spectroscopy because the mode-resolved THz comb spectrum includes both broadband THz radiation and narrow-line CW-THz radiation characteristics. In addition, all frequency modes of a THz comb can be phase-locked to a microwave frequency standard, providing excellent traceability. However, the need for stabilization of dual femtosecond lasers has often hindered its wide use. To overcome this limitation, here we have demonstrated adaptive-sampling THz-DCS, allowing the use of free-running femtosecond lasers. To correct the fluctuation of the time and frequency scales caused by the laser timing jitter, an adaptive sampling clock is generated by dual THz-comb-referenced spectrum analysers and is used for a timing clock signal in a data acquisition board. The results not only indicated the successful implementation of THz-DCS with free-running lasers but also showed that this configuration outperforms standard THz-DCS with stabilized lasers due to the slight jitter remained in the stabilized lasers.

  14. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  15. Noise mitigation techniques for high-precision laser spectroscopy and integrated photonic chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Eric J.

    In this dissertation, laser spectroscopy is utilized to monitor trace-gas species for environmental and health applications. Due to their non-invasive and in situ sensing capabilities, optical platforms are attractive for on-site, real-time diagnostics. Two main techniques are investigated: (i) Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) and (ii) tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS), where noise reduction techniques are implemented in both cases for precise and accurate quantification of analytes. A variety of sensing configurations are demonstrated, including benchtop laboratory sensors [Chapters 4, 6, 7], transportable extractive point sensors [Chapter 5], and on-chip integrated sensors [Chapter 7]. Chapters 4 to 6 demonstrate FRS for detection of paramagnetic molecules. Using a combination of phase-sensitive signal recovery, balanced-detection and polarizer angle optimization, these sensors consistently demonstrate near shot-noise limited performance with minimum fractional absorption 10 2x beyond conventional TDLS. Given that FRS is an ideal platform for implementation of common noise reduction techniques, it presents a viable solution to precision spectroscopy of chemical radicals. Chapter 7 contributes toward a new generation of integrated spectrometers, with the goal of scalable precision sensing nodes. To this end, we present examples of compact TDLS sensor modalities, including integrated sources for broadband, multi-heterodyne spectroscopy, and evanescent waveguide spectroscopy on a silicon-photonic chip. We conclude this dissertation with a vision of a fully integrated TDLS sensor node applicable for real-time sample quantification and localization.

  16. Laser-based semiconductor fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses research that has concentrated on methods for direct processing of integrated circuits (IC's), such as defect reduction in epitaxial silicon, large grain polysilicon growth, laser-assisted etching and film deposition methods, and removal of dislocation networks

  17. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for optical nerve identification. Preliminary ex vivo results for feedback controlled oral and maxillofacial laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Zam, Azhar; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael

    Objective: Laser surgery has many advantages. However, due to a lack of haptic feedback it is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities of optical nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Materials and Methods: Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone (15120 spectra) of ex vivo pig heads were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed by principal components analysis (PCA) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Results: Nerve tissue could correctly be identified and differed from skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone in more than 90% of the cases (AUC results) with a specificity of over 78% and a sensitivity of more than 86%. Conclusion: Nerve tissue can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with high precision and reliability. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  18. Lasers and Missile Defense: New Concepts for Space-Based and Ground-Based Laser Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Is the Department of Defense (DoD) pursuing the correct investment strategy for space-based laser weapons ? Recent advances in lasers optics and...spacecraft technologies may bring high-energy laser weapons to a sufficient level of maturity for serious consideration as space weapons against the...technology improvements have affected the strategic employment concepts for high-energy laser weapons . This study presents a comparison of competing space

  19. SO2 Spectroscopy with A Tunable UV Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, W. W.; Penney, C. M.; Lapp, M.

    1973-01-01

    A portion of the fluorescence spectrum of SO2 has been studied using a narrow wavelength doubled dye laser as the exciting source. One purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of SO2 resonance re-emission as a probe of SO2 in the atmosphere. When the SO2 is excited by light at 300.2 nm, for example, a strong reemission peak is observed which is Stokes-shifted from the incident light wavelength by the usual Raman shift (the VI symmetric vibration frequency 1150.5/cm ). The intensity of this peak is sensitive to small changes (.01 nm) in the incident wavelength. Measurements of the N2 quenching and self quenching of this re-emission have been obtained. Preliminary analysis of this data indicates that the quenching is weak but not negligible. The dye laser in our system is pumped by a pulsed N2 laser. Tuning 'and spectral narrowing are accomplished using a telescope-echelle grating combination. In a high power configuration the resulting pulses have a spectral width of about 5 x 10(exp -3) nm and a time duration of about 6 nsec. The echelle grating is rotated by a digital stepping motor, such that each step shifts the wavelength by 6 x 10(exp -4) nm. In addition to the tunable, narrow wavelength uv source and spectral analysis of the consequent re-emission, the system also provides time resolution of the re-emitted light to 6 nsec resolution. This capability is being used to study the lifetime of low pressure S02 fluorescence at different wavelengths and pressures.

  20. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  2. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelshin, V.; Cocolios, T.; Fedoseev, V.; Heinke, R.; Kieck, T.; Marsh, B.; Naubereit, P.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Studer, D.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.

    2017-11-01

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy study of excimer-laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, G.; Chrisey, D. B.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Horwitz, J. S.; Newman, D. A.

    1993-07-01

    The dispersed emission in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) (1200-3000 Å) from the plasma generated by the interaction of a KrF excimer laser with an Al and a YBa2Cu3O7 target has been measured. Emission spectra were collected as a function of distance above the target surface and as a function of laser fluence. The qualitative features of the plasmas from the two different targets were similar. The character of the emission spectra changed from a pseudocontinuous emission at the target surface to discrete emission from singly, doubly ionized species as well as neutrals at distances greater than ˜1.5 mm. The spatial variation indicated two regions: a high-density sheath along the target where the core emission is close to blackbody; and beyond, a plasma with large opacity emitting a UV spectrum of intensity decreasing fast with distance. Estimates of the plasma temperature and density were between 2 and 4 eV and ˜1018/cm3, respectively.

  4. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadelshin, V.; Cocolios, T.; Fedoseev, V.; Heinke, R.; Kieck, T.; Marsh, B.; Naubereit, P.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Studer, D.; Duppen, P. Van; Wendt, K.

    2017-01-01

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  5. Spectroscopy and Laser-SNMS on stable and radioactive strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Hauke; Walther, Clemens [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Franzmann, Michael [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kron, Tobias; Wendt, Klaus [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear accidents as experienced e.g. in Chernobyl or Fukushima and nuclear weapon tests released considerable activity levels and a variety of medium to long-lived radionuclides into the environment. Strontium-90 appears as a significant share of the fission products in spent nuclear fuel and correspondingly in any possible release. Due to its chemical properties it is subject to long range transport through the environment and can cause considerable dose to man when entering the food chain. Correspondingly, the investigation of speciation and migration channels is of major relevance. A radioanalytical approach is severely hampered by the low beta energy of the strontium-90 decay and the need to separate strontium-90 from the secular equilibrated daughter yttrium-90. Hence, application of a mass spectrometric method without chemical separation of the elements is a promising alternative for low-level investigation of strontium-90. Application of the new Laser-SNMS system at IRS Hannover could well suit those needs. It applies three Ti:Sa lasers for resonant ionization of neutral atoms produced by primary ion sputtering in a SIMS together with a time-of-flight mass analysis which provides high spatial resolution. The analytical measurements are preceded by spectroscopic studies on the level structure of strontium to develop a most efficient ionization scheme.

  6. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelshin, V., E-mail: gadelshin@uni-mainz.de [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Cocolios, T. [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Fedoseev, V. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Heinke, R.; Kieck, T. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Marsh, B. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Rothe, S.; Stora, T. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Studer, D. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Duppen, P. Van [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Wendt, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  7. Laser heating of scanning probe tips for thermal near-field spectroscopy and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. O’Callahan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopy and microscopy of the thermal near-field yield valuable insight into the mechanisms of resonant near-field heat transfer and Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces, as well as providing nanoscale spatial resolution for infrared vibrational spectroscopy. A heated scanning probe tip brought close to a sample surface can excite and probe the thermal near-field. Typically, tip temperature control is provided by resistive heating of the tip cantilever. However, this requires specialized tips with limited temperature range and temporal response. By focusing laser radiation onto AFM cantilevers, we achieve heating up to ∼1800 K, with millisecond thermal response time. We demonstrate application to thermal infrared near-field spectroscopy (TINS by acquiring near-field spectra of the vibrational resonances of silicon carbide, hexagonal boron nitride, and polytetrafluoroethylene. We discuss the thermal response as a function of the incident excitation laser power and model the dominant cooling contributions. Our results provide a basis for laser heating as a viable approach for TINS, nanoscale thermal transport measurements, and thermal desorption nano-spectroscopy.

  8. A combined laser-induced breakdown and Raman spectroscopy Echelle system for elemental and molecular microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehse, Marek [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Mory, David [LTB Lasertechnik Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 29, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Science, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Weritz, Friederike [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gornushkin, Igor, E-mail: igor.gornushkin@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, Ulrich [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Chemistry Department, Brook-Taylor-Strasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is integrated into a single system for molecular and elemental microanalyses. Both analyses are performed on the same approx 0.002 mm{sup 2} sample spot allowing the assessment of sample heterogeneity on a micrometric scale through mapping and scanning. The core of the spectrometer system is a novel high resolution dual arm Echelle spectrograph utilized for both techniques. In contrast to scanning Raman spectroscopy systems, the Echelle-Raman spectrograph provides a high resolution spectrum in a broad spectral range of 200-6000 cm{sup -1} without moving the dispersive element. The system displays comparable or better sensitivity and spectral resolution in comparison to a state-of-the-art scanning Raman microscope and allows short analysis times for both Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy performance of the system is characterized by ppm detection limits, high spectral resolving power (15,000), and broad spectral range (290-945 nm). The capability of the system is demonstrated with the mapping of heterogeneous mineral samples and layer by layer analysis of pigments revealing the advantages of combining the techniques in a single unified set-up.

  9. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  10. [Measurement on gas temperature distribution by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Yan, Jian-hua; Wang, Fei; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-fa

    2008-08-01

    The technique of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) can be used for gas temperature distribution measurement by scanning multiple gas absorption lines with a tunable diode laser. The fundamental of gas temperature distribution measurement by TDLAS is introduced in the present paper, and the discretization strategy of equation for gas absorption is also given here. Using constrained linear least-square fitting method, the gas temperature distribution can be calculated with the help of physical constraints under the condition of uniform gas concentration and pressure. Based on the spectral parameters of four CO absorption lines near 6330 cm(-1) from HITRAN database, the model of two-temperature distribution at 300 and 600 K with each path length of 55 cm was set up. The effects of relative measurement error and different path length constraints of temperature bins on the gas temperature distribution measurement results were simulated by constrained linear least-square fitting. The results show that the temperature distribution calculation error increases as the relative measurement error rises. A measurement error of 5% could lead to a maximum relative error of 11%, and an average relative error of 2.2% for calculation result. And the weak physical constraints of path length for temperature bins could increase the calculation result error during the process of constrained linear least-square fitting. By setting up the model of two-temperature distribution with gas cells at room temperature as the cold section and in tube furnace as the hot section, the experiment of gas temperature distribution measurement in lab was carried out. Using four absorption lines of CO near 6330 cm(-1) scanned by VCSEL diode laser, and fitting the background laser intensity without absorption by the cubic polynomial to get the baseline signal, the integrals of spectral absorbance for gas temperature distribution measurement can be calculated. The relative calculation

  11. Terahertz quasi time-domain spectroscopy based on telecom technology for 1550 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Robert B; Rehn, Arno; Nellen, Simon; Koch, Martin; Schell, Martin; Dietz, Roman J B; Balzer, Jan C

    2017-05-29

    We present a fiber-coupled terahertz quasi time-domain spectroscopy system driven by a laser with a central wavelength of 1550 nm. By using a commercially available multimode laser diode in combination with state-of-the-art continuous wave antennas, a bandwidth of more than 1.8 THz is achieved. The peak signal-to-noise ratio is around 60 dB. A simulation based on the optical spectrum of the laser diode and the transfer function of the THz path is in agreement with the experimental results. The system is used to extract the refractive index from two different samples and the results indicate that the performance is up to 1.8 THz comparable to a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system.

