WorldWideScience

Sample records for based assisted reproductive

  1. Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) ART refers to treatments and procedures that ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine. (2015). Assisted reproductive technologies: A guide for patients . Retrieved May 31, 2016, ...

  2. Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Fertility and Sterility Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Ethics Committee Opinions and Webinars Practice ... Donate copyright 1996 - 2018 ASRM, American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All Rights Reserved. ASRM Non Discrimination Policy ...

  3. Assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jack Yu Jen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) encompass fertility treatments, which involve manipulations of both oocyte and sperm in vitro. This chapter provides a brief overview of ART, including indications for treatment, ovarian reserve testing, selection of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) protocols, laboratory techniques of ART including in vitro fertilization (IVF), and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), embryo transfer techniques, and luteal phase support. This chapter also discusses potential complications of ART, namely ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and multiple gestations, and the perinatal outcomes of ART.

  4. Heparin for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad A; Sur, Shyamaly; Raine-Fenning, Nick; Jayaprakasan, Kannamannadiar; Thornton, Jim G; Quenby, Siobhan

    2013-08-17

    Heparin as an adjunct in assisted reproduction (peri-implantation heparin) is given at or after egg collection or at embryo transfer during assisted reproduction. Heparin has been advocated to improve embryo implantation and clinical outcomes.  It has been proposed that heparin enhances the intra-uterine environment by improving decidualisation with an associated activation of growth factors and a cytokine expression profile in the endometrium that is favourable to pregnancy. To investigate whether the administration of heparin around the time of implantation (peri-implantation heparin) improves clinical outcomes in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction. A comprehensive and exhaustive search strategy was developed in consultation with the Trials Search Co-ordinator of the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG). The strategy was used in an attempt to identify all relevant studies regardless of language or publication status (published, unpublished, in press, and in progress). Relevant trials were identified from both electronic databases and other resources (last search 6 May 2013). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included where peri-implantation heparin was given during assisted reproduction. Peri-implantation low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) during IVF/ICSI was given at or after egg collection or at embryo transfer in the included studies. Live birth rate was the primary outcome. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials and extracted relevant data. The quality of the evidence was evaluated using GRADE methods. Three RCTs (involving 386 women) were included in the review.Peri-implantation LMWH administration during assisted reproduction was associated with a significant improvement in live birth rate compared with placebo or no LMWH (odds ratio (OR) 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07 to 2.90, three studies, 386 women, I(2) = 51%, very low quality evidence with high

  5. Assisted reproduction and distributive justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitch, Vida

    2015-02-01

    The Canadian province of Quebec recently amended its Health Insurance Act to cover the costs of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). The province of Ontario recently de-insured IVF. Both provinces cited cost-effectiveness as their grounds, but the question as to whether a public health insurance system ought to cover IVF raises the deeper question of how we should understand reproduction at the social level, and whether its costs should be a matter of individual or collective responsibility. In this article I examine three strategies for justifying collective provisions in a liberal society and assess whether public reproductive assistance can be defended on any of these accounts. I begin by considering, and rejecting, rights-based and needs-based approaches. I go on to argue that instead we ought to address assisted reproduction from the perspective of the contractarian insurance-based model for public health coverage, according to which we select items for inclusion based on their unpredictability in nature and cost. I argue that infertility qualifies as an unpredictable incident against which rational agents would choose to insure under ideal conditions and that assisted reproduction is thereby a matter of collective responsibility, but only in cases of medical necessity or inability to pay. The policy I endorse by appeal to this approach is a means-tested system of coverage resembling neither Ontario nor Quebec's, and I conclude that it constitutes a promising alternative worthy of serious consideration by bioethicists, political philosophers, and policy-makers alike. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Risk of Monozygotic Twins After Assisted Reproduction: A Population-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Fabio; Cipriani, Sonia; Bianchi, Stefano; Bulfoni, Camilla; Bortolus, Renata; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that ovarian stimulation and assisted reproductive techniques (ART) may increase the frequency of monozygotic twins. In this article, we present the analysis of the estimated frequency of twin deliveries following in vitro fertilization (IVF) in Lombardy during the period 2010-2014 for a total of 450,949 pregnancies. This is a population-based study using data from the regional data base of Lombardy, a northern Italian region with a population of about 10 million inhabitants. During the considered period, a total of 461,424 single or multiple births were registered in Lombardy. After exclusion of triplets or more pregnancies, the total number of twin deliveries, in separate strata of like and unlike sex pregnancies twin deliveries, were obtained and the rate of twin deliveries was computed according to spontaneous and non-spontaneous conception and type of ART. Further, estimates of dizygotic or monozygotic twin births were calculated using Weinberg's methods. The frequency of twins deliveries was 1.24/100 deliveries after natural conception and 20.05 after assisted conception. The estimated rates of monozygotic twins was 0.45 and 0.72/100 (95% CI: 0.58-0.91) deliveries after natural and assisted conception, respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p assisted than after natural conception.

  7. Comparison of semen quality between university-based and private assisted reproductive technology laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S; Khan, Omar; Sønksen, Jens

    2018-01-01

    .9%). No significant differences were found in volume, concentration and total motile sperm count although the Bland-Altman plot bias for concentration was clinically significant (15.9 × 106/ml). CONCLUSIONS: In this small series, motility was significantly higher at private laboratories compared to a university......OBJECTIVE: Obtaining a semen analysis (SA) is an essential step in evaluating infertile men. Despite using standardized procedures for analysis semen quality in the same individual often varies on repeated tests. The objective of this study was to investigate inter-laboratory variation in semen...... quality between private- and university-based assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: IRB approval was obtained to retrospectively evaluate men with a SA at both the private- and university-based ART laboratories. When more than one SA was available from either...

  8. Validity for assisted hatching on pregnancy rate in assisted reproductive technology: analysis based on results of Japan Assisted Reproductive Technology Registry System 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasuji, Takashi; Saito, Hidekazu; Araki, Ryuichiro; Nakaza, Aritoshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Ishihara, Osamu; Irahara, Minoru; Kubota, Toshiro; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Sakumoto, Tetsuro

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of assisted hatching (AH) in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. In this retrospective observational study, the data of patients who were registered in the National ART Registry System of Japan between January and December 2010 were analyzed. The descriptive statistics and validity of AH in fresh embryo transfer (ET) and frozen-thawed ET were assessed by using multiple logistic regression analyses. From a total of 105,450 single ET, 46,029 (43.7%) cycles underwent AH. A total of 9737 (21.3%) and 36,292 (60.9%) cycles underwent AH from 45,818 fresh single ET and 59,632 frozen-thawed single ET, respectively. In the fresh ET patients that underwent AH, the clinical pregnancy and live birth rate were significantly decreased in patients of all ages compared with that of the non-AH group. In the frozen-thawed ET patients, there was no significant difference in pregnancy and live birth rate between the AH group and the non-AH group. AH treatment was more frequently performed in frozen-thawed ET patients than in fresh ET patients, and in the blastocyst stage than in the early cleavage stage. A significantly decreased pregnancy and live birth rate was observed in the fresh ET patients who underwent AH. In the frozen-thawed ET patients who underwent AH, improvement in the clinical pregnancy and live birth rate was not observed. Further studies on the indication and application of AH in ART treatment are required. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Religious aspects of assisted reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, H N; Sallam, N H

    2016-03-28

    Human response to new developments regarding birth, death, marriage and divorce is largely shaped by religious beliefs. When assisted reproduction was introduced into medical practice in the last quarter of the twentieth century, it was fiercely attacked by some religious groups and highly welcomed by others. Today, assisted reproduction is accepted in nearly all its forms by Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism, although most Orthodox Jews refuse third party involvement. On the contrary assisted reproduction is totally unacceptable to Roman Catholicism, while Protestants, Anglicans, Coptic Christians and Sunni Muslims accept most of its forms, which do not involve gamete or embryo donation. Orthodox Christians are less strict than Catholic Christians but still refuse third party involvement. Interestingly, in contrast to Sunni Islam, Shi'a Islam accepts gamete donation and has made provisions to institutionalize it. Chinese culture is strongly influenced by Confucianism, which accepts all forms of assisted reproduction that do not involve third parties. Other communities follow the law of the land, which is usually dictated by the religious group(s) that make(s) the majority of that specific community. The debate will certainly continue as long as new developments arise in the ever-evolving field of assisted reproduction.

  10. Religious aspects of assisted reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, HN; Sallam, NH

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human response to new developments regarding birth, death, marriage and divorce is largely shaped by religious beliefs. When assisted reproduction was introduced into medical practice in the last quarter of the twentieth century, it was fiercely attacked by some religious groups and highly welcomed by others. Today, assisted reproduction is accepted in nearly all its forms by Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism, although most Orthodox Jews refuse third party involvement. On the contrary assisted reproduction is totally unacceptable to Roman Catholicism, while Protestants, Anglicans, Coptic Christians and Sunni Muslims accept most of its forms, which do not involve gamete or embryo donation. Orthodox Christians are less strict than Catholic Christians but still refuse third party involvement. Interestingly, in contrast to Sunni Islam, Shi’a Islam accepts gamete donation and has made provisions to institutionalize it. Chinese culture is strongly influenced by Confucianism, which accepts all forms of assisted reproduction that do not involve third parties. Other communities follow the law of the land, which is usually dictated by the religious group(s) that make(s) the majority of that specific community. The debate will certainly continue as long as new developments arise in the ever-evolving field of assisted reproduction. PMID:27822349

  11. Genomic imprinting and assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaillet J Richard

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imprinted genes exhibit a parent-of-origin specific pattern of expression. Such genes have been shown to be targets of molecular defects in particular genetic syndromes such as Beckwith-Wiedemann and Angelman syndromes. Recent reports have raised concern about the possibility that assisted reproduction techniques, such as in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, might cause genomic imprinting disorders. The number of reported cases of those disorders is still too small to draw firm conclusions and the safety of these widely used assisted reproduction techniques needs to be further evaluated.

  12. Zika virus and assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Christina N; Bano, Rashda; Washington Cross, Chantel I; Segars, James H

    2017-06-01

    Due to the fact that the Zika virus can be sexually transmitted, there is a potential risk for disease transmission at several stages of assisted reproduction. Such a possibility poses a serious challenge to couples pursing fertility with reproductive technologies. Here, we discuss what is known regarding Zika virus infection with respect to sexual transmission and correlate this knowledge with recent recommendations in the realm of infertility treatment. Zika virus can be transmitted from infected men and women through vaginal, oral or anal intercourse. Zika virus RNA has been detected in blood, semen, cervical mucus and vaginal fluid. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control recommends that infected men wait 6 months, and infected women 8 weeks, prior to attempting pregnancy. Reproductive tissue donors should wait 6 months before giving a specimen. Further study of Zika virus transmission in different reproductive tissues and establishment of validated testing methods for viral disease transmissibility are urgently needed. Reproductive technologists need to establish screening, testing and laboratory protocols aimed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission during assisted reproduction.

  13. Optimizing equine assisted reproductive technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onstein, W.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833525

    2018-01-01

    Application of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) is more common in the horse breeding industries, but there is still room for improvement. Embryo recovery rate after embryo flushing, embryo production rate after ovum pick-up (OPU) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), cryopreservation

  14. Role of Antioxidants in Assisted Reproductive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Agarwal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS has been recognized as a significant cause of suboptimal assisted reproductive outcome. Many of the sperm preparation and manipulation procedures that are necessary in the in vitro environment can result in excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS thereby exposing the gametes and growing embryos to significant oxidative damage. Antioxidants have long been utilized in the management of male subfertility as they can counterbalance the elevated levels of ROS inducing a high state of OS. Few studies have looked into the clinical effectiveness of antioxidants in patients undergoing assisted reproduction. While an overall favorable outcome has been perceived, the specific clinical indication and optimal antioxidant regimen remain unknown. The goal of our review is to explore the sources of ROS in the in vitro environment and provide a clinical scenario-based approach to identify the circumstances where antioxidant supplementation is most beneficial to enhance the outcome of assisted reproduction.

  15. Role of Antioxidants in Assisted Reproductive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Majzoub, Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) has been recognized as a significant cause of suboptimal assisted reproductive outcome. Many of the sperm preparation and manipulation procedures that are necessary in the in vitro environment can result in excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) thereby exposing the gametes and growing embryos to significant oxidative damage. Antioxidants have long been utilized in the management of male subfertility as they can counterbalance the elevated levels of ROS inducing a high state of OS. Few studies have looked into the clinical effectiveness of antioxidants in patients undergoing assisted reproduction. While an overall favorable outcome has been perceived, the specific clinical indication and optimal antioxidant regimen remain unknown. The goal of our review is to explore the sources of ROS in the in vitro environment and provide a clinical scenario-based approach to identify the circumstances where antioxidant supplementation is most beneficial to enhance the outcome of assisted reproduction. Copyright © 2017 Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology.

  16. Microscopical advances in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, B

    2004-01-01

    In a series of papers carried out by this laboratory it was demonstrated that the quality of sterile males sperm, assessed submicroscopically and mathematically, is closely correlated with the success of the various procedures of assisted reproduction. If we attempt to select hypothetically optimal spermatozoa destined to the ICSI by light inverted microscopy, a considerable amount of ultrastructural information is lost and our selection is merely based on the motility. In this study we apply polarization microscopy to the ICSI technique, introducing polarizing and analyzing lenses in an inverted microscope model, operating in a transparent container. The retardation of the birefringence in the various organelles is evaluated by compensators, and the images are transmitted to a video system, and stored in a computer. Spermatozoa are maintained alive and perfectly motile in this polarizing inverted microscope, and the character of the birefringence is the same as in fixed and sectioned biological material examined by polarization microscopy. The birefringence of the sperm structures allows a sperm analysis closer to TEM than to phase contrast light microscopy analysis.

  17. Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's Reproductive Rights and Social Citizenship. There is a general perception that assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) affect only a small number of affluent women in India. However, the ART industry - tied as it is to the vigorously pushed medical tourism ...

  18. [Evolution of assisted reproductive technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannet, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    When natural conception is impossible and the underlying problem cannot be treated, medical intervention can reproduce the steps necessary for fertilization and early embryo development. The first known medical action in the field of human reproduction took place at the end of the 18th century, in the form of artificial insemination with the husband's semen, thus dissociating sexual intercourse from procreation. A further upheaval occurred at the end of the 19th century, with the use of donor sperm, separating the notions of genetic descent and parenthood. In the second half of the 20th century, medically assisted procreation saw two major technological advances, namely gamete freezing and in vitro fertilization (IVF). The first child conceived with frozen-thawed sperm was born in 1953, and the first IVF baby in 1978. Fertilization by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), first developed in 1992, can overcome many causes of male infertility. The convergence of reproductive biology and genetics has now opened up the possibility of screening for chromosome and gene defects in the embryo, prior to implantation. Thus, assisted reproductive technologies (ART) not only serve as a substitute for natural conception but can also avoid the birth of a disabled child While new technologies continue to extend the available options for infertile couples, they also have the potential to help single women and homosexual couples to have children. These practices are currently only accepted in certain countries. Overall, these new medical technologies have contributed to changing our conception of human reproduction, opening up new paradigms of parenthood and raising new challenges for society.

  19. Low-technology assisted reproduction and the risk of preterm birth in a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerlian, Carmen; Platt, Robert W; Tan, Seang-Lin; Gagnon, Robert; Basso, Olga

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the risk of preterm birth in singleton infants conceived through low-technology assisted reproduction (intrauterine insemination and/or ovulation induction/stimulation). Hospital-based cohort study. University-affiliated hospital. Singleton babies born between 2001 and 2007 to 16,712 couples with no reported infertility (reference category), 378 babies conceived with low-technology treatment; 437 conceived with high-technology treatment; and 620 conceived naturally after a period of infertility. None. Treatment data were obtained from couples undergoing standard infertility investigation and care. Preterm birth, defined at three clinical endpoints: assisted reproduction appeared to be a moderately strong predictor of preterm birth, with similar associations observed in the high-technology treatment group. After adjusting for confounders, as well as the shared characteristics of infertile couples, associations were attenuated but remained significant, suggesting that part of the risk is likely attributable to the treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmaceutical costs of assisted reproduction in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Maria-Reyes; Hernández, Juana; Antoñanzas, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Assisted reproduction is one of the health services currently being considered for possible limitation or exclusion from the public health services portfolio in Spain. One of the main reasons claimed for this is the impact on the budget for pharmaceutical expenditure. The objective of this study was to assess the significance of the pharmaceutical costs of assisted reproduction in Spain. This study focused on medical practice in Spain, and is based on the opinions of experts in assisted reproduction and the results provided by professional societies' publications. The reference year is 2012 and the setting was secondary care. We have included all existing pharmaceutical modalities for assisted reproduction, as well as the most common drug for each modality. We have considered the pharmaceutical cost per cycle for artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF_ICSI), and cryotransfer and donated fresh oocytes reception. In Spain, artificial insemination has a pharmaceutical cost per cycle of between €69.36 and €873.79. This amounts to an average cycle cost of €364.87 for partner's sperm and €327.10 for donor sperm. The pharmaceutical cost of IVF_ICSI ranges between €278.16 and €1,902.66, giving an average cost per cycle of €1,139.65. In the case of cryotransfer and donated fresh oocytes reception, the pharmaceutical cost per cycle is between €22.61 and €58.73, yielding an average cost of €40.67. The budgetary impact of pharmaceutical expenditure for assisted reproduction in Spain for the year 2012 was estimated at €98.7 million. In Spain, the total pharmaceutical cost of assisted reproduction is substantial. According to our results, we can say that about 29% of the total pharmaceutical expenditure for assisted reproduction techniques is funded by the National Health System and the rest represents 2.4% of the total annual out-of-pocket family expenditure on drugs.

  1. Utility of antioxidants during assisted reproductive techniques: an evidence based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2014-11-24

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is a common treatment of choice for many couples facing infertility issues, be it due to male or female factor, or idiopathic. Employment of ART techniques, however, come with its own challenges as the in vitro environment is not nearly as ideal as the in vivo environment, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) build-up leading to oxidative stress is kept in check by the endogenous antioxidants system. While physiological amounts of ROS are necessary for normal reproductive function in vivo, in vitro manipulation of gametes and embryos exposes these cells to excessive ROS production either by endogenous or exogenous environmental factors. In this review, we discuss the sources of ROS in an in vitro clinical setting and the influence of oxidative stress on gamete/embryo quality and the outcome of IVF/ICSI. Sources of ROS and different strategies of overcoming the excessive generation of ROS in vitro are also highlighted. Endogenously, the gametes and the developing embryo become sources of ROS. Multiple exogenous factors act as potential sources of ROS, including exposure to visible light, composition of culture media, pH and temperature, oxygen concentration, centrifugation during spermatozoa preparation, ART technique involving handling of gamete/embryo and cryopreservation technique (freeze/thawing process). Finally, the use of antioxidants as agents to minimize ROS generation in the in vitro environment and as oral therapy is highlighted. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants are discussed and the outcome of studies using these antioxidants as oral therapy in the male or female or its use in vitro in media is presented. While results of studies using certain antioxidant agents are promising, the current body of evidence as a whole suggests the need for further well-designed and larger scale randomized controlled studies, as well as research to minimize oxidative stress conditions in the clinical ART setting.

  2. Assisted reproduction for postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Merryn Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    With increasing longevity, an ageing population and advances in assisted reproductive technologies (ART), a greater number of women are deciding to have a child and become a mother in their later years. With this social and demographic change, an important social and ethical debate has emerged over whether single and/or married postmenopausal women should have access to ARTs. The aim of this paper is to address this question and review critically the arguments that have been advanced to support or oppose the use of ART by older women. The arguments presented consider the consequences for the individual, the family and wider society. They cover the potential physical and emotional harm to the older woman, the possible impact on the welfare and wellbeing of the future child, and the impact on the norms, values, customs and traditions of society. After reviewing the evidence, and weighing the opposing arguments, this paper concludes that there is no moral justification for a restriction on the use of ART by postmenopausal women. Allowing access to ART for postmenopausal women is an extension of reproductive autonomy and procreative rights in an age where the promotion of agency, autonomy, individual choice and human rights is paramount.

  3. Imprinting disorders after assisted reproductive technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Pinborg, Anja; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2006-01-01

    To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies.......To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies....

  4. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mouzon, J; Goossens, V; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-01-01

    This 11th European IVF-monitoring report presents the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments initiated in Europe during 2007.......This 11th European IVF-monitoring report presents the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments initiated in Europe during 2007....

  5. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraretti, A P; Goossens, V; de Mouzon, J

    2012-01-01

    This 12th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2008.......This 12th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2008....

  6. Assisted reproduction and child neurodevelopmental outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2013-01-01

    To systematically review the existing literature on neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born after medically assisted reproduction compared with those of children born after spontaneous conception.......To systematically review the existing literature on neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born after medically assisted reproduction compared with those of children born after spontaneous conception....

  7. Assisted reproductive technology and risk of congenital malformations: a meta-analysis based on cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiabi; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Wang, Hua; Liang, Desheng; Tan, Hongzhuan; Xia, Jiahui

    2015-10-01

    To assess the association between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and risk of congenital malformations (CM) by conducting a meta-analysis of cohort studies. PubMed, Google Scholar, Cochrane Libraries and Chinese database were searched through August 2014 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was used to calculate the overall combined risk estimates. Subgroup analysis was performed to explore potential heterogeneity moderators. Fifty-seven studies involving 119,874 infants conceived following ART and 1,212,320 infants conceived naturally were included in the analysis. The ART-conceived infants were associated with a higher risk of CM [relative risk (RR) = 1.33; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.24-1.43] when compared with those conceived naturally. When data were restricted to singleton births (RR = 1.38; 95 % CI 1.30-1.47), major CM (RR = 1.47; 95 % CI 1.29-1.68), matched/adjusted studies (RR = 1.37; 95 % CI 1.27-1.47) or high quality studies (RR = 1.40; 95 % CI 1.27-1.55), the increased risk of CM still existed in ART pregnancies. Additionally, an increased risk of CM was also found when the ART twin (RR = 1.18; 95 % CI 1.06-1.32) or multiple births (RR = 1.16; 95 % CI 1.05-1.27) were separately compared with spontaneously conceived twin or multiple births. Substantial heterogeneity was observed across studies (I (2) = 68, 44, 39, and 33 % for all infants, singletons, twins and multiples, respectively). Whether confounding factors were matched or adjusted, study quality and sample size as the first three of the most relevant heterogeneity moderators have been identified. No evidence of publication bias was observed (P > 0.10). The ART-conceived infants have a higher risk of CM compared with those conceived naturally. However, these estimates have to be viewed with caution because of heterogeneity.

  8. Assisted reproductive technology and major birth defects in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michele; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; de Klerk, Nicholas; Burton, Peter; Bower, Carol

    2012-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of major birth defects diagnosed by 6 years of age in all births and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly conceived by assisted reproductive technology (when this included intracytoplasmic sperm injection and in vitro fertilization [IVF]) and the remainder of nonassisted reproductive technology-conceived children born in Western Australia from 1994 to 2002. This retrospective cohort study used data linkage between three population-based registers (Reproductive Technology Register, Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies, and Midwives' Notification of Birth System) to identify all assisted reproductive technology (n=2,911) and nonassisted reproductive technology (n=210,997) births with and without birth defects diagnosed by age 6 and all terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. A major birth defect was diagnosed in 8.7% of assisted reproductive technology and 5.4% of nonassisted reproductive technology singletons (odds ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-1.79), as well as 7.1% of assisted reproductive technology twins and 5.9% of nonassisted reproductive technology twins of unlike sex (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.77-1.51). The prevalence of birth defects in assisted reproductive technology singletons and twins decreased markedly over the study period. This change was evident across all three clinics contributing data over the whole study and was particularly marked for children conceived as a result of IVF. There has been a decrease in the prevalence of birth defects over time in children born as a result of assisted reproductive technology in Western Australia; however, the prevalence of major birth defects in assisted reproductive technology singletons remains increased compared with nonassisted reproductive technology singletons. II.

  9. Posthumous Assisted Reproduction from Islamic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Omani Samani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development in assisted reproductive techniques along with relieving the pain of childlessnesshas brought new ethical and policy dilemmas. Posthumous assisted reproduction is the mostchallenging, difficult and sensitive issue to be discussed ethically and religiously. In this paper theacceptability of the posthumous reproduction in Islamic contexts is evaluated and major concernslike Consent and ownership of the gametes after death, Family and Marriage vision and Welfareof the child are discussed together with some international legislation. We can conclude that uponIslamic vision to assisted reproductive techniques as treatment of families and relieving the seriousproblem of childlessness, posthumous assisted reproduction is unacceptable even with previouslyfrozen gametes or embryos. Also, Islamic vision to marriage, consent and welfare of the childconfirms the unacceptability. There must be some law or legislation to ban this procedure in Islamiccontexts.

  10. Thirty-five years of assisted reproductive technologies in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna Birenbaum-Carmeli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Israel is known as a pronatalist country. Whether due to the Biblical commandment to ‘be fruitful and multiply’ or the traumas of the Holocaust and perennial wars, reproduction is a central life goal for most Israelis. Israeli women bear substantially more children than their counterparts in industrialized countries and view child-rearing as a key life accomplishment. These personal world-view and real-life individual quests take place in a context of equally pronatalist state policies and religious openness to assisted reproductive technologies. In this paper, I outline 35 years of assisted reproductive technologies in Israel by tracing a principal axis in the development of three major technologies of assisted reproduction: the proliferation of IVF-ICSI; the globalization of gamete donation; and the privatization of surrogacy. The paper is based on a policy analysis as well as various studies of assisted reproductive technologies, conducted in Israel over this period.

  11. The Use of Proteomics in Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteria, Ioanna; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Chrousos, George P; Tsangaris, George T

    2017-01-01

    Despite the explosive increase in the use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) over the last 30 years, their success rates remain suboptimal. Proteomics is a rapidly-evolving technology-driven science that has already been widely applied in the exploration of human reproduction and fertility, providing useful insights into its physiology and leading to the identification of numerous proteins that may be potential biomarkers and/or treatment targets of a successful ART pregnancy. Here we present a brief overview of the techniques used in proteomic analyses and attempt a comprehensive presentation of recent data from mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies in humans, regarding all components of ARTs, including the male and female gamete, the derived zygote and embryo, the endometrium and, finally, the ART offspring both pre- and postnatally. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Evolving ethics in medically assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Guido; de Wert, Guido

    2003-01-01

    Ethical problems arising from the application of assisted reproductive technology are discussed for four specific areas, namely embryo research, multiple pregnancies, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for social sexing, and finally PGD with HLA typing.

  13. Towards making assisted reproductive technology affordable and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To report the importance of public-private interaction (PPI) as a strategy to make assisted reproductive technology (ART) affordable. Methods. Design: Commentary. Setting: Reproductive Medicine Unit, Tygerberg Academic Hospital. Discussion. PPI together with simplified methods of IVF such as scaling down on ...

  14. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraretti, A P; Goossens, V; Kupka, M

    2013-01-01

    The 13th European in vitro fertilization (IVF)-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2009: are there any changes in the trends compared with previous years?......The 13th European in vitro fertilization (IVF)-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2009: are there any changes in the trends compared with previous years?...

  15. Cancer in women after assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Spector, Logan G; Missmer, Stacey A; Leach, Richard E; Williams, Melanie; Koch, Lori; Smith, Yolanda; Stern, Judy E; Ball, G David; Schymura, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of cancer after assisted reproductive technology (ART) therapy. Longitudinal cohort study. Not applicable. New York, Texas, and Illinois residents between 2004 and 2009, treated with ART, comprising cycles of 113,226 women, including 53,859 women without prior ART treatment, who were linked to their respective state cancer registries and whose cycles were reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS). None. Diagnosis of cancer, as reported to the state cancer registry; standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and their 95% confidence intervals, comparing the observed to expected cancer cases based on age-specific cancer rates in the general population of each state. Among the cohort of women without prior ART therapy, hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for treatment parameters and reproductive history factors. The mean follow-up period was 4.87 years; among women without prior ART, 450 women developed 460 cancers. Women treated with ART had a statistically significantly lower risk for all cancers (for all women: SIR 0.78; CI, 0.73-0.83; women without prior ART: SIR 0.75; CI, 0.68-0.82), breast cancer, and all female genital cancers; a non-statistically-significant lower risk for endocrine and uterine cancer; and a non-statistically-significant higher risk for melanoma and ovarian cancer. Among women without prior ART, we found no statistically significant increased HR by parity, number of cycles, cumulative follicle-stimulating hormone dosage, or cycle outcome. Women initiating ART treatment have no greater risk for developing cancer after nearly 5 years of follow-up compared with the general population and with other women treated with ART. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietary folate and reproductive success among women undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Audrey J; Afeiche, Myriam C; Wright, Diane L; Toth, Thomas L; Williams, Paige L; Gillman, Matthew W; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2014-10-01

    To prospectively evaluate the associations of folate with assisted reproductive technology outcomes within a population in the United States. This analysis included women (n=232) in a prospective cohort study at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. Diet was assessed before assisted reproductive technology treatment using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Intermediate and clinical endpoints of assisted reproductive technology were abstracted from medical records. Generalized linear mixed models with random intercepts to account for multiple cycles per woman were used to evaluate the association of folate intake with assisted reproductive technology outcomes adjusting for calorie intake, age, body mass index, race, smoking status, infertility diagnosis, and protocol type. Among the 232 women (median age 35.2 years, median folate intake 1,778 micrograms/day), higher folate intake was associated with higher rates of implantation, clinical pregnancy, and live birth. The adjusted percentage (95% confidence interval [CI]) of initiated assisted reproductive technology cycles resulting in a live birth for women in increasing quartiles of folate intake were 30% (95% CI 21-42%), 47% (95% CI 35-59%), 42% (95% CI 30-35%) and 56% (95% CI 43-67%) (P for trend=0.01). Live birth rates were 20% (95% CI 8-31%) higher among women in the highest quartile of supplemental folate intake (more than 800 micrograms/day) than among women in the lowest quartile (less than 400 micrograms/day). Higher supplemental folate intake was associated with higher fertilization rates and lower cycle failure rates before embryo transfer (P for trend=0.03 and 0.02). Higher intake of supplemental folate was associated with higher live birth rates after assisted reproductive technology treatment. : II.

  17. Preparing for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as rubella, tetanus, influenza, and whooping cough. Take advantage of wellness programs at work or in the ... Division of Reproductive Health Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding ...

  18. 21 CFR 884.6200 - Assisted reproduction laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction laser system. 884.6200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6200 Assisted reproduction laser system. (a) Identification. The assisted reproduction laser system is a device...

  19. 21 CFR 884.6100 - Assisted reproduction needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction needles. 884.6100 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6100 Assisted reproduction needles. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction needles are devices used in in...

  20. 21 CFR 884.6160 - Assisted reproduction labware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction labware. 884.6160 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6160 Assisted reproduction labware. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction labware consists of laboratory...

  1. 21 CFR 884.6130 - Assisted reproduction microtools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction microtools. 884.6130 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6130 Assisted reproduction microtools. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction microtools are pipettes or...

  2. 21 CFR 884.6120 - Assisted reproduction accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction accessories. 884.6120... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6120 Assisted reproduction accessories. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction accessories are a group of...

  3. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in in...

  4. Reducing multiple births in assisted reproduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Kamath, Mohan S

    2014-02-01

    Multiple pregnancy, a complication of assisted reproduction technology, is associated with poorer maternal and perinatal outcomes. The primary reason behind this is the strategy of replacing more than one embryo during an assisted reproduction technology cycle to maximise pregnancy rates. The solution to this problem is to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in-vitro fertilisation. The transition from triple- to double-embryo transfer, which decreased the risk of triplets without compromising pregnancy rates, was easily implemented. The adoption of a single embryo transfer policy has been slow because of concerns about impaired pregnancy rates in a fresh assisted reproduction technology cycle. Widespread availability of effective cryopreservation programmes means that elective single embryo transfer, along with subsequent frozen embryo transfers, could provide a way forward. Any such strategy will need to consider couples' preferences and existing funding policies, both of which have a profound influence on decision making around embryo transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Mexican National Consensus on Assisted Reproduction Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; López Ortiz, Carlos Salazar; Serviere Zaragoza, Claudio; Velázquez Cornejo, Gerardo; Pérez Peña, Efrain; Santos Haliscack, Roberto; Luna Rojas, Martha; Valerio, Emilio; Santana, Héctor; Gaviño Gaviño, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    It is estimated that 15% of couples living in industrialized countries are infertile, ie have failed to conceive, reproductive age, after 12 months ormore of regular intercourse without contraception. During the past decade has increased the demand for fertility treatments because they believe are moreeffective now. To unify the therapeutic approach and service to patients and set a precedent for a Mexican Official Standard respect and support for the legislation of these procedures. Consensus by technical experts group panel with the participation of 34 national centers accredited for use in assisted reproduction. He organized seven workshops with the following themes: 1) selection of patients for assisted reproduction treatment, 2) schemes controlled ovarian stimulation for assisted reproduction techniques of high complexity, 3) preparation and egg retrieval technique, 4) transferembryo; 5) luteal phase supplementation; 6) indications and techniques of cryopreservation and 7) informed consent. Each table had a coordinator who wrote and presented the findings to the full, it made a number of observations until they reached unanimity of criteria, which are reflected in this document. Patient selection for assisted reproduction techniques is the first step of the process. Proper selection lead to success, in the same way that a bad pick up for failure. In the case of egg donation the most important recommendation is that only one to two embryos transferred in order to reduce multiple pregnancy rates and maintaining high pregnancy rates.

  6. Epigenetics and assisted reproductive technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne; Romundstad, Liv Bente

    2016-01-01

    associated with ART techniques, but disentangling the influence of the ART procedures per se from the effect of the reproductive disease of the parents is a challenge. Epidemiological human studies have shown altered birth weight profiles in ART compared with spontaneously conceived singletons. Conception...... adolescents conceived by ART have altered lipid and glucose profiles and thereby a higher long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This commentary describes the basic concepts of epigenetics and gives a short overview of the existing literature on the association between imprinting disorders...

  7. [Adoption: an alternative to assisted reproductive techniques?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchy, S

    2011-09-01

    Information on adoption must be given to couples who seek treatment for medically-assisted procreation. But is adoption a real alternative? What are the chances for a couple who consults to see its desire for adoption be achieved according to its own situation, the characteristics of the child he wants, and the general situation of adoption? Can adoption, just like assisted procreation, often described by the couples as a "obstacle course", go parallel? Or should one try adoption once assisted reproduction failed? Is the couple willing to suffer the social and legal control of adoption after having supported the medical control of the ART? In all cases, the reality is that two out of three couples engaged in assisted reproduction will have a child whereas scarcely more than one candidate to adoption will be offered to adopt a child after three or four-years procedure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Cultural and Ethical Challenges of Assisted Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the cultural and ethical issues arising from the use of Assisted Reproductive Health Technologies. ... Legitimacy of children born through ART, religious obligation, patriarchy, polygamy and value of children are cultural issues surrounding ARTs while decision making about it, discrimination against ...

  9. Improving embryo quality in assisted reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to improve embryo quality in assisted reproductive technologies by gaining more insight into human preimplantation embryo development and by improving in vitro culture conditions. To do so, we investigated an intriguing feature of the human preimplantation embryo, i.e.

  10. Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, M. van der; Buckingham, K.; Farquhar, C.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Metwally, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progesterone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy by stimulating proliferation in response to human chorionic gonadotropin(hCG) produced by the corpus luteum. This occurs in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In assisted reproduction techniques(ART), progesterone and/or hCG

  11. Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, M. Van der; Buckingham, K.; Farquhar, C.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Metwally, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progesterone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy by stimulating proliferation in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is produced by the corpus luteum. This occurs in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In assisted reproduction techniques (ART) the progesterone

  12. Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    There is a general perception that assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) affect only a small number of affluent women in India. However, the ART industry - tied as it is to the vigorously pushed medical tourism industry - has expanded to the extent that its consequences are no longer limited to a small number of affluent ...

  13. The ethics of assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzinikolaou, Nikolaos

    2010-05-01

    Issues concerning the beginning of life and medical intervention in the onset of human existence are very delicate in their nature; they involve multi-dimensional knowledge, they are difficult to comprehend and sensitive to handle. When pure scientific elements are combined with profound emotions, when the genius of technological discoveries touches upon human dignity and sanctity, when passion for the technological achievement intervenes in basic human rights, then the sense of inadequacy and ignorance becomes intense and critical. Silence seems more sought-after than words, and willingness to learn more prudent than the desire to speak. Fear of the inconceivable consequences and even more so the inability to assess them, experiments with the unknown, the likelihood that basic historical, ethical and social values may change forever, but mainly the replacement of God in His wondrous work of creation--the onset of human life--places the ethics of reproductive technologies on the frontline of contemporary bioethics. This opinion paper does not deal with dangers, insults, fears, threats, "speed limits" or ethical controversies, but rather with the very mystery of life. Although there are no generally accepted replies to the various questions being posed, some thoughts and reservations, which can shed some light upon complicated dilemmas are presented. Firstly, the content of reproductive technologies, the problem of infertility today, the methods of fertility treatment, and of prenatal and pre-implantation testing are described, and then the social impact of IVF, complicated cases, deontological dilemmas and some ethical concerns are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Islam, Assisted Reproduction, and the Bioethical Aftermath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Tremayne, Soraya

    2016-04-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), including in vitro fertilization to overcome infertility, are now widely available across the Middle East. Islamic fatwas emerging from the Sunni Islamic countries have permitted many ARTs, while prohibiting others. However, recent religious rulings emanating from Shia Muslim-dominant Iran have created unique avenues for infertile Muslim couples to obtain donor gametes through third-party reproductive assistance. The opening of Iran to gamete donation has had major impacts in Shia-dominant Lebanon and has led to so-called reproductive tourism of Sunni Muslim couples who are searching for donor gametes across national and international borders. This paper explores the "bioethical aftermath" of donor technologies in the Muslim Middle East. Other unexpected outcomes include new forms of sex selection and fetal "reduction." In general, assisted reproduction in the Muslim world has been a key site for understanding how emerging biomedical technologies are generating new Islamic bioethical discourses and local moral responses, as ARTs are used in novel and unexpected ways.

  15. 21 CFR 884.6140 - Assisted reproduction micropipette fabrication instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction micropipette fabrication... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6140 Assisted reproduction micropipette fabrication instruments. (a) Identification...

  16. 21 CFR 884.6150 - Assisted reproduction micromanipulators and microinjectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction micromanipulators and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6150 Assisted reproduction micromanipulators and microinjectors. (a) Identification...

  17. Assisted reproductive technologies and the right to reproduce under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive rights in South Africa have traditionally focused on the rights of individuals to avoid reproduction. However, with an increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), there has been a shift in the focus on reproductive rights from the rights of individuals to avoid reproduction to the rights of ...

  18. International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies world report: Assisted Reproductive Technology 2008, 2009 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, S; Chambers, G M; de Mouzon, J; Nygren, K G; Zegers-Hochschild, F; Mansour, R; Ishihara, O; Banker, M; Adamson, G D

    2016-07-01

    What were utilization, outcomes and practices in assisted reproductive technology (ART) globally in 2008, 2009 and 2010? Global utilization and effectiveness remained relatively constant despite marked variations among countries, while the rate of single and frozen embryo transfers (FETs) increased with a concomitant slight reduction in multiple birth rates. ART is widely practised in all regions of the world. Monitoring utilization, an approximation of availability and access, as well as effectiveness and safety is an important component of universal access to reproductive health. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional survey on utilization, effectiveness and safety of ART procedures performed globally from 2008 to 2010. Between 58 and 61 countries submitted data from a total of nearly 2500 ART clinics each year. Aggregate country data were processed and analyzed based on forms and methods developed by the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART). Results are presented at country, regional and global level. For the years 2008, 2009 and 2010, >4 461 309 ART cycles were initiated, resulting in an estimated 1 144 858 babies born. The number of aspirations increased by 6.4% between 2008 and 2010, while FET cycles increased by 27.6%. Globally, ART utilization remained relatively constant at 436 cycles/million in 2008 and 474 cycles/million population in 2010, but with a wide country range of 8-4775 cycles/million population. ICSI remained constant at around 66% of non-donor aspiration cycles. The IVF/ICSI combined delivery rate (DR) per fresh aspiration was 19.8% in 2008; 19.7% in 2009 and 20.0% in 2010, with corresponding DRs for FET of 18.8, 19.7 and 20.7%. In fresh non-donor cycles, single embryo transfer increased from 25.7% in 2008 to 30.0% in 2010, while the average number of embryos transferred fell from 2.1 to 1.9, again with wide regional variation. The rates of twin deliveries following fresh non-donor transfers

  19. Resources and race: assisted reproduction in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth F.S. Roberts

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the early period of development of IVF in Ecuador, focusing on factors that shaped the decade after the nation's first successful IVF birth (1992–2002. It describes how a poorly resourced public healthcare sector compelled Ecuadorians towards private-sector medicine, which included assisted reproduction treatment, and how IVF clinics drew patients through the pervasive racial inequalities that characterise post-colonial Ecuadorian society. More generally, the development of assisted reproduction treatment in Ecuador exemplifies themes in 20th century healthcare provisioning and inequality in Latin America, making it essential to understand this larger picture when considering Ecuador’s IVF industry both within the region and also internationally.