  12. Comparative analysis of automotive paints by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and nonparametric permutation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntee, Erin; Viglino, Emilie; Rinke, Caitlin; Kumor, Stephanie; Ni Liqiang; Sigman, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated for the discrimination of automobile paint samples. Paint samples from automobiles of different makes, models, and years were collected and separated into sets based on the color, presence or absence of effect pigments and the number of paint layers. Twelve LIBS spectra were obtained for each paint sample, each an average of a five single shot 'drill down' spectra from consecutive laser ablations in the same spot on the sample. Analyses by a nonparametric permutation test and a parametric Wald test were performed to determine the extent of discrimination within each set of paint samples. The discrimination power and Type I error were assessed for each data analysis method. Conversion of the spectral intensity to a log-scale (base 10) resulted in a higher overall discrimination power while observing the same significance level. Working on the log-scale, the nonparametric permutation tests gave an overall 89.83% discrimination power with a size of Type I error being 4.44% at the nominal significance level of 5%. White paint samples, as a group, were the most difficult to differentiate with the power being only 86.56% followed by 95.83% for black paint samples. Parametric analysis of the data set produced lower discrimination (85.17%) with 3.33% Type I errors, which is not recommended for both theoretical and practical considerations. The nonparametric testing method is applicable across many analytical comparisons, with the specific application described here being the pairwise comparison of automotive paint samples.

  13. Impact of oxygen chemistry on the emission and fluorescence spectroscopy of laser ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, K. C.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen present in the ambient gas medium may affect both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) emission through a reduction of emission intensity and persistence. In this study, an evaluation is made on the role of oxygen in the ambient environment under atmospheric pressure conditions in LIBS and laser ablation (LA)-LIF emission. To generate plasmas, 1064 nm, 10 ns pulses were focused on an aluminum alloy sample. LIF was performed by frequency scanning a CW laser over the 396.15 nm (3s24s 2S1/2 → 3s23p 2P°3/2) Al I transition. Time-resolved emission and fluorescence signals were recorded to evaluate the variation in emission intensity caused by the presence of oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure (po) in the atmospheric pressure environment using N2 as the makeup gas was varied from 0 to 400 Torr O2. 2D-fluorescence spectroscopy images were obtained for various oxygen concentrations for simultaneous evaluation of the emission and excitation spectral features. Results showed that the presence of oxygen in the ambient environment reduces the persistence of the LIBS and LIF emission through an oxidation process that depletes the density of atomic species within the resulting laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume.

  14. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy of biosystems gas exchange with the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, B. G.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Sapozhnikova, V. A.

    1998-10-01

    A response of plants to stress action is characterized by an activation of the respiration process. The CO2 evolution by some plants exposed to elevated concentration of pollutants and pressure decrease is studied using a photoacoustic spectrometer with a CO2 laser. The measurements show a considerable CO2 evolution by all kinds of the test plants. The quantity of CO2 emitted by pea seedlings at 8 kPa, for example, exceeds the control one by about 20 times (24 h after the exposure start). The exposure of pea seedlings to C2H4 and O3 at various concentrations also increases CO2 evolution: the 48-h exposure of test plants to C2H4 (at 0.01 ppm) increases CO2 evolution by approximately 100% with respect to the control plants.

  16. Laser spectroscopy with an electrostatic ConeTrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S., E-mail: sam.kelly@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Campbell, P. [University of Manchester, Nuclear Physics Group, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street (United Kingdom); Cheal, B., E-mail: Bradley.Cheal@Liverpool.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Geldhof, S.; Jokinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A. [JYFL, University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    A compact electrostatic trap has been designed and installed as part of the recent upgrades to the IGISOL IV facility. The ConeTrap provides an in vacuo optical pumping site for low energy (800 eV) ionic ensembles available for interaction periods of 10-100 ms. At present, 6.7(3) % of injected mass A=98 ions can be trapped, stored for 5 ms, extracted and transported to a laser-ion interaction region. This fraction represents those ions for which no perturbation to total energy or energy spread is observed. Proposed enhancements to the trap are designed to improve the trapping efficiency by up to a factor of 5. Differential pumping and reduction in background pressure below the present 10{sup −6} mbar will extend storage times beyond 100 ms.

  17. Laser excited nonresonant fluorescence spectroscopy. Second annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbwachs, J.A.; Frueholz, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The relative populations of numerous tin levels populated by collisional energy transfer from an initially laser pumped level were obtained. These populations yield information concerning the relative rates of energy transfer for the various buffer gases studied. The results indicated two distinct energy transfer behaviors. First, for certain tin levels diatomic collision partners produce populations nearly two orders of magnitude higher than when rare gases are present. This behavior is attributed to the effects of near-resonant energy transfer pathways for the E → V/R and V/R → E processes found in the diatomic collision partners. Second, for other tin levels, diatomics and rare gases transfer population approximately at the same rates and more efficiently than in the former case. For these levels the near-resonant pathways can be obscured by means of a more effective energy transfer channel common to both diatomics and rare gases such as by curve crossing mechanisms

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for bone and cartilage differentiation - ex vivo study as a prospect for a laser surgery feedback mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehari, Fanuel; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Kanawade, Rajesh; Klämpfl, Florian; Adler, Werner; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Laser surgery enables for very accurate, fast and clean modeling of tissue. The specific and controlled cutting and ablation of tissue, however, remains a central challenge in the field of clinical laser applications. The lack of information on what kind of tissue is being ablated at the bottom of the cut may lead to iatrogenic damage of structures that were meant to be preserved. One such example is the shaping or removal of diseased cartilaginous and bone tissue in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Diseases of the TMJ can induce deformation and perforation of the cartilaginous discus articularis, as well as alterations to the cartilaginous surface of the condyle or even the bone itself. This may result in restrictions of movement and pain. The aim of a surgical intervention ranges from specific ablation and shaping of diseased cartilage, bone or synovial tissues to extensive removal of TMJ structures. One approach to differentiate between these tissues is to use Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The ultimate goal is a LIBS guided feedback control system for surgical laser systems that enables real-time tissue identification for tissue specific ablation. In the presented study, the authors focused on the LIBS based differentiation between cartilage tissue and cortical bone tissue using an ex-vivo pig model.

  19. Methods for measurement of heterogeneous materials with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, Andrew Jay

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical tool that can be used in a wide range of applications. By focusing a laser pulse onto a small area, material is ionized and heated to 10,000 to 20,000 K. As the plasma cools, atoms emit light. The light contains atomic information about the sample and is analyzed by a spectrometer. In this work, a fundamental study will examine the relationship between ablation and LIBS enhancement in dual-pulse LIBS. Also, an application of LIBS to...

  20. Two photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN’s AD

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms using counter-propagating ultraviolet laser beams. This excited some non-linear transitions of the antiproton at the wavelengths λ = 139.8–197.0 nm, in a way that reduced the thermal Doppler broadening of the observed resonances. The resulting narrow spectral lines allowed the measurement of three transition frequencies with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing these values with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was derived as 1836.1526736(23). We briefly review these results.

  1. Polarization spectroscopy on laser-produced plasmas and Z-pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong E. [POSTECH, Kyungbuk (Korea); Baronova, Elena O. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jakubowski, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    2002-08-01

    PPS experiments on laser-produced plasmas are reviewed. Polarization is interpreted in terms of the anisotropic velocity distribution of electrons due to non-local transport. The polarization of an x-ray laser, and recent results regarding the recombining plasma are also presented. X-ray polarization spectroscopy experiments on heliumlike ion lines from a vacuum spark and from a plasma focus are presented: in both cases, the resonance line of the heliumlike ions shows polarization in the direction perpendicular to the discharge axis. Two possible interpretations are suggested. (author)

  2. Near infrared spectroscopy of food systems using a supercontinuum laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Tine

    Mid-infrared and particularly near-infrared spectroscopy is extremely useful for food analysis because they measure chemical and physical properties fast and non-destructively. The advancement of a supercontinuum light source covering the near-infrared and parts of the ultraviolet and mid......)) can be obtained, (c) that the supercontinuum light is fiber compatible i.e. it can couple directly to fibers, and (d) that the fast repetition rate of the supercontinuum pulses makes it possible to do very fast measurements. For these reasons, the supercontinuum light stands out from the commonly...... applied near- and mid-infrared incandescent light bulbs. This thesis aim to explore the utility of using a supercontinuum source in two food applications. (1) The supercontinuum light was applied for the first time to barley seeds in transmission mode in the long wavelength near-infrared region from 2260...

  3. Laser apparatus for surgery and force therapy based on high-power semiconductor and fibre lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaev, V P

    2005-01-01

    High-power semiconductor lasers and diode-pumped lasers are considered whose development qualitatively improved the characteristics of laser apparatus for surgery and force therapy, extended the scope of their applications in clinical practice, and enhanced the efficiency of medical treatment based on the use of these lasers. The characteristics of domestic apparatus are presented and their properties related to the laser emission wavelength used in them are discussed. Examples of modern medical technologies based on these lasers are considered. (invited paper)

  4. Laser Spectroscopy of Vinyl Alcohol Embedded in Helium Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Hayley; Raston, Paul; Douberly, Gary E.

    2017-06-01

    Vinyl alcohol has two rotameric forms, known as syn- and anti-vinyl alcohol, where syn is the most stable. While both have been investigated by microwave and far-infrared spectroscopy, only the syn rotamer has been investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy. This is due to the low anti rotamer population (15%) at room temperature, in addition to the closeness in proximity of the mid-infrared bands between the rotamers; this results in overlapping bands that are dominated by syn-vinyl alcohol absorptions. In this investigation we increase the anti-vinyl alcohol population to 40% by using a high temperature "pyrolysis" source, and eliminate the spectral overlap by recording the spectra at low temperature in helium nanodroplets. We observe a number of bands of both rotamers in the OH, CH, and CO stretching regions that display rotational substructure. A highlight of this work is the observation of a Fermi dyad in the OH stretching region of anti-vinyl alcohol. Anharmonic frequency calculations suggest that this is due to a near degeneracy of the OH stretching state (νb{1}) with a triple combination involving νb{7}, νb{8}, and νb{9}. M. Rodler, J. Mol. Spec. 114, 23 (1985);S. Saito, Chem. Phys. Lett. 42, 3 (1976) H. Bunn, R. Hudson, A. S. Gentleman, and P. L. Raston, ACS Earth Space Chem. DOI: 10.1021/acsearthspacechem.6b00008 (2017) D-L Joo, A. J. Merer, D. J. Clouthier, J. Mol. Spec. 197, 68 (1999)

  5. Laser-spectroscopy studies of the nuclear structure of neutron-rich radium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. M.; Wilkins, S. G.; Billowes, J.; Binnersley, C. L.; Bissell, M. L.; Chrysalidis, K.; Cocolios, T. E.; Goodacre, T. Day; de Groote, R. P.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heinke, R.; Koszorús, Á.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Naubereit, P.; Neyens, G.; Ricketts, C. M.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Stroke, H. H.; Studer, D.; Vernon, A. R.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Yang, X. F.

    2018-02-01

    The neutron-rich radium isotopes, Ra-233222, were measured with Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The hyperfine structure of the 7 s2S10→7 s 7 p P31 transition was probed, allowing measurement of the magnetic moments, quadrupole moments, and changes in mean-square charge radii. These results are compared to existing literature values, and the new moments and change in mean-square charge radii of 231Ra are presented. Low-resolution laser spectroscopy of the very neutron-rich 233Ra has allowed the isotope shift and relative charge radius to be determined for the first time.

  6. Evaluation of self-absorption coefficients of aluminum emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sherbini, A.M.; El Sherbini, Th.M.; Hegazy, H.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In quantitative Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements it is essential to account for the effect of self-absorption on the emission lines intensity. In order to quantify this effect, in this paper we propose a simple method for evaluating the ratio between the actual measured line intensity and the intensity expected in absence of self-absorption and, if necessary, correcting the effect of self-absorption on line intensity. The method, based on a homogeneous plasma model, is applicable when the plasma electron density is known and in particular to lines whose Stark broadening parameter is available

  7. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Mid-infrared multiheterodyne spectroscopy with phase-locked quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, J.; Sterczewski, L. A.; Wysocki, G.

    2017-04-01

    Fabry-Pérot (FP) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) provide purely electronically controlled monolithic sources for broadband mid-infrared (mid-IR) multiheterodyne spectroscopy (MHS), which benefits from the large gain bandwidth of the QCLs without sacrificing the narrowband properties commonly associated with the single mode distributed feedback variant. We demonstrate a FP-QCL based multiheterodyne spectrometer with a short-term noise-equivalent absorption of ˜3 × 10-4/ √{ H z } , a mid-IR spectral coverage of 25 cm-1, and very short acquisition time (10 μs) capability. The broadband potential is demonstrated by measuring the absorption spectra of ammonia and isobutane under atmospheric pressure conditions. The stability of the system is enhanced by a two-stage active frequency inter-locking procedure, where the two QCLs are pre-locked with a slow feedback loop based on an analog frequency discriminator, followed by a high bandwidth optical phase-locked loop. The locking system provides a relative frequency stability in the sub kHz range over seconds of integration time. The strength of the technique lies in the ability to acquire spectral information from all optical modes simultaneously and individually, which bodes for a versatile and cost effective spectrometer for mid-IR chemical gas sensing.

  9. One-point calibration for calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy quantitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, G.H.; Teixeira, D.V. [Instituto de Fìsica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n" o – Campus da Praia Vermelha – CEP 24210-346 – Niterói – Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L. [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi, 1 — 56124 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi, 1 — 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    We present a new method for improving the reliability of quantitative analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The method can be considered as a variation of the calibration-free LIBS approach; although not completely standard-less, only one standard of known composition and similar matrix to the one to be analyzed is needed. On the other hand, the one-point calibration approach allows the empirical determination of essential experimental and spectroscopic parameters, whose knowledge is often imprecise or lacking; the result is a definite improvement of the trueness of LIBS analysis with respect to the traditional calibration-free approach. The characteristics and advantages of the proposed one-point calibration LIBS approach will be demonstrated on a set of copper-based samples of known composition. - Highlights: • A new method for improving the quantitative analysis by LIBS is presented. • Only one standard of known composition is needed for the analysis. • A set of copper-based samples of known composition is analyzed. • The concentrations calculated result remarkably close to the nominal concentrations.

  10. Improved accuracy in quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using sub-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan; Clegg, Samuel M.; Frydenvang, Jens; Wiens, Roger C.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard V.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Dyar, M. Darby

    2017-01-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of diverse geologic materials is one of the primary challenges faced by the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)-based ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The SuperCam instrument on the Mars 2020 rover, as well as other LIBS instruments developed for geochemical analysis on Earth or other planets, will face the same challenge. Consequently, part of the ChemCam science team has focused on the development of improved multivariate analysis calibrations methods. Developing a single regression model capable of accurately determining the composition of very different target materials is difficult because the response of an element’s emission lines in LIBS spectra can vary with the concentration of other elements. We demonstrate a conceptually simple “sub-model” method for improving the accuracy of quantitative LIBS analysis of diverse target materials. The method is based on training several regression models on sets of targets with limited composition ranges and then “blending” these “sub-models” into a single final result. Tests of the sub-model method show improvement in test set root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) for almost all cases. The sub-model method, using partial least squares regression (PLS), is being used as part of the current ChemCam quantitative calibration, but the sub-model method is applicable to any multivariate regression method and may yield similar improvements.

  11. Influence of ns-laser wavelength in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for discrimination of painting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xueshi; Syvilay, Delphine; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Texier, Annick; Martinez, Loic; Serfaty, Stéphane; Martos-Levif, Dominique; Detalle, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    The influence of ns-laser wavelength to discriminate ancient painting techniques such as are fresco, casein, animal glue, egg yolk and oil was investigated in this work. This study was carried out with a single shot laser on samples covered by a layer made of a mixture of the cinnabar pigment and different binders. Three wavelengths based on Nd: YAG laser were investigated (1064, 532 and 266 nm). The plasma is controlled at the same electron temperature after an adjustment of pulse energy for these three wavelengths on a fresco sample without organic binder. This approach allows to eliminate the effects of laser pulse energy and the material laser absorption. Afterwards, the emission spectra were compared to separate different techniques. The organic binding media has been separated based on the relative emission intensity of the present CN or C2 rovibrational emissions. In order to test the capability of separating or identifying, the chemometric approach (PCA) was applied to the different matrix. The different solutions in term of wavelength range to optimise the identification was investigated. We focused on the evaluation for the laser wavelength to insure a better separation. The different capacity was interpreted by differentiating the binders by the altered interaction mechanisms between the laser photon and the binders. Also, the electron temperature in the plasma was estimated, which provided the evidences to our findings.

  12. Characterization and optimization of an X-ray laser for the spectroscopy of Li-like heavy-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielbauer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of plasma-based collisionally excited x-ray lasers (XRL) have shown an optimization potential based on the dependence of the absorption region of the pumping laser on its angle of incidence on the plasma. For the experimental proof of this idea, a number of diagnostic schemes were developed, tested, qualified and applied. A high-resolution imaging system, yielding the keV emission profile perpendicular to the target surface, provided positions of the hottest plasma regions, interesting for the benchmarking of plasma simulation codes. The implementation of a highly efficient spectrometer for the plasma emission made it possible to gain information about the abundance of the ionization states necessary for the laser action in the plasma. The intensity distribution and deflection angle of the pump laser beam could be imaged for single XRL shots, giving access to its refraction process within the plasma. During a European collaboration campaign at the Lund Laser Center, Sweden, the optimization of the pumping laser incidence angle resulted in a reduction of the required pumping energy for a Ni-like Mo XRL, which enabled the operation at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Using the experiences gained there, the XRL performance at the PHELIX facility, GSI Darmstadt with respect to achievable repetition rate and at wavelengths below 20 nm was significantly improved, and also important information for the development towards multi-100 eV plasma XRLs was acquired. Due to the setup improvements achieved during the work for this thesis, the PHELIX XRL system now has reached a degree of reproducibility and versatility which is sufficient for demanding applications like the XRL spectroscopy of heavy ions. In addition, a European research campaign, aiming towards plasma XRLs approaching the water-window (wavelengths below 5 nm) was initiated. (orig.)

  13. Characterization and optimization of an X-ray laser for the spectroscopy of Li-like heavy-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielbauer, B.

    2007-10-24

    Recent developments in the theory of plasma-based collisionally excited x-ray lasers (XRL) have shown an optimization potential based on the dependence of the absorption region of the pumping laser on its angle of incidence on the plasma. For the experimental proof of this idea, a number of diagnostic schemes were developed, tested, qualified and applied. A high-resolution imaging system, yielding the keV emission profile perpendicular to the target surface, provided positions of the hottest plasma regions, interesting for the benchmarking of plasma simulation codes. The implementation of a highly efficient spectrometer for the plasma emission made it possible to gain information about the abundance of the ionization states necessary for the laser action in the plasma. The intensity distribution and deflection angle of the pump laser beam could be imaged for single XRL shots, giving access to its refraction process within the plasma. During a European collaboration campaign at the Lund Laser Center, Sweden, the optimization of the pumping laser incidence angle resulted in a reduction of the required pumping energy for a Ni-like Mo XRL, which enabled the operation at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Using the experiences gained there, the XRL performance at the PHELIX facility, GSI Darmstadt with respect to achievable repetition rate and at wavelengths below 20 nm was significantly improved, and also important information for the development towards multi-100 eV plasma XRLs was acquired. Due to the setup improvements achieved during the work for this thesis, the PHELIX XRL system now has reached a degree of reproducibility and versatility which is sufficient for demanding applications like the XRL spectroscopy of heavy ions. In addition, a European research campaign, aiming towards plasma XRLs approaching the water-window (wavelengths below 5 nm) was initiated. (orig.)

  14. Investigation on a new local control technology with near-infrared spectroscopy for laser induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Guoran; Zhang Hua; Qian Aiping; Qian Zhiyu, E-mail: nuaazhh@126.com, E-mail: ntuzhh@ntu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226019 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In order to control the treatment of laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, a new local control technique is put forward, which use a functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system. The temperature of biological tissue is regarded as the most important indicator for treatment of LITT. So, based on the experiments of LITT being performed on a liver cancer, the temperature and reducing scattering coefficient have been obtained in real time, respectively, with probe-type thermometer and fNIRS system. The results of the two factors have the same trend with different power of laser. It is confirmed that the fNIRS can be a useful local control technology for LITT.

  15. Production of photofission fragments and study of their nuclear structure by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Karaivanov, D.V.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Mel'nikova, L.M.; Myshinskij, G.V.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The prospective nuclear structure investigations of the fission fragments by resonance laser spectroscopy methods are discussed. Research in this field is currently being carried out as part of the DRIBs project, which is under development at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR. The fission fragments under study are mainly very neutron-rich nuclei near the proton (Z=50) and neutron (N=50 and 82) closed shells, nuclei in the region of strong deformation (N>60 and N>90) and nuclei with high-spin isomeric states. Resonance laser spectroscopy is used successfully in the study of the structure of such nuclei. It allows one to determine a number of nuclear parameters (mean-square charge radius, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments) and to make conclusions about the collective and single particle properties of the nuclei

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Wendelstein 7-X stellarator limiter tile analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Gierse, Niels; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Rasinski, Marcin; Dhard, Chandra Prakash; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; König, Ralf; Liang, Yunfeng; Ding, Hongbin; Linsmeier, Christian; W7-X Team3, the

    2017-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a well-established elemental composition analysis method as well as one of the most promising candidates for in situ first wall diagnosis of fusion devices. In this work, limiter graphite tiles, which were exposed in the initial operational phase (OP1.1) of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator to He and H plasma, are analyzed ex situ by LIBS employing a picosecond pulsed laser for the first time and compared with post mortem analysis techniques. Depth profiles of each element and 2D profile of the ratio of H and C atoms on the surface are investigated. Both H content and retention depth on the deposition dominated zone are higher than on the erosion dominated zone due to the formation of C-H co-deposition layer. The results from LIBS are in agreement with those from the cross-sectional scanning electron microscopic image and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  17. Detection of contaminants in ore samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Hussain, Talib; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Bakry, Ahmed H

    2007-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for the determination of contaminants present in ore samples. The plasma was generated by focusing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation at 1064 nm wavelength on the ore sample collected from one of the open-pit mines located in Saudi Arabia. The concentrations in this ore sample of different elements of environmental significance like Cu, Cr, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ti, Si, Fe and Al were determined by spectral analysis. Parametric dependence for improvement of LIBS sensitivity was carried out. The LIBS results were compared with the results obtained using other analytical techniques such as the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Limits of detection (LOD) of our LIBS system were also calculated for the elements under investigation.

  18. In-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy of actinium isotopes near the N =126 closed shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, C.; Creemers, P.; Ferrer, R.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gins, W.; de Groote, R.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Martínez, Y.; Raeder, S.; Sels, S.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Zadvornaya, A.; Barzakh, A. E.; Bastin, B.; Delahaye, P.; Hijazi, L.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Piot, J.; Savajols, H.; Thomas, J.-C.; Traykov, E.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Block, M.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Grawe, H.; Heinke, R.; Kron, T.; Naubereit, P.; Wendt, K.; Laatiaoui, M.; Moore, I.; Sonnenschein, V.; Loiselet, M.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Rothe, S.

    2017-11-01

    The in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique was applied on the Ac-215212 isotopes, produced at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility by using the in-gas-cell and the in-gas-jet methods. The first application under on-line conditions of the in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy method showed a superior performance in terms of selectivity, spectral resolution, and efficiency in comparison with the in-gas-cell method. Following the analysis of both experiments, the magnetic-dipole moments for the Ac-215212 isotopes, electric-quadrupole moments and nuclear spins for the Ac,215214 isotopes are presented and discussed. A good agreement is obtained with large-scale nuclear shell-model calculations by using a 208Pb core.

  19. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R; Barzakh, A; Bastin, B; Beerwerth, R; Block, M; Creemers, P; Grawe, H; de Groote, R; Delahaye, P; Fléchard, X; Franchoo, S; Fritzsche, S; Gaffney, L P; Ghys, L; Gins, W; Granados, C; Heinke, R; Hijazi, L; Huyse, M; Kron, T; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Laatiaoui, M; Lecesne, N; Loiselet, M; Lutton, F; Moore, I D; Martínez, Y; Mogilevskiy, E; Naubereit, P; Piot, J; Raeder, S; Rothe, S; Savajols, H; Sels, S; Sonnenschein, V; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E; Van Beveren, C; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Wendt, K; Zadvornaya, A

    2017-02-22

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency.