  20. Legal issues of biomedical assisted reproduction: Reproductive tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardžić Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available National laws represent a combination of customary and ethical, but also political and other opinions in a society. Particularly delicate, are the laws regulating the issue of assisted reproduction. In this area, broad social acceptance of legal solutions is an essential prerequisite for their use, while achieving the consent of the majority, especially the consensus is extremely difficult, almost impossible. As much as the laws seek to implement those views that are predominant, the adopted solutions will always remain incapable of granting wishes to a certain number of people. These persons, in an understandable effort to realize their desire for an offspring at any cost, will not hold back from seeking help at any place, even if it meant going to distant destinations and extracting large sums of money. In fact, many patients go to other countries which set less restrictive rules in the field of assisted reproduction, and it appears that in the near future we could not expect a reduction of this trend. This phenomenon, which is in theory called reproductive tourism, has long been a reality that one can see as a problem, while others view it as an irreplaceable solution. This paper seeks to highlight the main causes of this phenomenon, but also to try and give an answer as to, whether reproductive tourism should be prevented (and how or actually its maintenance in force reduces moral conflict in society through a mechanism that recognizes the right of everyone to a considerable extent of free will in decision making regarding the most significant issues which offspring certainly is.

  1. Pregnancy outcomes after assisted human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Nanette; Sierra, Sony

    2014-01-01

    To review the effect of assisted human reproduction (AHR) on perinatal outcomes, to identify areas requiring further research with regard to birth outcomes and AHR, and to provide guidelines to optimize obstetrical management and counselling of prospective Canadian parents. This document compares perinatal outcomes of different types of AHR pregnancies with each other and with those of spontaneously conceived pregnancies. Clinicians will be better informed about the adverse outcomes that have been documented in association with AHR, including obstetrical complications, adverse perinatal outcomes, multiple gestations, structural congenital abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities, and imprinting disorders. Published literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library from January 2005 to December 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (assisted reproduction, assisted reproductive technology, ovulation induction, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo transfer, and in vitro fertilization). Results were not restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies; studies of all designs published in English from January 2005 to December 2012 were reviewed, and additional publications were identified from the bibliographies of these articles. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to August 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Summary Statements 1. There is increasing evidence that infertility or subfertility is an

  2. The incidence of monozygotic twinning in assisted reproductive technology: analysis based on results from the 2010 Japanese ART national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasuji, Takashi; Saito, Hidekazu; Araki, Ryuichiro; Nakaza, Aritoshi; Nakashima, Akira; Kuwahara, Akira; Ishihara, Osamu; Irahara, Minoru; Kubota, Toshiro; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Sakumoto, Tetsuro

    2014-07-01

    To assess the incidence of monozygotic twinning (MZT) among cases undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. We performed a retrospective observational study and analyzed the data of patients who were registered in the national ART registry system of Japan from January to December 2010; only the data of patients with single embryo transfer (ET) were included. Of 30,405 pregnancies, 425 resulted in MZT following fresh and frozenthawed ET. The MZT incidence among women undergoing ART was 1.4 %. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that cases undergoing fresh and frozen-thawed ET, blastocyst transfer had a significantly increased MZT rate (P < 0.01). Assisted hatching (AH) and frozen-thawed ET and maternal age did not significantly affect the MZT incidence. Of 8510 fresh ET pregnancies, 104 resulted in MZT. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that blastocyst transfer significantly increased the MZT rate in cases undergoing fresh ET. Ovarian stimulation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, AH, and maternal age did not significantly affect the MZT incidence. Blastocyst transfer was associated with an increased MZT incidence. We have to be aware of the potential risk of MZT caused by blastocyst transfer. However, further studies are required to assess the correlation among specific AH types, embryo culture conditions, and MZT incidence.

  3. [Results after assisted reproduction at a public fertility clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanevik, Hans Ivar; Kahn, Jarl A; Bergh, Anette; Eriksen, Ellen; Friberg, Unn Mette; Haraldsen, Caroline Vegheim; Nilsen, Trine Gullhaug; Sydtveit, Astrid Helene; Rode, Paula

    2012-04-30

    Assisted reproduction is traditionally regarded as effective when it results in a high pregnancy rate per started treatment cycle. For the patients, it is more interesting to know how high the probability is of giving birth during a full course of assisted reproduction treatment. Retrospective series of 546 patients followed for three years of assisted reproduction at a public fertility clinic. During the follow-up period, 347 of the patients (63.6%) gave birth by means of assisted reproduction. Of the 199 remaining patients, 70 (12.8% of 546) stopped treatment because they had completed the three treatment cycles that are covered by public funding. Thirty seven patients (6.8% of 546) conceived without assisted reproduction. Assisted reproduction at public fertility clinics in Norway is as effective as that in our neighbouring countries. Over the past 18 years, the effectiveness of assisted reproduction has increased by about 50%.

  4. Geographic access to assisted reproductive technology health care in the United States: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John A; Menke, Marie N; Haefner, Jessica K; Moniz, Michelle H; Perumalswami, Chithra R

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the geographic distribution of assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics and the number of ART clinics within U.S. Census metropolitan areas and to estimate the number of reproductive-age women who have geographic access to ART services in the United States. A population-based cross-sectional study. Not applicable. None. None. Number of U.S. reproductive-age women living in areas with no ART clinic, a single ART clinic, or more than one ART clinic. There were 510 ART clinics in the United States in 2009-2013. Multiple ART clinics were present in 76 metropolitan areas (median population of 1.45 million people), where a total of 442 clinics were located. A single ART clinic was present in 68 metropolitan areas (median population of 454,000 people). Among U.S. reproductive-age women in 2010, 38.1 million (60.4% of the U.S. population) lived in an area with multiple ART clinics, 6.8 million (10.8% of the U.S. population) lived in an area with a single clinic, and 18.2 million (28.8% of the U.S. population) lived in an area (metropolitan and nonmetropolitan) with no ART clinics. Nearby geographic access to ART services is limited or absent for more than 25 million reproductive-age women (39.6% of the U.S. population) in the United States. This population estimate should spur continued policy and technological progress to increase access to ART services. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Criminal code and assisted human reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Bechiarelli, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    The Spanish Criminal Code punishes in the article 161 the crime of assisted reproduction of the woman without her assent as a form of crime relative to the genetic manipulation. The crime protects a specific area of the freedom of decision of the woman, which is the one that she has dealing with the right to the procreation at the moment of being fertilized. The sentence would include the damages to the health provoked by the birth or the abortion. The crime is a common one--everyone can commit it--and it is not required a result of pregnancy, but it is consumed by the mere intervention on the body of the woman, and its interpretation is contained on the Law 14/2006, of may 26, on technologies of human assisted reproduction. The aim of the work is to propose to consider valid the assent given by the sixteen-year-old women (and older) in coherence with the Project of Law about sexual and reproductive health and voluntary interruption of the pregnancy that is studied at this moment, in Spain, in order to harmonize the legal systems.

  6. Assisted reproductive technologies in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Don P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs have been used in the production of rhesus monkey offspring at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC and that experience is summarized here. Additionally these technologies serve as a source of oocytes/embryos for monozygotic twinning, embryonic stem (ES cell derivation and cloning. High fertilization efficiencies were realized with conventional insemination or following the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and approximately 50% of the resulting embryos grew in vitro to blastocysts. Both fresh and frozen sperm were employed in fertilization by ICSI and the resulting embryos could be low temperature stored for subsequent thawing and transfer when a synchronized recipient female was available or after shipment to another facility. Following the transfer of up to 3 embryos, an overall pregnancy rate of 30% was achieved with increasing rates dependent upon the number of embryos transferred. Singleton pregnancy outcomes following the transfer of ART produced embryos were similar to those observed in a control group of animals in the timed mated breeding colony at ONPRC. ICSI produced embryos were used in efforts to create monozygotic twins by blastomere separation or blastocyst splitting. While pregnancies were achieved following the transfer of demi-embryos, only one was a twin and it was lost to spontaneous abortion. ICSI produced embryos have also served as the source of blastocysts for the derivation of embryonic stem cells. These pluripotent cells hold potential for cell based therapies and we consider the monkey an important translational model in which to evaluate safety, efficacy and feasibility of regenerative medicine approaches based on the transplantation of stem cell-derived progeny. Finally, efforts to produce genetically-identical monkeys by nuclear transfer have been briefly summarized.

  7. Assisted reproduction developments in the Islamic world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, G I; Dickens, B M

    2001-08-01

    A November 2000 workshop organized by the International Islamic Center for Population Studies and Research, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, considered use of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) in the Islamic world. The workshop reinforced a 1997 recommendation that a Standing Committee for Shari'a Medical Ethics be constituted to monitor and assess developments in ART practice. Among issues the workshop addressed were equitable access to services for infertile couples of modest means, and regulation of standards of equipment and personnel that ART centers should satisfy to gain approval to offer services. Acceptable uses of preimplantation genetic diagnosis were proposed, and follicular maturation research in animals, including in vitro maturation and in vitro growth of oocytes, was encouraged, leading to human applications. Embryo implantation following a husband's death, induced postmenopausal pregnancy, uterine transplantation and gene therapy were addressed and human reproductive cloning condemned, but cloning human embryos for stem cell research was considered acceptable.

  8. Validation of birth outcomes from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS): population-based analysis from the Massachusetts Outcome Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Gopal, Daksha; Liberman, Rebecca F; Anderka, Marlene; Kotelchuck, Milton; Luke, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    To assess the validity of outcome data reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) compared with data from vital records and the birth defects registry in Massachusetts. Longitudinal cohort. Not applicable. A total of 342,035 live births and fetal deaths from Massachusetts mothers giving birth in the state from July 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008; 9,092 births and fetal deaths were from mothers who had conceived with the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and whose cycle data had been reported to the SART CORS. Not applicable. Percentage agreement between maternal race and ethnicity, delivery outcome (live birth or fetal death), plurality (singleton, twin, or triplet+), delivery date, and singleton birth weight reported in the SART CORS versus vital records; sensitivity and specificity for birth defects among singletons as reported in the SART CORS versus the Massachusetts Birth Defects Monitoring Program (BDMP). There was >95% agreement between the SART CORS and vital records for fields of maternal race/ethnicity, live birth/fetal death, and plurality; birth outcome date was within 1 day with 94.9% agreement and birth weight was within 100 g with 89.6% agreement. In contrast, sensitivity for report of any birth defect was 38.6%, with a range of 18.4%-50.0%, for specific birth defect categories. Although most SART CORS outcome fields are accurately reported, birth defect variables showed poor sensitivity compared with the gold standard data from the BDMP. We suggest that reporting of birth defects be discontinued. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assisted Reproductive Technology: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be prevented or minimized by limiting the number of embryos that are put into the woman's body. Learn More Assisted Reproductive Technologies (American Society for Reproductive Medicine) - PDF Also ...

  10. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology and assisted reproductive technology in the United States: a 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, James P; Coddington, Charles C; Doody, Kevin; Van Voorhis, Brad; Seifer, David B; Ball, G David; Luke, Barbara; Wantman, Ethan

    2016-09-01

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) was established within a few years of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in the United States, and has not only reported on the evolution of infertility care, but also guided it toward improved success and safety. Moving beyond its initial role as a registry, SART has expanded its role to include quality assurance, data validation, practice and advertising guidelines, research, patient education and advocacy, and membership support. The success of ART in this country has greatly benefited from SART's role, as highlighted by a series of graphs. SART continues to set the standard and lead the way. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic and epigenetic risks of assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziru; Wang, Yinyu; Lin, Jing; Xu, Jingjing; Ding, Guolian; Huang, Hefeng

    2017-10-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is used primarily for infertility treatments to achieve pregnancy and involves procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and cryopreservation. Moreover, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of ART is used in couples for genetic reasons. In ART treatments, gametes and zygotes are exposed to a series of non-physiological processes and culture media. Although the majority of children born with this treatment are healthy, some concerns remain regarding the safety of this technology. Animal studies and follow-up studies of ART-borne children suggested that ART was associated with an increased incidence of genetic, physical, or developmental abnormalities, although there are also observations that contradict these findings. As IVF, ICSI, frozen-thawed embryo transfer, and PGD manipulate gametes and embryo at a time that is important for reprogramming, they may affect epigenetic stability, leading to gamete/embryo origins of adult diseases. In fact, ART offspring have been reported to have an increased risk of gamete/embryo origins of adult diseases, such as early-onset diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and so on. In this review, we will discuss evidence related to genetic, especially epigenetic, risks of assisted reproduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assisted reproductive technology: Islamic Sunni perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed Ali

    2015-06-01

    Islam acknowledges that infertility is a significant hardship. Attempts to cure infertility are not only permissible, but also encouraged in Islam. Over the last three decades, a multitude of advances in assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have appeared. This review was carried out to inform readers, who are not familiar with Islamic doctrine, about the Sunni perspective on this topic. Systematic review of the literature. A series of searches was conducted of Medline databases published in English between January 1978 and December 2013 with the following assisted reproduction, infertility, gender selection, ethics, bioethics, and Islam. In Islamic Sunni law, all ARTs are allowed, provided that the source of the sperm, ovum, and uterus comes from a legally married couple during the span of their marriage. All forms of surrogacy are forbidden. A third-party donor is not allowed, whether he or she is providing sperm, eggs, embryos, or a uterus. Frozen preimplantation may be transferred to the wife in a successive cycle provided the marital bondage is not absolved by death or divorce. Gender selection for medical reasons is permitted. It is allowed for limited social reasons by some jurists, provided it does not involve discrimination against either sex. ART is acceptable and commendable in Islamic Sunni law provided it is practiced within the husband and wife dyad during the span of their marital contract. No third party should intrude upon the marital function of procreation. Surrogacy is not accepted by Sunni Islamic authorities.

  13. The morality of assisted reproduction and genetic manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Mori

    Full Text Available The author analyzes the pros and cons of various forms of assisted reproduction, including the use of so-called 'genetic manipulation'. He shows how in ethics the only arguments with any chance of reaching a consensus (or at least an agreement are those of the rational type, based on universally acceptable ethical principles or corroborated by empirical facts and real life experience (as the starting point for identifying problems requiring analysis. After an analysis in which he identifies the incoherence and inconsistency of arguments against assisted reproduction, the author defends the right of human beings to decide autonomously about the most healthy forms of procreation, including those involving genetic manipulation. His starting point is the moral principle by which it is morally preferable to intervene in natural processes (as opposed to not intervening whenever this implies preventing and reducing disease and suffering

  14. Congenital anomalies after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja; Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Malchau, Sara Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 5 million children have been born after assisted reproductive technology (ART), and in many developed countries ART infants represent more than 1% of the birth cohorts. It is well known that ART children are at increased risk of congenital malformations even after adjustment...... for known confounders such as maternal age. The proportion of ART children is not negligible, and knowledge about the causes of the higher risk of congenital malformations is crucial to develop prevention strategies to reduce the future risk in ART children. The aim of this review is to summarize...... the literature on the association between ART and congenital anomalies with respect to subfertility, fertility treatment other than ART, and different ART methods including intracytoplasmic sperm injection, blastocyst culture, and cryotechniques. Trends over time in ART and congenital anomalies will also...

  15. Gestational carrier in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugappan, Gayathree; Farland, Leslie V; Missmer, Stacey A; Correia, Katharine F; Anchan, Raymond M; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2018-03-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with the use of gestational carriers (GCs) with non-GC IVF cycles. Retrospective cohort study of assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles performed with (24,269) and without (1,313,452) the use of a GC. ART centers. Infertile patients seeking IVF with or without use of a GC. Autologous and donor oocyte cycles, fresh and cryopreserved embryo transfer cycles. Live birth rate (LBR), twin and high-order multiple birth rates. Approximately 2% of embryo transfers used a GC. Per embryo transfer, GCs had greater pregnancy rate and LBR across all IVF types compared with non-GC cycles in crude models and models adjusted a priori for potential confounders. For women with uterine-factor infertility, embryo transfer with the use of a GC resulted in a higher odds of live birth for autologous fresh embryos and for cryopreserved embryos compared with patients with non-uterine-factor infertility diagnoses. GC benefits LBRs for some patients seeking ART. The highest LBRs occurred when the indication for GC was uterine-factor infertility. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Heterotopic pregnancy in an assisted reproduction conception; case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility management by assisted reproduction techniques has had rapid increase. While there is robust evidence supporting the efficacy and safety of assisted reproduction technique (ART), complications are encountered. Heterotopic pregnancy, defined as the presence of both an intrauterine and an ectopic gestation, ...

  17. Do assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies require additional antenatal care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauniaux, E; Ben-Ami, I; Maymon, R

    2013-02-01

    Iatrogenic twinning has become the main side-effect assisted reproduction treatment. We have evaluated the evidence for additional care that assisted-reproduction twins may require compared with spontaneous twins. Misacarriages are increased in women with tubal problems and after specific treatments. Assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies complicated by a vanishing twin after 8 weeks have an increased risk of preterm delivery and of low and very low birthweight compared with singleton assisted-reproduction pregnancies. Monozygotic twin pregnancies occur at a higher rate after assisted reproduction treatment and are associated with a higher risk of perinatal complications. The incidence of placenta praevia and vasa praevia is increased in assisted-reproduction twin pregnancies. Large cohort studies do not indicate a higher rate of fetal congenital malformations in assisted-reproduction twins. Overall, assisted-reproduction twins in healthy women assisted-reproduction twins is only increased in women with a pre-existing medical condition such as hypertensive disorders and diabetes and most of these risks can be avoided with single-embryo transfer. Following the birth of the first IVF baby, rumours started to spread in both the medical literature and the media about the long-term health effects for children born following assisted reproduction treatment. However, after more than 30 years, the most common complications associated with IVF treatment remain indirect and technical such as the failure of treatment and ovarian hyperstimulation. Iatrogenic twinning has become the main side-effect of assisted reproduction treatment and the increasing number of twin pregnancies, in particular in older women, has generated numerous debates on the need for additional healthcare provision. In this review, we have evaluated the evidence for additional care that assisted-conception twin pregnancies may require compared with spontaneous twin pregnancies. Twin pregnancies are

  18. Varicocele repair in the era of modern assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Matthew; Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Lipshultz, Larry

    2012-11-01

    This review looks at the literature on varicocele repair and its effect on assisted reproductive techniques. The effects of varicocele correction on improved sperm production have been well documented with semen analysis data. What remain to be elucidated are the causes of the varicocele effect and how correction of the resultant pathophysiology may affect the outcomes of modern assisted reproductive technology. Basic science research shows us that varicoceles exert deleterious effects on Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, and germ cells via very different mechanisms. The effects of varicocele correction on the reproductive potential of sperm are less well understood. Clinical research has shown improved semen parameters, DNA integrity, and assisted reproductive technology outcomes after varicocele repair. Varicocele correction presents a possible method to optimize a couples' reproductive potential or decrease the need for complex assisted reproductive technology.

  19. [Assisted reproductive technologies and the embryo status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Y

    The status of the human embryo has always be a subject of philosophical and theological thoughts with major social consequences, but, until the 19th century, it has been mainly an abstraction. The arrival of the human embryo in vitro, materialized by Louise Brown's birth in 1978 and above all by the supernumerary embryos produced by the Australian team of Trounson and Wood following the introduction of ovarian stimulation, will turn theoretical thoughts into a reality. Nobody may ignore the hidden intentions behind the debate, as to recognise a status to a few days old embryo will immediately have a major impact on the status of a few weeks old foetus and therefore on the abortion rights. We will see that the embryo status, essentially based as well on a vision on the good and evil as on social order, cannot be based on a scientific analysis of the reproduction process but comes from a society's choice, by essence " arbitrary " and always disputable. This does not preclude the collectivity right and legitimacy to give a precise status and it is remarkable to observe the law is careful not to specify which status to give to the human embryo. It is more thru handling procedures and functioning rules that the law designed the embryo position, neither with a status of a person, nor of a thing. It nevertheless remains true that there is a constant risk that the legislation gives the embryo a status that would call into question it's unique characteristic of early reproductive stage, jeopardizing at once the hard-won reproductive freedom (reproductive choice) as well as freedom of research on embryonic stem cells, one of the most promising field of medical research.

  20. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance -- United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2013-12-06

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2010 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2010 (resulting from procedures performed in 2009 and 2010) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2010. 2010. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States and U.S. territories, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2010, a total of 147,260 ART procedures performed in 443 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,090 live-birth deliveries and 61,564 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,524), New York (excluding New York City) (14,212), Illinois (10,110), Massachusetts (9,854), New Jersey (8,783), and Texas (8,754). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 48.0% of all ART procedures performed, 45.0% of all infants born

  1. Application of microfluidic technologies to human assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2017-04-01

    Microfluidics can be considered both a science and a technology. It is defined as the study of fluid behavior at a sub-microliter level and the investigation into its application to cell biology, chemistry, genetics, molecular biology and medicine. There are at least two characteristics of microfluidics, mechanical and biochemical, which can be influential in the field of mammalian gamete and preimplantation embryo biology. These microfluidic characteristics can assist in basic biological studies on sperm, oocyte and preimplantation embryo structure, function and environment. The mechanical and biochemical characteristics of microfluidics may also have practical and/or technical application(s) to assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in rodents, domestic species, endangered species and humans. This review will consider data in mammals, and when available humans, addressing the potential application(s) of microfluidics to assisted reproduction. There are numerous sequential steps in the clinical assisted reproductive laboratory process that work, yet could be improved. Cause and effect relations of procedural inefficiencies can be difficult to identify and/or remedy. Data will be presented that consider microfluidic applications to sperm isolation, oocyte cumulus complex isolation, oocyte denuding, oocyte mechanical manipulation, conventional insemination, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo culture, embryo analysis and oocyte and embryo cryopreservation. While these studies have progressed in animal models, data with human gametes and embryos are significantly lacking. These data from clinical trials are requisite for making future evidence-based decisions regarding the application of microfluidics in human ART. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...... and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0...

  3. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Boulet, Sheree L; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2018-02-16

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Although the majority of infants conceived through ART are singletons, women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks for both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery (state-specific information for the United States (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2015 and compares birth outcomes that occurred in 2015 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2014 and 2015) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2015. 2015. In 1995, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493 [October 24, 1992]). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System, a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico). In 2015, a total of 182,111 ART procedures (range: 135 in Alaska to 23,198 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 464 U.S. fertility clinics and reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 59,334 live-birth deliveries (range: 55 in Wyoming to 7,802 in California) and 71,152 infants born (range: 68 in Wyoming to 9,176 in California). Nationally, the number of ART procedures performed per 1 million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART utilization rate, was

  4. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of gametes...

  5. Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Michelle; Buckingham, Karen; Farquhar, Cindy; Kremer, Jan Am; Metwally, Mostafa

    2011-10-05

    Progesterone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy by stimulating proliferation in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is produced by the corpus luteum. This occurs in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In assisted reproduction techniques (ART) the progesterone or hCG levels, or both, are low and the natural process is insufficient, so the luteal phase is supported with either progesterone, hCG or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. Luteal phase support improves implantation rate and thus pregnancy rates but the ideal method is still unclear. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2004 (Daya 2004). To determine the relative effectiveness and safety of methods of luteal phase support in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproductive technology. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), LILACS, conference abstracts on the ISI Web of Knowledge, OpenSigle for grey literature from Europe, and ongoing clinical trials registered online. The final search was in February 2011. Randomised controlled trials of luteal phase support in ART investigating progesterone, hCG or GnRH agonist supplementation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. Quasi-randomised trials and trials using frozen transfers or donor oocyte cycles were excluded. We extracted data per women and three review authors independently assessed risk of bias. We contacted the original authors when data were missing or the risk of bias was unclear. We entered all data in six different comparisons. We calculated the Peto odds ratio (Peto OR) for each comparison. Sixty-nine studies with a total of 16,327 women were included. We assessed most of the studies as having an unclear risk of bias, which we interpreted as a high risk

  6. Accuracy of self-reported survey data on assisted reproductive technology treatment parameters and reproductive history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; McLain, Alexander C; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Luke, Barbara; Yeung, Edwina H

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown whether data obtained from maternal self-report for assisted reproductive technology treatment parameters and reproductive history are accurate for use in research studies. We evaluated the accuracy of self-reported in assisted reproductive technology treatment and reproductive history from the Upstate KIDS study in comparison with clinical data reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Upstate KIDS maternal questionnaire data from deliveries between 2008 and 2010 were linked to data reported to Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. The 617 index deliveries were compared as to treatment type (frozen embryo transfer and donor egg or sperm) and use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection and assisted hatching. Use of injectable medications, self-report for assisted reproductive technology, or frozen embryo transfer prior to the index deliveries were also compared. We report agreement in which both sources had yes or both no and sensitivity of maternal report using Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System as the gold standard. Significance was determined using χ(2) at P self-reported use (P reported than was use of injectable medication (agreement, 76%) (P report in vitro fertilization treatment but are less accurate about procedures handled in the laboratory (intracytoplasmic sperm injection or assisted hatching). Clinics might better communicate with patients on the use of these procedures, and researchers should use caution when using self-reported treatment data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2017-02-10

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2014 and compares birth outcomes that occurred in 2014 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2013 and 2014) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2014. 2014. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico). In 2014, a total of 169,568 ART procedures (range: 124 in Wyoming to 21,018 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 458 U.S. fertility clinics and reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 56,028 live-birth deliveries (range: 52 in Wyoming to 7,230 in California) and 68,782 infants born (range: 64 in Wyoming to 8,793 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,647 (range: 364 in Puerto Rico

  8. International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology: world report on assisted reproductive technology, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Mansour, Ragaa; Ishihara, Osamu; Adamson, G David; de Mouzon, Jacques; Nygren, Karl G; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2014-02-01

    To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide and trends in outcomes over successive years. Cross-sectional survey on access, effectiveness, and safety of ART procedures performed in 53 countries during 2005. A total of 2,973 clinics from national and regional ART registries. Infertile women and men undergoing ART globally. Collection and analysis of international ART data. Number of cycles performed by country and region, including pregnancies, single and multiple birth rates, and perinatal mortality. Overall, 1,052,363 ART procedures resulted in an estimated 237,315 babies born. The availability of ART varied by country from 15 to 3,982 cycles per million of population. Of all initiated fresh cycles, 62.9% were intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration was 19.6% and for frozen embryo transfer 17.4%, with a cumulative delivery rate of 23.9%. With wide regional variations, single embryo transfer represented 17.5% of cycles, and the proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from fresh transfers was 23.6% and 1.5%, respectively. Systematic collection and dissemination of international ART data allows patients, health professionals, and policy makers to examine and compare the impact of reproductive strategies or lack of them as markers of reproductive health. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assisted reproduction techniques in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews current equine assisted reproduction techniques. Embryo transfer is the most common equine ART, but is still limited by the inability to superovulate mares effectively. Immature oocytes may be recovered by transvaginal ultrasound-guided aspiration of immature follicles, or from ovaries postmortem, and can be effectively matured in vitro. Notably, the in vivo-matured oocyte may be easily recovered from the stimulated preovulatory follicle. Standard IVF is still not repeatable in the horse; however, embryos and foals can be produced by surgical transfer of mature oocytes to the oviducts of inseminated recipient mares or via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Currently, ICSI and in vitro embryo culture are routinely performed by only a few laboratories, but reported blastocyst development rates approach those found after bovine IVF (i.e. 25%-35%). Nuclear transfer can be relatively efficient (up to 26% live foal rate per transferred embryo), but few laboratories are working in this area. Equine blastocysts may be biopsied via micromanipulation, with normal pregnancy rates after biopsy, and accurate genetic analysis. Equine expanded blastocysts may be vitrified after collapsing them via micromanipulation, with normal pregnancy rates after warming and transfer. Many of these recently developed techniques are now in clinical use.

  10. Assisted human reproduction: psychological and ethical dilemmas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singer, Dani; Hunter, Myra

    2003-01-01

    ... Psychological therapy and counselling with individuals and families after donor conception Sharon A Pettle Chapter 9 182 Policy development in third party reproduction: an international perspective...

  11. Full in vitro fertilization laboratory mechanization: toward robotic assisted reproduction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meseguer, Marcos; Krühne, Ulrich; Laursen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the current efforts made to standardize different steps of assisted reproductive technology processes by the introduction of new technologies for the nonsubjective sperm selection process, oocyte denudation by mechanical removal of cumulus cells, oocyte positioning, sperm...

  12. Reproduction in females bufalinas: artificial insemination and assisted reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vale, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive behavior in females bufalinas has been studied for the detection of estrus. A system that works through radio telemetry has been developed and proposed to replace the daily visual observation to determine the estrous phase with efficiency and precision. The method used is the fixation on the back of the female with a sensor that emits radio waves every time suffer a pressure exerted by the mountain. Waves have been captured by an antenna and sent to a computer system. The knowledge that has been developed on the management and use of reproductive biotechnologies of reproduction in buffalo, have enabled the technicians and breeders evaluate and indicate which procedures can be used successfully, and increase the application of the fixed-time artificial insemination during the year [es

  13. Need for Regulation of Assisted Reproductive Techniques in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive health and population control are part of the goals developing countries are called upon to pursue as part of the millennium development goals (MDGs). Indeed, population health is one of the parameters used in assessing progress towards achievement of these goals. Thus, assisted reproductive techniques ...

  14. Perceptions of infertile couples to assisted reproductive techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Maritsa Gourni; Pinelopi Sotiropoulou; Ioanna Gourni; Efthimios Faros; Maria Polikandrioti; Zoi Roupa

    2009-01-01

    Infertility treatment influences significantly not only the couples’ quality of life but also their psychology separately.Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions of infertility couples in regard to assisted reproductive techniques.Method and material: The sample study consisted of 110 infertile couples that seek medical help to a Center of Assisted Reproductive Techniques. A specially designed questionnaire was used for the needs of the survey, that included items relate...

  15. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies for Livestock Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrama Chakravarthi. P and N. Sri Balaji

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of farm animals is a prime concern over the years for researchers. Several reproductive technologies have been employed to achieve this. Assisted reproductive technologies like Artificial insemination, Superovulation, In vitro Fertilization, Embryo Transfer have been introduced to overcome reproductive problems, to increase the offspring from selected female’s and to reduce the generation intervals in farm animals. The progress achieved during the last few years in the assisted reproductive technologies field has been phenomenal. Artificial Insemination (AI is the most effective method being used for the genetic improvement of animals. Reproductive capacity and efficiency has been improved tremendously since the introduction of artificial insemination. The development of cloning using various cells from the animal body has created opening of a fascinating scientific arena. These technologies have been propounded as saviors of indigenous livestock breeds. These alternative reproductive techniques are available not only for manipulation of reproductive processes but also proven to be powerful tools in curbing the spread of vertically transmitted diseases. The successful reproductive technologies such as AI and Embryo transfer need be applied on a large scale, emerging biotechnogies such as MOET, IVF and Cloning provides powerful tool for rapidly changing the animal populations, genetically. This advanced reproduction technologies will definitely play an important role in the future perspective and visions for efficient reproductive performance in livestock. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 238-240

  17. High incidence of monozygotic twinning after assisted reproduction is related to genetic information, but not to assisted reproduction technology itself

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobek Jr., A.; Zbořilová, B.; Procházka, M.; Šilhánová, E.; Koutná, O.; Klásková, E.; Tkadlec, Emil; Sobek, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 3 (2015), s. 756-760 ISSN 0015-0282 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : monozygotic twins * genetics * assisted reproduction techniques * infertility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.426, year: 2015

  18. The role of adiponectin in reproduction: from polycystic ovary syndrome to assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Konstantinos G; Segars, James H

    2010-11-01

    To summarize the effects of the adipokine adiponectin on the reproductive endocrine system, from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to the gonads and target tissues of the reproductive system. A Medline computer search was performed to identify relevant articles. Research institution. None. Adiponectin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissue that acts to reduce insulin resistance and atherogenic damage, but it also exerts actions in other tissues. Adiponectin mediates its actions in the periphery mainly via two receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Adiponectin receptors are present in many reproductive tissues, including the central nervous system, ovaries, oviduct, endometrium, and testes. Adiponectin influences gonadotropin release, normal pregnancy, and assisted reproduction outcomes. Adiponectin, a beneficial adipokine, represents a major link between obesity and reproduction. Higher levels of adiponectin are associated with improved menstrual function and better outcomes in assisted reproductive cycles. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. From esterilología to reproductive biology: The story of the Mexican assisted reproduction business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra P González-Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the first overview of how assisted reproduction emerged and developed in Mexico. In doing so it addresses two broad points: when and how treatments using assisted reproductive technology became common practice within reproductive medicine; and how the Mexican assisted reproduction industry emerged. The paper begins in 1949, when the first medical association dedicated to esterilología – the biomedical area focused on the study of infertility – was established, thus providing the epistemic and professional ground upon which assisted reproductive technology would later thrive. The paper then traces the way in which this biomedical industry developed, from individual doctors in their practices to networks of clinics and from a clinical practice to a reproductive industry. It also describes the different ways in which the professional community and the government have worked towards developing a regulatory frame for the practice of assisted reproduction. The paper is informed by ethnographic work conducted at clinics, conferences, online forums and websites, as well as by analysis of the contemporary national media, government documents and national medical journals from the early mid-twentieth century to the those published today.

  20. Advanced sperm selection techniques for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Simon; Kroon, Ben; Ford, Emily; Hook, Ysanne; Glujovsky, Demián; Yazdani, Anusch

    2014-10-28

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) bring together gametes outside of the body to enhance the probability of fertilisation and pregnancy. Advanced sperm selection techniques are increasingly being employed in ART, most commonly in cycles utilising ICSI. Advanced sperm selection techniques are thought to improve the chance that structurally intact and mature sperm with high DNA integrity are selected for fertilisation. Advanced sperm selection strategies include selection according to surface charge; sperm apoptosis; sperm birefringence; ability to bind to hyaluronic acid; and sperm morphology under ultra-high magnification. These techniques theoretically improve ART outcomes. To evaluate the impact of advanced sperm selection techniques on ART outcomes. Systematic search of electronic databases (Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information Database (LILACS)), trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform), conference abstracts (Web of Knowledge) and grey literature (OpenGrey) for relevant randomised controlled trials. We handsearched the reference lists of included studies and similar reviews. The search was conducted in May 2014. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing an advanced sperm selection technique versus standard IVF or ICSI or versus another advanced sperm selection technique. We excluded studies of sperm selection using ultra-high magnification (intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection, or IMSI), as they are the subject of a separate Cochrane review. Quasi-randomised and pseudo-randomised trials were

  1. Fragmented and domesticated bodies in assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ramírez-Gálvez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the mechanisms producing the meaning of infertility and the new ways of producing life through the use of conceptive reproductive technologies. The normative underpinnings of maternity and/or reproduction are highlighted, as well as the emergence and shaping of this field as a contemporary drive toward the commodification and consumption of biotechnology. Scientific progress, in this case, is incorporated in the techno-embryo, linked to the fetishization of the gene and the assertion of traditional values associated with consanguineous families.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of monochorionic diamniotic twinning after assisted reproduction: A six-year experience base on a large cohort of pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bing; Wei, Zhao-Lian; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Xue; He, Xiao-Jin; Wu, Huan; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Yun-Xia

    2017-01-01

    To characterize the incidence and risk factors for monochorionic diamniotic(MC-DA) twinning after assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Retrospective population-based study. The study was conducted in China; Department of Reproductive Medicine Center at The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University. A cohort of 8860 clinical pregnancies after embryo transfer (ET) carried out in our center between 2011 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed for the incidence of MC-DA twinning. Logistic regression was used to model the effect on the incidence of MC-DA twinning after ART. Different clinical data (maternal age) and laboratory procedures (type of ET (fresh versus frozen), insemination (IVF or ICSI)), embryo stage at time of ET (cleavage or blastocyst)) on the incidence of MC-DA twinning were evaluated. Monochorionic-diamniotic pregnancies were identified when more than one fetal poles was visualized in one gestational sac via trans-vaginal ultrasound at early first-trimester (7 to 8 weeks). The overall MC-DA twinning rate was 2.55% (226/8860). Eighty one MC-DA twinnings occurred in the fresh cycles and 145 in the frozen cycles (2.67% vs. 2.49%). MC-DA twinning incidence showed no significant difference whether ICSI was performed or not (2.79% vs. 2.44%). The MZT that resulted from single embryo transfer (SET) cycles (1.99%) was slightly lower than multiple embryo transfer cycles (2.61%),but with non-significance. However, women women ≥35 years old (1.16%). Blastocyst transfer was associated with a significantly increase in MC-DA twinning incidence than cleavage-stage embryos transfer (2.79% VS 2.02%, P = 0.008). In the results of logistic regression analysis, blastocyst transfer is a major risk factor of MZT in the fresh cycles (P = 0.044), while maternal age plays a more important role in the frozen cycles (P = 0.004). There is an elevated prevalence of MC-DA twinning after ART. Both maternal age and blastocyst transfer are risk factors of monozygotic

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of monochorionic diamniotic twinning after assisted reproduction: A six-year experience base on a large cohort of pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Song

    Full Text Available To characterize the incidence and risk factors for monochorionic diamniotic(MC-DA twinning after assisted reproductive technologies (ART.Retrospective population-based study.The study was conducted in China; Department of Reproductive Medicine Center at The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University.A cohort of 8860 clinical pregnancies after embryo transfer (ET carried out in our center between 2011 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed for the incidence of MC-DA twinning.Logistic regression was used to model the effect on the incidence of MC-DA twinning after ART. Different clinical data (maternal age and laboratory procedures (type of ET (fresh versus frozen, insemination (IVF or ICSI, embryo stage at time of ET (cleavage or blastocyst on the incidence of MC-DA twinning were evaluated.Monochorionic-diamniotic pregnancies were identified when more than one fetal poles was visualized in one gestational sac via trans-vaginal ultrasound at early first-trimester (7 to 8 weeks.The overall MC-DA twinning rate was 2.55% (226/8860. Eighty one MC-DA twinnings occurred in the fresh cycles and 145 in the frozen cycles (2.67% vs. 2.49%. MC-DA twinning incidence showed no significant difference whether ICSI was performed or not (2.79% vs. 2.44%. The MZT that resulted from single embryo transfer (SET cycles (1.99% was slightly lower than multiple embryo transfer cycles (2.61%,but with non-significance. However, women <35 years displayed a significant higher rate (2.81% than women ≥35 years old (1.16%. Blastocyst transfer was associated with a significantly increase in MC-DA twinning incidence than cleavage-stage embryos transfer (2.79% VS 2.02%, P = 0.008. In the results of logistic regression analysis, blastocyst transfer is a major risk factor of MZT in the fresh cycles (P = 0.044, while maternal age plays a more important role in the frozen cycles (P = 0.004.There is an elevated prevalence of MC-DA twinning after ART. Both maternal age and

  4. Maternal and neonatal health outcomes following assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, A; Reichman, B; Boyko, V; Hourvitz, A; Ron-El, R; Lerner-Geva, L

    2013-05-01

    This study assessed the risk for maternal complications in women and neonatal outcomes in children conceived following assisted reproductive treatment as compared with spontaneously conception and also separately evaluated conventional IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The prospective cohort included 1161 women with singleton pregnancies: 561 who conceived following assisted reproduction (223 following IVF and 338 following ICSI) and 600 who conceived spontaneously. No differences were observed in pregnancy complications (including spontaneous abortion, pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes and Caesarean delivery) except for significantly increased risk for excess vaginal bleeding in assisted reproduction pregnancies (21.4% versus 12.9%; OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.18-2.37), which was prominent in women who reported polycystic ovary syndrome. Neonates born following assisted reproduction had increased risk for prematurity (10.6% versus 5.3%; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04-2.87), and IVF, but not ICSI, was associated with significantly increased risk for prematurity (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.28-4.37) and low birthweight (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.03-3.46). In conclusion, this study observed only an increased risk for excess vaginal bleeding as a pregnancy-associated complication in singleton pregnancies following assisted compared with spontaneous conception. However, singleton neonates born following IVF, but not ICSI, were at increased risk for prematurity. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Referral for assisted reproductive technology: Indications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    Angelman syndrome, which have increasingly been associated with assisted conception.[11] Overall, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that genetic risk and congenital malformation are increased in assisted conception. Preference for a child of one particular gender is a source of concern in most African societies.

  6. Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    But, because ART is not part of the public healthcare system it has yet to become a large concern for the health and reproductive rights movement in the way hazardous contraceptives and sex-selection have. This study will investigate the various dimensions of ART as it affects the lives of ordinary women. Researchers will ...

  7. Discontinuation Decision in Assisted Reproductive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Moini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vitro fertilization (IVF and intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI are recognizedas established and increasingly successful forms of treatment for infertility, yet significant numbersof couples discontinue treatment without achieving a live birth. This study aims to identify majorfactors that influence the decision to discontinue IVF/ICSI treatments.Materials and Methods: We studied the data of 338 couples who discontinued their infertilitytreatments after three cycles; based on medical records and phone contact. The main measure wasthe reason for stopping their treatments.Results: Economical problems were cited by 212 couples (62.7%, as their mean income wassignificantly less than other couples (p<0.0001. Lack of success was reported as a reason by229 (67.8%, from whom 165 (72% also had economical problems. Achieving independent-ART pregnancy was the reason for discontinuation in 20 (5.9% couples. Psychological stress,depression and anxiety were reported as other cessation factors by 169 (50%, 148 (43.8% and 182(53.8% couples, respectively.Conclusion: This survey suggests that the most common reasons for assisted reproductivetechnique (ART discontinuation after three cycles are: prior unsuccessful cycles, economicaland psychological problems. Therefore, the substantial proportion of couples could benefit frompsychological intervention, increasing awareness of ART outcomes and health funding to copemore adequately with failed treatments.