  20. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pořízka, P. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Demidov, A. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Keivanian, J. [Institute for Mining, Technical University Clausthal, Erzstraße 18, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gornushkin, I. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, U. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Chemistry Department, Humboldt Univerisät zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Straße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Riedel, J., E-mail: jens.riedel@bam.de [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  2. Laser Raman spectroscopy of snake venom neurotoxins: conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, A T; Jo, B H; Yu, N T

    1976-01-01

    Laser Raman spectra of neurotoxins of Pelamis platurus (yellow-bellied sea snake) and Laticauda semifasciata (broad-banded blue sea snake) were investigated. The amide I band appeared at 1672 cm-1 for both toxins, which presents an indication of anti-parallel beta structure. Since this agrees well with the result from the CD-ORD studies of snake neurotoxin, it was concluded that snake neurotoxins mainly consist of beta structure. The amide III band appeared at 1245 cm-1 for P. platurus toxin and 1248 cm-1 for L. semifasciata toxin. The four disulfide bonds present in the toxin have a very similar geometry. After vigorous heat treatment, the backbone configuration of the toxin molecule basically remained the same although it was partially denatured. The major peak at 512 cm-1 was not altered by the heat treatment but a new shoulder appeared at 546 cm-1. This suggests that a new type of S-S stretching vibration (trans-gauche-trans) was produced as a result of heat treatment. However, the majority of the S-S vibrations remained in the gauche-gauche-gauche orientation. A substantial change in the interactions between a tyrosine aromatic ring and neighboring residues was apparently the alteration caused by the heat treatment.

  3. A membrane basis for bacterial identification and discrimination using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.; Jeyasingham, Narmatha; Diedrich, Jonathan; Palchaudhuri, Sunil

    2009-05-01

    Nanosecond single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to discriminate between two different genera of Gram-negative bacteria and between several strains of the Escherichia coli bacterium based on the relative concentration of trace inorganic elements in the bacteria. Of particular importance in all such studies to date has been the role of divalent cations, specifically Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are present in the membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and act to aggregate the highly polar lipopolysaccharide molecules. We have demonstrated that the source of emission from Ca and Mg atoms observed in LIBS plasmas from bacteria is at least partially located at the outer membrane by intentionally altering membrane biochemistry and correlating these changes with the observed changes in the LIBS spectra. The definitive assignment of some fraction of the LIBS emission to the outer membrane composition establishes a potential serological, or surface-antigen, basis for the laser-based identification. E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in three nutrient media: trypticase soy agar as a control, a MacConkey agar with a 0.01% concentration of bile salts including sodium deoxycholate, and a trypticase soy agar with a 0.4% deoxycholate concentration. The higher concentration of deoxycholate is known to disrupt bacterial outer membrane integrity and was expected to induce changes in the observed LIBS spectra. Altered LIBS emission was observed for bacteria cultured in this 0.4% medium and laser ablated in an all-argon environment. These spectra evidenced a reduced calcium emission and in the case of one species, a reduced magnesium emission. Culturing on the lower (0.01%) concentration of bile salts altered the LIBS spectra for both the P. aeruginosa and two strains of E. coli in a highly reproducible way, although not nearly as significantly as culturing in the higher concentration of deoxycholate did. This was possibly due to the accumulation

  4. Improving the Selectivity of the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source and In-Source Laser Spectroscopy of Polonium

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Daniel Andreas; Jochim, Selim

    Exotic atomic nuclei far away from stability are fascinating objects to be studied in many scientic elds such as atomic-, nuclear-, and astrophysics. Since these are often short-lived isotopes, it is necessary to couple their production with immediate extraction and delivery to an experiment. This is the purpose of the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, at CERN. An essential aspect of this laboratory is the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) because it provides a fast and highly selective means of ionizing the reaction products. This technique is also a sensitive laser-spectroscopy tool for the development and improvement of electron excitation schemes for the resonant laser photoionization and the study of the nuclear structure or fundamental atomic physics. Each of these aspects of the RILIS applications are subjects of this thesis work: a new device for the suppression of unwanted surface ionized contaminants in RILIS ion beams, known as the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST), was impleme...

  5. Scale dependency of forest functional diversity assessed using imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. D.; Morsdorf, F.; Schmid, B.; Petchey, O. L.; Hueni, A.; Schimel, D.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Forest functional traits offer a mechanistic link between ecological processes and community structure and assembly rules. However, measuring functional traits of forests in a continuous and consistent way is particularly difficult due to the complexity of in-situ measurements and geo-referencing. New imaging spectroscopy measurements overcome these limitations allowing to map physiological traits on broad spatial scales. We mapped leaf chlorophyll, carotenoids and leaf water content over 900 ha of temperate mixed forest (Fig. 1a). The selected traits are functionally important because they are indicating the photosynthetic potential of trees, leaf longevity and protection, as well as tree water and drought stress. Spatially continuous measurements on the scale of individual tree crowns allowed to assess functional diversity patterns on a range of ecological extents. We used indexes of functional richness, divergence and evenness to map different aspects of diversity. Fig. 1b shows an example of physiological richness at an extent of 240 m radius. We compared physiological to morphological diversity patterns, derived based on plant area index, canopy height and foliage height diversity. Our results show that patterns of physiological and morphological diversity generally agree, independently measured by airborne imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning, respectively. The occurrence of disturbance areas and mixtures of broadleaf and needle trees were the main drivers of the observed diversity patterns. Spatial patterns at varying extents and richness-area relationships indicated that environmental filtering is the predominant community assembly process. Our results demonstrate the potential for mapping physiological and morphological diversity in a temperate mixed forest between and within species on scales relevant to study community assembly and structure from space and test the corresponding measurement schemes.

  6. Application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy on Breast Cancer Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alfattah, A.; Eldakrouri, A. A.; Emam, H.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide, millions of breast cancer cases appear each year. It ranked as the first malignant tumors in Egypt. Breast cancer patients are at increased risk of developing malignant melanoma and cancers of the ovary, endometrium, colon, thyroid, and salivary glands because of similar hormonal and genetic factors. Therefore, early diagnosis by a quick and accurate method may have a great affect on healing. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using LIPS as a simple, technique to diagnose breast cancer by measuring the concentration of trace elements in breast tissues. The accuracy of LIPS measurements was confirmed by carrying out another elemental analysis via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The results obtained via these two techniques showed that the concentration of Ca, Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn in the malignant tissue cells are significantly enhanced. A voting algorithm was built for instantaneous decision of the diagnostic technique (normal or malignant). This study instigates developing a new diagnostic tool with potential use in vivo.

  7. In-source laser spectroscopy of mercury isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    This proposal follows on from the Letter of Intent, I-153. The neutron-deficient mercury isotopes are one of the prime examples of shape coexistence anywhere in the nuclear chart. Wide-ranging and complementary experimental and theoretical approaches have been used to investigate their structure over the last few years, however mean-square charge radii are unknown for isotopes with $\\textit{A}$ < 181. It is proposed to measure the isotope shift (IS) and hyperfine structure (HFS) of the 253-nm transition in $^{177-182}$Hg in an attempt to study the propagation of the famous odd-even staggering behaviour. At the other end of the chain, no information exists on the optical spectroscopy of Hg isotopes beyond the $\\textit{N}$ = 126 shell closure. There is a well-known "kink" in mean-square charge radii beyond this point in the even $\\textit{Z}$ $\\geq$ 82 elements. It is proposed to measure the IS of $^{207,208}$Hg in order to provide the first information on this effect below $\\textit{Z}$ = 82.

  8. High-temperature laser induced spectroscopy in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmon, W.E.; Berthold, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for conducting optical spectroscopy in a hostile environment. It comprises: a source of high intensity light; an optical fiber connected to the source of high intensity light for transmitting light therefrom. The optical fiber having an end for discharging light onto a material to be spectroscopically analyzed; a sheath defining a space around at least a part of the optical fiber carrying the end of the optical fiber for shielding the optical fiber from the hostile environment; a window in the sheath for closing the space and for passing light transmitted through the end of the optical fiber out of the sheath; light detector means for detecting and spectroscopically analyzing emitted light from the material; an optical fiber means for transmitting the emitted light from the material to the light detector means; a standardization module for containing a sample having a known composition and being exposed to known temperature and pressure conditions; an additional optical fiber connected to the module for transmitting light to the sample in the module; multiplexer means; and additional optical fiber means for returning light from the module to the detector through the multiplexer means

  9. Multivariate classification of echellograms: a new perspective in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pořízka, Pavel; Klus, Jakub; Mašek, Jan; Rajnoha, Martin; Prochazka, David; Modlitbová, Pavlína; Novotný, Jan; Burget, Radim; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we proposed a new data acquisition approach that significantly improves the repetition rates of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiments, where high-end echelle spectrometers and intensified detectors are commonly used. The moderate repetition rates of recent LIBS systems are caused by the utilization of intensified detectors and their slow full frame (i.e. echellogram) readout speeds with consequent necessity for echellogram-to-1D spectrum conversion (intensity v...

  10. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Čada, Martin; Kment, Š.; Hubička, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 14 (2013), s. 2428-2430 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12045; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA MŠk LD12002; GA MŠk LH12043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode lasers * plasma diagnostics * absorption spectroscopy * time resolved Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  11. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  12. Laser spectroscopy of tin and cadmium: across N=82 and closing in on N=50

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the isotopes of tin starting in proximity of N = 50 up to and beyond N = 82, as well as the "magic-plus-one" nuclei of cadmium at both shell closures. The objective is to determine model-independent properties of ground and isomeric states by high-resolution laser spectroscopy, which are essential for understanding the structure of nuclei and their astrophysical importance in this region of the nuclear chart.

  13. On-line laser spectroscopy of the very neutron deficient thallium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.A.; Benck, E.C.; Buchinger, F.

    1993-01-01

    Collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy has been carried out for the 186-192 Tl isotopes produced by the heavy ion fusion evaporation reaction 181 Ta( 16 O, xn) 197-x Tl. The nuclear moments as well as the changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii were evaluated from the observed hyperfine structure splitting, the isomer and isotope shifts. The data will be interpreted in the droplet, Structinski, and particle plus rotor models

  14. Shell structure and level migrations in zinc studied using collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Tungate, G; De rydt, M A E; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Hammen, M; Blaum, K; Froemmgen, N E; Kowalska, M; Campbell, P; Neugart, R; Kreim, K D; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R; Procter, T J

    We propose to perform collinear laser spectroscopy of zinc isotopes to measure the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment, electric quadrupole moment and mean-square charge radius. The yield database indicates that measurements of the isotopes $^{60-81}$Zn will be feasible. These measurements will cross the N = 50 shell closure and provide nuclear moments in a region where an inversion of ground-state spin has been identified in neighbouring chains.

  15. Quasi zero-background tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy employing a balanced Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zuguang; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2008-12-22

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) normally observes small fractional absorptive reductions in the light flux. We show, that instead a signal increase on a zero background can be obtained. A Michelson interferometer, which is initially balanced out in destructive interference, is perturbed by gas absorption in one of its arms. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration show that the proposed zero-background TDLS can improve the achievable signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Wakui, Takashi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki; Mitsuya, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki; Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki; Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the 85 Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a 85 Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the 85 Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei

  17. Thermodynamics and speciation: Carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Klenze, R.; Meinrath, G.; Wimmer, H.

    1989-12-01

    The report includes the carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies. Part A describes the carbonate complexation behaviour of Am 3+ in aqueous solution under 1% CO 2 partial pressure, investigated by solubility and spectroscopic experiments. The average constants determined by the two methods are: log K sp (Am 2 (CO 3 ) 3 )=-29.7 ± 0.6, log β 1 =6.3 ± 0.3 and log β 2 = 9.7 ± 0.6. Part B presents speciation capabilities of three different pulsed laser spectroscopies: laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS), time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and photoacoustic detection of light scattering (PALS). Examples for the speciation of Am(III) and Cm(III) in different aquatic media are presented. (orig.)

  18. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the {sup 85}Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a {sup 85}Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the {sup 85}Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei.

  19. A comparison of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the discrimination of automotive glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naes, Benjamin E.; Umpierrez, Sayuri; Ryland, Scott; Barnett, Cleon; Almirall, Jose R.