  8. [Current issues of assisted reproduction in the Czech Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventruba, P; Žáková, J; Trávník, P; Crha, I; Mrázek, M; Rumpík, D; Štěpán, J; Režábek, K; Mardešić, T; Malenovská, A; Veselá, K; Brandejská, M

    2013-08-01

    Participants of the lunch table discussion held during the 22nd symposium of assisted reproduction in Brno discussed some current topics of assisted reproduction. DISCUSSED TOPICS: More than 150 participants at round tables discussed 10 topics: 1. IVF in native AR cycle,2. observation of the embryo development dynamics, 3. evaluation and support of endometrial receptivity,4. increased number of elective single embryo transfers (eSET), 5. transport of gametes and embryos in the Czech Republic and between the Czech Republic and abroad, 6. National registry of assisted reproduction,7. new view on sperm pathology, 8. problems with the SAR membership records, 9. surogacy motherhood and 10. preimplantation genetic diagnosis and preimplantation genetic screening. All findings were presented in the afternoon session. Some of the topics brought concrete results. Some topics could not be clearly concluded and will be the subject of further discussions. A brief summary of those discussion conclusions presents this paper.

  9. International committee for monitoring assisted reproductive technologies: world report on assisted reproductive technologies, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Osamu; Adamson, G David; Dyer, Silke; de Mouzon, Jacques; Nygren, Karl G; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Mansour, Ragaa

    2015-02-01

    To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide, and trends in outcomes over successive years. Cross-sectional survey on access, efficiency, and safety of ART procedures performed in 55 countries during 2007. Not applicable. Infertile women and men undergoing ART globally. Collection and analysis of international ART data. Number of cycles performed, by country and region, including pregnancies, single and multiple birth rates, and perinatal mortality. Overall, >1,251,881 procedures with ART were reported, and resulted in 229,442 reported babies born. The availability of ART varied by country, from 12 to 4,140 treatments per million population. Of all aspiration cycles, 65.2% (400,617 of 614,540) were intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration was 20.3%, and for frozen-embryo transfer (FET), 18.4%, with a cumulative delivery rate of 25.8%. With wide regional variations, single-embryo transfer represented 23.4% of fresh transfers, and the proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from fresh transfers was 22.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The perinatal mortality rate was 19.9 per 1,000 births for fresh in vitro fertilization using intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and 9.6 per 1,000 for FET. The proportion of women aged ≥40 years increased to 19.8% from 15.5% in 2006. The international trend toward women aged >40 years was a major component of ART services in some regions and countries. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in perinatal health after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Gissler, M.; Skjaerven, R.

    2015-01-01

    to lowering the rate of multiples but also concerning the health of singletons. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) The European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), the University of Copenhagen and the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation has supported the project. The Co......NARTaS group has received travel and meeting funding from the Nordic Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG). None of the authors has any competing interests to declare....

  11. POST-MORTEM ASSISTED REPRODUCTION IN BRAZILIAN LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Rego Borges Ribeiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates the main questions regarding the acceptance of post mortem assisted reproduction in Brazil. First, the treatment of the matter by the Federal Council of Medicine is addressed. The orphanhood of the offspring, the consent of the deceased donor, the fertile widow's access to the artificial conception, the egoistic motivations for the use of the technique, and the supposed unequal succession treatment given to the posthumous children are questioned. In the end, without discarding the existence of several other discussions, the present work concluded that the Brazilian legal system welcomes the performance of assisted reproduction post mortem.

  12. Trans people's experiences with assisted reproduction services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Abra, S; Tarasoff, L A; Green, D; Epstein, R; Anderson, S; Marvel, S; Steele, L S; Ross, L E

    2015-06-01

    What are the experiences of trans persons (i.e. those whose gender identity does not match the gender assigned to them at birth) who sought or accessed assisted reproduction (AR) services in Ontario, Canada, between 2007 and 2010? The majority of trans persons report negative experiences with AR service providers. Apart from research examining desire to have children among trans people, most of the literature on this topic has debated the ethics of assisting trans persons to become parents. To-date, all of the published research concerning trans persons' experiences with AR services is solely from the perspective of service providers; no studies have examined the experiences of trans people themselves. Secondary qualitative research study of data from nine trans-identified people and their partners (total n = 11) collected as part of a community-based study of access to AR services for sexual and gender minority people between 2010 and 2012. Trans-identified volunteers (and their partners, when applicable) who had used or attempted to access AR services since 2007 from across Ontario, Canada, participated in a 60-90 minute, semi-structured qualitative interview. Qualitative analysis was performed using a descriptive phenomenological approach. Emerging themes were continually checked against the data as part of an iterative process. The data highlight barriers to accessing AR services for trans people. Participant recommendations for improving AR service provision to better meet the needs of this population are presented. These recommendations address the following areas: (i) AR service provider education and training; (ii) service provider and clinic practices and (iii) clinic environment. The majority of study participants were trans people who identified as men and who resided in major urban areas; those living in smaller communities may have different experiences that were not adequately captured in this analysis. While existing literature debates the ethics of

  13. Computer-assisted reproductive surgery: microsurgery for the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choussein, S; Srouji, S S; Lipskind, S T; Gargiulo, A R

    2014-02-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in the field of medically assisted reproduction, minimally invasive surgery remains of vital importance in optimizing and preserving fertility, as well as treating infertility. By definition, reproductive surgery employs microsurgical techniques with the objective of restoring natural fertility or enhancing assisted reproductive technologies. The avant-garde minimalist philosophy of this branch of gynecology has made it the natural trailblazer of laparoscopic surgery. Minimally invasive conservative treatment of uterine, tubal, ovarian and peritoneal pathology has long been the gold standard for women of reproductive age and those seeking fertility preservation. Robust surgical outcome data acknowledge clear advantages of advanced laparoscopic surgery over laparotomy. However, this comes at the cost of significant technical challenges. Computer-assisted laparoscopy, also known as robotic surgery, is posed to address the practical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery and bridge this technical gap. This enabling technology is a conceptual fusion of the practicality of conventional open surgery and the minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery. With this comes the promise of simplifying complex minimally invasive fertility-sparing procedures so that they can be performed in a safe and reproducible manner by reproductive specialists.

  14. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy in reproductive surgery: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumaran, Jayapriya; Patel, Sejal D; Gangrade, Bhushan K; Narasimhulu, Deepa Maheswari; Pandian, Soundarya Ramanatha; Silva, Celso

    2017-06-01

    Robotic surgery is a conceptual fusion of the conventional open surgery and the minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. We reviewed the current role of robotic-assisted laparoscopy in the field of reproductive surgery by a literature search in PubMed database. We analyzed the reported advantages and limitations of the use of robotics in reproductive surgeries like myomectomy, tubal reanastomosis, endometriosis, ovarian tissue cryopreservation, and ovarian transposition. Overall, robotic assistance in reproductive surgery resulted in decreased blood loss, less post-operative pain, shorter hospital stay, and faster convalescence, whereas reproductive outcomes were similar to open/laparoscopic approaches. The main drawbacks of robotic surgery were higher cost and longer operating times. It is as safe and effective as the conventional laparoscopy and represents a reasonable alternate to abdominal approach. Procedures that are technically challenging with the conventional laparoscopy can be performed with robotic assistance. It has advantages of improved visualization and Endowrist™ movements allowing precise suturing. This helps to overcome the limitations of laparoscopy, especially in complicated procedures, and may shorten the steep learning curve in minimal invasive surgery. Randomized controlled trials looking at both short- and long-term outcomes are warranted to strengthen the role of robotic surgery in the field of reproductive surgery.

  15. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calhaz-Jorge, C.; De Geyter, C.; Kupka, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Are there any changes in the treatments involving ART and IUI initiated in Europe during 2013 compared with previous years? SUMMARY ANSWER: An increase in the overall number of ART cycles resulting from a higher number of countries reporting data was evident, the pregnancy rates...... (PRs) in 2013 remained stable compared with those reported in 2012, the number of transfers with multiple embryos (3+) was lower than ever before yet the multiple delivery rates (DRs) remained unchanged, and IUI activity and success rates were similar to those of last years. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY......: Since 1997, ART data in Europe have been collected and reported in 16 manuscripts, published in Human Reproduction. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Retrospective data collection of European ART data by the European IVF-monitoring Consortium for ESHRE. Data for cycles between 1 January and 31 December 2013...

  16. Influence of Paternal Age on Assisted Reproduction Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    We Will Retrospectively Assess Our Databases in Our Clinic; Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad in Valencia (Spain); Searching for Assisted Reproduction Procedures; IUI Standard IVF/ICSI Cycles and Ovum Donation IVF/ICSI Cycles; Who Were Referred to Our Unit to Cryopreserve Sperm During the Period; From January 2000 to December 2006

  17. Outcomes Of Assisted Reproductive Technologies At The Nairobi In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infertility is a common problem affecting up to ten per cent of married couples. A systematic evaluation of aetiologic factors forms the basis for choice of treatment and future fertility. On the global perspective, Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) has become internationally recognised treatment option for ...

  18. Assisted reproduction laboratory cost-drivers in South Africa: value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An overview is given on selected cost-drivers within an assisted reproduction technology (ART) laboratory, such as procedural costs; sperm preparations; laboratory supplies including embryo culture media and cryopreservation. Depending on the nature of an ART unit, i.e. private vs. public/tertiary, the structure of the unit ...

  19. Collision of Media Positions on Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanova, T. P.; Vopilova, I. E.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of the discourse on assisted reproductive technologies (ART) indicates the predominance of conservative representations of the family. The appearance of new technologies does not change the image of a "normal" family, because concepts connected with surrogate mothers and egg donors are minimally present in the discourse. In…

  20. Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome in assisted reproductive techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) is a crucial treatment for infertile couples and is frequently common. ART entails manipulation of oocyte and sperm in a laboratory: in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).The key objective of ART is to yield superior quality embryos that are competent for ...

  1. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Itzchak, E. Ben

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on maternal and pregnancy risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including use of assisted reproductive technology (ART), found conflicting results. This study included the following aims: to assess frequencies of ART in a large ASD group; to examine confounding birth and familial risk factors in the ASD with ART…

  2. Assisted reproductive technology in South Africa: First results ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. All assisted reproductive technology (ART) centres in South Africa were invited to join the register. Participant centres voluntarily submitted information from 2009 on the number of ART cycles, embryo transfers, clinical pregnancies, age of female partners or egg donors, and use of fertilisation techniques.

  3. Developmental plasticity and its relevance to assisted human reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roseboom, Tessa J.

    2018-01-01

    The advent of assisted reproduction has allowed the conception of millions of individuals who otherwise would not have existed. Although most ART children are born healthy, there is increasing awareness of the plasticity of the human embryo causing concerns about potential long-term consequences of

  4. Patient monitoring in Polish assisted reproductive technology centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krawczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Polish non-governmental patient association ‘Our Stork’ (Nasz Bocian introduced the ‘Patient monitoring in ART centres’ research project to gather previously unrecorded information on the situation of infertile people and the provision of assisted reproductive treatment in Poland. When the research project began, assisted reproductive treatment centres were unregulated by the state, a situation that had existed for more than 28 years following the birth of the first Polish test-tube baby in 1987. Patients signed civil contracts, remaining unprotected in terms of safety of treatment and recognition of their rights, and their presumed social position was described by doctors as ‘disciplined patients’ – a reflection of what Michele Foucault described as biopolitics. The research project comprised patient questionnaires (responses from 722 patients provided the basis for the document ‘Patient Recommendations in Infertility Treatment’, analysis of civil contracts and their accuracy in the context of patients’ legal rights in Poland, and in-depth interviews with assisted reproductive treatment centres’ owners, doctors, midwives, and patients to explore patient care. The data reveal that there is a lack of patient-centred care among doctors and medical staff in Poland and that following the passing into law of the 2015 Infertility Act, which introduced state regulation of assisted reproductive treatment centres, the situation for patients worsened.

  5. Multiple gestation as a marker of reproductive efficacy: learning from assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, F; Bravo, M; Fernández, E; Fabres, C; Balmaceda, J P; Mackenna, A

    2004-01-01

    This study postulates that apart from the number of embryos transferred, women with multiple gestation represent a subgroup of highly fertile individuals, whose embryos implant with higher efficiency than women with single gestation. Furthermore, each embryo generated from these women has a higher chance of reaching full term. The objective of this study was to compare implantation rate with the outcome of pregnancy (up to week 20) in multiple gestations following assisted reproductive techniques. The study group comprised 162 women with multiple gestation after assisted reproduction, followed prospectively with at least three ultrasound examinations performed between weeks 5 and 20 after the last menstrual period. Control group A comprised 344 fertile women with spontaneous single pregnancy followed with transvaginal ultrasound. Control group B consisted of 317 infertile women conceiving with single gestation after assisted reproduction and followed prospectively as in the study group. Embryo implantation rate and spontaneous embryo/fetal reduction, either partial or total (abortion), were registered in each case. Overall implantation in women with multiple gestation was higher (54.6%) than in the corresponding controls (25.6%). Furthermore, spontaneous embryo/fetus reduction was similar in the study cases and in fertile women (12.6 and 10.8% respectively) and significantly smaller than in the control group B (20.8%). Women with high reproductive efficacy exposed to assisted reproductive techniques generate cohorts of good quality embryos, with a high chance of implantation and of reaching birth.

  6. The process of justifying assisted reproductive technologies in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooshki, Ehsan Shamsi; Allahbedashti, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is medically defined as one year of unprotected intercourse that does not result in pregnancy. Infertility is a noticeable medical problem in Iran, and about a quarter of Iranian couples experience primary infertility at some point in their lives. Since having children is a basic social value in Iran, infertility has an adverse effect on the health of the couple and affects their well-being. The various methods of assisting infertile couples raise several ethical questions and touch upon certain sensitive points. Although the present Iranian legislative system, which is based on the Shi'a school of Islam, has legalised some aspects of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), given the absence of a general officially ratified act (official pathway), such medical interventions are usually justified through a fatwa system (non-official pathway). Officially registered married couples can access almost all ART methods, including third-party gamete donation, if they use such pathways. The process of justifying ART interventions generally began when in vitro fertilisation was given the nod and later, Ayatollah Khamenei (the political-religious leader of the country) issued a fatwa which permitted gamete donation by third parties. This open juristic approach paved the way for the ratification of the Embryo Donation to Infertile Spouses Act in 2003.

  7. Features of reproduction and assisted reproduction in the white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros

    OpenAIRE

    Ververs, Cyrillus; van Zijl Langhout, M; Govaere, Jan; Van Soom, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite the worldwide increase of rhinoceros calf numbers, the growth of the population of white and black rhinoceros is slowing down mainly due to anthropogenic causes, such as poaching and habitat loss. Assisted reproduction is one of the methods of preserving the valuable genomes of these animals from being lost, and assists in breeding them in captivity to maintain the specie(s) numbers and provide an option for possible reintroduction into the wild. Since wild rhinoceros are difficult to...

  8. Assisted reproduction and child neurodevelopmental outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Bjørn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2013-09-01

    To systematically review the existing literature on neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born after medically assisted reproduction compared with those of children born after spontaneous conception. Systematic review. Not applicable. Children born after medically assisted reproduction vs. reference groups of spontaneously conceived children. Data were reviewed from worldwide published articles, without restrictions as to publication year or language. A total of 80 studies included between 31 and 2,446,044 children. Child neurodevelopmental outcomes categorized as cognitive, behavioral, emotional or psychomotor development, or diagnoses of mental disorders. For infants, studies on psychomotor development showed no deficits, but few investigated cognitive or behavioral development. Studies on toddlers generally reported normal cognitive, behavioral, socio-emotional, and psychomotor development. For children in middle childhood, development seems comparable in children born after assisted reproduction and controls, although fewer studies have been conducted with follow-up to this age. Very few studies have assessed neurodevelopmental outcomes among teens, and the results are inconclusive. Studies investigating the risk of diagnoses of mental disorders are generally large, with long follow-up, but the results are inconsistent. It may tentatively be concluded that the neurodevelopment of children born after fertility treatment is overall comparable to that in children born after spontaneous conception. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In whose interest? Policy and politics in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchin, Anne

    2011-02-01

    This paper interprets the British legislative process that initiated the first comprehensive national regulation of embryo research and fertility services and examines subsequent efforts to restrain the assisted reproduction industry. After describing and evaluating British regulatory measures, I consider successive failures to control the assisted reproduction industry in the US. I discuss disparities between UK and US regulatory initiatives and their bearing on regulation in other countries. Then I turn to the political and social structures in which the assisted reproduction industry is embedded. I argue that regulatory bodies are seldom neutral arbiters. They tend to respond most readily to special interests and neglect strategies that could more effectively meet the health needs of the people they represent. Neither national nor international bodies have aggressively pursued policies to harness the industry, reduce infertility rates, or meet the needs of people whose fertility is threatened by substandard healthcare and environmental neglect. In conclusion, I consider recent initiatives by activist groups to mount an alternative response to the industry's current practices and build a transnational reproductive justice movement. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Brain ultrasound features in multiple births due to spontaneous conception compared with assisted reproductive techniques: a cross-sectional, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilari, P; Praticò, A D; Salafia, S; Praticò, E R; Cilauro, S; Saporito, A; Pavone, P; Ruggieri, M

    2014-02-01

    Multiple pregnancies from spontaneous conception and obtained by assisted reproductive techniques (ART) are associated with a disproportionate share of complications compared with natural singleton pregnancies. The outcome of multiple pregnancies obtained by ART is still the subject of controversial opinions in the medical literature as they are associated with increased rates of perinatal complications, and perinatal mortality, as well as maternal complications. Aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences between these two groups of infants. We examined the imaging findings by means of brain ultrasound (performed at birth and sequentially up to their 6th month of age) in a cohort of 296 twins and triplets born following different techniques of assisted fertilization (63 pregnancies; 119 neonates) vs. spontaneous conception (94 pregnancies; 177 neonates). We did record, by means of X square corrected test, statistically significant differences (P=0.002) between the two populations at birth in the number of normal ultrasound scans (ARTassisted conceptions (P=0.959) at long-term follow-up have been noticed.

  11. Assisted reproduction in history: the ethical experience of parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Massé García

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The decision to undergo medically assisted reproduction techniques involves a series of ethical questions that men and women of all times have had to answer: why do so? Wwho decides? Why so? Why not? How to face the process? We look at History to help them respond from the experience of so many women and couples who have needed to react toattend their impossible reproduction with the most unlikely resources. Looking at the subject and theirhis experience of meaning may be a more fruitful bioethical proposal than resorting toducing reflecting solely onion only to techniques.

  12. Assisted reproductive technologies are an integrated part of national strategies addressing demographic and reproductive challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Devroey, Paul; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2012-01-01

    The decline in the total fertility rate in the latter half of the 20th century in many European countries is becoming increasingly important in determining the demographic composition of Europe and its individual member states. This review focuses on discussion surrounding how assisted reproductive...

  13. Male and female alcohol consumption and live birth after assisted reproductive technology treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vittrup, Ida; Petersen, Gitte Lindved; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to assess the potential association between female and male alcohol consumption and probability of achieving a live birth after assisted reproductive treatment. From a nationwide Danish register-based cohort information on alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment......, 22.6% and 20.2% of cycles resulted in a live birth for abstainers and heavy consumers (>14 drinks/week), respectively. No statistically significant associations between alcohol consumption and live birth were observed. Adjusted odds ratios from trend analyses were 1.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.......99-1.01) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.97-1.01) for every one-unit increase in female and male weekly alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment initiation, respectively. In conclusion, this study did not show significant associations between male or female alcohol consumption and odds of live birth after...

  14. The Potential of Nanotechnology in Medically Assisted Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana H. Remião

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive medicine is a field of science which searches for new alternatives not only to help couples achieve pregnancy and preserve fertility, but also to diagnose and treat diseases which can impair the normal operation of the reproductive tract. Assisted reproductive technology (ART is a set of methodologies applied to cases related to infertility. Despite being highly practiced worldwide, ART presents some challenges, which still require special attention. Nanotechnology, as a tool for reproductive medicine, has been considered to help overcome some of those impairments. Over recent years, nanotechnology approaches applied to reproductive medicine have provided strategies to improve diagnosis and increase specificity and sensitivity. For in vitro embryo production, studies in non-human models have been used to deliver molecules to gametes and embryos. The exploration of nanotechnology for ART would bring great advances. In this way, experiments in non-human models to test the development and safety of new protocols using nanomaterials are very important for informing potential future employment in humans. This paper presents recent developments in nanotechnology regarding impairments still faced by ART: ovary stimulation, multiple pregnancy, and genetic disorders. New perspectives for further use of nanotechnology in reproductive medicine studies are also discussed.

  15. 21 CFR 884.6170 - Assisted reproduction water and water purification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction water and water purification... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6170 Assisted reproduction water and water purification systems. (a) Identification...

  16. CDC-reported assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates may mislead the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Choi, Jennifer; Darmon, Sarah K; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publicly reports assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates (LBR) for each US fertility clinic under legal mandate. The 2014 CDC report excluded 35,406 of 184,527 (19.2%) autologous assisted reproductive technology cycles that involved embryo or oocyte banking from LBR calculations. This study calculated 2014 total clinic LBR for all patients utilizing autologous oocytes two ways: including all initiated assisted reproductive technology cycles or excluding banking cycles, as done by the CDC. The main limitation of this analysis is the CDC report did not differentiate between cycles involving long-term banking of embryos or oocytes for fertility preservation from cycles involving short-term embryo banking. Twenty-seven of 458 (6%) clinics reported over 40% of autologous cycles involved banking, collectively performing 12% of all US assisted reproductive technology cycles. LBR in these outlier clinics calculated by the CDC method, was higher than the other 94% of clinics (33.1% versus 31.1%). However, recalculated LBR including banking cycles in the outlier clinics was lower than the other 94% of clinics (15.5% versus 26.6%). LBR calculated by the two methods increasingly diverged based on proportion of banking cycles performed by each clinic reaching 4.5-fold, thereby, potentially misleading the public. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Efficacy of Assisted Reproduction in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Impact of Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, S; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Fedder, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we analyze the chance of a live birth and the impact of inflammatory bowel disease surgery in women with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This is a nationwide cohort study based...

  18. Assisted reproductive technologies in South Dakota: the first ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannian, John; Hansen, Keith

    2006-07-01

    One in six couples experience infertility. New assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) have helped thousands of couples worldwide to have a family. IVF has been available in South Dakota for the past ten years. Improvements in the clinic and laboratory have led to better live birth rates and lower incidences of multiple pregnancies. Advances in technology will help even more people overcome fertility problems in the near future.

  19. Assisted reproductive technologies and equity of access issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M M

    2005-05-01

    In Australia and other countries, certain groups of women have traditionally been denied access to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). These typically are single heterosexual women, lesbians, poor women, and those whose ability to rear children is questioned, particularly women with certain disabilities or who are older. The arguments used to justify selection of women for ARTs are most often based on issues such as scarcity of resources, and absence of infertility (in lesbians and single women), or on social concerns: that it "goes against nature"; particular women might not make good mothers; unconventional families are not socially acceptable; or that children of older mothers might be orphaned at an early age. The social, medical, legal, and ethical reasoning that has traditionally promoted this lack of equity in access to ARTs, and whether the criteria used for client deselection are ethically appropriate in any particular case, are explored by this review. In addition, the issues of distribution and just "gatekeeping" practices associated with these sensitive medical services are examined.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage.

  1. [Activities and responsibilities of workers in embryologic and andrologic laboratories in assisted reproduction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záková, J; Trávník, P; Malenovská, A; Hűttelová, R

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the current status and rules for the laboratory staff activities and their competences in the centers of assisted reproduction. The rules were processed by the members of the Association of Reproductive Embryology (ARE) committee under the current legislation. Committee members of the Czech Sterility and Assisted Reproduction Society and Czech Gynecology and Obstetric Society approved these rules as obligatory for assisted reproduction centres in Czech Republic.

  2. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; de Klerk, C.; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; van den Broeck, U.; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C. M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE)

  3. Balancing animal welfare and assisted reproduction: ethics of preclinical animal research for testing new reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Verna; Dondorp, Wybo; Goossens, Ellen; Mertes, Heidi; Pennings, Guido; de Wert, Guido

    2018-02-07

    In the field of medically assisted reproduction (MAR), there is a growing emphasis on the importance of introducing new assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) only after thorough preclinical safety research, including the use of animal models. At the same time, there is international support for the three R's (replace, reduce, refine), and the European Union even aims at the full replacement of animals for research. The apparent tension between these two trends underlines the urgency of an explicit justification of the use of animals for the development and preclinical testing of new ARTs. Considering that the use of animals remains necessary for specific forms of ART research and taking account of different views on the moral importance of helping people to have a genetically related child, we argue that, in principle, the importance of safety research as part of responsible innovation outweighs the limited infringement of animal wellbeing involved in ART research.

  4. The Greek Orthodox position on the ethics of assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaos, Metropolitan

    2008-01-01

    In dealing with reproduction, the Church believes that every human being has a beginning but has no end; this is why conception constitutes an event of unique importance. The exact moment of the beginning of life is unknown to man, but the logic of sexual intercourse without reproduction and of reproduction without sexual intercourse must be seen with concern. Irrespective of the way it is conceived, the embryo has both a human beginning and a human perspective and in it, along with cellular multiplication, another process takes place, the beginning and development of its soul. Although modern technology has greatly contributed to health research, its irrational use threatens to desacralize man and to treat him as a machine. For this reason, all modern techniques of artificial fertilization have ethical and spiritual parameters that compel the Church to state Her reservations. The Church cannot recommend assisted reproduction as the solution to infertility; instead, She proposes a non-secularized perception on life that guarantees simplicity, peace, abstinence and mutual trust between spouses. She does not oppose resorting to medical help, but, at the same time, suggests that men and women render their life into the hands of God.

  5. Associations between male reproductive characteristics and the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhangshun; Shi, Xiaohong; Wang, Lihong; Yang, Yan; Fu, Qiang; Tao, Minfang

    2017-06-30

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between indicators of male body mass index (BMI), age, reproductive hormone levels, semen parameters, and the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The clinical data were collected from 636 couples who underwent ART between January, 2013 and December, 2015 at the reproductive center involved in our study. Pearson's correlation or Spearman rank correlation was applied to establish the relevant correlation coefficients. The correlation between influence factors' and pregnancy outcomes was analyzed using the Logistic regression model. Analyses were conducted using SPSS software. Male BMI was found to be negatively correlated with testosterone (T) ( P ART outcome. A higher male age was also negatively connected with the outcome of clinical pregnancy. Reproductive hormones were not associated with ART outcome. Sperm concentration and female age were important factors influencing ART clinical pregnancy, while the only significant factor influencing live birth was female age. Levels of obesity-related inflammatory indicators (i.e. free fatty acid (FFA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), human inhibin-B (IHNB), interleukin-1 (IL-1), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)) also varied with degrees of BMI. The present study provides information on the associations between male reproductive characteristics and the outcome of ART, which may contribute to improved strategies to help couples achieve better pregnancy outcomes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Risk of Cancer in Children Conceived by Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Marte Myhre; Larsen, Inger Kristin; Myklebust, Tor Åge; Robsahm, Trude Eid; Oldereid, Nan Birgitte; Brinton, Louise A; Storeng, Ritsa

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of children are born after assisted reproductive technology (ART), and monitoring their long-term health effects is of interest. This study compares cancer risk in children conceived by ART to that in children conceived without. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway contains individual information on all children born in Norway (including information of ART conceptions). All children born between 1984 and 2011 constituted the study cohort, and cancer data were obtained from the Cancer Registry of Norway. Follow-up started at date of birth and ended on the date of the first cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or December 31, 2011. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of overall cancer risk between children conceived by ART and those not. Cancer risk was also assessed separately for all childhood cancer types. The study cohort comprised 1 628 658 children, of which 25 782 were conceived by ART. Of the total 4554 cancers, 51 occurred in ART-conceived children. Risk of overall cancer was not significantly elevated (HR 1.21; 95% CI 0.90-1.63). However, increased risk of leukemia was observed for children conceived by ART compared with those who were not (HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.02-2.73). Elevated risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma was also found for ART-conceived children (HR 3.63; 95% CI 1.12-11.72), although this was based on small numbers. This population-based cohort study found elevated risks of leukemia and Hodgkin's lymphoma in children conceived by ART. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. The thin endometrium in assisted reproductive technology: An ongoing challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thin endometrium is identified to adversely affect reproductive success rates after assisted reproductive technology (ART. Several treatment modalities have been presented to patients with thin endometrium, to improve endometrial thickness and the subsequent endometrial receptivity. These approaches comprising hormonal management by estradiol, tamoxifen, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist, vasoactive agents such as aspirin, vitamin E, pentoxifylline, nitroglycerin and sildenafil, intra-uterine infusion of growth factor such as Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF and the latest application of platelet-rich plasma, electrical stimulation, regenerative medicine and presentation of endometrial receptivity array. In spite of the large variety of treatment, most of the choices achieve only minor modification in the endometrium thickness and have not been validated so far. Treatment of thin endometrium remains a challenge and future enormous investigations are required to further clarification and ideal management of patients with thin endometrium.

  8. Experience with ISO quality control in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Michael M

    2013-12-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs are complex organizations requiring the integration of multiple disciplines. ISO 9001:2008 is a quality management system that is readily adaptable to an ART program. The value that ISO brings to the entire organization includes control of documents, clear delineation of responsibilities of staff members, documentation of the numerous processes and procedures, improvement in tracking and reducing errors, and overall better control of systems. A quality ART program sets quality objectives and monitors their progress. ISO provides a sense of transparency within the organization and clearer understanding of how service is provided to patients. Most importantly, ISO provides the framework to allow for continual improvement. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Infertility and assisted reproduction in Denmark. Epidemiology and psychosocial consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lone

    2006-11-01

    Clinically a couple is considered to be infertile after at least one year without contraception and without pregnancy. There was scant knowledge about the prevalences of infertility, involuntary childlessness and the seeking of fertility treatment and only few longitudinal studies about the psychosocial consequences of infertility and its treatment. This thesis is about the epidemiological aspects of infertility; the conceptualization and measurement of important psychosocial aspects of infertility; and a medical sociological analysis of the associations between these psychosocial variables among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on nine papers. The three main purposes were: (i) to review critically, population based studies of infertility and medical care seeking in industrialised countries. Further, to examine these prevalences and subsequent motherhood among women in former assisted reproduction in a Danish population. (ii) To develop measures of psychosocial consequences of infertility: fertility problem stress, marital benefit, communication, coping strategies, attitudes to and evaluation of fertility treatment. (iii) To examine these phenomena and to analyse their interrelations among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on four empirical studies: (i) The Women and Health Survey, a cross-sectional population-based study among 15-44 year old women (n=907, 25-44 year old) in Copenhagen County, 1989. (ii) The Psychosocial Infertility Interview Study, a qualitative interview study among 16 couples (n=2 participants) infertility treatment at The Fertility Clinic, Herlev University Hospital,1992. (iii) The Infertility Cohort, a longitudinal cohort study consecutively including all couples (n=250 participants) beginning anew fertility treatment period at one of four public (Braedstrup, Herlev, Odense, Rigshospitalet) and one private fertility clinic (Trianglen),2000-2002. (iv) The Communication and Stress

  10. [Difference between perinatal mortality in multiple pregnancies obtained spontaneously versus assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rayo Rivas-Ortiz, Yazmín; Hernández-Herrera, Ricardo Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Recently assisted reproduction techniques are more common, which increases multiple pregnancies and adverse perinatal outcomes. Some authors report increased mortality in multiple pregnancies products obtained by techniques of assisted reproduction vs. conceived spontaneously, although other authors found no significant difference. To evaluate mortality rate of multiple pregnancies comparing those obtained by assisted reproduction vs. spontaneous conception. Retrospective, observational and comparative study. We included pregnant women with 3 or more products that went to the Unidad Médica de Alta Especialidad No. 23, IMSS, in Monterrey, NL (Mexico), between 2002-2008. We compared the number of complicated pregnancies and dead products obtained by a technique of assisted reproduction vs. spontaneous. 68 multiple pregnancies were included. On average, spontaneously conceived fetuses had more weeks of gestation and more birth weight than those achieved by assisted reproduction techniques (p = ns). 20.5% (14/68) of multiple pregnancies had one or more fatal events: 10/40 (25%) by assisted reproduction techniques vs. 4/28 (14%) of spontaneous multiple pregnancies (p = 0.22). 21/134 (16%) of the products conceived by assisted reproduction techniques and 6/88 (7%) of spontaneous (p assisted reproduction and 21% of the cases had one or more fatal events (11% more in pregnancies achieved by assisted reproduction techniques). 12% of the products of multiple pregnancies died (9% more in those obtained by a technique of assisted reproduction).

  11. Natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction: The knowledge amongst women of reproductive age in North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole K; Coffey, Anne; Woods, Cindy; de Costa, Caroline

    2018-04-16

    The demand for medically assisted reproduction continues to increase, with more women encountering challenges with fertility. Due to misconceptions and gaps in knowledge, women are often unaware of the risks related to delayed childbearing. Lack of understanding of natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction can lead to emotional suffering and changes in family plans. To assess the understanding and knowledge that women of reproductive age in North Queensland have regarding natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction. Data were collected from 120 women (30 nurses, 30 teachers, 30 university students and 30 Technical and Further Education students) via the distribution of a structured questionnaire. Participants were surveyed in person about their personal plans and opinions, knowledge about natural fertility, infertility and medically assisted reproduction, and their preferred source of information. Participants demonstrated suboptimal knowledge levels throughout all sections of the questionnaire, in particular when asked about medically assisted reproduction. When asked to identify their main source of information, 'friends and family' was the most popular choice. Results from this North Queensland study add to the existing international literature, highlighting the widespread nature of the problem. Without adequate understanding of natural fertility, the risks of infertility, and the role and limitations of medically assisted reproduction, women make uninformed decisions. Development of local reproductive health education programs need to be instigated in response. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. Incubator management in an assisted reproductive technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, H Lee; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Boone, William R

    2008-03-01

    To study the effect of incubator management on assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes. Series of retrospective and controlled, randomized studies. Tertiary care infertility practice. Mammalian gametes/embryos. Evaluation of human and bovine oocytes/embryos cultured in various environmental conditions. Fertilization and embryo development rate as well as clinical pregnancy rate (PR). Here we review the general topic of incubator management as it pertains to ART. Discussed within the context of this article will be our experiences as they relate to incubator management. Details as they apply to incubator environment also will include gamete/embryo positions within incubator, air quality, and quality control.

  13. [Ethical problems of research on medical-assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, N; Zucco, F

    1998-01-01

    Research in the field of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) is today very active internationally and is aimed both at improving success chances of already consolidated techniques (in fact these chances are still considerably low), and at elaborating new methods like ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection), oocyte cryoconservation, ovary tissue cultures. Some other techniques, connected to ART, are here considered, like preimplantation diagnosis, early sex determination, gene therapy in utero and cloning. All these subjects of research are here briefly mentioned in relation to the ethical debate which they have stirred or which they should stir according to the authors. These debates are in part mirrored in the different legislations.

  14. Prognostic factors for assisted reproductive technology in women with endometriosis-related infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignien, Chloé; Santulli, Pietro; Gayet, Vanessa; Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine; Korb, Diane; Bourdon, Mathilde; Marcellin, Louis; de Ziegler, Dominique; Chapron, Charles

    2017-03-01

    Assisted reproductive technology is one of the therapeutic options offered for managing endometriosis-associated infertility. Yet, published data on assisted reproductive technology outcome in women affected by endometriosis are conflicting and the determinant factors for pregnancy chances unclear. We sought to evaluate assisted reproductive technology outcomes in a series of 359 endometriosis patients, to identify prognostic factors and determine if there is an impact of the endometriosis phenotype. This was a retrospective observational cohort study, including 359 consecutive endometriosis patients undergoing in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, from June 2005 through February 2013 at a university hospital. Endometriotic lesions were classified into 3 phenotypes-superficial peritoneal endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis-based on imaging criteria (transvaginal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging); histological proof confirmed the diagnosis in women with a history of surgery for endometriosis. Main outcome measures were clinical pregnancy rates and live birth rates per cycle and per embryo transfer. Prognostic factors of assisted reproductive technology outcome were identified by comparing women who became pregnant and those who did not, using univariate and adjusted multiple logistic regression models. In all, 359 endometriosis patients underwent 720 assisted reproductive technology cycles. In all, 158 (44%) patients became pregnant, and 114 (31.8%) had a live birth. The clinical pregnancy rate and the live birth rate per embryo transfer were 36.4% and 22.8%, respectively. The endometriosis phenotype (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis) had no impact on assisted reproductive technology outcomes. After multivariate analysis, history of surgery for endometriosis (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence ratio, 0.06-0.38) or past surgery for endometrioma (odds ratio, 0.39; 95

  15. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for mammalian farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    technologies that have the potential to improve efficiency of livestock production. The focus will be on technologies that manipulate male and female gametes as well as the stem cells from which they are derived and the preimplantation embryo. While technology is crucial to other interventions in the reproductive process like control of seasonal breeding, hormonal regulation of ovulation, estrous cyclicity and pregnancy establishment, feeding to optimize reproduction, minimizing environmental stress, and selection of genes controlling reproduction, these will not be considered here. Rather the reader is directed to other chapters in this volume as well as some reviews on other aspects of artificial manipulation of reproduction (Reprod Fertil Dev 24:258-266, 2011; Reprod Domest Anim 43:40-47, 2008; Reprod Domest Anim 43:122-128, 2008; Soc Reprod Fertil Suppl 66:87-102, 2009; Comprehensive biotechnology, Amsterdam, pp 477-485; Dairy production medicine, Chichester, pp 153-163; Theriogenology 76:1619-1631, 2011; Theriogenology 76:1568-1582, 2011; Theriogenology 77:1-11, 2012). Given the large number of mammalian species used for production of products useful for man and the diversity in their biology and management, the review will not be comprehensive but instead will use results from species that are most illustrative of the opportunities generated by assisted reproductive technologies.

  16. A Biochemical Approach to Detect Oxidative Stress in Infertile Women Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becatti, Matteo; Fucci, Rossella; Mannucci, Amanda; Barygina, Victoria; Mugnaini, Marco; Criscuoli, Luciana; Giachini, Claudia; Bertocci, Francesco; Picone, Rita; Emmi, Giacomo; Evangelisti, Paolo; Rizzello, Francesca; Cozzi, Cinzia; Taddei, Niccolò; Coccia, Maria Elisabetta

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in critical biological processes in human reproduction. However, a reliable and biologically accurate indicator of this condition does not yet exist. On these bases, the aim of this study was to assess and compare the blood and follicular fluid (FF) redox status of 45 infertile subjects (and 45 age-matched controls) undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), and explore possible relationships between the assessed redox parameters and IVF outcomes. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production, assessed by flow cytometry analysis in blood leukocytes and granulosa cells, significantly increased (p assisted reproductive techniques and infertility management is recommended. PMID:29462946

  17. [Being a family today - ethics for assisted reproductive techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, S

    2013-09-01

    Currently in France, all the children born as a result of an assisted reproduction procedure, represent 2.5% of all births. Although this proportion is not high, it is not to be neglected, particularly with regard to the sociological issues raised by assisted reproduction technologies (ART) - i.e. removing anonymity of gamete donation, post mortem insemination, ART access to single women and gay couples, surrogacy - to name four of the most prominent debates. What is new with ART is that a new therapeutic target of medicine is being developed, in other words procreation. Now it is no longer necessary for a man and a woman to resort to sex to have a child. This is a profound questioning of the representation of what appeared to be intangible, with some sort of divine aura. How, in this context, developing an ethics for ART? From a fethnographic field survey, we show here how this ethos of ART develops and how, therefore, we consider the multiple ways of being a family today. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Assisted reproductive technologies: professional and legal restrictions in Australian clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kerry; Baker, H W G; Pitts, Marian; Thorpe, Rachel

    2005-02-01

    The professional and legal regulation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Australia is a vast maze of intersecting laws and guidelines which place restrictions on the provision of services such as infertility treatment, surrogacy, sex selection for social reasons, donor insemination, pre-implantation diagnosis and human embryo research. This study investigated the application of these restrictions on clinical practice in New South Wales, a relatively unregulated State, and Victoria, a relatively highly regulated State. The results of the survey indicate that the range of ART services in Victorian clinics was far more limited than in New South Wales clinics. The Victorian clinics uniformly restricted access of single and lesbian women and did not offer social sex selection procedures. The New South Wales clinics adopted different polices regarding these services. It was found that restrictive laws governing "social" issues have a significant impact on the availability of ART services and some respondents seemed unclear about the nature of restrictions and laws relevant to their work. It was also found that "reproductive tourism" is prevalent and restrictions were circumnavigated by patients with assistance from clinics. It was concluded that more evidence is required to evaluate regulation in this field of medicine.

  19. Epigenetic Influences During the Periconception Period and Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Akwasi A; Nafee, Tamer M; Ola, Bolarinde

    2017-01-01

    The periconception period starts 6 months before conception and lasts until the tenth week of gestation. In this chapter, we will focus on epigenetic modifications to DNA and gene expression within this period and during assisted reproduction. There are two critical times during the periconception window when significant epigenetic 'reprogramming' occur: one during gametogenesis and another during the pre-implantation embryonic stage. Furthermore, assisted conception treatments, laboratory protocols and culture media can affect the embryo development and birth weights in laboratory animals. There is, however, an ongoing debate as to whether epigenetic changes in humans, causing embryo mal-development, placenta dysfunction and birth defects, result from assisted reproductive technologies or are consequences of pre-existing medical and/or genetic conditions in the parents. The periconception period starts from ovarian folliculogenesis, through resumption of oogenesis, fertilisation, peri-implantation embryo development, embryogenesis until the end of organogenesis. In men, it is the period from spermatogenesis to epididymal sperm storage and fertilisation. Gametes and developing embryos are sensitive to environmental factors during this period, and epigenetic modifications can occur in response to adverse lifestyles and environmental factors. We now know that lifestyle factors such as advanced parentage age, obesity or undernutrition, smoking, excessive alcohol and caffeine intake and recreational drugs used during gamete production and embryogenesis could induce epigenetic alterations, which could impact adversely on pregnancy outcomes and health of the offspring. Furthermore, these can also result in a permanent and irreversible effect in a dose-dependent manner, which can be passed on to the future generations.

  20. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Flowers, Lisa; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2012-11-02

    Since the birth of the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in 1981, use of advanced technologies to overcome the problem of infertility has increased steadily, as has the number of fertility clinics providing ART services in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report presents the most recent data on ART use and birth outcomes for U.S. states and territories. 2009. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493 [October 24, 1992]). ART data for 1995-2003 were obtained from the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) through its proprietary Clinical Outcomes Reporting System data base (SART CORS). Since 2004, CDC has contracted with Westat, Inc., a statistical survey research organization, to obtain data from fertility clinics in the United States through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. In 2009, a total of 146,244 ART procedures were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 45,870 live-birth deliveries and 60,190 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of California (18,405), New York (14,539), Illinois (10,192), Massachusetts (9,845), New Jersey (9,146), and Texas (8,244). Together, these six states reported the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART and accounted for 48% of all ART procedures initiated, 46% of all infants born from ART, and 45

  1. Assisted reproductive technology in South Africa: first results generated from the South African Register of Assisted Reproductive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Silke Juliane; Kruger, Thinus Frans

    2012-02-23

    We present the first report from the South African Register of Assisted Reproductive Techniques. All assisted reproductive technology (ART) centres in South Africa were invited to join the register. Participant centres voluntarily submitted information from 2009 on the number of ART cycles, embryo transfers, clinical pregnancies, age of female partners or egg donors, and use of fertilisation techniques. Data were anonymised, pooled and analysed. The 12 participating units conducted a total of 4 512 oocyte aspirations and 3 872 embryo transfers in 2009, resulting in 1 303 clinical pregnancies. The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) per aspiration and per embryo transfer was 28.9% and 33.6%, respectively. Fertilisation was achieved by intracytoplasmic sperm injection in two-thirds of cycles. In most cycles, 1 - 2 embryos or blastocysts were transferred. Female age was inversely related to pregnancy rate. The register achieved a high rate of participation. The reported number of ART cycles covers approximately 6% of the estimated ART demand in South Africa. The achieved CPRs compare favourably with those reported for other countries.

  2. Ethics and regulation of inter-country medically assisted reproduction: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Carmel; Moreno, Adi; Eyal, Hedva; Leibel, Michal; Schuz, Rhona; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of medically assisted reproduction (MAR) for the treatment of infertility has brought benefit to many individuals around the world. But infertility and its treatment continue to be a cause of suffering, and over the past decade, there has been a steady growth in a new global market of inter-country medically assisted reproduction (IMAR) involving 'third-party' individuals acting as surrogate mothers and gamete donors in reproductive collaborations for the benefit of other individuals and couples who wish to have children. At the same time there is evidence of a double standard of care for third-party women involved in IMAR, violations of human rights of children and women, and extreme abuses that are tantamount to reproductive trafficking. This paper is the report of an inter-disciplinary working group of experts who convened in Israel to discuss the complex issues of IMAR. In Israel too IMAR practices have grown rapidly in recent years, mainly because of restrictions on access to domestic surrogacy for same sex couples and a chronically insufficient supply of egg cells for the treatment of couples and singles in need. Drawing upon local expertise, the paper describes documented practices that are harmful, suggests principles of good practice based on an ethic of care, and calls for action at the international, national and professional levels to establish a human rights based system of international governance for IMAR based on three regulatory models: public health monitoring, inter-country adoption, and trafficking in human beings, organs and tissues.

  3. New frontiers of assisted reproductive technology (Chien Tien Hsu Memorial Lecture 2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P C

    2009-02-01

    Many significant advances have been made in assisted reproductive technology since the birth of the first baby conceived with in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. The development of recombinant gonadotropins and gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists helps to simplify the ovarian stimulation. Excessive ovarian stimulation should be avoided because of the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and reduction in endometrial receptivity. Maturation of oocytes in vitro has been developed in some centers. It is still uncertain whether techniques such as assisted hatching, blastocyst transfer and pre-implantation aneuploidy screening can improve the live birth rates in assisted reproduction. The introduction of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for selection of human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) compatible embryos for treatment of siblings has raised ethical concerns. There is a higher risk of obstetric complications and congenital abnormalities even in singleton pregnancies achieved with assisted reproduction. Because of the risks of multiple pregnancies, elective single embryo transfer is increasingly used in good-prognosis patients. With a good freezing program, the cumulative pregnancy rate (including the pregnancies from subsequent replacement of frozen-thawed embryos) is not adversely affected. Improvement in cryopreservation techniques has made it possible to cryopreserve slices of ovarian tissue or oocytes, thus helping women who have to receive sterilizing forms of anti-cancer treatment to preserve their fertility. It is important that the development of the new techniques should be based on good scientific evidence. Ethical, legal and social implications should also be considered before the introduction of new techniques.

  4. Cancer risk among parous women following assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, M M; Larsen, I K; Myklebust, T Å; Robsahm, T E; Oldereid, N B; Omland, A K; Vangen, S; Brinton, L A; Storeng, R

    2015-08-01

    Do women who give birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer compared with women who give birth without ART? Without correction, the results indicate an increase in overall cancer risk, as well as a 50% increase in risk of CNS cancer for women giving birth after ART, however the results were not significant after correcting for multiple analyses. Studies regarding the effects of hormonal treatments involved with ART on subsequent cancer risk have provided inconsistent results, and it has also been suggested that infertility itself could be a contributory factor. A population-based cohort consisting of all women registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway as having given birth between 1 January 1984 and 31 December 2010 was assembled (n = 812 986). Cancers were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Study subjects were followed from start of first pregnancy during the observational period until the first cancer, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010. Of the total study population (n = 806 248), 16 525 gave birth to a child following ART. Cox regression analysis computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing cancer risk between ART women and non-ART women; for overall cancer, and for cervical, ovarian, uterine, central nervous system (CNS), colorectal and thyroid cancers, and for malignant melanoma. A total of 22 282 cohort members were diagnosed with cancer, of which 338 were ART women and 21 944 non-ART women. The results showed an elevated risk in one out of seven sites for ART women. The HR for cancer of the CNS was 1.50 (95% CI 1.03- 2.18), and among those specifically subjected to IVF (without ICSI) the HR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.22-2.73). Analysis of risk of overall cancer gave an HR of 1.16 (95% CI 1.04-1.29). Among those who had delivered only one child by the end of follow-up, the HR for ovarian cancer was 2.00 (95% CI 1.08-3.65), and for those nulliparous at entry the HR

  5. [Indications and modalities of assisted reproductive techniques in infertile women with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S; Hubert, D; Patrat, C; Bienvenu, T; Mosnier-Pudar, H; Lepercq, J

    2003-09-01

    To treat cystic fibrosis women who failed to conceive. Multidisciplinary coordinated approach in 20 infertile women affected with cystic fibrosis. Advisability of pregnancy was based on the assessment of pulmonary and nutritional status, risks of maternal health deterioration, infertility factors, risk of cystic fibrosis in the offspring. Assisted reproductive techniques in moderately affected women are described. Three patients requested only information, three were discouraged, two are still evaluated, 12 were treated and three delivered healthy children. The pulmonary status of each patient remained unchanged 36 months after delivery, and all three children remain healthy. Assisted reproductive techniques are an option in moderately affected infertile cystic fibrosis women. Advisability and management of pregnancy should be provided by a coordinated team of healthcare professionals with knowledge and experience in cystic fibrosis.

  6. Cryopreservation of embryos and oocytes in human assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, János; Kanyó, Katalin; Kriston, Rita; Somoskői, Bence; Cseh, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Both sperm and embryo cryopreservation have become routine procedures in human assisted reproduction and oocyte cryopreservation is being introduced into clinical practice and is getting more and more widely used. Embryo cryopreservation has decreased the number of fresh embryo transfers and maximized the effectiveness of the IVF cycle. The data shows that women who had transfers of fresh and frozen embryos obtained 8% additional births by using their cryopreserved embryos. Oocyte cryopreservation offers more advantages compared to embryo freezing, such as fertility preservation in women at risk of losing fertility due to oncological treatment or chronic disease, egg donation, and postponing childbirth, and eliminates religious and/or other ethical, legal, and moral concerns of embryo freezing. In this review, the basic principles, methodology, and practical experiences as well as safety and other aspects concerning slow cooling and ultrarapid cooling (vitrification) of human embryos and oocytes are summarized.

  7. Cryopreservation of Embryos and Oocytes in Human Assisted Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Konc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both sperm and embryo cryopreservation have become routine procedures in human assisted reproduction and oocyte cryopreservation is being introduced into clinical practice and is getting more and more widely used. Embryo cryopreservation has decreased the number of fresh embryo transfers and maximized the effectiveness of the IVF cycle. The data shows that women who had transfers of fresh and frozen embryos obtained 8% additional births by using their cryopreserved embryos. Oocyte cryopreservation offers more advantages compared to embryo freezing, such as fertility preservation in women at risk of losing fertility due to oncological treatment or chronic disease, egg donation, and postponing childbirth, and eliminates religious and/or other ethical, legal, and moral concerns of embryo freezing. In this review, the basic principles, methodology, and practical experiences as well as safety and other aspects concerning slow cooling and ultrarapid cooling (vitrification of human embryos and oocytes are summarized.

  8. Assisted reproductive technology treatment in women with severe eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assens, Maria; Ebdrup, Ninna H; Pinborg, Anja

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This national retrospective cohort study investigates the prevalence of women with severe eating disorders in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment compared with an age-matched background population without ART treatment. It assesses the frequency distribution of the first...... and last eating disorder diagnosis before, during, and after ART treatment, and evaluates differences in obstetric outcomes between women with and without a severe eating disorder. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Hospital-diagnosed eating disorders among 42 915 women in the Danish National ART cohort (DANAC......), registered during 1994-2009 in the mandatory Psychiatric Central Research Register, were compared with a non-eating disorder ART cohort of 42 644 women and an age-matched background population of 215 290 women without a history of ART treatment for the main outcome measures prevalence of eating disorders...

  9. Risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancies following assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opdahl, S; Henningsen, A A; Tiitinen, A

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancies conceived following specific assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures different from the risk in spontaneously conceived (SC) pregnancies? SUMMARY ANSWER: ART pregnancies had a higher risk of hypertensive disorders...... confounding cannot be excluded. In addition, we did not have information on all SC pregnancies in each woman's history, and could therefore not compare risk in ART versus SC pregnancies in the same mother. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Pregnancies following frozen-thawed cycles have a higher risk......, the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation, the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Liaison Committee between the Central Norway Regional Health Authority and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. None of the authors has any competing interests...

  10. Gender, infertility, motherhood, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinoglu, Serap; Buken, Nuket Ornek

    2010-01-01

    In Turkey, as in many other countries, infertility is generally regarded as a negative phenomenon in a woman's life and is associated with a lot of stigma by society. In other words, female infertility and having a baby using Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) have to be taken into consideration with respect to gender motherhood, social factors, religion and law. Yet if a woman chooses to use ART she has to deal with the consequences of her decision, such as being ostracized by society. Other types of procedures in this area, such as sperm and ova donation or surrogate motherhood, are not permitted in law. However; both before and after the development of this techonology, society has been finding its own solutions which are rarely questioned and are still performed This article will discuss what these practices are and try to reach some pragmatic conclusions concerning female infertility, the concept of motherhood and some traditional practices in Turkey.

  11. Role of hysteroscopy prior to assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Panagiotis; Hassiakos, Dimitrios; Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Vlahos, Nikolaos; Liapis, Angelos; Gregoriou, Odysseas

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether diagnostic hysteroscopy before assisted reproduction techniques (ΑRT) in women without known disease of the uterine cavity is necessary. Prospective cohort clinical study. Reproductive medicine clinic. The study group consisted of 217 infertile women attending the Reproductive Clinic for examination before undergoing ART, either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Patients underwent transvaginal sonography (TVS) and hysterosalpingography (HSG) for initial evaluation. If there were no abnormal intrauterine findings, diagnostic hysteroscopy was additionally performed. The safety and diagnostic value of hysteroscopy before ART was examined. Diagnostic hysteroscopy was performed successfully, without complications, in all 217 women. Ninety-five (43.7%) had a history of ART failures (group 1), and 122 (56.3%) had undergone no previous ART attempts (group 2). In 148 women (68.2%), findings at hysteroscopy were normal, whereas in 69 (31.8%), hysteroscopy revealed intrauterine lesions (polyps, septa, submucosal leiomyomas, or synechiae) that led to operative hysteroscopy. The most common intrauterine abnormality was the presence of endometrial polyps in 26 patients (12%). The total percentage of abnormal intrauterine findings was higher in women with a history of repeated ART failures in comparison with those with no history of ART attempts. No statistically significant difference in the outcome of in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection was observed between women with normal hysteroscopic findings and patients with hysteroscopically corrected endometrial disease. Sensitivity of diagnostic hysteroscopy is significantly higher than TVS and HSG in the diagnosis of intrauterine lesions. Diagnostic hysteroscopy should be performed before ART in all patients, including women with normal TVS and/or HSG findings, because a significant percentage of them have undiagnosed uterine disease that may impair the success of

  12. Risk of peripartum hysterectomy in births after assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromi, Antonella; Candeloro, Ilario; Marconi, Nicola; Casarin, Jvan; Serati, Maurizio; Agosti, Massimo; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether women who conceive after assisted reproductive technology (ART) are at higher risk for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. A case-control study using a prospectively maintained institutional database. A tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Thirty-one women who underwent peripartum hysterectomy for management of hemorrhage, and 19,902 control women. None. Association between potential predictors and peripartum hysterectomy. The incidence of peripartum hysterectomy was 1.7 cases per 1,000 births (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.4). After adjustment for maternal age and twin pregnancy, placenta previa (odds ratio [OR] 50.78, 95% CI 23.30-110.68), prior cesarean delivery (OR 6.72, 95% CI 2.99-15.09 for one cesarean; OR 6.80, 95% CI 1.45-31.90 for two or more cesareans), previous myomectomy (OR 24.59, 95% CI 6.70-90.19), and ART conception (OR 5.98, 95% CI 2.18-16.40) were all antenatal predictors for peripartum hysterectomy. In women having a peripartum hysterectomy, 13.4% of the risk is attributable to mode of conception. A history of ART increases the likelihood of needing a peripartum hysterectomy to control hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to determine whether ART conception should be included in algorithms of risk stratification for emergency cesarean hysterectomy and plan of care be modified accordingly. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Results of assisted reproductive technique in men with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Dominique; Patrat, Catherine; Guibert, Juliette; Thiounn, Nicolas; Bienvenu, Thierry; Viot, Géraldine; Jouannet, Pierre; Epelboin, Sylvie

    2006-05-01

    Sterility in men with cystic fibrosis (CF) raises the question of the use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). A multidisciplinary network including adult CF centre and reproductive medicine units was set up to answer requests for ART. This retrospective study included 25 men with CF between 1994 and 2004. Clinical status, semen analysis, CF mutations analysis and artificial insemination by donor (AID) or ICSI after surgical retrieval of sperm were monitored. All CF men had azoospermia. Two chose AID first (one delivery); 23 chose ICSI. Sperm were surgically retrieved in 21 cases, and ICSI was performed in 19. Pregnancies occurred in 12 of these 19 couples (63%) (two ectopic pregnancies, two spontaneous abortions, one termination of pregnancy for polymalformed twins and 11 single deliveries in nine couples). Two couples tried AID after ICSI failed; one had twins. Another adopted a child, and two had a spontaneous pregnancy. After a follow-up of 4.1+/-2.3 years, two patients died, two underwent lung transplantation and 21 remained stable. ART can help men with CF to become a father, but their health status and short survival need careful counselling and multidisciplinary medical care.

  14. Association between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RV Paul Chan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available RV Paul Chan1, Yoshihiro Yonekawa1, Margaux A Morrison2,3, Grace Sun1, Ryan K Wong1, Jeffrey M Perlman4, Michael F Chiang5,6, Thomas C Lee7, M Elizabeth Hartnett3, Margaret M DeAngelis2,31Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; 2Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 3University of Utah School of Medicine, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; 4Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; Departments of 5Ophthalmology and 6Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; 7The Vision Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, California, USAPurpose: To investigate the associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP requiring treatment. Methods: Retrospective analyses of inborn preterm infants screened for severe ROP at the Weill Cornell Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital by single factor logistic regression and multifactor models.Results: Of 399 ethnically diverse infants, 253 were conceived naturally and 146 by ART. Eight (3.16% patients conceived naturally, and 11 (7.53% with ART required laser treatment. In multifactor analyses, significant risks for severe ROP requiring treatment included both gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.52; P< 0.001 and ART ([OR] 4.70; [CI], 1.52–4.57; P = 0.007.Conclusions: ART is associated with severe ROP requiring treatment in this cohort. This is the first report that demonstrates a statistically significant association between ART and severe ROP requiring treatment in infants in the US.Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity, low birth rate, blindness, assisted reproductive technology

  15. Provision of assisted reproductive technology for single women in China: a new challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling Jing

    2004-01-01

    Following the enactment of the Jilin Regulation, single women, for the first time, are allowed to access assisted reproductive services in China. This paper is intended to analyze the arguments over whether single women are entitled to access assisted reproductive services, in relation to Chinese legal, ethical and social characteristics.

  16. Assisted Reproduction versus Spontaneous Conception: A Comparison of the Developmental Outcomes in Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Vance, Lisa; Anthis, Kristine S.; Needelman, Howard

    2004-01-01

    The use of assisted reproductive technology is increasing rapidly. Research, although sparse, has resulted in inconsistent findings as to the developmental prognosis for infants conceived by assisted reproductive techniques such as in vitro fertilization and the use of fertility drugs. In the present study, the authors compared twins who were…

  17. Influence of Exogenous Factors on Genomic Imprinting 3. The Impact of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The analytical review demonstrated the impact of assisted reproductive technologies on genomic imprinting of a child. It is shown that assisted reproductive technologies have a risk of intrauterine growth retardation and imprinting-associated Beckwith-Wiedemann, Angelman, Silver-Russell syndromes.

  18. Androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone or testosterone) for women undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Helen E; Rishworth, Josephine R; Siristatidis, Charalampos S; Kroon, Ben

    2015-11-26

    Infertility is a condition affecting 10% to 15% of couples of reproductive age. It is generally defined as "the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse". The treatment of infertility may involve manipulation of gametes or of the embryos themselves. These techniques are together known as assisted reproductive technology (ART). Practitioners are constantly seeking alternative or adjunct treatments, or both, in the hope that they may improve the outcome of assisted reproductive techniques. This Cochrane review focusses on the adjunct use of synthetic versions of two naturally-produced hormones, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone (T), in assisted reproduction.DHEA and its derivative testosterone are steroid hormones proposed to increase conception rates by positively affecting follicular response to gonadotrophin stimulation, leading to greater oocyte yields and, in turn, increased chance of pregnancy. To assess the effectiveness and safety of DHEA and testosterone as pre- or co-treatments in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction. We searched the following electronic databases, trial registers and websites up to 12 March 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, electronic trial registers for ongoing and registered trials, citation indexes, conference abstracts in the Web of Science, PubMed and OpenSIGLE. We also carried out handsearches. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing DHEA or testosterone as an adjunct treatment to any other active intervention, placebo, or no treatment in women undergoing assisted reproduction. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted relevant data and assessed them for risk of bias. We pooled studies using fixed-effect models. We calculated

  19. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Min; Chun, Sang Sik; Han, Hyuck Dong; Hwang, Jung Hye; Hwang, Kyung Joo; Kang, In Soo; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Ki Chul; Kim, Tak; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Lee, Won Don; Lee, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Yu Il; Min, Eung Gi; Moon, Hwa Sook; Moon, Shin Yong; Roh, Sung Il; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-11-01

    Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea in the year of 1985. However, it deserve to say that the invaluable data from fertility centers may serve as a useful source to find out which factors affect successful IVF outcome and to offer applicable information to infertile patients and fertility clinics. This article intended to report the status of ART in 2009 Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology surveyed. The current survey was performed to assess the status and success rate of ART performed in Korea, between January 1 and December 31, 2009. Reporting forms had been sent out to IVF centers via e-mail, and collected by e-mail as well in 2012. With International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies recommendation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and non-ICSI cases have been categorized and also IVF-ET cases involving frozen embryo replacement have been surveyed separately. Seventy-four centers have reported the treatment cycles initiated in the year of 2009, and had performed a total of 27,947 cycles of ART treatments. Among a total of 27,947 treatment cycles, IVF and ICSI cases added up to 22,049 (78.9%), with 45.3% IVF without ICSI and 54.7% IVF with ICSI, respectively. Among the IVF and ICSI patients, patients confirmed to have achieved clinical pregnancy was 28.8% per cycle with oocyte retrieval, and 30.9% per cycle with embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in 2009 is three embryos (40.4%), followed by 2 embryos (28.4%) and a single embryo transferred (13.6%). Among IVF and ICSI cycles that resulted in multiple live births, twin pregnancy rate was 45.3% and triple pregnancy rate was 1.1%. A total of 191 cases of oocyte donation had been performed to result in 25.0% of live birth rate. Meanwhile, a total of 5,619 cases of frozen embryo replacement had been performed with 33.7% of clinical

  20. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gregory M; Lee, Cheng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimates that in 2012 aquaculture production of fish will meet or exceed that of the capture fisheries for the first time. Thus, we have just turned the corner from a predominantly hunting gathering approach to meeting our nutritional needs from fish, to a farming approach. In 2012, 327 finfish species and five hybrids were covered by FAO aquaculture statistics, although farming of carps, tilapias, salmonids, and catfishes account for most of food-fish production from aquaculture. Although for most major species at least part of production is based on what might be considered domesticated animals, only limited production in most species is based on farming of improved lines of fish or is fully independent of wild seedstock. Consistent with the infancy of most aquaculture industries, much of the development and implementation of reproductive technologies over the past 100 years has been directed at completion of the life cycle in captivity in order to increase seed production and begin the process of domestication. The selection of species to farm and the emphasis of selective breeding must also take into account other ways to modify performance of an animal. Reproductive technologies have also been developed and implemented to affect many performance traits among fishes. Examples include technologies to control gender, alter time of sexual maturation, and induce sterilization. These technologies help take advantage of sexually dimorphic growth, overcome problems with growth performance and flesh quality associated with sexual maturation, and genetic containment. Reproductive technologies developed to advance aquaculture and how these technologies have been implemented to advance various sectors of the aquaculture industry are discussed. Finally, we will present some thoughts regarding future directions for reproductive technologies and their applications in finfish aquaculture.

  1. Effect of embryo freezing on perinatal outcome after assisted reproduction techniques: lessons from the Latin American Registry of Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Juan-Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Embryo cryopreservation is an integral part of assisted reproduction techniques; it allows the sequential transfer of all embryos, thus diminishing the risk of multiple pregnancies and associated perinatal complications. To address concerns about the safety of this procedure, neonatal outcome after 43,070 fresh embryo transfers was compared with 12,068 frozen-thawed embryo transfers (FET). After adjusting for maternal age, gestational age, embryo development at time of transfer, number of babies born and gestational order, FET was not found to be associated with an increase in perinatal mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81 to 3.62); preterm birth (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.18); or extreme preterm birth (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). Furthermore, after correcting for known confounding factors, FET was found to be associated with an increase in neonatal weight of 39.7 g (95% CI 1.54 to 64.10; P Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perinatal outcomes of pregnancies conceived by assisted reproductive technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šljivančanin Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent epidemiological studies showed significantly higher incidence of perinatal complications in newborns and women after the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART. Multiple pregnancies are more frequent after the use of ART. Singleton pregnancies following ART are more prone to preterm birth, low and very low birth weight (LBW and VLBW, small for gestational age (SGA and perinatal mortality. Objective. The aim of this study was to summarize the results of relevant articles and to evaluate whether the mode of conception is the determining factor for different pregnancy outcomes after assisted and natural conceptions. Methods. Eleven studies were included in this review. The following outcomes were observed: preterm and very preterm birth, SGA, LBW, VLBW, perinatal mortality, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and Apgar score (As ≤7 at fifth minute. Qualitative analysis and quantitative assessment were performed. Results. For singletons, odds ratios were 1.794 (95% confidence interval 1.660-1.939 for preterm birth, 1.649 (1.301-2.089 for LBW, 1.265 (1.048-1.527 for SGA. Admission to NICU, As≤7 at fifth minute and perinatal mortality showed significantly different frequency after assisted conception. Summary of results for twin gestations showed no significant difference between ART and spontaneous conception for preterm birth (32-36 weeks, very preterm birth (<32 weeks, LBW and VLBW. Conclusion. Analyzed studies showed that infants from ART have significantly worse perinatal outcome compared with natural conception. More observational studies should be conducted in order to establish the exact mechanism leading to more frequent perinatal morbidity and mortality after the use of ART.

  3. Lifestyle and Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Techniques: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinab, Hamzehgardeshi; Zohreh, Shahhosseini; Samadaee Gelehkolaee, Keshvar

    2015-02-24

    Studies reveal that lifestyles such as physical activity patterns, obesity, nutrition, and smoking, are factors that affect laboratory test results and pregnancy outcomes induced by assisted fertility techniques in infertile couples. The present study is a narrative review of studies in this area. In this study, researchers conducted their computer search in public databases Google Scholar general search engine, and then more specific: Science Direct, ProQuest, SID, Magiran, Irandoc, Pubmed, Scopus, cochrane library, and Psych info; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords: infertility (sterility, infertility), lifestyle (life behavior, lifestyle), Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART), antioxidant and infertility, social health, spiritual health, mental health, Alcohol and drug abuse, preventive factors, and instruments., and selected relevant articles to the study subject from 2004 to 2013. Firstly, a list of 150 papers generated from the initial search. Then reviewers studied titles and abstracts. Secondly, 111 papers were included. Finally, quality assessment of full text studies was performed by two independent reviewers. Researchers reviewed summary of all articles sought, ultimately used data from 62 full articles to compile this review paper. Review of literature led to arrangement of 9 general categories of ART results' relationship with weight watch and diet, exercise and physical activity, psychological health, avoiding medications, alcohol and drugs, preventing diseases, environmental health, spiritual health, social health, and physical health. The following was obtained from review of studies: since lifestyle is among important, changeable, and influential factors in fertility, success of these methods can be greatly helped through assessment of lifestyle patterns of infertile couples, and design and implementation of healthy lifestyle counseling programs, before and during

  4. Psychiatric disorders among women and men in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) cohort: protocol for a longitudinal, national register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lone; Hageman, Ida; Hougaard, Charlotte Ørsted; Sejbaek, Camilla Sandal; Assens, Maria; Ebdrup, Ninna Hinchely; Pinborg, Anja

    2013-03-21

    There are complex causal associations between mental disorders, fertility treatment, fertility treatment outcome and infertility per se. Eating disorders cause endocrine disturbances, anovulation and thereby infertility, and research has shown that infertility as well as unsuccessful assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment are potential risk factors for developing a depression on a long-term basis. Despite the fact that worldwide more than 400 000 ART treatment cycles are performed every year, the causal associations between mental disorders, use of medication for mental disorders and ART treatment in both sexes have only been sparsely explored. The main objective of this national register-based cohort study is to assess women's and men's mental health before, during, and after ART treatment in comparison with the mental health in an age-matched population-based cohort of couples with no history of ART treatment. Furthermore, the objective is to study the reproductive outcome of ART treatment among women who have a registered diagnosis of a mental disorder or have used medication for mental disorders prior to ART treatment compared with women in ART treatment without a mental disorder. We will establish the Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) cohort including all women registered with ART treatment in the Danish in vitro fertilisation Register during 1994-2009 (N=42 915) and their partners. An age-matched population-based comparison cohort of women without ART treatment (n=215 290) and their partners will be established. Data will be cross-linked with data from national registers on psychiatric disorders, medical prescriptions for mental disorders, births, causes of deaths and sociodemographic data. Survival analyses and other statistical analyses will be conducted on the development of mental disorders and use of medication for mental disorders for women and men both prior to and after ART treatment.

  5. Regulatory framework in assisted reproductive technologies, relevance and main issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have changed life for the past 25 years and many ethical and social issues have emerged following this new method of conception. In order to protect individuals against scientific and ethical abuses without inhibiting scientific progress, a specific legal framework is necessary. The first French law on Bioethics was voted after an extensive debate in 1994 then reviewed in 2004. This review previously scheduled every five years is currently being discussed. Legal provisions applying to ART are part of a large framework including the protection of the patients' rights and biomedical research. The key principles consist of respect for human life and ban on commercial practices of human body parts, eugenic practices and any kind of cloning. These key principles apply to ART. Donation is anonymous and free. Created in 2004, the Agence de la biomédecine is a government agency and one of the main tools of the French regulations. The missions focus on improving the quality and the safety of the management of ART. Evaluation of activities is available to all from the annual report. The agency represents the French competent authority for medical and scientific aspects of ART. Substantial differences in European legislations exist from the open-up "laissez faire" to the most restrictive one. As a consequence a large reproductive tourism has developed particularly for egg donation or surrogacy. The medical and ethical conditions of management of patients and donors represent the main critical points. In order to avoid ethical abuses, homogenization regarding the key principles is necessary in Europe. It is an opportunity to reassert that human body parts should not be a source of financial gain.

  6. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  7. Assisted reproduction: what factors interfere in the professional's decisions? Are single women an issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záchia, Suzana; Knauth, Daniela; Goldim, José R; Chachamovich, Juliana R; Chachamovich, Eduardo; Paz, Ana H; Felberbaum, Ricardo; Crosignani, PierGiorgio; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Passos, Eduardo P

    2011-05-31

    With the development of medical technology, many countries around the world have been implementing ethical guidelines and laws regarding Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR). A physician's reproductive decisions are not solely based on technical criteria but are also influenced by society values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the factors prioritized by MAR professionals when deciding on whether to accept to perform assisted reproduction and to show any existing cultural differences. Cross-sectional study involving 224 healthcare professionals working with assisted reproduction in Brazil, Italy, Germany and Greece. Instrument used for data collection: a questionnaire, followed by the description of four special MAR cases (a single woman, a lesbian couple, an HIV discordant couple and gender selection) which included case-specific questions regarding the professionals' decision on whether to perform the requested procedure as well as the following factors: socio-demographic variables, moral and legal values as well as the technical aspects which influence decision-making. Only the case involving a single woman who wishes to have a child (without the intention of having a partner in the future) demonstrated significant differences. Therefore, the study was driven towards the results of this case specifically. The analyses we performed demonstrated that professionals holding a Master's Degree, those younger in age, female professionals, those having worked for less time in reproduction, those in private clinics and Brazilian health professionals all had a greater tendency to perform the procedure in that case. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the reasons for the professional's decision to perform the procedure were the woman's right to gestate and the duty of MAR professionals to help her. The professionals who decided not to perform the procedure identified the woman's marital status and the child's right to a father as the reason to

  8. Assisted Reproduction: What factors interfere in the professional's decisions? Are single women an issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background With the development of medical technology, many countries around the world have been implementing ethical guidelines and laws regarding Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR). A physician's reproductive decisions are not solely based on technical criteria but are also influenced by society values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the factors prioritized by MAR professionals when deciding on whether to accept to perform assisted reproduction and to show any existing cultural differences. Methods Cross-sectional study involving 224 healthcare professionals working with assisted reproduction in Brazil, Italy, Germany and Greece. Instrument used for data collection: a questionnaire, followed by the description of four special MAR cases (a single woman, a lesbian couple, an HIV discordant couple and gender selection) which included case-specific questions regarding the professionals' decision on whether to perform the requested procedure as well as the following factors: socio-demographic variables, moral and legal values as well as the technical aspects which influence decision-making. Results Only the case involving a single woman who wishes to have a child (without the intention of having a partner in the future) demonstrated significant differences. Therefore, the study was driven towards the results of this case specifically. The analyses we performed demonstrated that professionals holding a Master's Degree, those younger in age, female professionals, those having worked for less time in reproduction, those in private clinics and Brazilian health professionals all had a greater tendency to perform the procedure in that case. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the reasons for the professional's decision to perform the procedure were the woman's right to gestate and the duty of MAR professionals to help her. The professionals who decided not to perform the procedure identified the woman's marital status and the child's right to a

  9. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2014-11-21

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2011 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2011 (resulting from procedures performed in 2010 and 2011) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2011. 2011. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2011, a total of 151,923 ART procedures performed in 451 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,818 live-birth deliveries and 61,610 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,808), New York (excluding New York City) (14,576), Massachusetts (10,106), Illinois (9,886), Texas (9,576), and New Jersey (8,698). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 47.2% of all ART procedures performed, 45.3% of all infants born from ART, and 45.1% of

  10. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance — United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-08-14

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure, women who undergo ART procedures, compared with those who conceive naturally, are more likely to deliver multiple birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2012 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2012 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2011 and 2012) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2012. 2012. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System, a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2012, a total of 157,635 ART procedures performed in 456 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 51,261 live-birth deliveries and 65,151 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (20,241), New York (19,618), Illinois (10,449), Texas (10,281), Massachusetts (9,754), and New Jersey (8,590). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of

  11. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - 
United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-12-04

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2013 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2013 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2012 and 2013) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2013. 2013. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2013, a total of 160,521 ART procedures (range: 109 in Wyoming to 20,299 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 467 U.S. fertility clinics and were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 53,252 live-birth deliveries (range: 47 in Alaska to 6,979 in California) and 66,691 infants (range: 61 in Alaska to 8,649 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,521 (range: 352 in Puerto Rico to 7,688 in DC). ART use

  12. Assisted reproductive technology in the United States: 2001 results generated from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine/Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    To summarize the procedures and outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) that were initiated in the United States in 2001. Data were collected electronically using the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) Clinic Outcome Reporting System software and submitted to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine/SART Registry. Three hundred eighty-five clinics submitted data on procedures performed in 2001. Data were collated after November 2002 [corrected] so that the outcomes of all pregnancies would be known. Incidence of clinical pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, abortion, stillbirth, and delivery. Programs reported initiating 108,130 cycles of ART treatment. Of these, 79,042 cycles involved IVF (with and without micromanipulation), with a delivery rate per retrieval of 31.6%; 340 were cycles of gamete intrafallopian transfer, with a delivery rate per retrieval of 21.9%; 661 were cycles of zygote intrafallopian transfer, with a delivery rate per retrieval of 31.0%. The following additional ART procedures were also initiated: 8,147 fresh donor oocyte cycles, with a delivery rate per transfer of 47.3%; 14,509 frozen ET procedures, with a delivery rate per transfer of 23.5%; 3,187 frozen ETs employing donated oocytes or embryos, with a delivery rate per transfer of 27.4%; and 1,366 cycles using a host uterus, with a delivery rate per transfer of 38.7%. In addition, 112 cycles were reported as combinations of more than one treatment type, 8 cycles as research, and 85 as embryo banking. As a result of all procedures, 29,585 deliveries were reported, resulting in 41,168 neonates. In 2001, there were more programs reporting ART treatment and a significant increase in reported cycles compared with 2000.

  13. High incidence of monozygotic twinning after assisted reproduction is related to genetic information, but not to assisted reproduction technology itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, Aleš; Zbořilová, Blažena; Procházka, Martin; Šilhánová, Eva; Koutná, Olga; Klásková, Eva; Tkadlec, Emil; Sobek, Aleš

    2015-03-01

    To study the incidence of monozygotic twinning (MZT) in patients using in vitro fertilization, relative to their age, genetic background, ovarian function, and assisted reproductive techniques used. Analysis of a collected database. Infertility treatment center. A total of 1,876 patients receiving infertility treatment between 2000 and 2012. Pregnancies with monozygotic twins (A: 23) were compared with deliveries of dizygotic twins (B: 423), singleton pregnancies (C: 880), and aborted pregnancies (D: 389). None. A genetic survey on multiple pregnancies in the extended family. Measures were micromanipulation technique, the length of embryo cultivation, type of cultivation media, basal follicle-stimulating hormone level, estradiol level on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration, number of oocytes, total consumption of gonadotropins, and consumption of gonadotropins needed for recovery of 1 oocyte. No differences were found between the incidence of MZT in cycles that did vs. did not use micromanipulation techniques. In addition, the length of embryo cultivation or type of cultivation media used did not affect the results. Estradiol levels and implantation rates were significantly higher in group A. The incidence of MZT in families in group A was significantly higher than that in groups B and C. We propose that the high incidence of MZT in infertility-clinic patients is conditioned by hereditary factors, and good ovarian function only facilitates the expression. The resulting recommendation is that young women with a positive family history and good ovarian function undergo elective single-embryo transfer, and proper counseling is advisable. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assisted reproductive technologies: medical safety issues in the older woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yakir; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Lavie, Ofer; Auslender, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Abstract Previous study has shown that in the United States, most maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications due to chronic disease are potentially preventable through improved medical care before conception. Many women who need assisted reproductive technology (ART) because of infertility are older than the average pregnant woman. Risks for such chronic diseases as obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and malignancy greatly increase with maternal age. Chronic illness increases the risk of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure and is also associated with increased obstetric risk and even death. The objective of this review is to outline the potential risks for older women who undergo ART procedures and pregnancy and to characterize guidelines for evaluation before enrollment in ART programs. A PubMed search revealed that very few studies have related to pre-ART medical evaluation. Therefore, we suggest a pre-ART medical assessment, comparable to the recommendations of the American Heart Association before noncompetitive physical activity and the American Society of Anesthesiologists before elective surgery. This assessment should include a thorough medical questionnaire and medical examination. Further evaluation and treatment should follow to ensure the safety of ART procedures and of ensuing pregnancies.

  15. [COMPLICATIONS OF PREGNANCY, RESULTING FROM ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksanyan, A

    2017-01-01

    When pregnancy occurs as a result of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), there are more chances of developing complications and adverse outcomes for the mother and fetus compared to spontaneous pregnancies. Taking into account the noted features, the purpose of our study was to determine the nature of the complications of induced pregnancy and their frequency, depending on the causes of infertility. Under our supervision were 86 women with induced single-pregnancy. Two clinical groups were formed depending on the causes of infertility: group I was represented by 53 observations, in which infertility of endocrine genesis took place; Group II included 33 women with tubal peritoneal infertility. Pregnancy, resulting from ART, should be attributed to the group at high risk of complications of pregnancy. Among the causes of female infertility, the tubal peritoneal factor is the least dangerous in terms of the complicated course of the gestational process, and the endocrine factors that can cause a two-fold increase in the frequency of the threat of abortion and pre-eclampsia are more dangerous. In turn, the cause of endocrine infertility are various factors that need to be determined when predicting the course of induced pregnancy. A special feature of maintaining this category of pregnant women is the constant observation and correction of dyshormonal disorders, which not only cause anovulation, but can also negatively affect the course of pregnancy.

  16. Effects of Assisted Reproduction Technology on Placental Imprinted Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Aoki, Chizu; Tamaki-Ishihara, Yuko; Fukuda, Yusuke; Kitamura, Mamoru; Matsue, Yoichi; So, Akiko; Morita, Mineto

    2010-01-01

    We used placental tissue to compare the imprinted gene expression of IGF2, H19, KCNQ1OT1, and CDKN1C of singletons conceived via assisted reproduction technology (ART) with that of spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons. Of 989 singletons examined (ART n = 65; SC n = 924), neonatal weight was significantly lower (P < .001) in the ART group than in the SC group, but placental weight showed no significant difference. Gene expression analyzed by real-time PCR was similar for both groups with appropriate-for-date (AFD) birth weight. H19 expression was suppressed in fetal growth retardation (FGR) cases in the ART and SC groups compared with AFD cases (P < .02 and P < .05, resp.). In contrast, CDKN1C expression was suppressed in FGR cases in the ART group (P < .01), while KCNQ1OT1 expression was hyperexpressed in FGR cases in the SC group (P < .05). As imprinted gene expression patterns differed between the ART and SC groups, we speculate that ART modifies epigenetic status even though the possibilities always exist. PMID:20706653

  17. Outcome of assisted reproductive technology in overweight and obese women

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenna, Antonio; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity among patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Latin America and its consequences on treatment outcomes. Methods We used the Latin American Registry of ART to obtain women's age and body mass index (BMI), cancellation rate, number of oocytes retrieved and embryos transferred, clinical pregnancy, live birth and miscarriage rates from 107.313 patients undergoing autologous IVF and ICSI during four years; a multivariable analysis was performed to determine the effect of BMI on cancellation, oocytes retrieved, pregnancy, live birth and miscarriage, adjusting for age, number of embryos transferred and embryo developmental stage upon embryo transfer, when appropriate. Results The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 16.1% and 42.4%, respectively; correcting for age of female partner, overweight and obesity were associated to an increase in the odds of cancellation and to a lower mean number of oocytes retrieved; after adjusting for age, number of embryos transferred and stage of embryo development at transfer, we found that the BMI category was not associated to a change in the likelihoods of pregnancy, live birth and miscarriage. Conclusions The prevalence of obesity among women seeking ART in Latin America is surprisingly high; however, BMI does not influence the outcome of ART performed in these women. PMID:28609272

  18. Association between Thrombophilia and Repeated Assisted Reproductive Technology Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Hamdi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was performed to investigate the incidence of thrombophilic gene mutations in repeated assisted reproductive technology (ART failures. Methods: The prevalence of mutated genes in the patients with a history of three or more previous ART failures was compared with the patients with a history of successful pregnancy following ARTs. The study group included 70 patients, 34 with three or more previously failed ARTs (A and control group consisted of 36 patients with successful pregnancy following ARTs (B. All patients were tested for the presence of mutated thrombophilic genes including factor V Leiden (FVL, Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR and Prothrombin (G20210A using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR. Results: Mutation of FVL gene was detected in 5.9% women of group A (2 of 34 compared with 2.8% women (1 of 36 of control group (P = 0.6. Mutation of MTHFR gene was found in 35.3% (12 cases as compared with 50% (18 cases of control (35.3% versus 50%; P = 0.23. Regarding Prothrombin, only control group had 5.6% mutation (P = 0.49. No significant differences were detected in the incidences of FVL, Prothrombin and MTHFR in the study group A compared with the control group B. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that thrombophilia does not have a significant effect in ART failures.