    2008-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF), and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are compared in terms of discrimination power for a glass sample set consisting of 41 fragments. Excellent discrimination results (> 99% discrimination) were obtained for each of the methods. In addition, all three analytical methods produced very similar discrimination results in terms of the number of pairs found to be indistinguishable. The small number of indistinguishable pairs that were identified all originated from the same vehicle. The results also show a strong correlation between the data generated from the use of μXRF and LA-ICP-MS, when comparing μXRF strontium intensities to LA-ICP-MS strontium concentrations. A 266 nm laser was utilized for all LIBS analyses, which provided excellent precision (< 10% RSD for all elements and < 10% RSD for all ratios, N = 5). The paper also presents a thorough data analysis review for forensic glass examinations by LIBS and suggests several element ratios that provide accurate discrimination results related to the LIBS system used for this study. Different combinations of 10 ratios were used for discrimination, all of which assisted with eliminating Type I errors (false exclusions) and reducing Type II errors (false inclusions). The results demonstrate that the LIBS experimental setup described, when combined with a comprehensive data analysis protocol, provides comparable discrimination when compared to LA-ICP-MS and μXRF for the application of forensic glass examinations. Given the many advantages that LIBS offers, most notably reduced complexity and reduced cost of the instrumentation, LIBS is a viable alternative to LA-ICP-MS and μXRF for use in the forensic laboratory

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on laser-engineered ruthenium dye-functionalized nanoporous gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lina [Department of Chemistry, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Franzka, Steffen [Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Analytics on the Nanoscale (ICAN), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47047 Duisburg (Germany); Biener, Monika; Biener, Jürgen [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hartmann, Nils, E-mail: nils.hartmann@uni-due.de [Department of Chemistry, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Analytics on the Nanoscale (ICAN), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47047 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photothermal laser processing is used to modify the surface structure of nanoporous gold. • Laser-fabricated structures exhibit pore sizes in the range from 25 nm to 200 nm and higher. • Ru-dye-functionalized surface structures are used in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies. • Raman peak intensities of N719, a commercial Ru-dye, exhibit a strong dependence on the pore size. • Maximum Raman peak intensities are observed for small pore sizes close to 25 nm. - Abstract: Photothermal processing of nanoporous gold with a microfocused continuous-wave laser at λ = 532 nm provides a facile means in order engineer the pore and ligament size of nanoporous gold. In this report we take advantage of this approach in order to investigate the size-dependence of enhancement effects in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Surface structures with laterally varying pore sizes from 25 nm to ≥200 nm are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and then functionalized with N719, a commercial ruthenium complex, which is widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Raman spectroscopy reveals the characteristic spectral features of N719. Peak intensities strongly depend on the pore size. Highest intensities are observed on the native support, i.e. on nanoporous gold with pore sizes around 25 nm. These results demonstrate the particular perspectives of laser-fabricated nanoporous gold structures in fundamental SERS studies. In particular, it is emphasized that laser-engineered porous gold substrates represent a very well defined platform in order to study size-dependent effects with high reproducibility and precision and resolve conflicting results in previous studies.

  1. Laser-based agriculture system

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-03-31

    A system and method are provided for indoor agriculture using at least one growth chamber illuminated by laser light. In an example embodiment of the agriculture system, a growth chamber is provided having one or more walls defining an interior portion of the growth chamber. The agriculture system may include a removable tray disposed within the interior portion of the growth chamber. The agriculture system also includes a light source, which may be disposed outside the growth chamber. The one or more walls may include at least one aperture. The light source is configured to illuminate at least a part of the interior portion of the growth chamber. In embodiments in which the light source is disposed outside the growth chamber, the light source is configured to transmit the laser light to the interior portion of the growth chamber via the at least one aperture.

  2. Sizes and shapes of short-lived nuclei via laser spectroscopy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.A.

    1985-10-01

    This project, a collaboration involving Iowa State University, Argonne National Lab., and the University of Minnesota, was aimed at the determination of properties of short-lived nuclei through their atomic hyperfine structure and optical isotope shifts. The basic approach was to use a cryogenic He-jet system to thermalize, neutralize, and transport radioactive nuclei produced online into a region suitable for laser spectroscopy. The photon burst method was then used for high sensitivity with the resulting continuous atomic beam. The experiment was located on beamline of the ANL superconducting heavy-ion accelerator. The He-jet system developed would reliably transport approx.10 2 nuclei into phase space useful for high resolution laser spectroscopy. The laser system developed could accurately and reproducibly sweep small frequency ranges for periods greater than or equal to1 day and sensitivity limits less than or equal to1 atom/s were achieved. However the nuclei were not transported as free atoms precluding nuclear determinations. Attempts to obtain free atoms by eliminating turbulence and contamination were not successful. Some of the high sensitivity spectroscopy techniques developed in this work are now being applied in a search for nuclear relics of the Big Bang and in studies of the photon statistics of light scattered by a single atom. 3 refs., 4 figs

  3. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  4. Elemental chemical analysis of submerged targets by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giacomo, A; Dell'Aglio, M; Casavola, A; Colonna, G; De Pascale, O; Capitelli, M

    2006-05-01

    Double-pulse laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (DP-LIPS) is applied to submerged targets to investigate its feasibility for elemental analysis. The role of experimental parameters, such as inter-pulse delay and detection time, has been discussed in terms of the dynamics of the laser-induced bubble produced by the first pulse and its confinement effect on the plasma produced by the second laser pulse. The analytical performance of this technique applied to targets in a water environment are discussed. The elemental analysis of submerged copper alloys by DP-LIPS has been compared with conventional (single-pulse) LIBS in air. Theoretical investigation of the plasma dynamics in water bubbles and open air has been performed.

  5. Resonance-enhanced laser-induced plasma spectroscopy: ambient gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, S.L.; Cheung, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    When performing laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for elemental analysis, the sensitivity could be significantly enhanced if the plume was resonantly rekindled by a dye laser pulse. The extent of the enhancement was found to depend on the ambient gas. Air, nitrogen, helium, argon and xenon at pressures ranging from vacuum to 1 bar were investigated. In vacuum, the analyte signal was boosted because of reduced cooling, but it soon decayed as the plume freely expanded. By choosing the right ambient gas at the right pressure, the expanding plume could be confined as well as thermally insulated to maximize the analyte signal. For instance, an ambient of 13 mbar xenon yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 110. That ratio was 53 when the pellet was ablated in air, and decreased further to 5 if the dye laser was tuned off resonance

  6. Raman spectroscopy of carbon nano-particles synthesized by laser ablation of graphite in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, J. F.; Cadenbach, T.; Costa V, C.; Paz, J. L. [Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Apdo. 17-12-866, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, EC 170109, Quito (Ecuador); Zhang, Z. B.; Zhang, S. L. [Institutionen for teknikvetenskaper, Fasta tillstandets elektronik, Angstromlaboratoriet, Lagerhyddsvagen, 1 Box 534, 751-21 Uppsala (Sweden); Debut, A.; Vaca, A. V., E-mail: cardenas9291@gmail.com [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Sangolqui (Ecuador)

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been synthesized by laser ablation of polycrystalline graphite in water using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with a width of 8 ns. Structural and mesoscopic characterization of the CNPs in the supernatant by Raman spectroscopy provide evidence for the presence of mainly two ranges of particle sizes: 1-5 nm and 10-50 nm corresponding to amorphous carbon and graphite Nps, respectively. These results are corroborated by complementary characterization using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (Tem). In addition, large (10-100 μm) graphite particles removed from the surface are essentially unmodified (in structure and topology) by the laser as confirmed by Raman analysis. (Author)

  7. Characteristics of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) constitutes an effective method to transport small amounts of different materials in the form of a solid aerosol. In this report, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the analysis of those aerosols produced by OC. For this purpose, materials were catapulted using a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. A second Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was used for LIBS analysis of the ejected particles. Data processing of aerosols was conducted using conditional data analysis. Also, the standard deviation method was used for the qualitative identification of the ejected particles. Two modes of interaction in OC (OC with focused or defocused pulses) have been evaluated and discussed. LIBS demonstrates that the distribution (spreading) of the ejected particles along the propagation axis increased as a function of the interpulse delay time. The mass density and the thickness of the target also play an important role in OC-LIBS.

  8. Characterization of organic photovoltaic devices using femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S. P.; Sarnet, Thierry; Siozos, Panayiotis; Loulakis, Michalis; Anglos, Demetrios; Sentis, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a non-contact probe, for characterizing organic photovoltaic devices during selective laser scribing, was investigated. Samples from organic solar cells were studied, which consisted of several layers of materials including a top electrode (Al, Mg or Mo), organic layer, bottom electrode (indium tin oxide), silicon nitride barrier layer and substrate layer situated from the top consecutively. The thickness of individual layers varies from 115 to 250 nm. LIBS measurements were performed by use of a 40 femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser operated at very low pulse energy (lines reflecting key elemental constituents of each layer in the organic solar cell structure, demonstrating the potential of LIBS for fast, non-contact characterization of organic photovoltaic coatings.

  9. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low

  10. Discrimination between authentic and false tax stamps from liquor bottles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-07-01

    This work describes the preliminary application of a compact and low-cost laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for falsification detection of tax stamps used in alcoholic beverages. The new instrument was based on a diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YLF microchip laser and a mini-spectrometer containing a Czerny-Turner polichromator coupled to a non-intensified, non-gated, and non-cooled 2048 pixel linear sensor array (200 to 850 nm spectral range). Twenty-three tax stamp samples were analyzed by firing laser pulses within two different regions of each sample: a hologram and a blank paper region. For each acquired spectrum, the emitted radiation was integrated for 3000 ms under the continuous application of laser pulses at 100 Hz (integration of 300 plasmas). Principal component analysis (PCA) or hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of all emission spectra from the hologram or blank paper region revealed two well-defined groups of authentic and false samples. Moreover, for the hologram data, three subgroups of false samples were found. Additionally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was successfully applied for the detection of the false tax stamps using all emission spectra from hologram or blank paper region. The discrimination between the samples was mostly ascribed to different levels of calcium concentration in the samples.

  11. Energetic materials identification by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Amir Hossein; Tehrani, Masoud Kavosh; Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Darbani, Seyyed Mohammad Reza

    2017-04-20

    In this study, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a combination of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis has been implemented for the identification of energetic materials, including TNT, RDX, black powder, and propellant. Also, aluminum, copper, inconel, and graphite have been used for more accurate investigation and comparison. After the LIBS test and spectrum acquisition on all samples in both air and argon ambient, optimized neural networks were designed by LIBS data. Based on input data, three ANN algorithms are proposed: the first is fed with the whole LIBS spectra in air (ANN1) and the second with the principle component analysis (PCA) scores of each spectrum in air (ANN2) and the other with the PCA scores of the spectrum in Ar (ANN3). According to the results, error of the network is very low in ANN2 and 3 and the best identification and discrimination was obtained by ANN3. After these, in order to validate and for more investigation of this combined method, we also used Al/RDX standard samples for analysis.

  12. Determination of the postmortem interval by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy using swine skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marín-Roldan, A.; Manzoor, S.; Moncayo, S.; Navarro-Villoslada, F.; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R.C.; Caceres, J.O.

    2013-01-01

    Skin and muscle samples are useful to discriminate individuals as well as their postmortem interval (PMI) in crime scenes and natural or caused disasters. In this study, a simple and fast method based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed to estimate PMI using swine skeletal muscle samples. Environmental conditions (moisture, temperature, fauna, etc.) having strong influence on the PMI determination were considered. Time-dependent changes in the emission intensity ratio for Mg, Na, Hα and K were observed, as a result of the variations in their concentration due to chemical reactions in tissues and were correlated with PMI. This relationship, which has not been reported previously in the forensic literature, offers a simple and potentially valuable means of estimating the PMI. - Highlights: • LIBS has been applied for Postmortem Interval estimation. • Environmental and sample storage conditions have been considered. • Significant correlation of elemental emission intensity with PMI has been observed. • Pig skeletal muscle samples have been used

  13. High-Resolution Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy used in Homeland Security and Forensic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Martin, Rodger Carl [ORNL; Grissino-Mayer, Henri [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to detect elements for a variety of homeland security applications such as nuclear materials identification and inventory,and forensic applications has been demonstrated. For nuclear materials applications, we detected and profiled metals in coatings that were used to encapsulate nuclear fuel. Multivariate analysis has been successfully employed in the quantification of elements present in treated wood and engineered wood composites. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications related to homeland security. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) are sufficient; (2) samples can be analyzed by LIBS very rapidly, and (3) biological materials such as human and animal bones and wood can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation. For forensic applications they have used LIBS to determine differences in animal and human bones. They have also applied this technique in the determination of counterfeit and non-counterfeit currency. They recently applied LIBS in helping to solve a murder case.

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Coupled with Multivariate Chemometrics for Variety Discrimination of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Qiang; Zhao, Yan-Ru; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the variety of soil by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with chemometrics methods. 6 certified reference materials (CRMs) of soil samples were selected and their LIBS spectra were captured. Characteristic emission lines of main elements were identified based on the LIBS curves and corresponding contents. From the identified emission lines, LIBS spectra in 7 lines with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were chosen for further analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out using the LIBS spectra at 7 selected lines and an obvious cluster of 6 soils was observed. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) were introduced to establish discriminant models for classifying the 6 types of soils, and they offered the correct discrimination rates of 90% and 100%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the performance of models and the results demonstrated that the LS-SVM model was promising. Lastly, 8 types of soils from different places were gathered to conduct the same experiments for verifying the selected 7 emission lines and LS-SVM model. The research revealed that LIBS technology coupled with chemometrics could conduct the variety discrimination of soil.

  15. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Coupled with Multivariate Chemometrics for Variety Discrimination of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Qiang; Zhao, Yan-Ru; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the variety of soil by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with chemometrics methods. 6 certified reference materials (CRMs) of soil samples were selected and their LIBS spectra were captured. Characteristic emission lines of main elements were identified based on the LIBS curves and corresponding contents. From the identified emission lines, LIBS spectra in 7 lines with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were chosen for further analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out using the LIBS spectra at 7 selected lines and an obvious cluster of 6 soils was observed. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) were introduced to establish discriminant models for classifying the 6 types of soils, and they offered the correct discrimination rates of 90% and 100%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the performance of models and the results demonstrated that the LS-SVM model was promising. Lastly, 8 types of soils from different places were gathered to conduct the same experiments for verifying the selected 7 emission lines and LS-SVM model. The research revealed that LIBS technology coupled with chemometrics could conduct the variety discrimination of soil. PMID:27279284

  16. High resolution applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for environmental and forensic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Andre, Nicolas; Harris, Ronny; Ebinger, Michael; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Vass, Arpad A.

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a 'universal calibration curve'. In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants

  17. Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: State of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoni, E.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is offering a critical review of Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (CF-LIBS), the approach of multi-elemental quantitative analysis of LIBS spectra, based on the measurement of line intensities and plasma properties (plasma electron density and temperature) and on the assumption of a Boltzmann population of excited levels, which does not require the use of calibration curves or matrix-matched standards. The first part of this review focuses on the applications of the CF-LIBS method. Quantitative results reported in the literature, obtained in the analysis of various materials and in a wide range of experimental conditions, are summarized, with a special emphasis on the departure from nominal composition values. The second part is a discussion of the simplifying assumptions which lie at the basis of the CF-LIBS algorithm (stoichiometric ablation and complete atomization, thermal equilibrium, homogeneous plasma, thin radiation, detection of all elements). The inspection of the literature suggests that the CF-LIBS method is more accurate in analyzing metallic alloys rather than dielectrics. However, the full exploitation of the method seems to be still far to come, especially for the lack of a complete characterization of the effects of experimental constraints. However, some general directions can be suggested to help the analyst in designing LIBS measurements in a way which is more suited for CF-LIBS analysis.

  18. A study of association between fingernail elements and osteoporosis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Maryam; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Hassan Tavassoli, Seyed

    2012-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to investigate the possible effect of osteoporosis on the elemental composition of fingernails. Also, the ability to classify healthy, osteopenic, and osteoporotic subjects based on their fingernail spectra has been examined. 46 atomic and ionic emission lines belonging to 13 elements, which are dominated by calcium and magnesium, have been identified. Measurements are carried out on fingernail clippings of 99 subjects including 27 healthy, 47 osteopenic, and 25 osteoporotic subjects. The Pearson correlations between spectral intensities of different elements of fingernail and age and bone mineral densities (BMDs) in nail samples are calculated. Correlations between line intensities of some elements such as sodium and potassium, calcium and iron, magnesium and silicon and also between some fingernail elements, BMD, and age are observed. Although some of these correlations are weak, some information about mineral metabolism can be deduced from them. Discrimination between nail samples of healthy, osteopenic, and osteoporotic subjects is shown to be somehow possible by a discriminant function analysis using 46 atomic emission lines of the LIBS spectra as input variables. The results of this study provide some evidences for association between osteoporosis and elemental composition of fingernails measured by LIBS.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of minerals: Carbonates and silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Nancy J.; Harmon, Russell S.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Miziolek, Andrzej M.

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides an alternative chemical analytical technique that obviates the issues of sample preparation and sample destruction common to most laboratory-based analytical methods. This contribution explores the capability of LIBS analysis to identify carbonate and silicate minerals rapidly and accurately. Fifty-two mineral samples (18 carbonates, 9 pyroxenes and pyroxenoids, 6 amphiboles, 8 phyllosilicates, and 11 feldspars) were analyzed by LIBS. Two composite broadband spectra (averages of 10 shots each) were calculated for each sample to produce two databases each containing the composite LIBS spectra for the same 52 mineral samples. By using correlation coefficients resulting from the regression of the intensities of pairs of LIBS spectra, all 52 minerals were correctly identified in the database. If the LIBS spectra of each sample were compared to a database containing the other 51 minerals, 65% were identified as a mineral of similar composition from the same mineral family. The remaining minerals were misidentified for two reasons: 1) the mineral had high concentrations of an element not present in the database; and 2) the mineral was identified as a mineral with similar elemental composition from a different family. For instance, the Ca-Mg carbonate dolomite was misidentified as the Ca-Mg silicate diopside. This pilot study suggests that LIBS has promise in mineral identification and in situ analysis of minerals that record geological processes

  20. Geometrical effects in data collection and processing for calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2018-01-01

    Data processing in the calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is usually based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation along a particular line of sight through a plasma plume. The LIBS data processing is generalized to the case when the spectral data are collected from large portions of the plume. It is shown that by adjusting the optical depth and width of the lines the spectra obtained by collecting light from an entire spherical homogeneous plasma plume can be least-square fitted to a spectrum obtained by collecting the radiation just along a plume diameter with a relative error of 10-11 or smaller (for the optical depth not exceeding 0.3) so that a mismatch of geometries of data processing and data collection cannot be detected by fitting. Despite the existence of such a perfect least-square fit, the errors in the line optical depth and width found by a data processing with an inappropriate geometry can be large. It is shown with analytic and numerical examples that the corresponding relative errors in the found elemental number densities and concentrations may be as high as 50% and 20%, respectively. Safe for a few found exceptions, these errors are impossible to eliminate from LIBS data processing unless a proper solution of the radiative transfer equation corresponding to the ray tracing in the spectral data collection is used.

  1. Studies of Basalt Through Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS for the Manufacturing of Lapilli Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael De la Viuda-Pérez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Basaltic samples selected from different areas of Tenerife were analyzed by applying laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, Raman spectroscopy and X Ray Diffraction (XRD in order to identify the basic chemical composition and mineralogy. The basic composition obtained from the analysis was: O, F, Na, K, Mg, Al Si, Ca, Ti and Fe. Raman spectroscopic and XRD analyses indicated a basaltic mineralogy which is consistent with the basic composition results obtained from LIBS. The results of the analyses carried out using portable instrumentation proved the suitability of the LIBS, specially combined with the Raman spectroscopy for their application in the mineralogical-chemical identification in the areas where basalts and lapilli are extracted for construction works in Tenerife.

  2. Multivariate classification of edible salts: Simultaneous Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Nam, Sang-Ho; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Oropeza, Dayana; Quarles, Derrick; Yoo, Jonghyun; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), both based on laser ablation sampling, can be employed simultaneously to obtain different chemical fingerprints from a sample. We demonstrated that this analysis approach can provide complementary information for improved classification of edible salts. LIBS could detect several of the minor metallic elements along with Na and Cl, while LA-ICP-MS spectra were used to measure non-metallic and trace heavy metal elements. Principal component analysis using LIBS and LA-ICP-MS spectra showed that their major spectral variations classified the sample salts in different ways. Three classification models were developed by using partial least squares-discriminant analysis based on the LIBS, LA-ICP-MS, and their fused data. From the cross-validation performances and confusion matrices of these models, the minor metallic elements (Mg, Ca, and K) detected by LIBS and the non-metallic (I) and trace heavy metal (Ba, W, and Pb) elements detected by LA-ICP-MS provided complementary chemical information to distinguish particular salt samples.

  3. Frequency Modulation Multiplexing for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Gases by use of Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Diode Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Daniel B.; Paige, Mark E.; Bomse, David S.

    1998-04-01

    Modulation frequency multiplexing provides a straightforward method, analogous to television or radio broadcasting, for performing simultaneous detection of multiple gases by use of wavelength modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers. When fiber-optic coupled lasers are used, our approach guarantees that all beams transit the same optical path and impinge on the same detector. Each laser is modulated at a different frequency and the detector output is processed by a set of lock-in amplifiers, one for each laser, to measure the absorbance encountered by each laser.

  4. Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, Vasily N; Pershin, Sergey M; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Fedorov, Alexander N; Bukin, Vladimir V; Oshurko, Vadim B; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N

    2018-01-01

    A new approach combining Raman spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) within a single laser event was suggested. A pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser running in double pulse mode (two frequency-doubled sequential nanosecond laser pulses with dozens microseconds delay) was used to combine two spectrometry methods within a single instrument (Raman/LIBS spectrometer). First, a low-energy laser pulse (power density far below ablation threshold) was used for Raman measurements while a second powerful laser pulse created the plasma suitable for LIBS analysis. A short time delay between two successive pulses allows measuring LIBS and Raman spectra at different moments but within a single laser flash-lamp pumping. Principal advantages of the developed instrument include high quality Raman/LIBS spectra acquisition (due to optimal gating for Raman/LIBS independently) and absence of target thermal alteration during Raman measurements. A series of high quality Raman and LIBS spectra were acquired for inorganic salts (gypsum, anhydrite) as well as for pharmaceutical samples (acetylsalicylic acid). To the best of our knowledge, the quantitative analysis feasibility by combined Raman/LIBS instrument was demonstrated for the first time by calibration curves construction for acetylsalicylic acid (Raman) and copper (LIBS) in gypsum matrix. Combining ablation pulses and Raman measurements (LIBS/Raman measurements) within a single instrument makes it an efficient tool for identification of samples hidden by non-transparent covering or performing depth profiling analysis including remote sensing. Graphical abstract Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

  5. Wavelength dependence of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on questioned document investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsherbiny, Nany; Aied Nassef, O

    2015-07-01

    The fast and nearly non-destructive criteria of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been exploited for forensic purposes, specifically, document investigation. The dependence of the optical emission spectra of different black gel ink samples on the excitation laser wavelength, namely the visible wavelength at λ=532 nm and the IR wavelength at λ=1064 nm, was studied. The inks of thirty black gel-ink pens comprising ten brands were analyzed to determine the variation of the chemical composition of ink and to discriminate among them with minimum mass removal and minimum damage to the document's paper. Under the adopted experimental conditions, the ability of the visible LIBS to differentiate among the different ink samples was successful compared to IR LIBS at the same laser pulse energy (~25 mJ/pulse, laser fluence is ~1400J·cm(-2) for visible laser and ~1100J·cm(-2) for IR laser) which could be attributed to the IR absorption effects by the black ink. However, the visible LIBS produces deeper crater with respect to that produced by IR LIBS. Applying IR LIBS with higher pulse energy of ~87mJ (laser fluence is ~4100J·cm(-2)), identification and differentiation of the adopted samples was performed with producing a larger-diameter but superficial crater. The plasma parameters are discussed at the adopted experimental conditions. The results support the potential of LIBS technique using both the visible and IR lasers to be commercially developed for forensic document examination. Copyright © 2015 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative Potassium Measurements with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Low-Energy Lasers: Application to In Situ K-Ar Geochronology for Planetary Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Horiuchi, Misa; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Kameda, Shingo; Sugita, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    In situ radiogenic isotope measurements to obtain the absolute age of geologic events on planets are of great scientific value. In particular, K-Ar isochrons are useful because of their relatively high technical readiness and high accuracy. Because this isochron method involves spot-by-spot K measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and simultaneous Ar measurements with mass spectrometry, LIBS measurements are conducted under a high vacuum condition in which emission intensity decreases significantly. Furthermore, using a laser power used in previous planetary missions is preferable to examine the technical feasibility of this approach. However, there have been few LIBS measurements for K under such conditions. In this study, we measured K contents in rock samples using 30 mJ and 15 mJ energy lasers under a vacuum condition (10 -3  Pa) to assess the feasibility of in situ K-Ar dating with lasers comparable to those used in NASA's Curiosity and Mars 2020 missions. We obtained various calibration curves for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and continuum emission from the laser-induced plasma. Experimental results indicate that when K 2 O K emission line at 769 nm normalized with that of the oxygen line yields the best results for the 30 mJ laser energy, with a detection limit of 88 ppm and 20% of error at 2400 ppm of K 2 O. Futhermore, the calibration curve based on the K 769 nm line intensity normalized with continuum emission yielded the best result for the 15 mJ laser, giving a detection limit of 140 ppm and 20% error at 3400 ppm K 2 O. Error assessments using obtained calibration models indicate that a 4 Ga rock with 3000 ppm K 2 O would be measured with 8% (30 mJ) and 10% (15 mJ) of precision in age when combined with mass spectrometry of 40 Ar with 10% of uncertainty. These results strongly suggest that high precision in situ isochron K-Ar dating is feasible with a laser used in

  7. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  8. Thermal damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM BN Masina1, BW Mwakikunga2, M Elayaperumal2, A Forbes1, and R Bodkin3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2CSIR...