  19. Ocular Manifestations in Infants Resulted from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Kermani, Ramin Mozafari; Mohhamadi, Ali Reza; Nateghi, Mohammad Reza; Fazeli, Abolhasan Shahzade; Kashi, Khashayar Mehdizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, many infertile couples can have child by assistant reproductive technology (ART). Always the undesirable effects of these methods on newborn are considered and are evaluated. The aim of this study is to describe the impact of ART on ocular and visual performances of infants born by these methods. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 479 infants aged three-nine months presented to an optometry clinic of Child Health and Development Research Department (CHDRD), Tehran, Iran. Static retinoscopy, qualitative fixation evaluation, Hirschberg test, red reflex assessment and external eye examination were carried out. Other information such as birth weight and maturity of the infants was recorded. It was possible to assess only 320 out of 479 infants due to general condition of some participants. Comparison of mean refractive error in infants' right and left eyes did not show any significant difference. Our findings confirmed that 20.3% had poor fixation, while 2.9% revealed manifest strabismus. The results also revealed the prevalences of myopia, hyperopia and emmetropia are 2.9%, 87%, and 10.1%, respectively. Red reflex abnormalities were significantly found in boys and in preterm infants (p ART, especially for premature male ART infants. These results also suggest the probability of fixation condition and visual deficiencies in these infants. It is recommended to pay close attention to this preliminary report about the refractive and fixation condition of the infants born after ART.

  20. Impact of endometrial cavity fluid on assisted reproductive technology outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Shi, Lin; Shi, Juanzi

    2016-03-01

    The impact of endometrial cavity fluid (ECF) on assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes has not been evaluated in a meta-analysis. To evaluate the impact of ECF on the outcome of ART cycles. PubMed, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and China Doctoral/Masters Dissertations Full-text Databases were searched for reports published in any language before January 1, 2015, using relevant keywords. Studies were included if they compared the outcome of ART in women with and without ECF. Background information, participants' characteristics, and study outcomes were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method. Six studies evaluating 5928 ART cycles were included. The pregnancy rate was significantly lower in the group with ECF than in the group without ECF (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55-0.98; P=0.03). The same association was observed if the analysis included only patients with hydrosalpinx (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.15-0.86; P=0.02). The clinical pregnancy rate after ART is significantly lower among patients with ECF than among those without ECF. In addition, if ECF is found in patients with hydrosalpinx, ART cycles should be cancelled after oocyte retrieval. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assisted reproductive technology in China: compliance and non-compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jie; Feng, Huai L

    2014-04-01

    According to the WHO, infertility and sterility will be the third-most serious disease worldwide in the 21st century, after cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast to developed countries, assisted reproductive technology (ART) were not offered in China until the mid-1980s with the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) infant born in Taiwan in 1985, then Hong Kong in 1986, and mainland China in 1988, respectively. Since those inceptions, the practice of ART in China has evoked a variety of social, cultural, political and one-child policy responses that have resulted in restrictions on the number of IVF cycles performed annually. According to recent survey, an estimate 40-50 million women and 45 million men suffered from infertility, which is estimated that more than ten million Chinese infertile couples require ART treatment. However, it has limited access to ART facilities, many of them may not have a child are whirling to all types of fertility therapies. Exposure to radiation, pesticides and other environmental pollutants, work-related stress and unhealthy lifestyles are believed to contribute to the increasing incidence of infertility in China. The aim of this first report is to provide China nationwide ART data and government policy in compliance and 
non-compliance, particularly related to family plan policy in China.

  2. [Premature twins: clinic comparison, reproductive assisted techniques versus spontaneous conception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega-Alvarez, Roxana; Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Bernardez-Zapata, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Twin pregnancies occur one out of every 800. Due to the increase in maternal age and infertility, the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) has risen. Thirty five percent of pregnancies solved using ART are twin pregnancies. A RT consists of infertility treatments in which oocytes and sperm are manipulated. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical behavior of premature twins born through ART versus those born after spontaneous conception (SC). Retrolective cohort study. The data was obtained from the records of preterm twins born between August 2010 and August 2013. Preterm twins were categorized in two groups: the ones conceived using ART versus those conceived through SC. Demographic characteristics and neonatal outcomes were compared. The total was of 398 patients: 208 conceived in consequence of ART and 190 through SC. The primary outcome and neonatal morbidities showed no significant difference, only the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis and the use of parenteral nutrition showed significant difference. The length of hospital stay between groups was similar. In our population of preterm twins, the mode of conception had no detectable effect on mortality or short term morbidities.

  3. The Role of Acupuncture in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Hong Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to provide reliable evidence by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis for evaluating the role of acupuncture in assisted reproductive technology. All randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of acupuncture, including manual, electrical, and laser acupuncture (LA techniques, on the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR and live birth rate (LBR of in vitro fertilization (IVF or artificial insemination were included. The controlled groups consisted of no acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. The sham acupuncture included sham acupuncture at acupoints, sham acupuncture at non- or inappropriate points, sham LA, and adhesive tapes. Twenty-three trials (a total of 5598 participants were included in this paper. The pooled CPR from all acupuncture groups was significantly higher than that from all controlled groups, whereas the LBR was not significantly different between the two groups. However, the results were quite distinct when the type of control and/or different acupuncture times were examined in a sensitivity analysis. The results mainly indicate that acupuncture, especially around the time of the controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, improves pregnancy outcomes in women undergoing IVF. More positive effects from acupuncture in IVF can be expected if a more individualized acupuncture programs are used.

  4. [Health and development of children conceived through assisted reproductive technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Sylvie; Patrat, Catherine; Luton, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Around 3% of children are conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART) in France. Several questions concerning the early or late follow-up of these children are raised, as there are differences in the population in charge and because of clinical or biological procedures used. Nevertheless, one has to be cautious in interpreting the data as it is difficult to study one factor at a time, and as many other events can bias the results. However, ART is associated with a higher risk, even moderate, of prematurity, foetal hypotrophy, and neo natal complications, as compared to natural conceived children. There is also increasing evidence that ART-conceived children present more epigenetic diseases and congenital mainly concerning cardio-vascular, uro-genital and musculo-skeletal systems, as natural conceived children. Absolute risks remain anyway moderate and reassuring. Long term follow up is encouraging, with correct growth or psychomotor development of these children, and no significant excess of risk for cancer, but it is necessary to carry on this follow up in order to have data on their development to adulthood and on their fertility.

  5. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staffdagger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; Klerk, C. de; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; Broeck, U. Van den; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C.M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? SUMMARY ANSWER: Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human

  7. Psychological evaluation test after the use of assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, José Gonçalves; Razera Baruffi, Ricardo Luiz; Mauri, Ana Lucia; Petersen, Claudia Guilhermino; Felipe, Valeria; Garbellini, Erika

    2002-06-01

    The emotional changes provoked by the use of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) may trigger important psychological reactions. The objective of the present study was to develop a psychological evaluation test (PET-ART) in order to identify the occurrence of psychological problems and to facilitate their treatment. A total of 128 women were submitted to PET-ART of the Center for Human Reproduction, "Sinhá Junqueira" Maternity Foundation, after application of IVF/ICSI program at least once. The causes of infertility were male-related in 45% of cases, female-related in 48%, and both male- and female-related in 7%. Infertility was primary in 79% of cases and secondary in 21%. The mean age of the women was 34.5 +/- 5.2 years and the mean age of the men was 37.9 +/- 6.8 years. The PET-ART was evaluated using a questionnaire with 15 questions selected in order to detect emotional reactions caused by infertility. The responses were assigned four grades with respect to intensity (1 = mild intensity; 2 = medium intensity; 3 = high intensity; and 4 = maximum or unbearable intensity). The sum of the responses corresponded to PET-ART score ranging from 15 to 60 points. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated by the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. The PET-ART identified five questions receiving 50% or more responses of the high/maximum intensity type (sum of the percentages of responses with a score of 3 and 4). The questions were the following: 1--The waiting time before being submitted to a pregnancy test (82.8% of the patients); 2--A negative result of the pregnancy test (77.3% of the patients); 3--The degree of anxiety in a new attempt to obtain pregnancy (76.5% of the patients); 4--Finding the money necessary for the repetition of the IVF/ICSI techniques (66.4% of the patients); 5--The possibility of collecting few eggs, or of forming or not an embryo in the laboratory is an expectation that makes me anxious (57.8% of the patients). The mean PET-ART was 33

  8. Assessment of attitudes towards assisted reproduction: a survey among medical students and parous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Katri; Länsimies, Esko; Hippeläinen, Maritta; Heinonen, Seppo

    2006-11-01

    The present paper explores attitudes towards different aspects of assisted reproductive technologies among parous women and future doctors (third- and fourth-year medical students). We anonymously surveyed 200 parous women who had at least three infants and had given birth at Kuopio University Hospital, and 200 medical students of Kuopio University. The overall response rate was 45%. Most of the medical students were childless (95.7%), unmarried (63.8%), and younger (24 vs. 35 years) compared with the parous women (p single women. Over 40% of medical students would allow the use of a surrogate mother for lesbian and homosexual couples; the number was under 20% in the group of parous women. Their setting of priorities within the field of reproductive health also showed differences in prostate cancer screening, doctor's appointments for contraception, abortion and menopausal hormone replacement therapy. Medical students take a rather liberal stance on reproductive issues. On the other hand, baseline attitudes among medical students reveal some degree of subjectivism when it comes to allocation of scarce healthcare resources within the field of reproductive health. Medical education faces a challenge in ensuring that future physicians are able to set priorities and balance resources between preventive medicine and management of specific medical conditions, and to base their attitudes on evidence.

  9. Embryo transfer techniques: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine survey of current Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Thomas L; Lee, Malinda S; Bendikson, Kristin A; Reindollar, Richard H

    2017-04-01

    To better understand practice patterns and opportunities for standardization of ET. Cross-sectional survey. Not applicable. Not applicable. An anonymous 82-question survey was emailed to the medical directors of 286 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member IVF practices. A follow-up survey composed of three questions specific to ET technique was emailed to the same medical directors. Descriptive statistics of the results were compiled. The survey assessed policies, protocols, restrictions, and specifics pertinent to the technique of ET. There were 117 (41%) responses; 32% practice in academic settings and 68% in private practice. Responders were experienced clinicians, half of whom had performed technique. Multiple steps in the ET process were identified as "highly conserved;" others demonstrated discordance. ET technique is divided among [1] trial transfer followed immediately with ET (40%); [2] afterload transfer (30%); and [3] direct transfer without prior trial or afterload (27%). Embryos are discharged in the upper (66%) and middle thirds (29%) of the endometrial cavity and not closer than 1-1.5 cm from fundus (87%). Details of each step were reported and allowed the development of a "common" practice ET procedure. ET training and practices vary widely. Improved training and standardization based on outcomes data and best practices are warranted. A common practice procedure is suggested for validation by a systematic literature review. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in Collection, Transport and Maturation of Equine Oocytes for Assisted Reproductive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Elaine M

    2016-12-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques that are based on oocyte manipulations have gained acceptance in the equine industry. Methods to collect and handle immature or maturing oocytes have been developed, and systems to ship oocytes now allow for collection in one location and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in another. Subsequently, ICSI-produced embryos can be transferred onsite, shipped to another location, or cryopreserved. Methods for the collection, identification, culture, maturation, and shipment of equine oocytes are reviewed, with an emphasis on procedures from laboratories providing clinical services with documented success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The purchase of fruitfulness: assisted conception and reproductive disability in a seventeenth-century comedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belling, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between socioeconomic and biogenetic reproduction are always socially constructed but not always acknowledged. These relationships are examined as they apply to an instance of infertility and assisted reproduction presented in a seventeenth-century English play, Thomas Middleton's 1613 comedy, A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. Middleton's satirization of the effects of secrecy on the category of reproductive disability is analyzed and its applicability to our own time considered. The discussion is in four parts, focusing on: the attribution of disabled status to one member of the couple, the wife; the use of this attribution to protect the husband's reputation for sexual and reproductive health; the concealment of the nature of assisted reproduction; and the interests of the child conceived with such assistance.

  12. Aneuploidy rates in failed pregnancies following assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shweta; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Milad, Magdy; Kazer, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    Approximately 10%-15% of clinically recognized pregnancies end with a first trimester loss. Cytogenetic analysis of products of conception (POC) has revealed that a large proportion of these spontaneous miscarriages are a result of chromosomal abnormalities. However, relatively few studies have evaluated chromosomal abnormalities in pregnancies achieved using assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Here, we review the incidence and type of chromosomal abnormalities that occurred in our infertility patient population undergoing ART and provide a review of the literature pertaining to this subject. A retrospective chart review of all patients from our medical center who conceived using ART between January 2000 and January 2008, who experienced a subsequent early pregnancy loss, and whose POCs were successfully karyotyped were included. We also conducted a literature review in PubMed, searching for other articles on this subject. Two hundred fourteen patients conceived with ART, experienced an early loss, and subsequently underwent a dilation and curettage (D&C) between 2000 and 2008. A total of 59 (27%) patients chose to have cytogenetic testing, and their POCs were successfully karyotyped. The overall rate of aneuploidy in this group was 83%. Our PubMed search revealed a total of 12 studies that were identified and evaluated and deemed appropriate for review. Consistent with most of the literature, we found a high rate of aneuploidy present in infertile patients conceiving using ART. Because an abnormal karyotype provides an explanation for an early loss, this and other studies seem to suggest that routinely carrying out this assessment in such patients may be of value.

  13. Ocular Manifestations in Infants Resulted from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Jafarzadehpur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many infertile couples can have child by assistant reproductive technology (ART. Always the undesirable effects of these methods on newborn are considered and are evaluated. The aim of this study is to describe the impact of ART on ocular and visual performances of infants born by these methods.In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 479 infants aged three-nine months presented to an optometry clinic of Child Health and Development Research Department (CHDRD, Tehran, Iran. Static retinoscopy, qualitative fixation evaluation, Hirschberg test, red reflex assessment and external eye examination were carried out. Other information such as birth weight and maturity of the infants was recorded.It was possible to assess only 320 out of 479 infants due to general condition of some participants. Comparison of mean refractive error in infants' right and left eyes did not show any significant difference. Our findings confirmed that 20.3% had poor fixation, while 2.9% revealed manifest strabismus. The results also revealed the prevalences of myopia, hyperopia and emmetropia are 2.9%, 87%, and 10.1%, respectively. Red reflex abnormalities were significantly found in boys and in preterm infants (p < 0.05. Failure of fixation control was seen more frequently with increasing refractive error, which significantly developed in preterm infants (p < 0.001.These results reflect the necessity of more comprehensive assessments and further follow-up of infants born by ART, especially for premature male ART infants. These results also suggest the probability of fixation condition and visual deficiencies in these infants. It is recommended to pay close attention to this preliminary report about the refractive and fixation condition of the infants born after ART.

  14. Tubal factor infertility and perinatal risk after assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawwass, Jennifer F; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M; Session, Donna R; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J

    2013-06-01

    To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02-14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04-1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of preterm birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20-1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20-1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART.

  15. Assisted Reproductive Techniques and Risk of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Alessandro; Molinatto, Cristina; Cerrato, Flavia; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Carli, Diana; Peris, Clementina; Riccio, Andrea; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista

    2017-07-01

    The emerging association of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) with imprinting disorders represents a major issue in the scientific debate on infertility treatment and human procreation. We studied the prevalence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) in children conceived through ART to define the specific associated relative risk. Patients with BWS born in Piemonte, Italy, were identified and matched with the general demographic data and corresponding regional ART registry. Between 2005 and 2014, live births in Piemonte were 379 872, including 7884 from ART. Thirty-eight patients with BWS were born, 7 from ART and 31 naturally conceived. BWS birth prevalence in the ART group was significantly higher than that of the naturally conceived group (1:1126 vs 1:12 254, P < .001). The absolute live birth risk in the ART group was 887.9 per 1 000 000 vs 83.3 per 1 000 000 in the naturally conceived group, providing a relative risk of 10.7 (95% confidence interval 4.7-24.2). During the 1997-2014 period, 67 patients were diagnosed with BWS out of 663 834 newborns (1:9908 live births). Nine out of the 67 BWS patients were conceived through ART (13.4%), and 8 were molecularly tested, with 4 having an imprinting center 2 loss of methylation, 2 with 11p15.5 paternal uniparental disomy, and 2 negative results. ART entails a 10-fold increased risk of BWS and could be implicated in the pathogenesis of genomic events besides methylation anomalies. These data highlight the need for awareness of ART-associated health risk. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Long-acting FSH versus daily FSH for women undergoing assisted reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwer, A.W.; Farquhar, C.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assisted reproduction techniques (ART), such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), can help subfertile couples to create a family. It is necessary to induce multiple follicles, which is achieved by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) injections.

  17. Serum and follicular fluid organochlorine concentrations among women undergoing assisted reproduction technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Meeker, John D; Missmer, Stacey A; Altshul, Larisa; Vitonis, Allison F; Ryan, Louise; Cramer, Daniel W; Hauser, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides, is widespread among the general population. There is evidence of adverse effects on reproduction and early pregnancy in relation to organochlorine exposure but human studies remain limited. The increased use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) presents unique opportunities for the assessment of environmental influences on early pregnancy outcomes not...

  18. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.

    2013-01-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved...... of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed....

  19. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in women with schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Ninna H; Assens, Maria; Hougaard, Charlotte O

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence rate of women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and to study these women's fertility treatment outcome in comparison to women with no psychotic disorders.......To determine the prevalence rate of women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and to study these women's fertility treatment outcome in comparison to women with no psychotic disorders....

  20. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2006: results generated from European registers by ESHRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mouzon, J; Goossens, V; Bhattacharya, S

    2010-01-01

    In this 10th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report, the results of assisted reproductive techniques from treatments initiated in Europe during 2006 are presented. Data were mainly collected from existing national registers.......In this 10th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report, the results of assisted reproductive techniques from treatments initiated in Europe during 2006 are presented. Data were mainly collected from existing national registers....

  1. The effect of assisted reproduction treatment on mental health in fertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivaridelavar, Maryam; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza

    2016-01-01

    The process of assisted reproductive treatment is a stressful situation in the treatment of infertile couples and it would harm the mental health of women. Fertile women who started infertility treatment due to male factor infertility have reported to experience less stress and depression than other women before the assisted reproductive process but considering the cultural and social factors and also the etiology of the assisted reproductive process, it could affect the metal health of these women. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the mental health of fertile women who undergo assisted reproductive treatment due to male factor infertility. This study was a prospective study on 70 fertile women who underwent assisted reproductive treatment due to male factor infertility. The exclusion criterion was to stop super ovulation induction. To assess mental health, anxiety and depression dimensions of the general health questionnaire were used. Before starting ovulation induction and after oocyte harvesting, the general health questionnaire was filled by women who were under treatment. Data were analyzed using multi-variable linear regression, paired t-test, and Chi-square. The results showed that the mean score of depression and anxiety before ovulation induction and after oocyte harvesting were not significantly different; but the rate of mental health disorder in the depression dimension was significantly decreased after oocytes harvesting (31.7% vs. 39.7%). Also, there was a significant relation between the level of anxiety and depression before ovulation induction and after oocyte harvesting (P assisted reproductive treatment does not affect the mental health in fertile women independently, but these women start assisted reproductive process with high levels of depression and anxiety. Therefore, prior to the assisted reproductive treatment mental health consultation is needed.

  2. Enduring politics: the culture of obstacles in legislating for assisted reproduction technologies in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Allison

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assisted reproductive technology has become a normalized part of reproductive medicine in many countries around the world. Access, however, is uneven and inconsistent, facilitated and restricted by such factors as affordability, social and moral acceptance or refusal and local cultures of medical practice. In Ireland, assisted reproductive technology has been available since 1987 but remains unregulated by legislation. This creates an uncertain and untenable legal circumstance given the contested issues related to constitutional protection of the right to life of the unborn and the indeterminate legal status of embryos in vitro. This paper examines the impact of an enduring political impasse. It explores how clinical assisted reproductive technology services in Ireland operate both inside and outside dominant institutional frameworks, meeting a pronatalist and pro-family social and political agenda, while sometimes contradicting the pro-life politics that has continued to shape women’s reproductive lives. The medical approaches to infertility thus intersect with the ongoing debates around abortion, the failure of the government to regulate, and notions of embodied motherhood and responsibility within changing meanings of family and kinship. At the same time women and their partners seek assisted reproductive technology treatment in other countries throughout the European Union where laws differ and availability of services varies. A decade has passed since the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction in Ireland released its recommendations; the enduring legislative vacuum leaves women, families and practitioners in potential legal limbo.

  3. Globalisation of birth markets: a case study of assisted reproductive technologies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarojini Nadimpally

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The escalation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs in India into a veritable fertility industry is the result of a multitude of reasons. This paper places the bio-genetic industry within the larger political economy framework of globalisation and privatisation, thus employing a framework that is often omitted from discussions on ARTs, but has direct and significant bearings on the ART industry in India. As markets for human organs, tissues and reproductive body parts experience unprecedented growth, the limits of what can or should be bought and sold continue to be pushed. As such, bodies have emerged as sale-worthy economic capital. Commercial flows of reproductive material create and deploy the division of the body into parts over which ownership is claimed, in the process following 'modern routes of capital' and raising issues of structural inequality. This paper presents a brief picture of India's fertility industry with specific focus on its ground-level operation, nature and growth. It aims to explore the industry dimensions of ARTs, by highlighting the macro picture of health care markets and medical tourism in India, the proliferation of the ART industry, market features such as the social imperative to mother, costs, promotion and marketing, unverified claims, inflated success rates, deals and offers, actors and collaborations in the field, and finally, the absence of standards. This paper presents findings from the research 'Constructing Conceptions: The Mapping of Assisted Reproductive Technologies in India', by Sama, a Delhi-based resource group working on gender, health and rights. This research was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in the three states of Uttar Pradesh, Orissa and Tamil Nadu in India, and is one of the first of its kind, highlighting unethical medical practices and making a case for the regulation of the ART industry. As such, it forms a significant part of Sama's ongoing work on women and technologies

  4. Globalisation of birth markets: a case study of assisted reproductive technologies in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarojini, Nadimpally; Marwah, Vrinda; Shenoi, Anjali

    2011-08-12

    The escalation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in India into a veritable fertility industry is the result of a multitude of reasons. This paper places the bio-genetic industry within the larger political economy framework of globalisation and privatisation, thus employing a framework that is often omitted from discussions on ARTs, but has direct and significant bearings on the ART industry in India. As markets for human organs, tissues and reproductive body parts experience unprecedented growth, the limits of what can or should be bought and sold continue to be pushed. As such, bodies have emerged as sale-worthy economic capital. Commercial flows of reproductive material create and deploy the division of the body into parts over which ownership is claimed, in the process following 'modern routes of capital' and raising issues of structural inequality.This paper presents a brief picture of India's fertility industry with specific focus on its ground-level operation, nature and growth. It aims to explore the industry dimensions of ARTs, by highlighting the macro picture of health care markets and medical tourism in India, the proliferation of the ART industry, market features such as the social imperative to mother, costs, promotion and marketing, unverified claims, inflated success rates, deals and offers, actors and collaborations in the field, and finally, the absence of standards. This paper presents findings from the research 'Constructing Conceptions: The Mapping of Assisted Reproductive Technologies in India', by Sama, a Delhi-based resource group working on gender, health and rights. This research was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in the three states of Uttar Pradesh, Orissa and Tamil Nadu in India, and is one of the first of its kind, highlighting unethical medical practices and making a case for the regulation of the ART industry. As such, it forms a significant part of Sama's ongoing work on women and technologies, particularly policy

  5. Globalisation of birth markets: a case study of assisted reproductive technologies in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The escalation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in India into a veritable fertility industry is the result of a multitude of reasons. This paper places the bio-genetic industry within the larger political economy framework of globalisation and privatisation, thus employing a framework that is often omitted from discussions on ARTs, but has direct and significant bearings on the ART industry in India. As markets for human organs, tissues and reproductive body parts experience unprecedented growth, the limits of what can or should be bought and sold continue to be pushed. As such, bodies have emerged as sale-worthy economic capital. Commercial flows of reproductive material create and deploy the division of the body into parts over which ownership is claimed, in the process following 'modern routes of capital' and raising issues of structural inequality. This paper presents a brief picture of India's fertility industry with specific focus on its ground-level operation, nature and growth. It aims to explore the industry dimensions of ARTs, by highlighting the macro picture of health care markets and medical tourism in India, the proliferation of the ART industry, market features such as the social imperative to mother, costs, promotion and marketing, unverified claims, inflated success rates, deals and offers, actors and collaborations in the field, and finally, the absence of standards. This paper presents findings from the research 'Constructing Conceptions: The Mapping of Assisted Reproductive Technologies in India', by Sama, a Delhi-based resource group working on gender, health and rights. This research was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in the three states of Uttar Pradesh, Orissa and Tamil Nadu in India, and is one of the first of its kind, highlighting unethical medical practices and making a case for the regulation of the ART industry. As such, it forms a significant part of Sama's ongoing work on women and technologies, particularly policy

  6. Psychosocial needs of women and their partners after successful assisted reproduction treatment in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Crespo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that pregnancy and parenthood after a period of infertility are unproblematic and gratifying. However, a review of the literature highlights the complexity of the psychological and social consequences of pregnancy, childbirth and parenting after successful treatment with assisted reproductive technology. These experiences, including those following the creation of new forms of non-genetic and/or social parenthood, require investigation in order to understand how women and their partners integrate their journey from infertility to pregnancy and parenthood after successful assisted reproductive treatment. This paper presents results derived from qualitative interviews with 30 pregnant women and 21 couples after assisted reproductive treatment (repeated rounds of individual interviews with the study participants conducted from July 2010 to April 2014 as part of a larger ethnographic study exploring the psychosocial needs of women and partners following assisted reproductive treatment in Barcelona’s. The transcribed text was coded into categories of either predetermined or emergent topics. Prior studies have found that couples who achieve pregnancy after infertility may experience higher levels of anxiety in relation to pregnancy. This anxiety can be linked with a higher risk of complications during pregnancy after assisted reproductive treatment compared with spontaneous conception. However, the evidence concerning adjustment to pregnancy and parenthood is inconclusive. This study highlights the necessity for participants to give meaning to these treatments, given the variability that exists in perceptions of infertility and pregnancy after successful assisted reproductive treatment.

  7. Status of human assisted reproduction in Spain: results from the new registry of Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosser, Roser; Gispert, Rosa; Torné, Mar; Calaf, Joaquim

    2009-11-01

    The FIVCAT. NET database in Catalonia is the only official obligatory registry of human assisted reproduction practitioners in Spain. The present study assessed the effectiveness and outcomes of assisted reproduction over the period 2001-2005 relative to other established worldwide registries. The data analysed were derived from all centres conducting assisted reproduction in Catalonia, and included users of the services (resident and non-resident); all cycles performed; descriptive characteristics of the assisted reproduction procedures; and sociodemographic characteristics of the women. Effectiveness of assisted reproduction was measured by standard indicators such as rates of pregnancy and rates of live births per pregnancy. The results indicated that the preferred number of embryos for transfer changed from three to two over this period. Pregnancies per transfer improved from 33.2% to 37.1% (from 36.9% to 40.2% using fresh embryos and from to 18.4% to 27.0% with frozen embryos). Multiple births decreased from 50.1% to 38.6%, premature births from 37.5% to 28.3% and low-birth-weight infants from 38.0% to 25.6%. It is concluded that the conduct of assisted reproduction in Catalonia has improved considerably and compares favourably with other countries, not only with respect to the level of activity, but also the effectiveness and outcomes achieved, although the quality of the sociodemographic information requires improvement.

  8. Does age of the sperm donor influence live birth outcome in assisted reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, N K; Mair, E; Pearce, K; Choudhary, M

    2016-03-01

    Does age of the sperm donor have an effect on reproductive outcomes (live birth rate and miscarriage occurrence) of donor insemination or in vitro fertilization treatment using donated sperm? Live birth and miscarriage occurrence in assisted reproduction treatment using donor sperms was not found to be affected by the age of sperm donors up to 45 years old. Literature on the effect of sperm donor age on outcome of medically assisted reproduction is scarce. Most researchers agree that semen parameters deteriorate with increasing paternal age. However, there is no substantial evidence to suggest that this deterioration adversely affects the reproductive outcomes in couples undergoing medically assisted reproduction. This retrospective cohort study analysed 46 078 first donor insemination treatments and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles using donated sperm from 1991 to 2012. The first fresh donor insemination and IVF/ICSI treatment cycles (46 078 treatment cycles) using donated sperm from the long-term anonymized data registry from 1991 to 2012 of the HFEA, the UK regulator, were analysed by the binary logistic modelling technique for association between sperm donor age and reproductive outcomes (live birth occurrence and miscarriage occurrence). The statistical package SPSS (version 21) was used for analysis and results were considered to be statistically significant if the P-value was 0.05). The miscarriage occurrence (i.e. number of miscarriages per 100 women commencing treatment) was 1.3% in 18-34 year old women, 1.9% in 35-37 year old women and 1.9% in 38-50 year old women undergoing donor insemination treatment. In the sperm donation IVF/ICSI treatment group, these figures were 5.7, 8.4 and 6.8% respectively. The results were not suggestive of any unfavourable effect of advancing sperm donor age on the odds of miscarriage occurrence (P > 0.05). As sperm donors are a select population based on good semen indices

  9. Risk factors associated with preterm birth among singletons following assisted reproductive technology in Australia 2007–2009–a population-based retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xu K; Wang, Yueping A; Li, Zhuoyang; Lui, Kei; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth, a leading cause of neonatal death, is more common in multiple births and thus there has being an increasing call for reducing multiple births in ART. However, few studies have compared risk factors for preterm births amongst ART and non-ART singleton birth mothers. Methods A population-based study of 393,450 mothers, including 12,105 (3.1%) ART mothers, with singleton gestations born between 2007 and 2009 in 5 of the 8 jurisdictions in Australia. Univariable and mult...

  10. The impact of male overweight on semen quality and outcome of assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lise; Humaidan, Peter; Bungum, Leif

    2014-01-01

    It is well-documented that male overweight and obesity causes endocrine disorders that might diminish the male reproductive capacity; however, reports have been conflicting regarding the influence of male body mass index (BMI) on semen quality and the outcome of assisted reproductive technology...... (ART). The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased male BMI affects sperm quality and the outcome of assisted reproduction in couples with an overweight or obese man and a non-obese partner. Data was prospectively collected from 612 infertile couples undergoing ART at a Danish fertility...

  11. Development of a security system for assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yong Soo; Ryu, Eun Kyung; Park, Sung Jin; Yoon, Jeong; Yoon, San Hyun; Yang, Gi Deok; Hur, Chang Young; Lee, Won Don; Lim, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART), medical accidents can result in serious legal and social consequences. This study was conducted to develop a security system (called IVF-guardian; IG) that could prevent mismatching or mix-ups in ART. A software program was developed in collaboration with outside computer programmers. A quick response (QR) code was used to identify the patients, gametes and embryos in a format that was printed on a label. There was a possibility that embryo development could be affected by volatile organic components (VOC) in the printing material and adhesive material in the label paper. Further, LED light was used as the light source to recognize the QR code. Using mouse embryos, the effects of the label paper and LED light were examined. The stability of IG was assessed when applied in clinical practice after developing the system. A total of 104 cycles formed the study group, and 82 cycles (from patients who did not want to use IG because of safety concerns and lack of confidence in the security system) to which IG was not applied comprised the control group. Many of the label paper samples were toxic to mouse embryo development. We selected a particular label paper (P touch label) that did not affect mouse embryo development. The LED lights were non-toxic to the development of the mouse embryos under any experimental conditions. There were no differences in the clinical pregnancy rates between the IG-applied group and the control group (40/104 = 38.5 % and 30/82 = 36.6 %, respectively). The application of IG in clinical practice did not affect human embryo development or clinical outcomes. The use of IG reduces the misspelling of patient names. Using IG, there was a disadvantage in that each treatment step became more complicated, but the medical staff improved and became sufficiently confident in ART to offset this disadvantage. Patients who received treatment using the IG system also went through a somewhat

  12. Risk factors associated with preterm birth among singletons following assisted reproductive technology in Australia 2007-2009--a population-based retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu K; Wang, Yueping A; Li, Zhuoyang; Lui, Kei; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-07

    Preterm birth, a leading cause of neonatal death, is more common in multiple births and thus there has being an increasing call for reducing multiple births in ART. However, few studies have compared risk factors for preterm births amongst ART and non-ART singleton birth mothers. A population-based study of 393,450 mothers, including 12,105 (3.1%) ART mothers, with singleton gestations born between 2007 and 2009 in 5 of the 8 jurisdictions in Australia. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to evaluate socio-demographic, medical and pregnancy factors associated with preterm births in contrasting ART and non-ART mothers. Ten percent of singleton births to ART mothers were preterm compared to 6.8% for non-ART mothers (P disadvantaged (12.4% in the lowest quintile vs 20.7%), less likely to be smokers (3.8% vs 19.4%), more likely to be first time mothers (primiparous 62.4% vs 40.5%), had more preexisting hypertension and complications during pregnancy. Irrespective of the mode of conception, preexisting medical and pregnancy complications of hypertension, diabetes and antepartum hemorrhages were consistently associated with preterm birth. In contrast, socio-demographic variables, namely young and old maternal age (34), socioeconomic disadvantage (most disadvantaged quintile Odds Ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.77-1.17), smoking (OR 1.12, 95%CI: 0.79-1.61) and priminarity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.35, AOR not significant) shown to be associated with elevated risk of preterm birth for non-ART mothers were not demonstrated for ART mothers, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Nonetheless, in multivariable analysis, the association between ART and the elevated risk for singleton preterm birth persisted after controlling for all included confounding medical, pregnancy and socio-economic factors (AOR 1.51, 95% CI: 1.42-1.61). Preterm birth rate is approximately one-and-a-half-fold higher in ART mothers than non

  13. Changing direction: the struggle of regulating assisted reproductive technology in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Griessler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From 1992 until 2015, Austria had a very restrictive Reproductive Medicine Law (FMedG, 1992 that prohibited a number of treatments such as egg donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD, heterologous sperm donation for IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI as well as general access to assisted reproductive technology for same-sex couples. As one consequence of this rather prohibitive law, Austrian physicians active in the area of assisted reproductive technology co-operated with, or had daughter institutes in, countries with less restrictive legislation such as the Czech Republic and Slovakia, which are only a few hours’ drive away. For a long time, liberalisation of the Reproductive Medicine Law was blocked by the fierce and seemingly unresolvable struggle between the restrictive conservative party (ÖVP and the permissive social democrats’ party (SPÖ. In 2014 the impasse, which had lasted for decades, was finally resolved in favour of a more liberal Reproductive Medicine Law that permits egg donation, PGD in some cases and heterologous sperm donation for IVF/ICSI and lesbian couples. Assisted reproductive technology treatments for single women and surrogate motherhood remain prohibited. The new Reproductive Medicine Law was heavily opposed by the Catholic Church, by some conservatives and by disability associations. By applying the concept of political culture, this paper explains why a liberalisation of the Reproductive Medicine Law was blocked for decades, and how the sudden policy change came about.

  14. The devil we know: the implications of bill C-38 for assisted human reproduction in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattapan, Alana; Cohen, Sara R

    2013-07-01

    In June 2012, the Canadian House of Commons passed the so-called omnibus budget bill, making several important changes to the governance of assisted reproduction in Canada. The bill (Bill C-38) was widely criticized for its unwieldy size and rapid passage through Parliament, preventing adequate parliamentary debate and public scrutiny. Given the substantive nature of the amendments to the Assisted Human Reproduction Act made by Bill C-38, and the lack of relevant discussion about these changes both before and following its passage, this commentary is intended to identify how Bill C-38 may alter the governance of reproductive technologies in Canada. In this commentary, we address some of the more significant changes made by Bill C-38 to the regulation of reproductive medicine in Canada. We identify the benefits and challenges of closing Assisted Human Reproduction Canada, noting that doing so eliminates a much-needed forum for stakeholder consultation in this field. Further, we explore the implications of moving the regulation of donor semen from the Food and Drugs Act to the Assisted Human Reproduction Act; these include increased liability for physicians, and opportunities to expand the existing regulations to account for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer Canadians using donor gametes and recent advances in reproductive technologies. Overall, we argue that although the implementation of a policy framework in this field remains highly dependent on yet-to-be written regulations, the changes to the Assisted Human Reproduction Act enabled by Bill C-38 may significantly alter how Canadians interact with reproductive technologies.

  15. Is the probability of prenatal diagnosis or termination of pregnancy different for fetuses with congenital anomalies conceived following assisted reproductive techniques? A population-based evaluation of fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tararbit, K; Lelong, N; Jouannic, J-M; Goffinet, F; Khoshnood, B

    2015-06-01

    To compare the probability of prenatal diagnosis (PND) and termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) between fetuses conceived by assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and spontaneously-conceived fetuses with congenital heart defects (CHD). Population-based observational study. Paris and surrounding suburbs. Fetuses with CHD in the Paris registry of congenital malformations and cohort of children with CHD (Epicard). Comparison of ART-conceived and spontaneously conceived fetuses taking into account potential confounders (maternal characteristics, multiplicity and year of birth or TOPFA). Probability and gestational age at PND and TOPFA for ART-conceived versus spontaneously conceived fetuses. The probability of PND (28.1% versus 34.6%, P = 0.077) and TOPFA (36.2% versus 39.2%, P = 0.677) were not statistically different between ART-conceived (n = 171) and spontaneously conceived (n = 4620) fetuses. Estimates were similar after adjustment for potential confounders. Gestational age at PND tended to be earlier for ART fetuses (23.1 versus 24.8 weeks, P = 0.05) but no statistical difference was found after adjustment for confounders. Gestational age at TOPFA was comparable between ART-conceived and spontaneously conceived fetuses. In our population, ART conception was not significantly associated with the probability of PND or TOPFA for CHD. One implication of our results is that live births may be adequate for assessing the overall risk of CHD related to ART. However, total prevalence, in particular of severe CHD, would not be adequately assessed if TOPFA are not included. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. Leptin and its potential interest in assisted reproduction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catteau, A; Caillon, H; Barrière, P; Denis, M G; Masson, D; Fréour, T

    2016-04-01

    Leptin, an adipose hormone, has been shown to control energy homeostasis and food intake, and exert many actions on female reproductive function. Consequently, this adipokine is a pivotal factor in studies conducted on animal models and humans to decipher the mechanisms behind the infertility often observed in obese women. A systematic PubMed search was conducted on all articles, published up to January 2015 and related to leptin and its actions on energy balance and reproduction, using the following key words: leptin, reproduction, infertility, IVF and controlled ovarian stimulation. The available literature was reviewed in order to provide an overview of the current knowledge on the physiological roles of leptin, its involvement in female reproductive function and its potential interest as a prognostic marker in IVF cycles. Animal and human studies show that leptin communicates nutritional status to the central nervous system and emerging evidence has demonstrated that leptin is involved in the control of reproductive functions by acting both directly on the ovaries and indirectly on the central nervous system. With respect to the clinical use of leptin as a biomarker in IVF cycles, a systematic review of the literature suggested its potential interest as a predictor of IVF outcome, as high serum and/or follicular fluid leptin concentrations have correlated negatively with cycle outcome. However, these preliminary results remain to be confirmed. Leptin regulates energy balance and female reproductive function, mainly through its action on hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function, whose molecular and cellular aspects are progressively being deciphered. Preliminary studies evaluating leptin as a biomarker in human IVF seem promising but need further confirmation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Mimicking physiological O2 tension in the female reproductive tract improves Assisted Reproduction outcomes in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, S; Sánchez-Hurtado, M A; Gutiérrez, H; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Romar, R; Latorre, R; Coy, P; López-Albors, O

    2018-02-27

    Is O2 tension in the pig oviduct and uterus affected by the estrous cycle stage and the animal's age, and can the outcome of in vitro embryo development be improved by mimicking these physiological values? O2 tension within the pig reproductive organs is affected by the animal's age, and values close to those measured in vivo have a positive impact on embryo development and quality when used during IVF and embryo culture (EC). To obtain a healthy embryo in vitro, it is necessary to adopt a culture microenvironment that approximates physiological conditions. Despite advances in surgical procedures and sensitive probes that allow accurate assessment of in vivo O2 tension, few such studies have been conducted recently in mammals. In addition, no reference values of physiological O2 tension in the reproductive tract exist for large animal models such as pig, and the effect of O2 tension on ART outcomes is unknown. This study was conducted in pigs. We measured oviductal and uterine O2 tension (n = 29 and 13 respectively) and then examined how the use of the physiological values in pig IVF and EC affected pig ART output (n = 1447 oocytes). The oviductal and uterine O2 tension at the different stages of the estrous cycle was monitored using a laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) assisted approach along with a flexible and thin miniaturized luminescent probe. Two groups of pigs, Large-white x Landrace breed, were used: for the first group, 16 pre-pubertal gilts (5 months old and 95 kg) were induced to ovulate with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG); in the second group 13 mature sows (24-48 months and 185 kg) were used. IVF and EC were performed at two different O2 tensions: Atmospheric O2 (20%) and the mean in vivo value measured (7%). At 18-20 hours post-insemination (hpi), a small sample of presumptive zygotes were fixed, stained, and examined under epifluorescence microscopy to assess the fertilization rates. At

  18. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G; Youssef, Mohamed A; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J

    2016-04-29

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotrophin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimens have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006 and 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycles. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (searched from inception to May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, inception to 28 April 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to 28 April 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 28 April 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to 28 April 2015), CINAHL (to 28 April 2015) and trial registers to 28 April 2015, and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for

  19. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals' educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients' knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pknowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients' responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11) and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive

  20. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezabadi Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions. Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Total mean knowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients’ responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11 and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16. The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12 and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16. Most females (92.1% and males (83.3% were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245. Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as

  1. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pinfertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive procedures. PMID:28367301

  2. Perinatal outcomes among singletons after assisted reproductive technology with single-embryo or double-embryo transfer versus no assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angela S; Chang, Jeani; Zhang, Yujia; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Boulet, Sheree L; McKane, Patricia; Bernson, Dana; Kissin, Dmitry M; Jamieson, Denise J

    2017-04-01

    To examine outcomes of singleton pregnancies conceived without assisted reproductive technology (non-ART) compared with singletons conceived with ART by elective single-embryo transfer (eSET), nonelective single-embryo transfer (non-eSET), and double-embryo transfer with the establishment of 1 (DET -1) or ≥2 (DET ≥2) early fetal heartbeats. Retrospective cohort using linked ART surveillance data and vital records from Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Connecticut. Not applicable. Singleton live-born infants. None. Preterm birth (PTB Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Obesity and Outcome of Assisted Reproduction in Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dinas, Konstantinos

    2018-01-01

    Assisted reproduction, including in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, is increasingly being used for the management of infertility in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, there are limited data regarding the association between obesity and the outcome of assisted reproduction in this specific population as well as on the effects of weight loss. The aim of the present review is to summarize the existing evidence on the association between obesity and the outcome of assisted reproduction in patients with PCOS. Accumulating data suggest that obesity is associated with lower pregnancy and live birth rates in patients with PCOS who are undergoing assisted reproduction therapy. However, it remains unclear whether weight loss improves the outcome of this therapy. Notably, recent guidelines state that the health benefits of postponing pregnancy to achieve weight loss must be balanced against the risk of declining fertility with advancing age. Therefore, if weight loss is not achieved within a reasonable time period, assisted reproduction therapy should be offered in adequately selected patients with PCOS, regardless of the presence of obesity.

  4. Assisted Reproduction and the Courts: The Case of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Linda S.; Schmid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyze appellate court cases heard in California between 1960 and 2000 that focus on the status of children conceived through reproductive technology in an effort to examine the role of the courts in defining parentage and family in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. In the absence of legislation, the primary…

  5. From ‘Mung Ming’ to ‘Baby Gammy’: a local history of assisted reproduction in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Whittaker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the rapidly changing history of IVF in Thailand since the birth of the first IVF conceived child there in 1987. The paper is based upon extensive Thai and English media material as well as interviews with leading reproductive specialists and is informed by long-term ethnographic research on IVF in Thailand. Assisted reproduction was quickly accepted in Thai society and associated with modernity and nationalist pride in Thai scientific progress. From its early beginnings in state-owned teaching hospitals, assisted reproduction rapidly expanded into the Thai private sector. Although Thai Medical Council guidelines were introduced in 1997, the loose regulatory regime saw the growth of an international trade in assisted reproductive technology services and medical facilitation companies brokering commercial surrogacies. From 2011, various controversies brought the industry into disrepute. These included: the trafficking of Vietnamese women as surrogates; non-medical sex selection and commercial ova donation and commercial surrogacy in breach of Thai Medical Council guidelines; the highly publicised case of a Japanese man commissioning 15 children with multiple surrogates; and the ‘Baby Gammy’ case involving the abandonment of a twin born with Down Syndrome. These cases exposed the exploitative downside of an assisted reproductive technology market that takes advantage of countries with little or no regulation in place and led Thai society to question the benefits of these technologies, their practitioners and the industry it has created. Since 2015, new legislation restricts clinical practices, limits eligibility for services and bans all commercial ova donation or surrogacy or its facilitation.

  6. Fresh versus frozen embryo transfers in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai Mee; van Wely, Madelon; Mol, Femke; Repping, Sjoerd; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan

    2017-03-28

    In general, in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) implies a single fresh and one or more frozen-thawed embryo transfers. Alternatively, the 'freeze-all' strategy implies transfer of frozen-thawed embryos only, with no fresh embryo transfers. In practice, both strategies can vary technically including differences in freezing techniques and timing of transfer of cryopreservation, that is vitrification versus slow freezing, freezing of two pro-nucleate (2pn) versus cleavage-stage embryos versus blastocysts, and transfer of cleavage-stage embryos versus blastocysts.In the freeze-all strategy, embryo transfers are disengaged from ovarian stimulation in the initial treatment cycle. This could avoid a negative effect of ovarian hyperstimulation on the endometrium and thereby improve embryo implantation. It could also reduce the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in the ovarian stimulation cycle by avoiding a pregnancy.We compared the benefits and risks of the two treatment strategies. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the freeze-all strategy compared to the conventional IVF/ICSI strategy in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Studies (CRSO), MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and two registers of ongoing trials in November 2016 together with reference checking and contact with study authors and experts in the field to identify additional studies. We included randomised clinical trials comparing a freeze-all strategy with a conventional IVF/ICSI strategy which includes fresh transfer of embryos in women undergoing IVF or ICSI treatment. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by Cochrane. The primary review outcomes were cumulative live birth and OHSS. Secondary outcomes included other adverse effects (miscarriage rate). We included four randomised clinical trials analysing a total

  7. Endometrial injury in women undergoing assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastri, Carolina O; Lensen, Sarah F; Gibreel, Ahmed; Raine-Fenning, Nick; Ferriani, Rui A; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Martins, Wellington P

    2015-03-22

    Implantation of an embryo within the endometrial cavity is a critical step in assisted reproductive techniques (ART). Previous research has suggested that endometrial injury - intentional damage to the endometrium - can increase the probability of pregnancy in women undergoing ART. To assess the effectiveness and safety of endometrial injury performed before embryo transfer in women undergoing ART. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) and ClinicalTrials.gov. The original search was performed in November 2011, and further searches were done in March 2014 and January 2015. Randomised controlled trials comparing intentional endometrial injury before embryo transfer in women undergoing ART, versus no intervention or a sham procedure. Two independent review authors screened studies and extracted data which were checked by a third review author. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias. We contacted and corresponded with study investigators as required and analysed data using risk ratio (RR) and a random-effects model. We assessed the quality of the evidence by using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. We included 14 trials that included 1063 women in the intervention groups and 1065 women in the control groups. Thirteen studies compared endometrial injury performed between day 7 of the previous cycle and day 7 of the embryo transfer (ET) cycle versus no injury, and one study compared endometrial injury on the day of oocyte retrieval versus no injury. Overall, eight of the 14 included studies were deemed to be at high risk of bias in at least one domain.In studies comparing endometrial

  8. [Assisted Reproduction and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Patients Susceptible to Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, K; Kocur, T; Horák, J; Horňák, M; Oráčová, E; Hromadová, L; Veselý, J; Trávník, P

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproduction, as well as pregnancy itself, in patients with breast cancer or other hereditary type of cancer, is a widely discussed topic. In the past, patients treated for breast cancer were rarely involved in the discussion about reproductive possibilities or infertility treatment. However, current knowledge suggests, that breast cancer is neither a contraindication to pregnancy, nor to assisted reproduction techniques. On the contrary, assisted reproduction and preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods might prevent the transmission of genetic risks to the fetus. In this review we summarize data concerning pregnancy risks in patients with increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, we introduce current possibilities and approaches to fertility preservation prior to assisted reproduction treatment as well as novel methods improving the safety of fertility treatment. In the second part of this review, we focus on karyomapping--an advanced molecular genetic tool for elimination of germinal mutations in patients with predisposition to cancer. Moreover, the rapid development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods contributes to detection of both chromosomal aneuploidy and causal mutations in a relatively short time-span.

  9. No increase in autism-associated genetic events in children conceived by assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sean; Wenegrat, Julia; Rettew, David; Althoff, Robert; Bernier, Raphael

    2014-08-01

    To understand the rate of genetic events in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who were exposed to assisted reproduction. Case control study using genetics data. Twelve collaborating data collection sites across North America as part of the Simons Simplex Collection. 2,760 children with ASD, for whom 1,994 had published copy number variation data and 424 had published gene mutation status available. None. Rates of autism-associated genetic events in children with ASD conceived with assisted reproduction versus those conceived naturally. No statistically significant differences in copy number variations or autism-associated gene-disrupting events were found when comparing ASD patients exposed to assisted reproduction with those not exposed to assisted reproduction. This is the first large genetic association to concurrently examine the genotype of individuals with ASD in relation to their exposure to ART versus natural conception, and it adds reassuring evidence to the argument that ART does not increase the risk of ASD. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assisted reproduction in a cohort of same-sex male couples and single men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Stephanie A; Shmorgun, Ziva; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Baratz, Ari; Librach, Clifford L

    2013-08-01

    To date, there is limited published data on same-sex male couples and single men using assisted reproduction treatment to build their families. The objective of this retrospective study was to better understand treatment considerations and outcomes for this population when using assisted reproduction treatment. A total of 37 same-sex male couples and eight single men (seven homosexual and one heterosexual) who attended the CReATe Fertility Centre for assisted reproduction services were studied. There was a 21-fold increase in the number of same-sex male couples and single men undergoing assisted reproduction treatment since 2003. The mean age was 46years (24-58). Twenty-eight couples (76%) chose to use spermatozoa from both partners to fertilize their donated oocytes. Most men (32 same-sex male couples and seven single men; 87%) obtained oocytes from an anonymous donor, whereas five couples and one single man (13%) had a known donor. Anonymous donors who were open to be contacted by the child after the age of 18 were selected by 67% of patients. Of all 25 deliveries, eight (32%) were sets of twins. All of the twins were half genetic siblings. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prerequsite result of routine human immunodeficiency virus serology among infertile women before assisted reproduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osemwenkha, Abieyuwa Patricia; Ibadin, Kennedy Osegua; Akotha, Egodi Eugenia; Ibeh, Isaiah Ndubuisi

    2011-04-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which causes or induces incurable fatal infections have been transmitted through Assisted Reproduction Technology and from infected mothers to the fetus or new born. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of this chronic viral agent among infertile women recruited for Assisted Reproduction Technique programme in Benin City, Nigeria. Sera (serum) from Five hundred and Ninety infertile women attending Human Reproduction Research Programme/In-vitro fertilization Center at University of Benin Teaching Hospital were screened for the presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibody using three algorithm or techniques of Determine, Unigold and Stat Pack kits. The age range of the infertile women was 20-49 years. 28 (4.7%) out of Five Hundred and fifty infertile women recruited for Assisted Reproduction Technique and screened for Human Immunodeficiency Virus antibody were seropositive with increase in prevalence of 10. 0%, 8.5% and 7.5% among infertile women in age groups of (20 - 24), (25 - 29)yrs and (30 - 34)yrs. Chi-square statistical analysis of data shows insignificance in seroprevalence rate in relation to the number of infertile women screened (P > 0.0001) but the screening of these infertile women for the presence Human Immunodeficiency Virus should continue due to the attendant effects. Infertile women who are Human Immunodeficiency Virus carriers give a new dimension to assisted reproductive techniques. This will no doubt help to prevent further spread and adverse pregnancy outcome.

  12. A demographic projection of the contribution of assisted reproductive technologies to world population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddy, Malcolm J; Gosden, Matthew D; Gosden, Roger G

    2018-04-01

    Enormous unmet needs for infertility treatment exist because access to assisted reproductive technologies is demographically skewed. Since the first IVF baby in 1978, the number of people conceived by reproductive technology has grown much faster than expected, reaching several million today and rapidly approaching 0.1% of the total world population. As more patients build families, and their children in turn become parents, the number owing their existence to assisted reproductive technologies, either directly or indirectly, will expand tremendously in future decades, but no attempts have been made hitherto to project the magnitude. We have projected growth to the year 2100, along with the fractional contribution to world population. The chief variable driving growth is access to fertility services. If it stagnates at current levels of about 400,000 babies per year, an estimated 157 million people alive at the end of the century will owe their lives to assisted reproductive technologies (1.4% of global population), but at an arbitrary upper limit of 30,000 extra births annually there will be 394 million additional people alive (3.5%). As the conquest of infertility continues, individuals who owe their lives to assisted reproductive technologies will quietly make a significant contribution to demographic growth as well as social progress. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Politics, doctors, assisted reproductive technologies & religion: Transgenerational understandings and experiences of single motherhood in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Moreno, Ana

    2017-10-01

    The aim is to achieve a transgenerational view of single motherhood in Spain, to look at which contexts it arises in, how it changes with the introduction of assisted reproduction, and how the role of religion in Spanish society permeates medical practice and affects the lives of women patients. I examine single motherhood and investigate two interconnected themes: (a) being a mother and being mothered are both permeated with sociocultural, political, religious, economic and psychological significance; (b) Spain led Europe in multiple births due to assisted reproduction, thus ethical conflicts and patient rights are analyzed.

  14. Urinary Concentrations of Phthalate Metabolites and Pregnancy Loss Among Women Conceiving with Medically Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerlian, Carmen; Wylie, Blair J; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Williams, Paige L; Ford, Jennifer B; Souter, Irene C; Calafat, Antonia M; Hauser, Russ

    2016-11-01

    Animal studies demonstrate that several phthalates are embryofetotoxic and are associated with increased pregnancy loss and malformations. Results from human studies on phthalates and pregnancy loss are inconsistent. We examined pregnancy loss prospectively in relation to urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations among women undergoing medically assisted reproduction. We used data from 256 women conceiving 303 pregnancies recruited between 2004 and 2012 from the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. We quantified 11 phthalate metabolite concentrations and calculated the molar sum of four di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites (ΣDEHP). We estimated risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals for biochemical loss and total pregnancy loss (assisted reproduction.

  15. Rules and economic features connected with adoption and medical assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemion Braho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this brief study is to analyze the phenomenon of adoption and the assisted reproductive technologies, not from a social point of view as experts often do, but on an economic point of view. This could be possible analyzing first of all the laws regulating these “markets” and the influence of this regulation on the economic aspects. Although it could seem immoral to study this social aspects connected with filiation, we know that the social desire of some parents or some individuals to have children and their possibility is oriented by laws, economic possibilities and economy in general. This study is based on an empirical methodology, taking as study-case Italy and trying not to give any ethic orientation.

  16. Justice-based social assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando

    2016-01-01

    What are the main objectives of social protection institutions in developing countries? What should be their scope and reach? What is the source of their legitimacy? Finding appropriate answers to these questions is essential to understanding, and shaping, the emergence of welfare institutions in low- and middle-income countries. Most available answers rely on instrumental arguments. Few make reference to normative principles. This article draws on three concepts from Rawls – social justice as regulating cooperation, the social minimum, and the need for a freestanding political notion of social justice – to develop a coherent argument for grounding social assistance on social justice. In line with this argument, it identifies some parameters for a justice-based social assistance. This article then discusses, with examples, the tensions existing between a social justice-based social minimum and ‘real’ social assistance institutions emerging in developing countries. PMID:27708544

  17. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown conflicting results whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk...... of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050......). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed...

  18. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and growth in children born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kai, Claudia Mau; Main, Katharina M; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2006-01-01

    cohorts was normal. Our findings of subtle differences in target height attainment and serum IGF-I levels between infants born after assisted reproduction techniques and controls may not be clinically significant. However, these observations indicate that further systematic follow-up of growth and puberty......CONTEXT: Concern has been raised about the safety of assisted reproduction techniques for the offspring. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to investigate postnatal growth and growth factors in children born after intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF......). DESIGN: The study had two cohorts: a population-based longitudinal infant cohort 0-36 months [236 ICSI, 173 IVF, 1530 naturally conceived (NC)], and a cross-sectional child cohort at 5 yr (68 ICSI, 67 IVF, 70 NC). INTERVENTION: Anthropometrical measurements were made at birth, 3, 18, 36 (infant cohort...

  19. Assisted reproductive technology with donor sperm: national trends and perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkowicz, Sabrina A; Crawford, Sara B; Hipp, Heather S; Boulet, Sheree L; Kissin, Dmitry M; Kawwass, Jennifer F

    2018-04-01

    Information regarding the use of donor sperm in assisted reproductive technology, as well as subsequent treatment and perinatal outcomes, remains limited. Outcome data would aid patient counseling and clinical decision making. The objectives of the study were to report national trends in donor sperm utilization and live birth rates of donor sperm-assisted reproductive technology cycles in the United States and to compare assisted reproductive technology treatment and perinatal outcomes between cycles using donor and nondonor sperm. We hypothesize these outcomes to be comparable between donor and nondonor sperm cycles. This was a retrospective cohort study using data from all US fertility centers reporting to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance System, accounting for ∼98% of assisted reproductive technology cycles (definition excludes intrauterine insemination). The number and percentage of assisted reproductive technology cycles using donor sperm and rates of pregnancy, live birth, preterm birth (technology cycles using donor and autologous oocytes performed between 1996 and 2014 (n = 1,710,034). The outcomes analysis was restricted to include only fresh autologous cycles performed between 2010 and 2014 (n = 437,569) to focus on cycles with a potential outcome and cycles reflective of current practice, thereby improving the clinical relevance. Cycles canceled prior to retrieval were excluded. Statistical analysis included linear regression to explore polynomial trends and log-binomial regression to estimate relative risk for outcomes among cycles using donor and nondonor sperm. Of all banking and fresh donor and autologous oocyte assisted reproductive technology cycles performed between 1996 and 2014, 74,892 (4.4%) used donor sperm. In 2014, 7351 assisted reproductive technology cycles using donor sperm were performed, as compared with 1763 in 1996 (6.2% vs 3.8% of all cycles). Among all

  20. Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) with Baboons Generate Live Offspring: A Nonhuman Primate Model for ART and Reproductive Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simerly, Calvin R.; Castro, Carlos A.; Jacoby, Ethan; Grund, Kevin; Turpin, Janet; McFarland, Dave; Champagne, Jamie; Jimenez, Joe B.; Frost, Pat; Bauer, Cassandra; Hewitson, Laura; Schatten, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Human reproduction has benefited significantly by investigating non-human primate (NHP) models, especially rhesus macaques. To expand the Old World monkey species available for human reproductive studies, we present protocols in baboons, our closest Old World primate relatives, for Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) leading to live-born offspring. Baboons complement rhesus by confirming or modifying observations generated in humans often obtained by the study of clinically-discarded specimens donated by anonymous infertility patient-couples. Here, baboon ART protocols, including oocyte collection, in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), preimplantation development to blastocyst stage and embryo transfer techniques are described. With baboon ART methodologies in place, motility during baboon fertilization was investigated by time-lapse video microscopy. The first ART baboons produced by ICSI, a pair of male twins, were delivered naturally at 165 days post-gestation. Genetic testing of these twins confirmed their ART parental origins and demonstrated that they are unrelated fraternal twins, not identicals. These results have implications for ART outcomes, embryonic stem cell derivation, and reproductive sciences. PMID:20631291

  1. Increased follicle-stimulating hormone is associated with higher assisted reproduction use after vasectomy reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wayland; Sultan, Raymond; Lee, Richard; Goldstein, Marc

    2011-06-01

    Of men with vasectomy 6% elect to have more children. When considering vasectomy reversal vs in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection, an elucidation of preoperative factors that predict surgical success would help determine appropriate management. We tested the hypothesis that preoperative follicle-stimulating hormone 10 U/l or greater predict a lower paternity rate after vasectomy reversal. Using preoperative follicle-stimulating hormone levels we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who underwent vasectomy reversal. Follicle-stimulating hormone was measured in cases suspicious for impaired spermatogenesis. The final analysis included 206 men, who were divided by follicle-stimulating hormone less than 10 U/l (normal in 155) and 10 U/l or greater (high in 51). Nominal logistic regression was performed to evaluate assisted reproduction predictors. Mean ± SD follicle-stimulating hormone in the normal and high groups was 5.1 ± 2.2 and 16.2 ± 6.2 U/l, respectively. Postoperative semen parameters were similar. However, in the high hormone group there was greater use of any type of assisted reproduction (78.4% vs 54.8%, p = 0.0028). On multivariate analysis follicle-stimulating hormone 10 U/l or greater (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.34-6.83) and vasoepididymostomy that was bilateral or to a solitary testis (OR 3.26, 95% CI 1.09-9.69) was associated with greater assisted reproduction use. We evaluated preoperative follicle-stimulating hormone as a predictor of reproductive outcome in men with suspected subfertility who underwent vasectomy reversal. Increased follicle-stimulating hormone was associated with a higher rate of assisted reproduction even after controlling for confounding covariates. Thus, men with increased follicle-stimulating hormone should be counseled on the increased likelihood of needing assisted reproduction to achieve pregnancy after vasectomy reversal. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  2. Assisted reproduction in female rhinoceros and elephants--current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, R; Göritz, F; Streich, Wj; Hildebrandt, Tb

    2007-09-01

    Over the last few decades, rhinoceroses and elephants became important icons in the saga of wildlife conservation. Recent surveys estimate the wild Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephant populations to be, at most, 50 250 and 637 600 respectively. For the five rhinoceros species, black (Diceros bicornis), white (Ceratotherium simum), Indian (Rhinoceros unicornis), Javan (Rhinoceros sondaicus) and Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus Sumatrensis), the population estimates of 3610, 11 330, 2400, 60 and 300, respectively, are of even greater concern. Protected against habitat loss, poaching and left undisturbed, rhinoceros and elephants reproduce well in the wild. But small and decreasing populations make successful captive management of these taxa increasingly important. In captivity, however, most populations face possible 'extinction' because of historically poor reproductive performance. From the first descriptions of the reproductive anatomy and the oestrous cycle (Laws 1969; Kassam and Lasley 1981; Balke et al. 1988a,b; Plotka et al. 1988; Godfrey et al. 1991) to the present use of advanced assisted reproduction technologies, researchers have strive to understand the function and dysfunction of the reproductive biology of these charismatic species. This paper reviewed the current knowledge on rhinoceros and elephant reproduction biology, reproductive cycle, gestation, dystocia, reproductive pathology, oestrous induction and artificial insemination, sperm sexing, IVF and contraception, and how this knowledge is or might be used to aid species conservation for maximal reproductive efficiency and enhancement of genetic management.

  3. Management of HIV infected patients with assisted reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy) has significantly decreased the morbidity and mortality in individuals infected with HIV. Many couples who are infected with HIV (sero-discordant and sero-concordant) seek assistance with conception. The objective of the paper is to address the options available to ...

  4. First trimester biochemistry in pregnancies conceived using assisted reproduction techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabor, Ann; Ekelund, Charlotte; Nørgaard, Pernille

    Objective: To examine the effects of method of conception on first trimester PAPP-A and free beta-hCG and the dependency of gestational age at the time of sampling on these effects Methods: Data on more than 100 000 spontaneously conceived and on 6 859 pregnancies conceived by assisted reproducti...

  5. Assisted reproductive techniques in Latin America: The Latin American Registry, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Musri, Carolina; Urbina, Maria Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Multinational data on assisted reproduction techniques undertaken in 2013 were collected from 158 institutions in 15 Latin American countries. Individualized cycle-based data included 57,456 initiated cycles. Treatments included autologous IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), frozen embryo transfers, oocyte donations. In autologous reproduction, 29.22% of women were younger than 35 years, 40.1% were 35-39 years and 30.6% were 40 years or older. Overall delivery rate per oocyte retrieval was 20.6% for ICSI and 25.4% for IVF. Multiple births included 20.7% for twins and 1.1% for triplets and over. In oocyte donations, twins reached 30% and triplets 1.4%. In singletons, pre-term births were 7.5%: 36.58% in twins and 65.52% in triplets. The relative risk for prematurity was 4.9 (95% CI 4.5 to 5.3) in twins and 8.7 (95% CI 7.6 to 10.0) in triplets and above. Perinatal mortality was 29.4 per 1000 in singletons, 39.9 per 1000 in twins and 71.6 per 1000 in high order multiples. Elective single embryo transfer represented only 2% of cycles, with delivery rate of 39.1% in women aged 34 years or less. Given the effect of multiple births and prematurity, it is mandatory to reduce the number of embryos transferred in the region.

  6. Does the current regulation of assisted reproductive techniques in the UK safeguard animal welfare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Madeleine L H

    2014-02-01

    Reproductive medicine is one of the fastest-developing fields of veterinary medicine, Regulation of veterinary assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) is currently divided between the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (1986); the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966, and the Animal Welfare Act (2006). None of those pieces of legislation was purpose designed to protect the welfare of animals undergoing ARTs, either directly or by determining which veterinary ART procedures may or may not be performed. Consequently, due to the lack of reference to such procedures, the welfare protection aims of the legislation are sometimes ambiguous. It is therefore difficult to ascertain whether the aims of the legislation are being fulfilled, but, in the opinion of this author, the legislation is anyway inadequate in scope, most particularly because it fails to provide a reporting function. It is unclear whether all or any veterinary ART procedures being undertaken on post-natal animals are associated with suffering. Some ARTs may cause discomfort, stress or pain: study or review of the welfare effects of these would be valuable. Any future review of the legislation regulating veterinary ARTs, be that an overall review or a review of one of the relevant statutes (for example the VSA), should take into account the interface between research and clinical medicine; the potentially welfare-compromising gaps between the Acts; the need to introduce reporting functions in order to build an evidence base, and the issue of veterinary specialisation and whether specialised techniques should be carried out only by those with specialist post-graduate qualifications.

  7. Tracking official development assistance for reproductive health in conflict-affected countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Preeti; Roberts, Bayard; Guy, Samantha; Lee-Jones, Louise; Conteh, Lesong

    2009-06-09

    Reproductive health needs are particularly acute in countries affected by armed conflict. Reliable information on aid investment for reproductive health in these countries is essential for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of aid. The purpose of this study was to analyse official development assistance (ODA) for reproductive health activities in conflict-affected countries from 2003 to 2006. The Creditor Reporting System and the Financial Tracking System databases were the chosen data sources for the study. ODA disbursement for reproductive health activities to 18 conflict-affected countries was analysed for 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006. An average of US $20.8 billion in total ODA was disbursed annually to the 18 conflict-affected countries between 2003 and 2006, of which US $509.3 million (2.4%) was allocated to reproductive health. This represents an annual average of US $1.30 disbursed per capita in the 18 sampled countries for reproductive health activities. Non-conflict-affected least-developed countries received 53.3% more ODA for reproductive health activities than conflict-affected least-developed countries, despite the latter generally having greater reproductive health needs. ODA disbursed for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment increased by 119.4% from 2003 to 2006. The ODA disbursed for other direct reproductive health activities declined by 35.9% over the same period. This study provides evidence of inequity in disbursement of reproductive health ODA between conflict-affected countries and non-conflict-affected countries, and between different reproductive health activities. These findings and the study's recommendations seek to support initiatives to make aid financing more responsive to need in the context of armed conflict.

  8. Tracking official development assistance for reproductive health in conflict-affected countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Patel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reproductive health needs are particularly acute in countries affected by armed conflict. Reliable information on aid investment for reproductive health in these countries is essential for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of aid. The purpose of this study was to analyse official development assistance (ODA for reproductive health activities in conflict-affected countries from 2003 to 2006. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Creditor Reporting System and the Financial Tracking System databases were the chosen data sources for the study. ODA disbursement for reproductive health activities to 18 conflict-affected countries was analysed for 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006. An average of US $20.8 billion in total ODA was disbursed annually to the 18 conflict-affected countries between 2003 and 2006, of which US $509.3 million (2.4% was allocated to reproductive health. This represents an annual average of US $1.30 disbursed per capita in the 18 sampled countries for reproductive health activities. Non-conflict-affected least-developed countries received 53.3% more ODA for reproductive health activities than conflict-affected least-developed countries, despite the latter generally having greater reproductive health needs. ODA disbursed for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment increased by 119.4% from 2003 to 2006. The ODA disbursed for other direct reproductive health activities declined by 35.9% over the same period. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of inequity in disbursement of reproductive health ODA between conflict-affected countries and non-conflict-affected countries, and between different reproductive health activities. These findings and the study's recommendations seek to support initiatives to make aid financing more responsive to need in the context of armed conflict.

  9. The clinical benefit and safety of current and future assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel; Harper, Joyce

    2012-08-01

    Since the first birth by IVF was achieved in 1978, the techniques involved in assisted reproductive technology have grown at an enormous rate. However, new technology has rarely been robustly validated before clinical use and developing scientific understanding of the available techniques has done little to alter their use. Furthermore, there are inconsistencies in the available clinical studies and endpoints. The benefits of some technologies already established for routine use are currently dubious and there are clear ethical concerns with providing them to patients when their scientific basis is not clear. As the uptake of assisted reproductive technology increases and newer technologies continue to push the boundaries of science, it is important to consider the clinical benefits and safety of all assisted reproductive technologies. This review will discuss aspects of some of the more recent techniques, including sperm DNA-damage tests, intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection, amino acid and metabolomics profiling, preimplantation genetic screening and time-lapse imaging, and those that may have substantial impacts on the field of reproductive medicine in the future including artificial gametes, ovarian transplantation and gene therapy. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The place of reconstructive tubal surgery in the era of assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomel, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques yield high rates of success for women with tubal factor infertility. Because they are potentially effective for all categories of infertility, for two decades, clinical and basic research in infertility has been focused on IVF techniques and outcomes, rather than developing surgical techniques or training infertility subspecialists in tubal microsurgery. Nonetheless, in comparison with IVF, reconstructive tubal surgery is inexpensive and offers multiple opportunities to attempt conception. Performing laparoscopic salpingostomy prior to IVF in women with good prognosis tubal disease may improve the outcome of subsequent IVF, while offering the potential for spontaneous conception. Tubo-tubal anastomosis for reversal of tubal ligation, performed either by a microsurgical technique through a mini-laparotomy or by laparoscopy, is preferable to IVF in younger women with no other fertility factors, because it offers potentially higher cumulative pregnancy rates. Surgery is the only alternative for women with tubal factor infertility who for personal or other reasons are unable to undergo assisted reproductive techniques. Tubal reconstructive surgery and assisted reproductive techniques must be considered complementary forms of treatment for women with tubal factor infertility, and training in tubal reconstructive surgery should be an integral part of subspecialty training in reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Individualizing FSH dose for assisted reproduction using a novel algorithm: the CONSORT study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivennes, F.; Howles, C.M.; Borini, A.; Germond, M.; Trew, G.; Wikland, M.; Zegers-Hochschild, F.; Saunders, H.; Alam, V.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The CONSORT dosing algorithm individualizes recombinant human FSH (r-hFSH) doses for assisted reproduction technologies, assigning 37.5 IU increments according to patient characteristics: basal FSH, body mass index, age and antral follicle count. A prospective, uncontrolled, international,

  12. Impact of assisted reproductive technology on the incidence of multiple-gestation infants: a population perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Irma; Chambers, Georgina M.; van Loendersloot, Laura; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd; Gianotten, Judith; Hompes, Peter G. A.; Ledger, William; Mol, Ben W. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study the value of a population view in assessing assisted reproductive technology (ART) multiple-gestation infants. Descriptive comparison of ART treatment and population statistics in seven developed countries (United States [U.S.], South Korea, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia,

  13. Assisted reproductive technology and severe postpartum haemorrhage: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyfløt, L T; Sandven, I; Oldereid, N B; Stray-Pedersen, B; Vangen, S

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the association between assisted reproductive technology and severe postpartum haemorrhage. Case-control study. The study was conducted in Norway; Division of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Oslo University Hospital and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Drammen Hospital. A source population including all women admitted for delivery at Oslo University Hospital and Drammen Hospital during the time period 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2011. The study population consisted of all cases of severe postpartum haemorrhage (n = 1064) and a random sample of controls (n = 2059). We used an explanatory strategy in the analysis, with multivariable logistic regression. Severe postpartum haemorrhage; defined as blood loss ≥1500 ml or need for blood transfusion. Assisted reproductive technology was associated with an increased risk of severe postpartum haemorrhage (crude OR = 2.92; 95% CI 2.18-3.92, P single gestation (adjusted OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.12-2.24, P = 0.010). Our findings warrant an increased awareness of the risk of severe postpartum haemorrhage in women conceiving with assisted reproductive technology. Furthermore, the high risk of severe postpartum haemorrhage in the presence of a twin or triplet pregnancy is an additional argument for single embryo transfer. Assisted reproductive technology is associated with an increased risk of severe postpartum haemorrhage. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Female nutrition and assisted reproduction in European eel: influences on oogenesis and egg quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipa

    maturation scale, which may result in an increase in production of viable European eel eggs. Overall, this PhD project contributed to the development of assisted reproduction procedures by providing new and valuable knowledge about the factors influencing the maturational response of European female eels...

  15. Why do singletons conceived after assisted reproduction technology have adverse perinatal outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, A; Wennerholm, U B; Romundstad, L B

    2013-01-01

    Assisted reproduction technology (ART) is used worldwide, at increasing rates, and data show that some adverse outcomes occur more frequently than following spontaneous conception (SC). Possible explanatory factors for the well-known adverse perinatal outcome in ART singletons were evaluated....

  16. [Nurses as a support to improve the quality of life during assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells-Ayuso, Paula; Berenguer-Labaig, Cristina; Sánchez-Martín, Pascual; Sánchez-Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure how infertility and assisted reproduction treatments (including artificial insemination) could affect the quality of life, and to evaluate how nurses could be helpful in this process, by alleviating anxiety and increasing the quality of life. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 48 patients (26 cycles) in an Assisted Reproduction Unit from 2nd December 2013 to 30th April 2014. Socio-demographic data were obtained, with the quality of life being assessed using the FertiQoL questionnaire before and after the treatment, and the consultations with a nurse by telephone or e-mail of these patients were also analyzed. The study results show a decreased quality of life in these patients, which was worse in men and in couples who had no previous children. Patient-centered care improved quality of life and tolerability to the assisted reproduction treatment. Patients frequently telephoned the nurse to solve their doubts and problems. The present study suggests that nurses can play an important role in improving the quality of life of patients undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Families Created by Assisted Reproduction: Parent-Child Relationships in Late Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Lucy; Golombok, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of the third phase of a longitudinal study of families created by assisted reproduction. The quality of parent-child relationships was examined close to the adolescent's 18th birthday in 26 "in vitro" fertilization (IVF) families and 26 donor insemination (DI) families in comparison with 38 adoptive families and 63…

  18. [Requests for assisted reproduction formulated by same-sex couples consulting physicians in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannet, P; Spira, A

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine the characteristic features of requests for assisted reproduction formulated by same-sex couples consulting physicians in France, we conducted a study in collaboration with professional organizations, general practitioners, gynecologists and obstetricians who distributed an email questionnaire among their recruitment. In our sample, 191 physicians (71% of responders) reported that 1040 homosexual couples expressed desire to become parents in 2011-2012. Nearly all of the physicians (94%) reported that the couples sought assistance before participating in an assisted reproduction technology (ART) program in a foreign country, but 35% reported that advice was solicited concerning natural reproduction and 48.5% reported requests for advice concerning inseminations performed by the woman herself. Most of the physicians responded to all or part of the requests and 61% of those who had been consulted reported they had directly participated in preparing an ART program in a foreign country. Among the 270 physicians who participated in this study, 162 (60%) believed that ART should be assessable to homosexual couples in France, but less than half of them were in favor of reimbursement by the national health insurance fund. Although biased and non-representative, this study shows that assisted reproduction, with or without medical intervention, is a real-life phenomenon for many homosexual couples, and for many physicians, even before same-sex marriage became legal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxicity testing of human assisted reproduction devices using the mouse embryo assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt-Van der Zalm, J.P.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Westphal, J.R.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Wetzels, A.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Systems to assess the toxicity of materials used in human assisted reproduction currently lack efficiency and/or sufficient discriminatory power. The development of 1-cell CBA/B6 F1 hybrid mouse embryos to blastocysts, expressed as blastocyst rate (BR), is used to measure toxicity. The embryos were

  20. The costs and consequences of assisted reproductive technology : an economic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, Mark P.; Hoorens, Stijn; Chambers, Georgina M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the growing use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) worldwide, there is only a limited understanding of the economics of ART to inform policy about effective, safe and equitable financing of ART treatment. A review was undertaken of key studies regarding the costs and consequences of

  1. The experience of pregnancy resulting from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) treatment: A qualitative Brazilian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelles, L M N; MacCallum, F; Lopes, R C S; Piccinini, C A; Passos, E P

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancies achieved through medical treatments following a period of infertility may demand extra emotional and practical investment from women. This paper aims at understanding the experience of pregnancy after Assisted Reproductive Technology, and exploring whether this experience is affected by previous failed infertility treatments. This paper uses a qualitative approach. Participants were nineteen expectant first-time mothers from Brazil who conceived through Assisted Reproductive Technology treatment. During the third trimester of gestation, a semi-structured interview was administered to assess perceptions of and feelings about treatment and pregnancy. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis, and the sample was divided into two groups according to whether it was the participant's first treatment or not. Themes identified include: tolerance of the demands of treatment and pregnancy, consideration of the mechanics of treatment and pregnancy, and emotionally painful aspects of treatment and pregnancy. Pregnancy itself was regarded as a reward or compensation for the difficulties undergone. Perspectives differed according to whether pregnancy followed the first Assisted Reproductive Technology treatment; those who had undergone previously unsuccessful treatments focused less on the mechanical aspects of the process but were more concerned about possible physical problems. The similarities and differences found according to number of treatments attempted should be taken into consideration when providing psychological support for expectant Assisted Reproductive Technology mothers. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Endometrial injury prior to assisted reproductive techniques for recurrent implantation failure: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Nikoletta; Karavolos, Stamatios; Choudhary, Meenakshi

    2015-10-01

    Endometrial injury to improve implantation for women undergoing assisted reproductive techniques has attracted a lot of attention recently and has rapidly become incorporated into clinical practice. The aim of this study is, thus, to assess the effectiveness and safety of endometrial injury performed in the cycle preceding assisted reproductive techniques in women with recurrent implantation failure. Electronic database searches, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and grey literature, up to 30th May 2015 were conducted with no restrictions. Randomized controlled trials comparing endometrial injury versus placebo or no treatment in the cycle preceding assisted reproductive techniques in women with recurrent implantation failure were selected. The primary outcome was live birth rate. Secondary outcomes were clinical pregnancy, implantation, miscarriage and procedure-related complication rates. Of the 1115 publications identified, 4 met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was not possible due to significant clinical heterogeneity among the included studies. Patients' characteristics differed, as did the intervention used with endometrial injury being performed at different phases of the preceding menstrual cycle. Moreover, the effect of endometrial injury on live birth and clinical pregnancy rates were inconsistent among the included studies. In summary, there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of endometrial injury in women with recurrent implantation failure undergoing assisted reproductive techniques while the procedure-associated complication rate has not been assessed. Clinical implementation should, thus, be deferred until robust evidence becomes available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-acting FSH versus daily FSH for women undergoing assisted reproduction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwer, A.W.; Farquhar, C.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assisted reproduction techniques (ART) such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) can help subfertile couples to create a family. It is necessary to induce multiple follicles; this is achieved by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) injections. Current

  4. Two Y genes can replace the entire Y chromosome for assisted reproduction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ward, Monika A

    2014-01-03

    The Y chromosome is thought to be important for male reproduction. We have previously shown that, with the use of assisted reproduction, live offspring can be obtained from mice lacking the entire Y chromosome long arm. Here, we demonstrate that live mouse progeny can also be generated by using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes, the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. Sry is believed to function primarily in sex determination during fetal life. Eif2s3y may be the only Y chromosome gene required to drive mouse spermatogenesis, allowing formation of haploid germ cells that are functional in assisted reproduction. Our findings are relevant, but not directly translatable, to human male infertility cases.