  9. IGZO TFT-based circuit with tunable threshold voltage by laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Yu, Guang; Wu, Chenfei

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a high-performance inverter based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) has been fabricated, which consists of a driver TFT and a load TFT. The threshold voltage (Vth) of the load TFT can be tuned by applying an area-selective laser annealing. The transfer curve of the load TFT shows a parallel shift into the negative bias direction upon laser annealing. Based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, the negative Vth shift can be attributed to the increase of oxygen vacancy concentration within the device channel upon laser irradiation. Compared to the untreated inverter, the laser annealed inverter shows much improved switching characteristics, including a large output swing range which is close to full swing, as well as an enhanced output voltage gain. Furthermore, the dynamic performance of ring oscillator based on the laser-annealed inverter is improved.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with multi-kHz fibre laser for mobile metal analysis tasks — A comparison of different analysis methods and with a mobile spark-discharge optical emission spectroscopy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharun, Michael; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The identification and separation of different alloys are a permanent task of crucial importance in the metal recycling industry. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers important advantages in comparison to the state-of-the-art techniques for this application. For LIBS measurement no additional sample preparation is necessary. The overall analysis time is much smaller than for the state-of-the-art techniques. The LIBS setup presented in this study enables mobile operation with a handheld probe for the analysis of metallic materials. Excitation source is a fibre laser with a repetition rate of 30 kHz and a pulse energy of 1.33 mJ. The compact optical setup allows measurements at almost every point of a sample within 5 ms. The generated plasma light is analysed using a Multi-CCD spectrometer. The broad spectral coverage and high resolution provide an outstanding amount of spectroscopic information thereby enabling a variety of calibration approaches. Using a set of Al-based and a set of Fe-based samples the analytical performance of uni- and multivariate calibrations is evaluated. The same sample sets are analysed with a commercial state-of-the-art spark-discharge optical emission spectrometer allowing an assessment of the achieved results. Even though the possible analytical correctness of the fibre laser based LIBS measurements is found to similar or even better than that of the conventional technique, advantages of the multivariate data evaluation have not yet been realised in the investigations. However, due to the in situ sample preparation and short measurement times, fibre-laser based LIBS offers superior features. - Highlights: • Mobile, hand-guided LIBS apparatus for metal analysis, even for steel • Comparable results as state-of-the-art SD-OES instrument • New sectioned calibration function resulting in smaller deviations • Comparison of univariate and multivariate analysis methods

  11. Study of atmospheric air AC glow discharge using optical emission spectroscopy and near infrared diode laser cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Wang, Chuji; Dibble, Theodore S.

    2008-11-01

    AC glow discharges were generated in atmospheric pressure by applying high voltage AC in the range of 3500-15000 V to a pair of stainless steel electrodes separated by an air gap. The discharges were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The electronic (Tex), vibrational (Tv), and rotational (Tr) temperatures were measured. Spectral stimulations of the emission spectra of several vibronic bands of the 2^nd positive system of N2, the 1^st negative system of N2^+, the (0,1,2,3-0) bands of NO (A-X), and the (0-0) band of OH (A-X), which were obtained under various plasma operating conditions, show that Tr, Tv, and Tex are in the ranges of 2000 - 3800, 3500 - 5000, and 6000 - 10500^ K, respectively. Emission spectra show that OH concentration increases while NO concentration decreases with an increase of electrode spacing. The absorption spectra of H2O and OH overtone in the near infrared (NIR) were measured by the cw-CRDS with a telecommunications diode laser at wavelength near 1515 nm.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement of a small fraction of rhenium in bulk tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, D.; Ueda, Y.; Doerner, R. P.; Baldwin, M. J.; Ibano, K.

    2018-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of bulk rhenium (Re) and tungsten (W)-Re alloy has been performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength = 1064 nm, pulse width ∼4-6 ns, laser energy = 115 mJ). It is found that the electron temperature, Te, of laser-induced Re plasma is lower than that of W plasma, and that Te of W-Re plasma is in between Re and W plasmas. This indicates that material properties affect Te in a laser-induced plasma. For analysis of W-3.3%Re alloy, only the strongest visible Re I 488.9 nm line is found to be used because of the strong enough intensity without contamination with W lines. Using the calibration-free LIBS method, the atomic fraction of Re, cRe, is evaluated as a function of the ambient Ar gas pressure, PAr. At PAr analysis), while cRe increases with an increase in PAr at >10 Torr due to spectral overlapping of the Re I 488.9 nm line by an Ar II 488.9 nm line.

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy on the laser-cooling candidate La^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, E; Cerchiari, G; Fritzsche, S; Kellerbauer, A

    2015-09-11

    The bound-bound transition from the 5d^{2}6s^{2} ^{3}F_{2}^{e} ground state to the 5d6s^{2}6p ^{3}D_{1}^{o} excited state in negative lanthanum has been proposed as a candidate for laser cooling, which has not yet been achieved for negative ions. Anion laser cooling holds the potential to allow the production of ultracold ensembles of any negatively charged species. We have studied the aforementioned transition in a beam of negative La ions by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The center-of-gravity frequency was measured to be 96.592 80(10) THz. Seven of the nine expected hyperfine structure transitions were resolved. The observed peaks were unambiguously assigned to the predicted hyperfine transitions by a fit, confirmed by multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations. From the determined hyperfine structure we conclude that La^{-} is a promising laser cooling candidate. Using this transition, only three laser beams would be required to repump all hyperfine levels of the ground state.

  14. Nanoparticle-Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for the noninvasive analysis of transparent samples and gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, C; Dell'Aglio, M; Gaudiuso, R; Alrifai, R; Torelli, M; De Giacomo, A

    2018-05-15

    In this paper, Nanoparticle-Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is applied to transparent samples and gemstones with the aim to overcome the laser induced damage on the sample. We propose to deposit a layer of AuNPs on the sample surface by drying a colloidal solution before ablating the sample with a 532 nm pulsed laser beam. This procedure ensures that the most significant fraction of the beam, being in resonance with the AuNP surface plasmon, is mainly absorbed by the NP layer, which in turn results the breakdown to be induced on NPs rather than on the sample itself. The fast explosion of the NPs and the plasma induction allow the ablation and the transfer in the plasma phase of the portion of sample surface where the NPs were placed. The employed AuNPs are prepared in milliQ water without the use of any chemical stabilizers by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL), in order to obtain a strict control of composition and impurities, and to limit possible spectral interferences (except from Au emission lines). Therefore with this technique it is possible to obtain, together with the emission signal of Au (coming from atomized NPs), the emission spectrum of the sample, by limiting or avoiding the direct interaction of the laser pulse with the sample itself. This approach is extremely useful for the elemental analysis by laser ablation of high refractive index samples, where the laser pulse on an untreated surface can otherwise penetrate inside the sample, generate breakdown events below the superficial layer, and consequently cause cracks and other damage. The results obtained with NELIBS on high refractive index samples like glasses, tourmaline, aquamarine and ruby are very promising, and demonstrate the potentiality of this approach for precious gemstones analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrumentation for international safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barefield Ii, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, D Kirk [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Advanced methodologies and improvements to current measurements techniques are needed to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards. This need was recognized and discussed at a Technical Meeting on 'The Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards' held at IAEA headquarters (September 2006). One of the principal recommendations from that meeting was the need to pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (UBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials'. Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the 'Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications' also held at IAEA headquarters (July 2008). This meeting was attended by 12 LlBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of South Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. Following a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts agreed that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. Inspectors needs were grouped into the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activities in Hot Cells; (3) Verify status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. The primary tool employed by the IAEA to detect undeclared processes and activities at special nuclear material facilities and sites is environmental sampling. One of the objectives of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Program Plan calls for the development of advanced

  16. Effects of three-mode field interactions in laser instabilities and in beat-frequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdow, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Population pulsations are fluctuations in the population difference (of a two level system) due to the presence of two or more coherent waves interfering in the medium. In this work, the author shows that population pulsations generated by three waves, a central wave and two mode-locked sidebands, are responsible for both the multiwavelength and the single-wavelength instabilities of single-mode lasers containing homgeneously-broadened media. The role of the population pulsations in establishing these instabilities, however, diminish as the central mode is detuned away from the atomic resonance frequency. For homogeneously-broadened lasers, the author finds two regions of single-wavelength instability. The first is at line center, for which population pulsations are solely responsible, and the second is off line center where the unsaturated medium provides the required gain and anomalous dispersion. For the case of inhomogeneously-broadened lasers, the author shows that population pulsations significantly increase the instability range over that predicted by Casperson for single-mode bad-cavity lasers. Both the unidirectional ring and the standing-wave cavities are treated. The Fourier expansion technique, used in this work, for treating three-frequency operation in saturation spectroscopy is shown to be equivalent (in appropriate limits) to the linear stability analysis in laser theory and optical bistability. The author also shows, in single-sideband saturation spectroscopy, that for long interaction lengths propagation effects can significantly influence the absorption and dispersion coefficients of the medium. Finally, the author shows that under certain conditions the pronounced splitting effects of the population pulsations develop into regions of intense absorption

  17. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration...

  18. Emerging enhanced imaging technologies of the esophagus: spectroscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Lourdes Y; Singh, Satish; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2015-05-15

    Despite advances in diagnoses and therapy, esophageal adenocarcinoma remains a highly lethal neoplasm. Hence, a great interest has been placed in detecting early lesions and in the detection of Barrett esophagus (BE). Advanced imaging technologies of the esophagus have then been developed with the aim of improving biopsy sensitivity and detection of preplastic and neoplastic cells. The purpose of this article was to review emerging imaging technologies for esophageal pathology, spectroscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We conducted a PubMed search using the search string "esophagus or esophageal or oesophageal or oesophagus" and "Barrett or esophageal neoplasm" and "spectroscopy or optical spectroscopy" and "confocal laser endomicroscopy" and "confocal microscopy" and "optical coherence tomography." The first and senior author separately reviewed all articles. Our search identified: 19 in vivo studies with spectroscopy that accounted for 1021 patients and 4 ex vivo studies; 14 clinical CLE in vivo studies that accounted for 941 patients and 1 ex vivo study with 13 patients; and 17 clinical OCT in vivo studies that accounted for 773 patients and 2 ex vivo studies. Human studies using spectroscopy had a very high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of BE. CLE showed a high interobserver agreement in diagnosing esophageal pathology and an accuracy of predicting neoplasia. We also found several clinical studies that reported excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for the detection of BE using OCT. Advanced imaging technology for the detection of esophageal lesions is a promising field that aims to improve the detection of early esophageal lesions. Although advancing imaging techniques improve diagnostic sensitivities and specificities, their integration into diagnostic protocols has yet to be perfected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure of potassium isotopes studied with collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082445

    By exploring the structure of different nuclei, one can learn about the interaction between the nucleons, their building blocks. In this field of research, there is a strong interplay between experiment and theory. In particular, theory has a crucial role in the interpretation of the experimental results, while new experimental results provide testing ground and directions for theorists. In the light- and mid-mass regions of the nuclear chart, the shell model is very successful and widely used for calculations of the ground- as well as excited- states properties. It is based on associated larger energy gaps between single particle energy levels for isotopes with certain proton (Z) and neutron (N) numbers, which are called "magic numbers". It was believed that these numbers (8, 20, 28, ...) are preserved for all nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. However, during the last decades studies of the isotopes with an unbalanced number of protons and neutrons revealed that in these isotopes the shell gaps could chan...