  5. Trends of racial disparities in assisted reproductive technology outcomes in black women compared with white women: Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology 1999 and 2000 vs. 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifer, David B; Zackula, Rosey; Grainger, David A

    2010-02-01

    To determine trends in assisted reproductive technology (ART) in black and white women by comparing Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) database outcomes for 2004-2006 with previously reported outcomes for 1999 and 2000. Retrospective, cohort study. The SART member clinics that performed at least 50 cycles of IVF and reported race in more than 95% of cycles. Women receiving 158,693 IVF cycles. In vitro fertilization using nondonor embryos. Live birth rate per cycle started. Reporting of race increased from 52% to 60%. The proportion of black, non-Hispanic (BNH) women increased from 4.6% to 6.5%. For BNH women using fresh embryos and no prior ART, significant increasing trends were observed for older age, male factor, uterine factor, diminished ovarian reserve, and ovulation disorders. The BNH women were 2.5 times more likely to have tubal factor for those cycles with no prior ART. The proportion of live births per cycle started increased across all groups over time, although greater increases occurred for white women. There seems to be widening disparities in IVF outcomes between BNH and white women, perhaps attributable to poor prognostic factors among black women. Race continues to be a marker for prognosis for ART outcomes and should be reported. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with monozygosity in assisted reproductive technology pregnancies and the risk of recurrence using linked cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Wantman, Ethan; Stern, Judy E

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate factors associated with monozygosity (MZ) (number of fetal heartbeats on early ultrasound greater than the number of embryos transferred) and the risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies using a national assisted reproduction database. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. 197,327 pregnancies (including 2,824 with evidence of MZ) from cycles reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) between 2004 and 2010. None. Evidence of MZ, adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals computed from logistic regression models. In the univariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with ovulation disorders, donor oocytes, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) suppression, assisted hatching (AZH), and day 5-6 transfer, and was decreased with higher follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) doses (≥3,000 IU). In the multivariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with GnRH-a suppression, AZH, and decreased with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and higher FSH dose. The interaction showed that although MZ was more likely with day 5-6 embryos, AZH had a minimal nonsignificant effect, whereas in day 2-3 embryos, AZH had a substantial statistically significant effect. Only one woman had a recurrence of MZ in a subsequent assisted reproduction pregnancy, which is consistent with randomness. The risk of MZ was higher with fresh day 5-6 embryos, donor oocytes, GnRH-a suppression, lower FSH doses, and AZH (particularly with day 2-3 embryos). Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tracking official development assistance for reproductive health in conflict-affected countries: 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P; Dahab, M; Tanabe, M; Murphy, A; Ettema, L; Guy, S; Roberts, B

    2016-09-01

    To provide information on trends on official development assistance (ODA) disbursement patterns for reproductive health activities in 18 conflict-affected countries. Secondary data analysis. 18 conflict-affected countries and 36 non-conflict-affected countries. The Creditor Reporting System (CRS) database was analyzed for ODA disbursement for direct and indirect reproductive health activities to 18 conflict-affected countries (2002-2011). A comparative analysis was also made with 36 non-conflict-affected counties in the same 'least-developed' income category. Multivariate regression analyses examined associations between conflict status and reproductive health ODA and between reproductive needs and ODA disbursements. Patterns of ODA disbursements (constant U.S. dollars) for reproductive health activities. The average annual ODA disbursed for reproductive health to 18 conflict-affected countries from 2002 to 2011 was US$ 1.93 per person per year. There was an increase of 298% in ODA for reproductive health activities to the conflict-affected countries between 2002 and 2011; 56% of this increase was due to increases in HIV/AIDS funding. The average annual per capita reproductive health ODA disbursed to least-developed non-conflict-affected countries was 57% higher than to least-developed conflict-affected countries. Regression analyses confirmed disparities in ODA to and between conflict-affected countries. Despite increases in ODA for reproductive health for conflict-affected countries (albeit largely for HIV/AIDS activities), considerable disparities remains. Study tracking 10 years of aid for reproductive aid shows major disparities for conflict-affected countries. © 2016 The Authors. BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. The use of recombinant luteinizing hormone in patients undergoing assisted reproductive techniques with advanced reproductive age: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Micah J; Levens, Eric D; Levy, Gary; Ryan, Mary E; Csokmay, John M; DeCherney, Alan H; Whitcomb, Brian W

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of recombinant LH in assisted reproduction technology (ART) cycles in patients of advanced reproductive age. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Published randomized controlled clinical trials comparing recombinant LH plus recombinant FSH versus recombinant FSH only in patients of advanced reproductive age. Patients 35 years and older undergoing assisted reproduction. Recombinant LH plus recombinant FSH controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) versus recombinant FSH stimulation only in assisted reproduction cycles. Implantation and clinical pregnancy. Seven trials were identified that met inclusion criteria and comprised 902 assisted reproduction technology cycles. No differences in serum E(2) on the day of hCG administration were reported in any trials. Two trials reported lower oocyte yield and one trial reported lower metaphase II oocyte yield in the recombinant LH-supplemented group. One trial reported higher fertilization rates in the recombinant LH-supplemented group. In a fixed effect model, implantation was higher in the recombinant LH-supplemented group (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.78). Similarly, clinical pregnancy was increased in the recombinant LH-supplemented group (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.83). The addition of recombinant LH to ART cycles may improve implantation and clinical pregnancy in patients of advanced reproductive age. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Trends and correlates of good perinatal outcomes in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil; Kissin, Dmitry; Anderson, John E; Session, Donna; Macaluso, Maurizio; Jamieson, Denise J

    2012-10-01

    To estimate trends in good perinatal outcomes (singleton live births at term with birthweight more than 2,500 g) among live births after assisted reproductive technology in the United States from 2000 to 2008, and associated factors among singletons in 2008. Using retrospective cohort data from the National Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance System from 2000 to 2008, we calculated relative change and χ tests for trend in the proportion of good perinatal outcomes among assisted reproductive technology live births (n=444,909) and liveborn singletons (n=222,500). We conducted univariable analyses followed by multiple logistic regression to estimate the effects of various characteristics on the outcome among singletons born in 2008 after fresh, nondonor assisted reproductive technology cycles (n=20,780). The proportion of good perinatal outcomes among all liveborn neonates increased from 38.6% in 2000 to 42.5% in 2008, whereas it declined marginally among singletons from 83.6% to 83.4%. One previous birth, transfer of fewer than three embryos, and the presence of fewer than three fetal hearts on 6-week ultrasound examination were associated with good perinatal outcome among singletons. Non-Hispanic black race, tubal factor infertility, uterine factor infertility, ovulatory disorder, and 5-day embryo culture were associated with reduced odds for a good outcome. The strongest association was the presence of one fetal heart compared with more than two (adjusted odds ratio 2.43, 95% confidence interval 1.73-3.42). From 2000 to 2008, good perinatal outcomes increased among assisted reproductive technology live births. Among singleton live births, odds for good outcome were greatest with the presence of a single fetal heart and lowest in women of non-Hispanic black race. II.

  10. Joint reproductive autonomy: does Evans v Amicus Healthcare Ltd provide for a gender-neutral approach to assisted reproductive rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allin, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Assisted reproductive technology encompasses methods of achieving pregnancy by artificial or partially artificial means. Whilst these methods are more commonly used by couples suffering from problems of infertility, some forms of assistance are employed by fertile couples, for example pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. The overall regulatory framework in the UK is predominantly found in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. The usual rules relating to consent and autonomy apply and were discussed in depth in Evans v Amicus Healthcare Ltd and later in Evans v United Kingdom. This paper considers whether the Evans litigation envisages the possibility of further encouraging joint autonomy in the use of zygotes and whether there is a continuing right to autonomy by the party not bearing the pregnancy. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. [Targeted screening for HTLV-1 in couples requesting medically assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S

    2011-08-01

    Currently there are no guidelines for the targeting of HTLV-1 screening of couples requesting inclusion in an assisted fertility programme. These can be drawn up only if there is a multidisciplinary input allowing for specialist advice on the quantification of risk in the target populations offered help with fertility both in mainland France and the Antilles or French Guyana.In units offering Assisted Reproductive Technics (ART) targeted screening which might reveal a requirement for specific medical management, presents the opposing problems of the need for exhaustive questioning of the couple and that of non-discrimination. If screening is arranged to take place before the couple is taken on for assisted reproduction, then the good practice which is currently recommended and applied for HIV, is a suitable reference model. It remains to define the expected benefits in this branch of medicine where medical responsibility in assisted conception is already highly regulated. Moreover, if any measures are applied in the context of assisted reproduction, this would suggest that similar guidelines should be established for natural conception.

  12. Assisted reproductive technology use and outcomes among women with a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Missmer, Stacey A; Spector, Logan G; Leach, Richard E; Williams, Melanie; Koch, Lori; Smith, Yolanda R; Stern, Judy E; Ball, G David; Schymura, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    How do the assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes of women presenting for ART after cancer diagnosis compare to women without cancer? The likelihood of a live birth after ART among women with prior cancer using autologous oocytes is reduced and varies by cancer diagnosis but is similar to women without cancer when donor oocytes are used. Premenopausal patients faced with a cancer diagnosis frequently present for fertility preservation. Population-based cohort study of women treated with ART in NY, TX and IL, USA. Women with their first ART treatment between 2004 and 2009 were identified from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database and linked to their respective State Cancer Registries based on name, date of birth and social security number. Years were rounded, i.e. year 1 = 6-18 months before treatment. This study used reports of cancer from 5 years, 6 months prior to treatment until 6 months after first ART treatment. Women who only presented for embryo banking were omitted from the analysis. The likelihood of pregnancy and of live birth with ART using autologous oocytes was modeled using logistic regression, with women without prior cancer as the reference group, adjusted for woman's age, parity, cumulative FSH dosage, infertility diagnosis, number of diagnoses, number of ART cycles, State of residency and year of ART treatment. Results of the modeling are reported as adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and (95% confidence intervals). The study population included 53 426 women; 441 women were diagnosed with cancer within 5 years prior to ART cycle start. Mean (±SD) age at cancer diagnosis was 33.4 ± 5.7 years; age at start of ART treatment was 34.9 ± 5.8 for women with cancer compared with 35.3 ± 5.3 years for women without cancer (P = 0.03). Live birth rates among women using autologous oocytes differed substantially by cancer status (47.7% without cancer versus 24.7% with cancer, P information on

  13. Assisted reproductive technology in Japan: a summary report of 1992-2014 by the Ethics Committee, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irahara, Minoru; Kuwahara, Akira; Iwasa, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tomonori; Ishihara, Osamu; Kugu, Koji; Sawa, Rintaro; Banno, Kouji; Saito, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    The Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology implemented a registry report system for the clinical practice of assisted reproductive technology in 1986. The aggregated results from 1992 to 2014 are reported herein. The total number of registered treatments was 393 745 cycles, of which 66 550 were pregnancy cycles and 46 008 were cycles with a live birth. Compared to the number of registered treatments in 2008, when the cycle-based registry was newly introduced, there was a 2.07-fold increase in the total number of treatments and a 2.25-fold increase in the number of cycles with a live birth. As the average age of patients who receive assisted reproductive technology has become markedly higher year by year, the most common age of those patients who received assisted reproductive technology in 2014 was 40 years. The total numbers of both assisted reproductive technology treatments and assisted reproductive technology live births are likely to be higher in the future. In addition, the trend toward aging patients seems to be continuing into the future.

  14. Criminal law aspects of assisted human reproduction in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardžić Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous shortcomings of the Law on Infertility Treatment by Biomedically Assisted Fertilization culminate in provisions defining criminal offences. A question is raised regarding the possibility and results of the application of such criminal provisions due to the legislative technique used in the process of their creation, language, qualified forms of the offences, span of criminal sanctions, as well as having in mind the overlapping of such criminal offences with some of the misdemeanors punishable by the same Law. A possibility to provide for a criminal law protection in this highly sensitive area is put into question due to a very courageous action of the legislator reflected in the attempt to introduce criminal offences, punishable by long prison sentences.

  15. [Medical-assisted reproduction and protection of the person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnoni, F

    1998-01-01

    The position of the Catholic community on medical assisted procreation is here put forward. The two values that need to be upheld are: the protection of human life from before the birth and its conception within marriage. These values need to be incorporated into juridical norms, which, in a pluralistic society, cannot involve anything other than a long process of reapproachment between varying positions towards an agreed text. The absolute nature of the values defended by catholics do not require "legislative rigidity", but allow collaboration towards the common good of all those involved. The United Nations' declaration on human rights and the nascent international conventions on bioethics provide us with negative limits at the least and encourage the political community to take on their proper legislative responsibilities in the field.

  16. Polar bodies in assisted reproductive technology: current progress and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanchang; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Ya-Peng; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic cell-cycle progression, unequal divisions take place, resulting in a large oocyte and two diminutive polar bodies. The first polar body contains a subset of bivalent chromosomes, whereas the second polar body contains a haploid set of chromatids. One unique feature of the female gamete is that the polar bodies can provide beneficial information about the genetic background of the oocyte without potentially destroying it. Therefore, polar body biopsies have been applied in preimplantation genetic diagnosis to detect chromosomal or genetic abnormalities that might be inherited by the offspring. Besides the traditional use in preimplantation diagnosis, recent findings suggest additional important roles for polar bodies in assisted reproductive technology. In this paper, we review the new roles of polar bodies in assisted reproductive technology, mainly focusing on single-cell sequencing of the polar body genome to deduce the genomic information of its sibling oocyte and on polar body transfer to prevent the transmission of mtDNA-associated diseases. We also discuss additional potential roles for polar bodies and related key questions in human reproductive health. We believe that further exploration of new roles for polar bodies will contribute to a better understanding of reproductive health and that polar body manipulation and diagnosis will allow production of a greater number of healthy babies. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  17. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture...... gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional...

  18. Financial "risk-sharing" or refund programs in assisted reproduction: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Financial "risk-sharing" fee structures in assisted reproduction programs charge patients a higher initial fee but provide reduced fees for subsequent cycles and often a partial or complete refund if treatment fails. This opinion of the ASRM Ethics Committee analyzes the ethical issues raised by these fee structures, including patient selection criteria, conflicts of interest, success rate transparency, and patient informed consent. This document replaces the document of the same name, last published in 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;100:334-6). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer in children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Karin Jerhamre; Henningsen, Anna-Karina A; Källen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer? SUMMARY ANSWER: Children born after ART showed no overall increase in the rate of cancer when compared with children born as a result of spontaneous conception. WHAT...... with ART. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: No conflict of interest was reported. The study was supported by grants from The European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, the Danish Agency...

  20. Bariatric surgery influences the number and quality of oocytes in patients submitted to assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofolini, Juliana; Bianco, Bianca; Santos, Gustavo; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2014-03-01

    To determine differences in follicle stimulation, oocyte retrieval, maturation, and fertilization among patients who underwent bariatric surgery, obese patients, and patients with 18 assisted reproduction techniques and check that these patients may have some impairment in ovarian response. The study comprised three groups: GI: 29 patients who had undergone restrictive and/or malabsorptive bariatric surgery; GII: 57 obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m²); and GIII: 94 patients (18 reproductive process can be impaired. Bariatric surgery appears to have an important impact on the formation of follicles and oocytes. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  1. The Case of Sacrococcygeal Teratoma in an IVF Pregnancy: Is There any Association between Congenital Tumors and Assisted Reproduction Techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempe, Anjali; Singh, Nilanchali; Sharma, Ila; Agarwal, Satish

    2014-04-01

    Sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) is a rare congenital tumor and its association with IVF pregnancy is not clear. There are limited reports of congenital tumors in IVF pregnancy. The exact embryogenesis of SCT is not known but a genetic etiology has been reported. Whether these congenital tumors have any association with assisted reproductive techniques remains obscure. In this study, a case of SCT in an IVF pregnancy with donor oocytes was reported. IVF was performed for bilateral tubal blockade and poor ovarian reserve. It was diagnosed antenatally by ultrasonography. Successful surgical treatment was performed in postnatal period and six months follow-up remained uneventful. The purpose of reporting this case is to emphasize on the possibility of association of congenital tumors with assisted reproductive techniques and hence, the need for screening in these pregnancies. An association could not be detected based on few case reports and therefore, large population based studies are required to elucidate the effect of these reproductive techniques on occurrence of congenital tumors.

  2. Protection for Children Born Through Assisted Reproductive Technologies Act, B.E. 2558: The Changing Profile of Surrogacy in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The National Legislative Assembly of Thailand has enacted on February 19, 2015 the Protection for Children Born through Assisted Reproductive Technologies Act (ART Act). Its primary objective aims at protecting children born through assisted reproductive technologies and providing the legal procedures that the intended parents must follow. The focus of this article is to discuss the ongoing issues involving assisted reproduction in Thailand. After reviewing the past legal framework surrounding surrogate motherhood and the downsides of the assisted reproductive technology market in Thailand, the article will discuss the new ART Act and its regulatory framework. It will conclude that although the new law contains some flaws and limitations, it has so far been successful in tackling surrogacy trafficking and preventing reproductive scandals from occurring again.

  3. Protection for Children Born Through Assisted Reproductive Technologies Act, B.E. 2558: The Changing Profile of Surrogacy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Stasi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Legislative Assembly of Thailand has enacted on February 19, 2015 the Protection for Children Born through Assisted Reproductive Technologies Act (ART Act. Its primary objective aims at protecting children born through assisted reproductive technologies and providing the legal procedures that the intended parents must follow. The focus of this article is to discuss the ongoing issues involving assisted reproduction in Thailand. After reviewing the past legal framework surrounding surrogate motherhood and the downsides of the assisted reproductive technology market in Thailand, the article will discuss the new ART Act and its regulatory framework. It will conclude that although the new law contains some flaws and limitations, it has so far been successful in tackling surrogacy trafficking and preventing reproductive scandals from occurring again.

  4. Genome editing and assisted reproduction: curing embryos, society or prospective parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Giulia

    2017-07-19

    This paper explores the ethics of introducing genome-editing technologies as a new reproductive option. In particular, it focuses on whether genome editing can be considered a morally valuable alternative to preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Two arguments against the use of genome editing in reproduction are analysed, namely safety concerns and germline modification. These arguments are then contrasted with arguments in favour of genome editing, in particular with the argument of the child's welfare and the argument of parental reproductive autonomy. In addition to these two arguments, genome editing could be considered as a worthy alternative to PGD as it may not be subjected to some of the moral critiques moved against this technology. Even if these arguments offer sound reasons in favour of introducing genome editing as a new reproductive option, I conclude that these benefits should be balanced against other considerations. More specifically, I maintain that concerns regarding the equality of access to assisted reproduction and the allocation of scarce resources should be addressed prior to the adoption of genome editing as a new reproductive option.

  5. The association of placenta previa and assisted reproductive techniques: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Manoochehr; Jenabi, Ensiyeh; Fereidooni, Bita

    2017-06-06

    Several epidemiological studies have determined that assisted reproductive techniques (ART) can increase the risk of placenta previa. To date, only a meta-analysis has been performed for assessing the relationship between placenta previa and ART. This meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the association between placenta previa and ART in singleton and twin pregnancies. A literature search was performed in major databases PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus from the earliest possible year to April 2017. The heterogeneity across studies was explored by Q-test and I 2 statistic. The publication bias was assessed using Begg's and Egger's tests. The results were reported using odds ratio (OR) and relative risk (RR) estimates with its 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a random-effects model. The literature search yielded 1529 publications until September 2016 with 1,388,592 participants. The overall estimate of OR was 2.67 (95%CI: 2.01, 3.34) and RR was 3.62 (95%CI: 0.21, 7.03) based on singleton pregnancies. The overall estimate of OR was 1.50 (95%CI: 1.26, 1.74) based on twin pregnancies. We showed based on odds ratio reports in observational studies that ART procedures are a risk factor for placenta previa.

  6. Psychological adjustment in adolescents conceived by assisted reproduction techniques: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioi, Elena Cristiana; Golombok, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional time for identity formation and relationships with parents. While people born through assisted reproduction techniques (ART) appear to be well adjusted in childhood, it is unclear whether these findings carry into adolescence, and whether diverse ART have different psychological outcomes. This review summarizes what is known about the psychological adjustment and family relationships of the growing number of children born through ART who are reaching adolescence. The Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO and Scopus databases were searched systematically for peer reviewed papers focusing on adolescent psychological adjustment and parent-adolescent relationships in families created by ART. Key search inclusion criteria included all papers published in English relating to adolescents aged between 11 and 18 years. Seventeen publications with varied methodologies were identified by this review. Only papers relating to in vitro fertilization (IVF), egg donation and donor insemination were identified. Results were categorized according to ART that used the parents' own gametes (IVF) and those that involved reproductive donation (egg donation, and donor insemination). Compared with naturally conceived adolescents and standardized normative samples, adolescents born through all ARTs seemed to be equally well adjusted, and to have positive parent-adolescent relationships. Some differences were however identified based on the type of ART used. In particular, the sex of the parent and child, along with age and process of disclosure of the adolescent's conception were identified as key mediators of parent-adolescent relationships in families created by donor insemination. The studies in this review indicate that children born through ART have positive parent-adolescent relationships and are well adjusted, with some slight differences based on different ART. The generalizability of findings may be limited by the general low level of disclosure to

  7. Menopausal women requesting egg/embryo donation: examining health screening guidelines for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Taleen; Bachmann, Gloria; Ayers, Charletta

    2016-07-01

    As more postreproductive women opt to pursue pregnancy with advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ART), the menopausal practitioner will become more involved in counseling, screening, and referral of premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal women for these services. This review was conducted with the aim of (1) evaluating ART screening practices as they pertain to postreproductive women, and (2) reviewing the outcomes of ART using oocyte donation in postreproductive women. A total of 950 unique records were found on PubMed, Clinical Key, and Google Scholar. Of these, 252 records were screened for relevance based on their titles and abstracts. With further review of these 252 records, 93 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and 63 were excluded based on relevance to our study. Finally, 30 studies were included in our qualitative synthesis. Despite the increasing use of ART in postreproductive women, there are limited guidelines for determining candidacy with regard to maternal health, the most comprehensive of which are the guidelines from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). Although the American Society for Reproductive Medicine guidelines state that healthy women over 50 who are prepared for parenthood are candidates for ART through oocyte donation, they note that older women should be counseled as to the increased obstetric risk associated with advanced maternal age. With aging, particularly for those women who are menopausal and postmenopausal, the woman and her fetus, however, are at risk of increased morbidity and mortality as compared with younger, healthy pregnant women. Because national trends suggest that women are delaying childbearing, the cohort of postreproductive women looking toward ART using donor oocytes as a fertility option will expand and menopausal practitioners will often participate in the ART counseling of these women. Because maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality increase in

  8. Dizygotic twin pregnancies after medically assisted reproduction and after natural conception: maternal and perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensdorp, Alexandra J; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben W J; Lambalk, Cornelis B; van Wely, Madelon

    2016-08-01

    To compare maternal and perinatal outcomes in dizygotic twin pregnancies conceived after medically assisted reproduction (MAR) with outcomes after natural conception (NC). Nationwide registry based study. Academic medical center. Primiparous women who delivered opposite sex twins between January 2000 and December 2012 in the Netherlands, comprising dizygotic twin pregnancies: 6,694 women, 470 after ovulation induction (OI), 511 after intrauterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (IUI-COH), 2,437 after in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and 3,276 after NC. None. Multivariable logistic regression and generalized linear mixed models to evaluate differences in outcomes: maternal outcomes of hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, hemorrhage, and delivery mode, perinatal outcomes including small for gestational age (SGA) with birth weight <10th percentile, birth weight <1,500 g, 5-minute Apgar score <7, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, congenital anomalies, and perinatal mortality. We found no statistically significant differences in maternal or perinatal outcomes after OI compared with NC. Women pregnant after IVF-ICSI had a lower risk for hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.83) compared with women pregnant after NC. After IUI-COH more children had Apgar scores <7 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.81) and perinatal mortality rates were higher (aOR 1.56; 95% CI, 1.04-2.33) compared with NC. We found no differences in perinatal outcomes after IVF-ICSI compared with NC. Overall, maternal and perinatal risks other than those due to multiplicity are similar for twin pregnancies conceived after MAR and after NC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global cultural and socioeconomic factors that influence access to assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, G David

    2009-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is the most successful treatment for the 9% of people at reproductive age who suffer with infertility, but only a small percentage of those needing ART actually access it. Access varies greatly internationally owing to religious, cultural and political factors, probably the most important factor being each society's perspective on the moral status of the embryo. Economic factors, the nature of the healthcare system and public funding affect access both among and within countries. Regulations and guidelines are highly variable, but critical, in determining access and types of services. Cross-border travel for reproductive care is not uncommon. In the future, better public funding of ART, technological improvements, lower cost and slow international harmonization with fewer differences in ART services will probably increase access significantly.

  10. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2012: results generated from European registers by ESHREaEuro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calhaz-Jorge, C.; De Geyter, C.; Kupka, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    1997, ART data in Europe have been collected and re-ported in 15 manuscripts, published in Human Reproduction. Retrospective data collection of European ART data by the EIM Consortium for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Data for cycles between 1 January and 31......The 16th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the data of the treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) and intrauterine insemination (IUI) initiated in Europe during 2012: are there any changes compared with previous years? Despite some fluctuations in the number...... of countries reporting data, the overall number of ART cycles has continued to increase year by year, the pregnancy rates (PRs) in 2012 remained stable compared with those reported in 2011, and the number of transfers with multiple embryos (3+) and the multiple delivery rates were lower than ever before. Since...

  11. Introduction of various vietnamese indigenous pig breeds and their conservation by using assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Tich, Nguyen Khac; Nguyen, Bui Xuan; Ozawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Manabe, Noboru; Ratky, Jozsef; Kanai, Yukio; Nagai, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    Pigs are one of the most important domesticated animals in Vietnam. They are the main source of meat for the Vietnamese. According to FAO statistics, Vietnam is among the top 5 countries raising pigs in the world, with nearly 27 million hogs. This review article introduces the distribution, morphology, growth potential, meat-producing ability and reproductive efficiency of six Vietnamese indigenous pig breeds: I, Mong Cai, Muong Khuong, Soc, Meo and Co. The collected data showed that these Vietnamese pigs are less effective in comparison with Western pigs in terms of reproductive and meat-producing ability as well as weight growth. However, these Vietnamese indigenous breeds have some special characteristics, such as very early sexual maturity, and good adaptability to harsh raising conditions or poor feeding. Moreover, recent genetic research has shown that Vietnamese pigs are genetically diverse. Thus, conservation of these pig breeds using assisted reproductive techniques is urgent and important.

  12. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Methods. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics...... or not – were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women relatively modest. The results can be generalized...

  13. States Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (SMART) Collaborative: data collection, linkage, dissemination, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mneimneh, Allison S; Boulet, Sheree L; Sunderam, Saswati; Zhang, Yujia; Jamieson, Denise J; Crawford, Sara; McKane, Patricia; Copeland, Glenn; Mersol-Barg, Michael; Grigorescu, Violanda; Cohen, Bruce; Steele, JoAnn; Sappenfield, William; Diop, Hafsatou; Kirby, Russell S; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2013-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) refers to fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled outside the body. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) oversees the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), which collects data on all ART procedures performed in the United States. The NASS, while a comprehensive source of data on ART patient demographics and clinical procedures, includes limited information on outcomes related to women's and children's health. To examine ART-related health outcomes, CDC and three states (Massachusetts, Florida, and Michigan) established the States Monitoring ART (SMART) Collaborative to evaluate maternal and perinatal outcomes of ART and improve state-based ART surveillance. To date, NASS data have been linked with states' vital records, disease registries, and hospital discharge data with a linkage rate of 90.2%. The probabilistic linkage methodology used in the SMART Collaborative has been validated and found to be both accurate and efficient. A wide breadth of applied research within the Collaborative is planned or ongoing, including examinations of the impact of insurance mandates on ART use as well as the relationships between ART and birth defects and cancer, among others. The SMART Collaborative is working to improve state-based ART surveillance by developing state surveillance plans, establishing partnerships, and conducting data analyses. The SMART Collaborative has been instrumental in creating linked datasets and strengthening epidemiologic and research capacity for improving maternal and infant health programs and evaluating the public health impact of ART.

  14. Lower limb ischemia in a thrombophilic woman during ovarian stimulation for assisted reproduction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Strina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Women receiving hormone therapy as part of assisted reproduction protocols are at increased risk for thrombosis. Controlled ovarian stimulation may be a risk factor for thrombotic events, and thrombophilic subjects are more prone to develop thrombosis during hormone therapies. Materials and methods We report a case of arterial thrombosis of the iliacofemuropopliteal axis, which occurred in a young woman with Factor V Leiden-related thrombophilia, who was receiving recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and leuprorelin in preparation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, and pharmacological thromboprophylaxis with enoxaparin. Results The thrombosis resulted in critical limb ischemia whose clinical evolution is described. Discussion Further research is needed to identify the best strategy for reducing the thrombotic risk associated with assisted reproduction protocols and to determine whether these women should receive pharmacological thromboprophylaxis.

  15. A comparative analysis of assisted reproductive technology cycles in Australia and New Zealand 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, C M; Wang, Y A; Sullivan, E A

    2010-09-01

    There are different funding arrangements for fertility treatments between New Zealand (NZ) and Australia. In NZ, there are two options for patients accessing treatment: either meeting specified criteria for age, no smoking and BMI for publicly funding or funding their own treatment. This differs from Australia, which has no explicit eligibility criteria restricting access to fertility treatment. An analysis of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Australia and NZ was undertaken to consider the impact of these different funding approaches. Data were extracted from the Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Database between 2004 and 2007. A total of 116 111 autologous fresh cycles were included. In Australia, more cycles were in women aged 40 years or older compared with those in NZ (23.5 versus 16.0%, P Single embryo transfer was more common in NZ than that in Australia, in women women women undergoing treatment and may explain the improved pregnancy outcomes seen in NZ couples who undergo fertility treatments.

  16. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, hypertension and recurrent pregnancy loss presented for assisted reproduction. The patient responded well to enoxaparin and prednisone during both assisted reproduction and prenatal treatment. This case report indicates that prescription of immunosuppressant and blood thinners can be safely recommended throughout the whole prenatal period in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Enoxaparin and prednisone may be prescribed concurrently during pregnancy.

  17. Poor knowledge of age-related fertility decline and assisted reproduction among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Désirée; Vassena, Rita; Prat, Andrés; Vernaeve, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Reproduction is a matter of concern for individuals and society due to the postponement of childbearing, and healthcare professionals are the main source of information and counselling. This study aims to evaluate how knowledgeable healthcare professionals are about fertility and assisted reproduction, and to explore attitudes towards social oocyte freezing. A cross-sectional study was performed with 201 professionals (gynaecologists, physicians and nurses) from four public centres in Spain. Participants completed a survey about fertility, IVF, oocyte donation (OD) and social oocyte freezing, between May 2013 and March 2014. Reported mean age limits for pregnancy were 39.5 ± 4.5 (spontaneously), 43.7 ± 5.2 (IVF) and 49.0 ± 6.5 (OD). Gynaecologists reported a younger limit for spontaneous and IVF pregnancies (P 39, compared with 77.3% of other physicians and 72.9% of nurses. Regarding social oocyte freezing, 41.8% of gynaecologists thought it should be offered to every young woman, versus 62.7% of other physicians and 48.9% of nurses (P = 0.041). In conclusion, gynaecologists are more knowledgeable about fertility and assisted reproduction, while more restrictive towards social oocyte freezing. Knowledge and attitudes could influence the quality of information and counselling given to patients. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Maqasid al-Shariah as a Complementary Framework for Conventional Bioethics: Application in Malaysian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Fatwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdul Halim; Rahman, Noor Naemah Abdul; Saifuddeen, Shaikh Mohd

    2017-09-11

    Rapid development in the area of assisted reproductive technology (ART), has benefited mankind by addressing reproductive problems. However, the emergence of new technologies and techniques raises various issues and discussions among physicians and the masses, especially on issues related to bioethics. Apart from solutions provided using conventional bioethics framework, solutions can also be derived via a complementary framework of bioethics based on the Higher Objectives of the Divine Law (Maqasid al-Shariah) in tackling these problems. This approach in the Islamic World has been applied and localised in the Malaysian context. Thus, this paper highlights a conceptual theoretical framework for solving current bioethical issues, with a special focus on ART in the Malaysian context, and compares this theory with conventional theories of bioethics.

  19. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2004: results generated from European registers by ESHRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goossens, V.; Ferraretti, A.P.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: European results of assisted reproductive techniques from treatments initiated during 2004 are presented in this eighth report. METHODS: Data were mainly collected from existing national registers. From 29 countries, 785 clinics reported 367,066 treatment cycles including: IVF (114......: Compared with earlier years, the reported number of ART cycles in Europe increased and the pregnancy rates increased marginally, even though fewer embryos were transferred and the multiple delivery rates were reduced Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  20. Irish public opinion on assisted human reproduction services: Contemporary assessments from a national sample

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, David J; Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Hawrylyshyn, Christine A; Sokol, Piotr; Walsh, Anthony PH

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To measure Irish opinion on a range of assisted human reproduction (AHR) treatments. Methods: A nationally representative sample of Irish adults (n=1,003) were anonymously sampled by telephone survey. Results: Most participants (77%) agreed that any fertility services offered internationally should also be available in Ireland, although only a small minority of the general Irish population had personal familiarity with AHR or infertility. This sample finds substantial agreeme...

  1. “Living each week as unique” : maternal fears in Assisted Reproductive Technology pregnancies

    OpenAIRE

    Dornelles, Lia Mara; MacCallum, Fiona; Lopes, Rita; Piccinini, Cesar Augusto; Passos, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:\\ud to explore women's fears during pregnancy following conception via assisted reproductive technology (ART).\\ud \\ud Methods:\\ud 19 expectant first-time mothers were interviewed during the third trimester of pregnancy using a semi-structured schedule. Perceptions of and feelings about pregnancy were assessed. Content analysis was used to identify themes and subthemes.\\ud \\ud Findings:\\ud four overarching themes emerged: the baby's survival, the health of the baby, the efficacy of t...

  2. Infertility and assisted reproductive technology: the role of the perinatal social worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, D A

    1997-01-01

    The inability to conceive a pregnancy can cause disruption and anguish to individuals and couples sharing that experience. The treatments for infertility, especially those involving assisted reproductive technology such as in vitro fertilization, can be physically, financially and emotionally stressful for participants. The impact of infertility and its treatment has introduced a new venue for perinatal social worker services to counsel, educate and support these patients.

  3. Current progress on assisted reproduction in dogs and cats : in vitro embryo production

    OpenAIRE

    Luvoni, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    International audience; The objective of the development of assisted reproduction techniques in dogs and cats is their application to non-domestic canine and feline species, most of which are considered threatened or endangered. Among these techniques, an entirely in vitro system for embryo production is effectively an important tool for conservation of wildlife. In the last decade, progress has been made in embryo production in carnivores. It has been shown that canine oocytes can resume mei...

  4. The Role of Varicocele Repair in the New Era of Assisted Reproductive Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Cocuzza, Mariana Amora; Bragais, Frances Monette Papa; Agarwal, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    Infertility affects 10-15% of couples who are trying to conceive, and half of the cases are due to male infertility. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection is increasingly being used to overcome multiple sperm deficiencies. Due to its effectiveness, some have proposed ICSI as a solution for all cases of male infertility, regardless of the cause. Hence, even men with potentially treatable causes of infertility have sought the aid of assisted reproductive technology, rather than undergo specific ther...

  5. Live birth rates and safety profile using dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Ravichandran; Rajesh, Hemashree; Wong, Ker Yi; Faisal, Fazlin; Yu, Su Ling

    2017-06-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) result in a deficient luteal phase, requiring the administration of intramuscular, intravaginal or oral exogenous progesterone. Dydrogesterone, an oral retroprogesterone with good bioavailability, has been used in assisted reproductive cycles with outcomes that are comparable to those of vaginal or intramuscular progesterone. However, there are limited reviews on its use for luteal phase support in ARTs, in terms of pregnancy outcomes and associated fetal anomalies. This study aimed to review the live birth rates and associated fetal anomalies of women who were given dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in assisted reproductive cycles at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. This retrospective descriptive study included 1,050 women who underwent in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection at the Centre for Assisted Reproduction of Singapore General Hospital between 2000 and 2011. The women were given dydrogesterone for luteal phase support. The main outcome measures were rates of pregnancy, live birth, miscarriage and fetal anomalies. The pregnancy and live birth rates were 34.7% and 27.7%, respectively. Among those who achieved pregnancy, 17.0% miscarried, 0.8% had ectopic pregnancies and 0.3% had molar pregnancies. Fetal anomalies were detected in 1.9% of pregnancies, all of which were terminated by choice. Since the outcomes of dydrogesterone are comparable to those of intramuscular and vaginal progesterone, it is a reasonable option to provide luteal phase support for women who are uncomfortable with injections or vaginal insertions. Randomised controlled studies are needed to determine the optimal dosage of dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in ARTs.

  6. Encouraging results despite complexity of multidisciplinary care of HIV-infected women using assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Jeanine; Partisani, Marialuisa; Wittemer, Christiane; Lang, Jean-Marie; Viville, Stéphane; Favre, Romain

    2005-11-01

    Assisted reproduction technologies can treat infertility for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive women. We assessed the efficacy of these techniques in the results and difficulties encountered while conducting our assisted reproduction programme for 49 couples in which at least the woman had HIV infection that was currently under control. Treatments included intrauterine insemination (IUI), IVF and ICSI, with ovarian stimulation. Embryos were transferred on day 3 after oocyte retrieval. An elective single transfer was performed, except for patients aged > or = 40 years. The median age of the women was 36 years. Ten IUI, nine IVF, 53 ICSI and 10 frozen-thawed embryo transfers have been performed. No pregnancy occurred following the IUI trials but for the couples with IVF and ICSI attempts the clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 23.9%. Eight babies have been born leading to a 22.2% take home baby rate per treated couple. Contamination was not observed in any newborn. Assisted reproduction technologies and particularly ICSI can provide HIV seropositive women with a safe means of mothering children. Results are encouraging when considering the age of the patients and a preferential single embryo transfer.

  7. First trimester screening for Down syndrome and assisted reproduction: no basis for concern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wøjdemann, K R; Larsen, S O; Shalmi, A

    2001-01-01

    In pregnancies obtained after assisted reproduction the false-positive rate of second trimester Down syndrome (DS) screening is increased by 1.5-3-fold. This may cause an increase in the number of amniocenteses and the fetal loss rate. The present study for the first time examined whether assisted.......93-1.25) for beta-hCG and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.95-1.11) for NT. The first trimester marker values in assisted reproductive pregnancies and spontaneously conceived pregnancies were not significantly different. Estimated false-positive rates for a risk cut-off of 1:400 varied from 4.7% in IVF pregnancies to 5.1% in OI...... reproductive technologies affect the results of first trimester screening. The markers PAPP-A, free beta-hCG and the nuchal translucency (NT) thickness were examined at 12-14 weeks' gestation. Screening markers in 47 in vitro fertilisation (IVF), 63 ovulation induction (OI) and 3026 spontaneously conceived...

  8. Relationship between Dietary Fat Intake, Its Major Food Sources and Assisted Reproduction Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Ashraf; Ramezanzadeh, Fatemeh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hosein

    2014-10-01

    High dietary fat consumption may alter oocyte development and embryonic development. This prospective study was conducted to determine the relation between dietary fat consumption level, its food sources and the assisted reproduction parameters. A prospective study was conducted on 240 infertile women. In assisted reproduction treatment cycle, fat consumption and major food sources over the previous three months were identified. The number of retrieved oocytes, metaphase ΙΙ stage oocytes numbers, fertilization rate, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy rate were also determined. The data were analyzed using multiple regression, binary logistic regression, chi-square and t-test. The p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Total fat intake adjusted for age, body mass index, physical activity and etiology of infertility was positively associated with the number of retrieved oocytes and inversely associated with the high embryo quality rate. An inverse association was observed between sausage and turkey ham intake and the number of retrieved oocytes. Also, oil intake level had an inverse association with good cleavage rate. The results revealed that higher levels of fat consumption tend to increase the number of retrieved oocytes and were adversely related to embryonic development. Among food sources of fat, vegetable oil, sausage and turkey ham intake may adversely affect assisted reproduction parameters.

  9. Techniques of Assisted Human Reproduction and the Problematic of Parental Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the issues related to the civil responsibility of parents, when using the assisted human reproductions techniques. Drew up a discussion about the reflections of the principles of responsible parenting and of human dignity in the use of those techniques, delineating one by one of them that can cause damages to the embryo, unborn or child already born. Discussing about the assisted human reproduction techniques, it outlined those allowed by the Federal Medical Council through the Resolution nº 2013/2013 and stood out the legal system omission related to the regulation of the use of those techniques, since the only legal instrument that deals with it, that is the Law nº 11.105/2005, did not specify about it. Was presented therefore, all human assisted reproduction techniques that give rise to a possible potentiation of vulnerability of the embryo as well as to possibly answers regarding to the legal status of the embryo that the doctrine is trying to trace. Finally, we discussed about the civil responsibility forms, relating it to the responsible parenthood and the damages caused from not using those techniques.