  20. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  1. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  2. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    reflectivity of the background. This device can be configured to detect hydrogen fluoride , hydrogen sulfide, or methane. Other related papers with the...absorption spectroscopy and in-situ gas chromatography ”. volume 3758, 109–115. SPIE, October 1999. 42. Hunsmann, S., K. Wunderle, S. Wagner, U. Rascher, U...black), 1 atm He (dashed black) and 10 atm He (short dash back), each with a buffer gas mixture including 100 Torr C2H6. Gain profiles are normalized

  3. A conceptual design of the set-up for solid state spectroscopy with free electron laser and insertion device radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Makhov, V N

    2001-01-01

    The set-up for complex solid state spectroscopy with the use of enhanced properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers is proposed. Very high flux and pulsed properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers offer the possibility for the use of such powerful techniques as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for the studies of excited states of electronic excitations or defects in solids. The power density of radiation can become high enough for one more method of exited-state spectroscopy: transient optical absorption spectroscopy. The set-up is supposed to combine the EPR/ODMR spectrometer, i.e. cryostat supplied with superconducting magnet and microwave system, and the optical channels for excitation (by radiation from insertion devices or free electron laser) and detection of luminescence (i.e. primary and secondary monochromators). The set-up can be used both for 'conventional' spectroscopy of solids (reflec...

  4. Variational study of the constituents of cholesterol stones by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K; Rai, Vinita; Rai, A K

    2009-01-01

    The major and minor constituents of cholesterol gallstones were investigated by Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The elements detected in the center and in the shell part were calcium (Ca), carbon (C), copper (Cu), hydrogen (H), magnesium (Mg), nitrogen (N), sodium (Na), oxygen (O) and potassium (K), but Cu was absent from the surface of the cholesterol gallstones. Our experimental results revealed that calcium was a major constituent of cholesterol gallstones. Our results also showed that the concentration of Ca, Cu and Mg were large in the center in comparison with the shell. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) spectra of both portions of the surface (colored part and discolored part) of the cholesterol gallstones were recorded. The concentrations of sodium and potassium were higher in the non-pigmented (colored) part than in the pigmented part (discolored/pigment), which showed that the deficiency of sodium and potassium was playing a key role in the formation of discoloration at the different locations on the outer surfaces of the cholesterol gallstones. Thus, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a suitable technique for the analysis of cholesterol gallstones without any sample preparation.

  5. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems.

  6. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzichino, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.spizzichino@enea.it; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems. - Highlights: • Applications of LIBS to archeometry are reviewed. • Complementary among LIBS, LIF, Raman and multivariate analysis is highlighted. • Three major areas of successful LIBS application in archeometry are identified. • Significant results have been presented for several different materials.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D.; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L.; Rehanek, Jens; Weniger, Christian; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hill, Ethan; Borovik, Andrew; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Optical Society of America. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based on self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. We show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  8. Infrared laser transient absorption spectroscopy of the ethyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, T.J.; Johnson, P.M.; Jin, P.; Oatis, S.

    1996-01-01

    The observation and analysis of the high resolution spectrum of the CH 2 rocking fundamental of the ethyl radical, C 2 H 5 , at wavelengths close to 18.9 μm is reported. The band origin is found to be at 528.1 cm -1 . The spectrum shows evidence for a very low barrier to internal rotation, or torsion, in this species. A simple model Hamiltonian, based on an assumed structure with G 12 symmetry, qualitatively reproduces the observations and implies a torsional barrier of approximately 20 cm -1 in both the zero point and excited vibrational states. The Hamiltonian cannot reproduce the observations to the level of the experimental accuracy and the importance of several neglected terms is tested and discussed. The observed torsional splittings imply that, within the confines of the model, the a-inertial and internal rotation axes in the molecule are coincident to within 1 degree. In addition to their intrinsic interest, the spectra will be useful for future state resolved studies of the kinetics of chemical reactions involving the radical. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Elemental and mineralogical imaging of a weathered limestone rock by double-pulse micro-Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, Giorgio S.; Campanella, Beatrice; Grifoni, Emanuela; Legnaioli, Stefano; Lorenzetti, Giulia; Pagnotta, Stefano; Poggialini, Francesco; Palleschi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Olga

    2018-05-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the alteration conditions of historical limestone rocks exposed to urban environment using the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The approach proposed is based on the microscale three dimensional (3D) compositional imaging of the sample through double-pulse micro-Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (DP-μLIBS) in conjunction with optical microscopy. DP-μLIBS allows to perform a quick and detailed in-depth analysis of the composition of the weathered artifact by creating a 'virtual thin section' (VTS) of the sample which can estimate the extent of the alteration processes occurred at the limestone surface. The DP-μLIBS analysis of these thin sections showed a reduction with depth of the elements (mainly Fe, Si and Na) originating from atmospheric dust, particulate deposition and the surrounding environment (due to the proximity of the sea), whereas, the LIBS signal of Ca increased in intensity from the black crust to the limestone underneath.

  10. Status of fiber lasers study of on ytterbium doped fiber laser and laser spectroscopy of doped fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, S.

    1994-07-01

    This work shows all the advantages and drawbacks of the rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and fiber optical amplifiers, pointing out their potential use for instrumentation and optical fiber sensor technology. The theory of light propagation in optical fibers is presented in order to understand the manufacturing methods. A comparative study of preform surface and concentration analysis is performed. The gain behaviour is also thoroughly examined. A synthesis of all technological parameters of the fiber laser is then established and all technologies of the constituting integrated components are reviewed and compared. The experimental techniques mainly involve: site selective excitation tunability, cooperative luminescence, oxidation state changes induced by gamma irradiation, ytterbium-doped mono-mode continuous wave tunable three-level fiber laser. (TEC). 622 refs., 176 figs

  11. Developments for resonance ionization laser spectroscopy of the heaviest elements at SHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, F.; Chhetri, P.; Ackermann, D.; Backe, H.; Block, M.; Cheal, B.; Clark, A.; Droese, C.; Ferrer, R.; Giacoppo, F.; Götz, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kaleja, O.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kunz, P.; Mistry, A. K.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lauth, W.; Raeder, S.; Walther, Th.; Wraith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental determination of atomic levels and the first ionization potential of the heaviest elements (Z ⩾ 100) is key to challenge theoretical predictions and to reveal changes in the atomic shell structure. These elements are only artificially produced in complete-fusion evaporation reactions at on-line facilities such as the GSI in Darmstadt at a rate of, at most, a few atoms per second. Hence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are required. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and valuable tools to investigate atomic properties. In combination with a buffer-gas filled stopping cell, the Radiation Detected Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RADRIS) technique provides the highest sensitivity for laser spectroscopy on the heaviest elements. The RADRIS setup, as well as the measurement procedure, have been optimized and characterized using the α -emitter 155 Yb in on-line conditions, resulting in an overall efficiency well above 1%. This paves the way for a successful search of excited atomic levels in nobelium and heavier elements.

  12. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  13. Discrimination between authentic and false tax stamps from liquor bottles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the preliminary application of a compact and low-cost laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for falsification detection of tax stamps used in alcoholic beverages. The new instrument was based on a diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YLF microchip laser and a mini-spectrometer containing a Czerny–Turner polichromator coupled to a non-intensified, non-gated, and non-cooled 2048 pixel linear sensor array (200 to 850 nm spectral range). Twenty-three tax stamp samples were analyzed by firing laser pulses within two different regions of each sample: a hologram and a blank paper region. For each acquired spectrum, the emitted radiation was integrated for 3000 ms under the continuous application of laser pulses at 100 Hz (integration of 300 plasmas). Principal component analysis (PCA) or hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of all emission spectra from the hologram or blank paper region revealed two well-defined groups of authentic and false samples. Moreover, for the hologram data, three subgroups of false samples were found. Additionally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was successfully applied for the detection of the false tax stamps using all emission spectra from hologram or blank paper region. The discrimination between the samples was mostly ascribed to different levels of calcium concentration in the samples. - Highlights: • Compact and low-cost laser-induced breakdown spectrometer • Analysis of tax stamps used in alcoholic beverages • Detection of false tax stamps using the LIBS spectra and chemometrics • Falsification detection ascribed to different levels of calcium concentration

  14. Discrimination between authentic and false tax stamps from liquor bottles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri, E-mail: fbgonzaga@inmetro.gov.br [Chemical Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO), Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50, Xerém, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho [Chemical Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO), Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50, Xerém, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Correa, Deleon Nascimento [Technical–Scientific Police Superintendency, Criminalistic Institute Dr. Octávio Eduardo de Brito Alvarenga—IC-SPTC-SP, 05507-060 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work describes the preliminary application of a compact and low-cost laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for falsification detection of tax stamps used in alcoholic beverages. The new instrument was based on a diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YLF microchip laser and a mini-spectrometer containing a Czerny–Turner polichromator coupled to a non-intensified, non-gated, and non-cooled 2048 pixel linear sensor array (200 to 850 nm spectral range). Twenty-three tax stamp samples were analyzed by firing laser pulses within two different regions of each sample: a hologram and a blank paper region. For each acquired spectrum, the emitted radiation was integrated for 3000 ms under the continuous application of laser pulses at 100 Hz (integration of 300 plasmas). Principal component analysis (PCA) or hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of all emission spectra from the hologram or blank paper region revealed two well-defined groups of authentic and false samples. Moreover, for the hologram data, three subgroups of false samples were found. Additionally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was successfully applied for the detection of the false tax stamps using all emission spectra from hologram or blank paper region. The discrimination between the samples was mostly ascribed to different levels of calcium concentration in the samples. - Highlights: • Compact and low-cost laser-induced breakdown spectrometer • Analysis of tax stamps used in alcoholic beverages • Detection of false tax stamps using the LIBS spectra and chemometrics • Falsification detection ascribed to different levels of calcium concentration.

  15. MBE System for Antimonide Based Semiconductor Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lester, Luke

    1999-01-01

    .... SLR-770 inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing system. The SLR-770 has been invaluable in the study of plasma etching of AlGaAsSb and GaSb-materials that form the backbone of antimonide-based semiconductor lasers...

  16. Laser-induced cavitation based micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are in strong demand as versatile and robust pumping techniques. Here, we present a cavitation based technique, which is able to pump a volume of 4000 m3 within 75 s against an estimated pressure head of 3 bar. The single cavitation event is created by focusing a laser pulse in

  17. Feasibility of atomic and molecular laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to in-situ determination of chlorine in concrete : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been studied as a fast method of detecting chlorine in concrete samples. Both single pulse (SP) and double pulse (DP) experiments have been tested. Several combinations of lasers (Neodymium-Yttrium Alum...

  18. Carbon determination in carbon-manganese steels under atmospheric conditions by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labutin, Timur A; Zaytsev, Sergey M; Popov, Andrey M; Zorov, Nikita B

    2014-09-22

    The most sensitive lines of carbon, used nowadays for its determination in steels by laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), are at vacuum UV and, thereby, LIBS potential is significantly reduced. We suggested the use of the C I 833.51 nm line for carbon determination in low-alloy steels (c(C)~0.186-1.33 wt.%) in air. Double-pulse LIBS with the collinear scheme was performed for maximal enhancement of a carbon emission signal without substantial complication of experimental setup. Since this line is strongly broadened in laser plasma, it overlapped with the closest iron lines greatly. We implemented a PCR method for the construction of a multivariate calibration model under spectral interferences. The model provided a RMSECV = 0.045 wt.%. The predicted carbon content in the rail templet was in an agreement with the reference value obtained by a combustion analyzer within the relative error of 6%.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of plant materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Dario [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, 09972-270 Diadema-SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura - Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13416-000 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil); Gomes, Marcos da Silva [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura - Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13416-000 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Souza, Paulino Florencio de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura - Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13416-000 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil); Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira, PO Box 162, 13400-970 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil); Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Gustavo Cofani dos Santos, Luis [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura - Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13416-000 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco Jose, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura - Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13416-000 Piracicaba-SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Developments and contributions of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the determination of elements in plant materials are reviewed. Several applications where the solid samples are interrogated by simply focusing the laser pulses directly onto a fresh or dried surface of leaves, roots, fruits, vegetables, wood and pollen are presented. For quantitative purposes aiming at plant nutrition diagnosis, the test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets, prepared from clean, dried and properly ground/homogenized leaves, and the use of univariate or multivariate calibration strategies are revisited. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative LIBS analysis of plant materials are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fresh or dried leaves, fruits, roots and pellets can be easily interrogated by LIBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS is a powerful tool for plant nutrition diagnosis and elemental mapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intended LIBS users will find a survey of applications in a comprehensive table.

  20. Investigation of archaeological metal artefacts by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankova, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.; Leshtakov, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to determining the elemental composition of a set of ancient bronze artefacts dated from the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age (14th – 10th century BC). We used a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with pulse duration of 10 ns and energy of 10 mJ and determined the elemental composition of the bronze alloy that was used in manufacturing the samples under study. The concentrations of tin and lead in the bulk of the examined materials was estimated after generating calibration curves for a set of four standard samples. The preliminary results of the analysis will provide information on the artefacts provenance and on the production process.