  10. Fatty acid composition of human follicular fluid phospholipids and fertilization rate in assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaker, Maghsod; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad; Khanaki, Korosh; Darabi, Masoud; Farzadi, Laya; Shahnazi, Vahideh; Mehdizadeh, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids are known to be critically important in multiple biological functions. Phospholipid fatty acids of follicular fluid, an important microenvironment for the development of oocytes, may contribute to the women's fertility and the efficacy of assisted reproduction techniques. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fatty acid composition of follicular fluid phospholipids on women undergoing assisted reproductive techniques. Follicular fluid samples were obtained from 100 patients, referred to Tabriz Alzahra Hospital. Seventy-nine subjects underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF) and the remaining 21 underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Total lipid of follicular fluid was extracted and fatty acids were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Saturated fatty acids (SFA, P = 0.002) and the ratio of SFA to polyunsaturated fatty acids (P = 0.001) were correlated negatively with a number of mature oocytes after age adjustment. Linoleic acid (P = 0.006) was positively correlated, while the level of arachidonic acid was negatively correlated with fertility percentage after adjustment for body mass index, sperm count, sperm motility. Since phospholipids are one of the major components of lipid metabolism, the results of this study highlight the importance of this component in follicular fluid lipid metabolism. Consequently, it is proposed as an index in determination of the rate of success in assisted reproductive techniques such as IVF/ICSI.

  11. Assisted reproductive techniques and risk of exstrophy-epispadias complex: a German case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwink, Nadine; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Hirsch, Karin; Reifferscheid, Peter; Schmiedeke, Eberhard; Schmidt, Dominik; Reckin, Sabrina; Obermayr, Florian; Boemers, Thomas M; Stein, Raimund; Reutter, Heiko; Rösch, Wolfgang H; Brenner, Hermann; Ebert, Anne-Karoline

    2013-04-01

    We assessed the risk of exstrophy-epispadias complex in children conceived by in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Data from the German Network for Congenital Uro-REctal malformations were compared to nationwide data from the German In Vitro Fertilization Register and the German Federal Statistical Office. Odds ratios (95% CI) were determined to quantify associations using logistic regression. A total of 123 patients with exstrophy-epispadias complex born in Germany between 1997 and 2011 were recruited through participating departments of pediatric urology and pediatric surgery throughout the country as well as the German self-help organizations Blasenekstrophie/Epispadie e.V. and Kloakenekstrophie. All German live births (10,069,986) between 1997 and 2010 comprised the controls. Overall, 12 subjects (10%) and 129,982 controls (1%) were conceived by in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Conception by assisted reproductive technique was associated with a more than eightfold increased risk of exstrophy-epispadias complex compared to spontaneous conception (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.6-15.0, p assisted reproductive techniques such as in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are associated with a markedly increased risk of having a child born with exstrophy-epispadias complex. However, it remains unclear whether this finding may be due to assisted reproduction per se and/or underlying infertility/subfertility etiology or parent characteristics. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The mutual benefits of research in wild animal species and human-assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comizzoli, P; Paulson, E E; McGinnis, L K

    2018-02-22

    Studying the reproductive biology of wild animal species produces knowledge beneficial to their management and conservation. However, wild species also share intriguing similarities in reproductive biology with humans, thereby offering alternative models for better understanding the etiology of infertility and developing innovative treatments. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness in different scientific communities about intriguing connections between wild animals and humans regarding infertility syndromes or improvement of fertility preservation. The objectives are to (1) highlight commonalities between wild species and human fertility, (2) demonstrate that research in wild species-assisted reproductive technologies can greatly enhance success in human reproductive medicine, and (3) recognize that human fertility preservation is highly inspiring and relevant to wild species conservation. In addition to having similar biological traits in some wild species and humans, the fact of sharing the same natural environment and the common needs for more options in fertility preservation are strong incentives to build more bridges that will eventually benefit both animal conservation and human reproductive medicine.

  13. Assisted reproductive technologies to prevent human mitochondrial disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Andy; Braude, Peter; Flinter, Frances; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Ogilvie, Caroline; Perry, Anthony C F

    2017-11-09

    Mitochondria are essential cytoplasmic organelles that generate energy (ATP) by oxidative phosphorylation and mediate key cellular processes such as apoptosis. They are maternally inherited and in humans contain a 16,569-base-pair circular genome (mtDNA) encoding 37 genes required for oxidative phosphorylation. Mutations in mtDNA cause a range of pathologies, commonly affecting energy-demanding tissues such as muscle and brain. Because mitochondrial diseases are incurable, attention has focused on limiting the inheritance of pathogenic mtDNA by mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT). MRT aims to avoid pathogenic mtDNA transmission between generations by maternal spindle transfer, pronuclear transfer or polar body transfer: all involve the transfer of nuclear DNA from an egg or zygote containing defective mitochondria to a corresponding egg or zygote with normal mitochondria. Here we review recent developments in animal and human models of MRT and the underlying biology. These have led to potential clinical applications; we identify challenges to their technical refinement.

  14. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhen Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. METHODS: Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus <35 were eligible for the meta-analysis. No statistical difference was found in risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77. CONCLUSIONS: ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  15. Combined jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis following assisted reproductive technology--new observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Ophira; Schiby, Ginette; Heiman, Zehava; Avivi, Kamila; Sigal, Carol; Levran, David; Dor, Jeushua; Itzchak, Yacov

    2009-08-01

    To study the predilection of jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis in patients going through assisted reproductive technology (ART). This technology puts women at high risk of developing the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and thrombotic events. Study cases. Large Academic Medical Center. Five women who developed jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis following ART were included in the study. The deep vein thrombosis was demonstrated by ultrasound Doppler or computerized tomography angiography. All women were interviewed and data obtained from outpatient and hospital medical charts. Magnetic resonance imaging and complete thrombophilic profile workup was performed in each woman. Open biopsy from the lesions was taken from one of the women. Correlation between mechanical branchial cysts filled with fluid during OHSS and jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis. Five women developed jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis following ART. They were found to harbor clusters of rudimentary branchial cysts filled with fluid at the time of OHSS, which compressed the jugular and subclavian veins at their junction at the base of the neck. Four patients (80%) were found to be carriers of factor V Leiden. Predilection of jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis early in pregnancy is the result of mechanical compression mediated by rudimentary branchial cysts filled with fluid during OHSS, particularly in subjects who are carriers of factor V Leiden.

  16. Developmental outcomes of Japanese children born through Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in toddlerhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sayaka; Hashimoto, Keiji; Ogawa, Kohei; Horikawa, Reiko; Sago, Haruhiko

    2018-02-27

    This study aimed to investigate developmental outcomes of Japanese babies born through Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) at ages 2 and 3. The data were gathered from 1085 children in a hospital-based cohort study conducted in Japan. The children's level of development was assessed through a parent-rated questionnaire, the Kinder Infant Development Scale, which consists of nine developmental domains. We compared the development of children born through ART and those born naturally by conducting analyses of covariance. For the analyses, the effect of maternal age, family income, parental education and multiple birth were controlled for. At 24 months, no significant difference was found between children born through ART and those born naturally in development in any domain. At 36 months, a significant difference was found in development of Receptive language (F (1, 845) = 6.148, P = 0.013), Expressive language (F (1, 845) = 4.060, P = 0.044) and Language concept (F (1, 845) = 6.968, P = 0.008). For these domains, children born through ART had a significantly higher developmental age compared to children born naturally. At age 2, no significant difference was found between the children born through ART and those born naturally in nine developmental domains, although at age 3, the children born through ART showed significantly better language development than the children born naturally. © 2018 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jun-Zhen; Pang, Li-Hong; Li, Min-Qing; Xu, Jing; Zhou, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART) are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77). ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  18. Homoaffective parentage--specifically, a matter of medically assisted reproduction: a parallel between Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Marianna

    2011-09-01

    In the field of homosexuality an issue still excessively polemical is the one concerning the possibility of paternity or maternity (biological or adoptive) as a right to be exercised by homosexuals. An even more controversial issue is that of homosexuals' access to assisted reproductive techniques. Carrying out an analysis of two countries, Brazil and Portugal face this with opposite approaches in legislation and legal doctrine. In Brazil, the issue is not legislatively regulated. In Portugal, there is regulatory law. The question that arises is: what is better an extremely reductive and discriminatory law or a true legal vacuum? Several questions may be raised in this context. The first one is: is there indeed a right to parenthood? What to say about surrogacy? In these cases is the commandment of the child's best interest being heeded, which is the vector for any decision relating to an infant or teenager? Differences of understanding will always exist, especially in such a sensitive field as Family Law. But one fact must be accepted: any resolution and legislation in this context must be based on the principle of the best interests of the - born or unborn - child and other constitutional principles as equality, freedom, non-discrimination and human dignity, forgetting the prejudice rooted in society and the unfounded conjectures of homophobic judgments.

  19. Comparison of three infertility-specific measures in men and women going through assisted reproductive technology treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedro, Juliana; Frederiksen, Yoon; Schmidt, Lone

    2017-01-01

    We compared the psychometric properties of COMPI Fertility Problem Stress Scales, Fertility Problem Inventory, and Fertility Quality of Life Tool in 293 patients enrolled for assisted reproductive technology. COMPI Fertility Problem Stress Scales and Fertility Problem Inventory subscales presented...

  20. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... or not – were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women initiation were 9338€ and 15 040€ for women ≥35 years. Conclusion. The public costs for live births after conception with medically assisted reproduction treatment are relatively modest. The results can be generalized...... hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Methods. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics...

  1. Prenatal testing among women pregnant after assisted reproductive techniques in Denmark 1995-2000: a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, A.C.; Loft, A.; Pinborg, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women pregnant after assisted reproductive techniques (ART) are generally older than women with spontaneously conceived pregnancies, and are consequently more likely to carry a child affected by a chromosomal disorder. Furthermore, a significantly increased rate of chromosomal...

  2. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J; Ravelli, Anita C J

    2015-08-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harper, J.C.; Geraedts, J.; Borry, P.; Cornel, M.C.; Dondorp, W.; Gianaroli, L.; Harton, G.; Milachich, T.; Kaariainen, H.; Liebaers, I.; Morris, M.; Sequeiros, J.; Sermon, K.; Shenfield, F.O.; Skirton, H.; Soini, S.; Spits, C.; Veiga, A.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Viville, S.; de Wert, G.; Macek, M.

    2013-01-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two

  4. [Analysis of factors associated with multiple pregnancies in assisted reproduction treatment complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Nieto, C A; Méndez-Lozano, D H; Fraustro-Ávila, M E; García-Martínez, M R; Soto-Cossio, L E; Basurto-Díaz, D; Flores-Mendoza, H

    2016-01-01

    Today, advances in technology provide the best success rates in the reproductive medicine field. One of the biggest concerns about it, is the high risk of achieving multiple pregnancies, which may carry greater health risks for both; the mother and fetuses. Besides that, multiple pregnancies are considered a complication or an adverse effect of assisted reproduction treatments. To compare the factors associated with multiple pregnancy in patients who underwent complex assisted reproduction techniques. A retrospective and transversal case control study was rolled to compare the factors associated with multiple pregnancy rates, these results were correlated using a logistic regression model. a total of 1063 cases were reviewed, we obtained a pregnancy rate of 35.9%, and a multiple pregnancy rate of 31.5%. We found positive statistical association between patient age, total number of oocytes obtained, total embryos transferred, total vitrified embryos per cycle, total serum cuantitative B-GCH level, endometrial thickness in milimeters, and the Honest of a multiple pregnancy. In the logistic regression model, we found statistical association between the number of embryos transferred, number of embryos obtained, embryo quality, total vitrified embryos and the risk for multiple pregnancies. The total number of embryos transferred in a cycle of a complex assisted reproduction, is the most important factor for the onset of multiple pregnancies. The age of patients, the number of oocytes, total number of embryos obtained, the number of embryos transferred, the quality of embryos transferred and the number of frozen embryos per cycle, correlate significantly with more risk for multiple pregnancies.

  5. Should HCV discordant couples with a seropositive male partner be treated with assisted reproduction techniques (ART)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasi, Valeria; Oneta, Monica; Parrilla, Bina; Cetin, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The debate on HCV discordant couples requiring assisted reproduction is still open today, and specific guidelines have not yet been established on whether or not physicians should treat HCV discordant couples who require ART. We studied the results of our reproductive assistance with sperm washing in HCV discordant couples, all treated in a single center, including the serological status of mothers and babies, and the outcome of the pregnancies. Prospective study conducted between January 2008 and December 2010 in our Reproductive Center in Sacco Hospital, University of Milan. Thirty-five HCV serodiscordant infertile couples with an HCV viremic positive male partner were enrolled. All of them completed the immuno-virological and fertility triage, and were treated according to our clinical protocols. Forty-seven superovulation and IUI and 38 second-level ART procedures are reported. The pregnancy rates for IUI and ICSI are similar to those reported by the Italian ART register. All the 85 sperm samples were treated with sperm washing technique to reduce HCV in semen and the possible risk of transmission. We did not observe any preterm delivery or negative perinatal outcome. No mothers or babies are infected by HCV. This is the biggest prospective study conducted in a single center involving HCV discordant infertile couples in an ART program. Although sexual transmission of HCV is very low, in subfertile or infertile couples sperm washing should be used to treat HCV positive semen before ART. We suggest that it is not necessary to perform nested PCR to detect HCV RNA in the final swim-up. Since the presence of HCV in semen implies a possible risk of nosocomial contamination, safety regulations must be strictly applied in assisted reproduction laboratories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and molecular analyses of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: Comparison between spontaneous conception and assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jair; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Fernández, García-Moya; Segovia, Mabel; Perandones, Claudia; Pérez Jurado, Luis A; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario; Arias, Pedro; Gordo, Gema; Dapía, Irene; Mena, Rocío; Palomares, María; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Nevado, Julián; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Vallespín, Elena; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by an excessive prenatal and postnatal growth, macrosomia, macroglossia, and hemihyperplasia. The molecular basis of this syndrome is complex and heterogeneous, involving genes located at 11p15.5. BWS is correlated with assisted reproductive techniques. BWS in individuals born following assisted reproductive techniques has been found to occur four to nine times higher compared to children with to BWS born after spontaneous conception. Here, we report a series of 187 patients with to BWS born either after assisted reproductive techniques or conceived naturally. Eighty-eight percent of BWS patients born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR in comparison with 49% for patients with BWS conceived naturally. None of the patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypermethylation of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR, neither CDKN1 C mutations nor patUPD11. We did not find differences in the frequency of multi-locus imprinting disturbances between groups. Patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had an increased frequency of advanced bone age, congenital heart disease, and decreased frequency of earlobe anomalies but these differences may be explained by the different molecular background compared to those with BWS and spontaneous fertilization. We conclude there is a correlation of the molecular etiology of BWS with the type of conception. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Public opinion regarding utilization of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Divya K; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S; Correia, Katharine F; Barton, Sara E; Missmer, Stacey A

    2013-11-01

    There have been calls to restrict access to fertility treatment in women above a certain body mass index (BMI). It is important to consider public expectations before formulating policy. The study objective was to assess public opinion regarding provision of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to obese (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) women in the United States. The study was conducted through an Internet-based survey of U.S. residents ages 18-75. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression to describe predictors of response based on demographic characteristics. Of the 1049 respondents, 60.7% support the use of ART in obese women. Adjusting for age and gender, the odds of support were over twice as high in participants with BMI>40 kg/m(2) as in normal-weight respondents (OR=2.87, 95% CI=1.28-6.44). Fifty-five percent of participants supported a BMI limit for access to ART. Both increasing education (p-value=0.02) and BMI (p-value=0.01) were inversely associated with support of a BMI limit. Individuals who had themselves used ART were also less likely (OR=0.27, 95% CI=0.07--0.99) to support a BMI limit. In an Internet-based survey, participants who are in favor of ART are likely to support its use among obese women. More than 50% of these respondents also support implementation of a BMI limit for access to these services.

  8. Psychological adjustment in adolescents conceived by assisted reproduction techniques: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioi, Elena Cristiana; Golombok, Susan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adolescence is a transitional time for identity formation and relationships with parents. While people born through assisted reproduction techniques (ART) appear to be well adjusted in childhood, it is unclear whether these findings carry into adolescence, and whether diverse ART have different psychological outcomes. This review summarizes what is known about the psychological adjustment and family relationships of the growing number of children born through ART who are reaching adolescence. METHODS The Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO and Scopus databases were searched systematically for peer reviewed papers focusing on adolescent psychological adjustment and parent–adolescent relationships in families created by ART. Key search inclusion criteria included all papers published in English relating to adolescents aged between 11 and 18 years. RESULTS Seventeen publications with varied methodologies were identified by this review. Only papers relating to in vitro fertilization (IVF), egg donation and donor insemination were identified. Results were categorized according to ART that used the parents' own gametes (IVF) and those that involved reproductive donation (egg donation, and donor insemination). Compared with naturally conceived adolescents and standardized normative samples, adolescents born through all ARTs seemed to be equally well adjusted, and to have positive parent–adolescent relationships. Some differences were however identified based on the type of ART used. In particular, the sex of the parent and child, along with age and process of disclosure of the adolescent's conception were identified as key mediators of parent–adolescent relationships in families created by donor insemination. CONCLUSIONS The studies in this review indicate that children born through ART have positive parent–adolescent relationships and are well adjusted, with some slight differences based on different ART. The generalizability of findings may be limited

  9. Assisted reproductive technologies in Latin America: the Latin American Registry, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Musri, Carolina; do Carmo Borges de Souza, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Multinational data on assisted reproduction technologies were collected from 155 institutions in 14 Latin American countries during 2012. Case-by-case data included 47,326 assisted reproduction technology cycles covering over 80% of cycles carried out in Latin America. Treatments included IVF, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), frozen embryo transfers, oocyte donations and fertility preservation. Embryo transfer and IVF-ICSI was carried out in 39% of women aged 35-39 years and 31% of women aged 40 years or over. Delivery rate per oocyte retrieval was 20.9% for ICSI and 26.5% for IVF. Multiple births comprised 20.6% twins and 1.2% triplets and over. In oocyte donations, twins reached 27.8% and triplets and over 2.4%. Pre-term births in singletons were 14%. The relative risk of prematurity increased by 4.30 (95% CI 4.1 to 4.6) in twins and 43.8 (95% CI 28.5 to 67.4) in triplets and higher. Perinatal mortality increased from 25.2 per thousand in singletons to 44.4 in twins and 80.7 in triplets and over. Elective single embryo transfer was carried out in only 1.4%, of cycles, with a delivery rate of 30% in women 34 years or younger, and should be considered the way forward provided access is facilitated with public funding. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Zinc protects sperm from being damaged by reactive oxygen species in assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinxiang; Wu, Shiqiang; Xie, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhengyao; Wu, Ruiyun; Cai, Junfeng; Luo, Xiangmin; Huang, Suzhen; You, Liuxia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of zinc on hydrogen peroxide-induced sperm damage in assisted reproduction techniques. First, sperms were selected from semen samples of 20 healthy men prepared by density gradient centrifugation. Selected sperm were treated with either 0.001% H(2)O(2), 12.5 nM ZnCL(2), 0.001% H(2)O(2) + 12.5 nM ZnCL(2) or 0.9% NaCl(2) (control). After this treatment, the motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation of sperms in each group were analysed by Goodline sperm detection system, optical microscopy and sperm DNA fragmentation assay. Poorer motility, vitality, membrane integrity and more DNA damage were found in sperms treated by H(2)O(2), compared with control. When sperms were treated with both H(2)O(2) and zinc, however, all indicators were improved compared with H(2)O(2) alone. There was a close association between oxidative stimulation and sperm injury; zinc could inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced damage of sperm in assisted reproductive technology. However, the presence of zinc in culture medium can decrease the sperm quality without addition of peroxide. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assisted reproductive techniques after fertility-sparing treatments in gynaecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapardiel, Ignacio; Cruz, Maria; Diestro, Maria D; Requena, Antonio; Garcia-Velasco, Juan A

    2016-04-01

    The trend toward late childbearing has made fertility preservation a major issue for women who face gynecological cancer. New techniques in assisted reproductive medicine enable conception after primary treatment of these cancers. Here, we aimed to review the efficacy and safety of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) after fertility-preserving treatment of gynaecological cancers. We conducted a systematic literature review of both prospective and retrospective studies in the PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL and SciSearch databases. In the retrieved studies, we evaluated live births, clinical pregnancies, overall survival and disease-free survival. We identified many prospective and retrospective studies on this topic, but no relevant randomized clinical trials. Fertility-sparing treatments with safe oncological outcomes are feasible in endometrial, cervical and ovarian cancer cases. After cancer treatment, ART seem safe and show variable obstetrical outcomes. After fertility-preserving treatment for gynaecological cancers, ART can enable pregnancy to be achieved with apparent oncological safety. The success of such procedures should directly impact clinical practice and management of those patients who require fertility-sparing treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Survey assessing obesity policies for assisted reproductive technology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Leah; Sueldo, Carolina; Engmann, Lawrence; Nulsen, John; Benadiva, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    To determine what assisted reproductive technologies (ART) policies, if any, have been instituted in response to an increasingly overweight and obese patient population. Cross-sectional survey. University-affiliated IVF clinic. Women in the overweight and obese body mass index (BMI) categories seeking ART treatments. Anonymous survey sent to medical directors at 395 IVF centers listed in Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology database. Assessment of recommendations, policies, and restrictions for patients who are overweight/obese and who desire treatment for infertility, including in IVF, IUI, and donor egg cycles. Seventy-seven anonymous responses were received (19.5% response rate): 64.9% of centers have a formal policy for obesity, and 84% of those have a maximum BMI at which they will perform IVF, while 38% of those have a maximum BMI for performing IUI; 64.6% of respondents reported anesthesia requirements/concerns as the primary criteria for patient exclusion. Other primary considerations included safety during ongoing pregnancy and ART outcomes. Centers that have policies regarding obesity and access to ART consider efficacy, procedural safety, safety in pregnancy, and overall health status. Policies vary widely. The patient's autonomy must be balanced with nonmaleficence and the avoidance of interventions that may be unsafe both immediately and long term. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of male overweight on semen quality and outcome of assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Thomsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well-documented that male overweight and obesity causes endocrine disorders that might diminish the male reproductive capacity; however, reports have been conflicting regarding the influence of male body mass index (BMI on semen quality and the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased male BMI affects sperm quality and the outcome of assisted reproduction in couples with an overweight or obese man and a non-obese partner. Data was prospectively collected from 612 infertile couples undergoing ART at a Danish fertility center. Self-reported information on paternal height and weight were recorded and BMI was calculated. The men were divided into four BMI categories: underweight BMI 30 kg m−2 . Conventional semen analysis was performed according to the World Health Organization guideline and sperm DNA integrity was analyzed by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA. No statistically significant effect of male BMI was seen on conventional semen parameters (sperm concentration, total sperm count, seminal volume and motility or on SCSA-results. Furthermore, the outcome of ART regarding fertilization rate, number of good quality embryos (GQE , implantation and pregnancy outcome was not influenced by the increasing male BMI.

  14. The impact of male overweight on semen quality and outcome of assisted reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Lise; Humaidan, Peter; Bungum, Leif; Bungum, Mona

    2014-01-01

    It is well-documented that male overweight and obesity causes endocrine disorders that might diminish the male reproductive capacity; however, reports have been conflicting regarding the influence of male body mass index (BMI) on semen quality and the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased male BMI affects sperm quality and the outcome of assisted reproduction in couples with an overweight or obese man and a non-obese partner. Data was prospectively collected from 612 infertile couples undergoing ART at a Danish fertility center. Self-reported information on paternal height and weight were recorded and BMI was calculated. The men were divided into four BMI categories: underweight BMI obese BMI > 30 kg m−2. Conventional semen analysis was performed according to the World Health Organization guideline and sperm DNA integrity was analyzed by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). No statistically significant effect of male BMI was seen on conventional semen parameters (sperm concentration, total sperm count, seminal volume and motility) or on SCSA-results. Furthermore, the outcome of ART regarding fertilization rate, number of good quality embryos (GQE), implantation and pregnancy outcome was not influenced by the increasing male BMI. PMID:24759576

  15. "It just alienated us": a case study to explore the impact of assisted reproductive technology on family relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kathleen; Jackson, Debra; Rudge, Trudy

    2007-01-01

    New reproductive technologies have the capacity to impact on both personal and healthcare relationships. This article utilizes a case study approach to unpack experiences of one couple who encountered immense and unforeseen difficulties as a result of treatment with assisted reproductive technology. Findings of this case reveal both difficulties and breaches in obtaining informed consent and the consequences these breaches have on relationships. Comprehensive information contributes to positive relationships between patients and healthcare providers. Maintaining supportive relationships between all parties concerned with assisted reproductive technology services is essential, as rifts in these relationships can be devastating and long-lasting.

  16. Can Male Fertility Be Improved Prior to Assisted Reproduction through The Control of Uncommonly Considered Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M.Campagne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Male factor infertility or subfertility is responsible for up to 50% of infertility cases. A considerablebody of recent studies indicates that lifestyle as well as environmental and psychological factorscan negatively affect male fertility, more than previously thought. These negative effects have beenshown in many cases to be reversible. This review aims to provide a rationale for early clinicalattention to these factors and presents a non-exhaustive evidence-based collection of primaryrelevant conditions and recommendations, specifically with a view to making first line diagnosticsand recommendations. The presently available evidence suggests that considering the high cost,success rates, and possible side effects of assisted reproduction techniques (ART, such as in vitrofertilization (IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, early efforts to improve malefertility appear to be an attainable and worthwhile primary goal.A series of searches was conducted of Medline, Cochrane and related databases from November14th, 2010 to January 26th, 2012 with the following keywords: male, fertility, infertility, spermdefects, IVF, ICSI, healthy habits, and lifestyle. Subsequent follow-up searches were performed forupcoming links. The total number of studies contemplated were 1265; of these, 296 studies werereviewed with criteria of relevance; the date of study or review; study sample size and study type;and publishing journal impact status. Data were abstracted based upon probable general clinicalrelevancy and use. Only a selection of the references has been reflected here because of spacelimitations. The main results obtained were evidence-supported indications as to the other causes ofmale infertility, their early detection, and treatment.

  17. Recent developments in genetics and medically assisted reproduction: from research to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J C; Aittomäki, K; Borry, P; Cornel, M C; de Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Geraedts, J; Gianaroli, L; Ketterson, K; Liebaers, I; Lundin, K; Mertes, H; Morris, M; Pennings, G; Sermon, K; Spits, C; Soini, S; van Montfoort, A P A; Veiga, A; Vermeesch, J R; Viville, S; Macek, M

    2018-01-01

    Two leading European professional societies, the European Society of Human Genetics and the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology, have worked together since 2004 to evaluate the impact of fast research advances at the interface of assisted reproduction and genetics, including their application into clinical practice. In September 2016, the expert panel met for the third time. The topics discussed highlighted important issues covering the impacts of expanded carrier screening, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, voiding of the presumed anonymity of gamete donors by advanced genetic testing, advances in the research of genetic causes underlying male and female infertility, utilisation of massively parallel sequencing in preimplantation genetic testing and non-invasive prenatal screening, mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes, and additionally, issues related to cross-generational epigenetic inheritance following IVF and germline genome editing. The resulting paper represents a consensus of both professional societies involved.

  18. The role of steroid hormone supplementation in non-assisted reproductive technology treatments for unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaas, Alexander M; Hansen, Karl R

    2016-12-01

    Fertility treatment strategies are evolving, with a more rapid transition to assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments after unsuccessful non-ART treatments. This trend increases the potential importance of adjuvant treatments in non-ART cycles, such as steroid hormone supplementation. It has been established that success rates of ART treatments are increased with the use of luteal support with progesterone. In the setting of non-ART cycles, however, the evidence is less clear, and clinical practices vary widely between providers and clinics. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of the current evidence for the use of steroid hormone supplementation, including progesterone for luteal support, estrogens, androgens, and mineralocorticoids, in the setting of non-ART treatments for ovulatory women. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intrauterine demise due to congenital mesoblastic nephroma in a fetus conceived by assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, Monique E; Shapiro, Svetlana; Young, Lawrence; Carr, Stephen R; Gundogan, Fusun

    2011-03-01

    To report a case of antenatally diagnosed congenital mesoblastic nephroma in an assisted reproductive technology (ART) conception. Case report. Tertiary care university-affiliated hospital. Fetus of 26-weeks' gestation with antenatally diagnosed large abdominal tumor. ART with transfer of cryopreserved embryo. Postmortem examination. Examination revealed a congenital mesoblastic nephroma, mixed classic and cellular type, with marked intratumoral hemorrhage and associated hydrops. The marked fetal erythroblastosis was suggestive of fetal response to pronounced anemia. Intrauterine demise is attributed to fetal intratumoral hemorrhage and early nonimmune hydrops secondary to a large congenital mesoblastic nephroma. This is the third reported case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma in an ART conception. Whether the association between mesoblastic nephroma and ART is coincidental or causative remains to be determined. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assisted reproductive technology and the risk of preterm birth among primiparas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunietz, Galit Levi; Holzman, Claudia; McKane, Patricia; Li, Chenxi; Boulet, Sheree L; Todem, David; Kissin, Dmitry M; Copeland, Glenn; Bernson, Dana; Sappenfield, William M; Diamond, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the risk of preterm birth among liveborn singletons to primiparas who conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) using four mutually exclusive categories of infertility (female infertility only, male infertility only, female and male infertility, and unexplained infertility) and to examine preterm birth risk along the gestational age continuum. Retrospective cohort study. Not applicable. Singletons born to primiparas who conceived with or without ART. None. Preterm (risk for preterm birth, even when only the male partner had been diagnosed with infertility. The risk of preterm birth for ART-conceived infants whose mothers were diagnosed with infertility included the earliest deliveries. Copyright © 2015 American Society for ReproductiveMedicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Processing of semen by density gradient centrifugation selects spermatozoa with longer telomeres for assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingling; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Feifei; Zhao, Wanli; Dai, Shanjun; Liu, Jinhao; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Xin, Hang; Niu, Wenbing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-07-01

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes contain specialized chromatin structures called telomeres, the length of which plays a key role in early human embryonic development. Although the effect of sperm preparation techniques on major sperm characteristics, such as concentration, motility and morphology have been previously documented, the possible status of telomere length and its relation with sperm preparation techniques is not well-known for humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of density gradient centrifugation in the selection of spermatozoa with longer telomeres for use in assisted reproduction techniques in 105 samples before and after sperm processing. After density gradient centrifugation, the average telomere length of the sperm was significantly longer (6.51 ± 2.54 versus 5.16 ± 2.29, P technique for selection of sperm with longer telomeres. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring specific discrepancies in global health care justice, I will point to the need for delivery doctors in the developing world to provide basic assistance to women who hazard many pregnancies as a priority before offering assisted reproduction to women in the developed world. The wide disparities between maternal health in the developing world and elective fertility treatments in the developed world are clearly unjust within Catholic social teachings. I conclude this article by offering policy suggestions for moving closer to health care justice via doctor distribution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Effect of overweight on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology in infertile women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čedíková, M; Babuška, V; Lhotská, P; Lošan, P; Zech, N H; Králíčková, M; Novotný, Z

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and overweight negatively affect the ability of women to conceive naturally, contributes to the increased incidence of obstetric complications during pregnancy and affect the outcome of assisted reproduction techniques (ART). The aim of our study was to compare the results of treatment of infertilityin a group of infertile women undergoing ART, depending on the values of BMI and changes in levels of selected hormones and markers of oxidative stress in follicular fluid. Retrospective comparative study. Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague; Institute of Reproductive Medicine and Endocrinology, IVF Centers - Prof. Zech, Plzeň. The studied group consisted of 44 women (mean age of 31.9 years, SD = 4.35) treated for infertility at the Institute of Reproductive Medicine and Endocrinology - IVF Centers Prof. Zech. Women were divided into 2 groups according to BMI (37 women had normal BMI, 7 women were overweight). Prolactin, free T3 and T4 hormone, homocysteine, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, total antioxidant capacity and total protein were analyzed in the follicular fluid both groups. Only blood free samples were studied after pooling of all FF samples of each patient. We observed significantly lower levels of glutathion peroxidase in the group of overweight women(p = 0.0044). The pregnancy success rate with women with normal BMI and overweight women did not differ significantly from each other (p = 0.4430). Our study did not confirm the negative effect of obesity on the results of treatment of infertility, specifical-ly pregnancy rate in a group of infertile women undergoing treatment with assisted reproduction techniques.

  4. Use of pig oocytes for training new professionals in human assisted reproduction laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Daniela Paes de Almeida Ferreira; Pasqualotto, Fábio Firmbach; Madaschi, Camila; Bonetti, Tatiana Carvalho de Souza; Rodrigues, Débora; Iaconelli, Assumpto; Borges, Edson

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate whether swine oocytes are useful for training new technicians in a human reproduction laboratory. Prospective study. Graduate school in assisted reproductive techniques (ART) in Brazil. Students in a human reproduction laboratory. Medium-sized follicles were aspirated from prepubertal gilts' ovaries and collected at a slaughterhouse. Oocytes were retrieved from the follicular fluid. Twenty-one students trained during four periods of 20 hours each were evaluated as to their ability to perform micromanipulation and were compared with a group of well-trained professionals (control group). Students' ability in oocyte retrieval, oocyte manipulation, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection during and after the 80 hours of training. Students were able to retrieve, on average, 23.8 oocytes per ovary. Their micromanipulation skills substantially increased, reaching an oocyte retrieval rate of 77.2%, compared with 84.9% in the control group after the training period. Although the oocyte damage rate gradually decreased, from 52.0% after 20 hours of training to 5.4% after 80 hours, these figures were still above the control group oocyte damage rate by 0.3%, which was a statistically significant level. Regarding intracytoplasmic sperm injection, within 40 hours, no students were able to perform a single injection; and by the end of 80 hours, they achieved an average of 4.0 oocytes per hour, whereas the control group injected 20.6 oocytes per hour, a statistically significant difference. Swine ovaries may be a useful tool in the spectrum of training techniques for unskilled assisted reproductive techniques laboratory professionals.

  5. Outcome of assisted reproduction in women with congenital uterine anomalies: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, M; Richardson, A; Asif, S; Polanski, L; Parris-Larkin, M; Chandler, J; Fogg, L; Jassal, P; Thornton, J G; Raine-Fenning, N J

    2018-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies, including arcuate uterus, and their effect on reproductive outcome in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction. Consecutive women referred for subfertility between May 2009 and November 2015 who underwent assisted reproduction were included in the study. As part of the initial assessment, each woman underwent three-dimensional transvaginal sonography. Uterine morphology was classified using the modified American Fertility Society (AFS) classification of congenital uterine anomalies proposed by Salim et al. If the external contour of the uterus was uniformly convex or had an indentation of Reproductive outcomes, including live birth, clinical pregnancy and preterm birth, were compared between women with a normal uterus and those with a congenital uterine anomaly. Subgroup analysis by type of uterine morphology and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, levels of anti-Müllerian hormone, antral follicle count and number and day of embryo transfer were performed. A total of 2375 women were included in the study, of whom 1943 (81.8%) had a normal uterus and 432 (18.2%) had a congenital uterine anomaly. The most common anomalies were arcuate (n = 387 (16.3%)) and subseptate (n = 16 (0.7%)) uterus. The rate of live birth was similar between women with a uterine anomaly and those with a normal uterus (35% vs 37%; P = 0.47). The rates of clinical pregnancy, mode of delivery and sex of the newborn were also similar between the two groups. Preterm birth before 37 weeks' gestation was more common in women with uterine anomalies than in controls (22% vs 14%, respectively; P = 0.03). Subgroup analysis by type of anomaly showed no difference in the incidence of live birth and clinical pregnancy for women with an arcuate uterus, but indicated worse pregnancy outcome in women with other major anomalies (P = 0.042 and 0.048, respectively). Congenital uterine anomalies as a whole, when

  6. Embryo transfer practices in the United States: a survey of clinics registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, Emily S; Ryan, Ginny L; Levens, Eric D; Cunningham, Alexandra F; Macones, George A; Carson, Kenneth R; Beltsos, Angeline N; Odem, Randall R

    2010-09-01

    To gain a better understanding of factors influencing clinicians' embryo transfer practices. Cross-sectional survey. Web-based survey conducted in December 2008 of individuals practicing IVF in centers registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). None. None. Prevalence of clinicians reporting following embryo transfer guidelines recommended by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), prevalence among these clinicians to deviate from ASRM guidelines in commonly encountered clinical scenarios, and practice patterns related to single embryo transfer. Six percent of respondents reported following their own, independent guidelines for the number of embryos to transfer after IVF. Of the 94% of respondents who reported routinely following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, 52% would deviate from these guidelines for patient request, 51% for cycles involving the transfer of frozen embryos, and 70% for patients with previously failed IVF cycles. All respondents reported routinely discussing the risks of multiple gestations associated with standard embryo transfer practices, whereas only 34% reported routinely discussing single embryo transfer with all patients. Although the majority of clinicians responding to our survey reported following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, at least half would deviate from these guidelines in a number of different situations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Trends over time in congenital malformations in live-born children conceived after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Bergh, Christina; Skjaerven, Rolv

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Children born after assisted reproductive technology (ART), particularly singletons, have been shown to have an increased risk of congenital malformations compared with children born after spontaneous conception. We wished to study if there has been a change in the risk of major...... spontaneous conception during the study period. The relative risk of being born with a major congenital malformation between all ART children and spontaneous conception children remained similar through all four time periods, p=0.39. However, we found that over time the number of children diagnosed...

  8. Association between ovarian stimulators with or without intrauterine insemination, and assisted reproductive technologies on multiple births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, Sonia; Sheehy, Odile; Monnier, Patricia; Bissonnette, François; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Fraser, William; Bérard, Anick

    2015-10-01

    We sought to quantify the risk of multiple births associated with the use of different modalities of medically assisted reproduction. We conducted a case-control study using a birth cohort from 2006 through 2009. This cohort was built with the linkage of data obtained by a self-administered questionnaire and medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, birth, and death databases in Quebec. Cases were pregnancies resulting in multiple live births (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision/International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes). Each case was matched, on maternal age and year of delivery, with 3 singleton pregnancies (controls) randomly selected among all Quebec singleton pregnancies. Data on the use of different fertility treatments were collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for body mass index, number of previous live births, ethnicity, family income, place of residence, marital status, subfertility, reduction of embryos, diabetes, metformin treatment, folic acid supplementation, and lifestyle factors, were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs). We evaluated the associations between each type of fertility treatment (ovarian stimulators used alone, intrauterine insemination [IUI] used with ovarian stimulation, and assisted reproductive technologies [ART]) and the risk of multiple births. A total of 1407 cases of multiple births and 3580 controls were analyzed. More than half of multiple births following medically assisted reproduction (53.6%) occurred among women having used ovarian stimulation with or without IUI. The use of ovarian stimulators alone and IUI with ovarian stimulation increase the risk of multiple births (adjusted OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 3.2-6.4; and adjusted OR, 9.32; 95% CI, 5.60-15.50, respectively) compared to spontaneous conception. The use of invasive ART was associated with a greatly increased risk of multiple births

  9. Risk disparities in the globalisation of assisted reproductive technology: the case of Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Ok

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the disparities in risks associated with biomedical technology focusing on the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). ART among biomedical technologies transferred to Asia is a representative case that reveals in its clinical use and related scientific research the global politics of technology. This study notes the global politics at work in the recognition of and reaction to such risks. While many Asian countries aggressively pursue technological development, weak legislative and administrative regulations have created various problems and controversial cases. This study asserts that risks associated with technology are characterised as social facts not natural ones or mere 'side effects', since technological development and risk are closely intertwined.

  10. Low birth weight: Is it related to assisted reproductive technology or underlying infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondapalli, Laxmi A.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Since 1978, we have witnessed a successful evolution of assisted reproductive technology (ART), with improvement of the pregnancy rates and a growing demand. However, in recent years, there has been increasing concern regarding its safety due to the potential health impact on its infants. The raise of the developmental origins of adult disease has positioned low birth weight (LBW) as a significant health issue. Despite multiple studies have associated ART with LBW, the etiology of this association remains largely unknown. This paper reviews the potential association between different components of ART and infertility with LBW, while acknowledging the limitations to interpretation of the existing literature. PMID:23375144

  11. Male cytogenetic evaluation prior to assisted reproduction procedures performed in Mar del Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, María N; Miranda, Lucía A López; Gil, Eduardo Daniel; Zanier, Germán Justo; Iriarte, Pedro Fernández; Zanier, Justo H Mario; Coco, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    This paper aimed to estimate the frequency of occurrence and the types of chromosomal abnormalities found in 141 infertile men with abnormal semen parameters. the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities were determined with male mitotic karyotype analysis from peripheral blood through chromosome banding techniques before assisted reproduction procedures. In this series of 141 infertile men, 19 (13%) had chromosomal anomalies and 35 (25%) had polymorphic variants. The main chromosome abnormalities were reciprocal translocations and marker chromosomes in mosaic. These results stress the relevance of cytogenetic studies for infertile males as a diagnostic tool and a valuable input in genetic counseling.

  12. Cumulus cell mitochondrial activity in relation to body mass index in women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria K. Gorshinova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most studies have considered the negative influence of obesity on fertility in both genders. In the present study, we assessed mitochondrial activity expressed as the mitochondrial potential index (MPI in cumulus cells from obese women and women with a normal body mass index (BMI during assisted reproductive therapy. The results revealed a significant reduction of MPI with increased body mass. The lower MPI levels in cumulus cells from obese women may reflect mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, which can affect the cumulus-oocyte complex and have an impact on oocyte development.

  13. What's the message? A content analysis of newspaper articles about assisted reproductive technology from 2005 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L; Tulandi, T; Whitley, R; Constantinescu, T; Ells, C; Zelkowitz, P

    2014-06-01

    Infertility and its treatment is the subject of considerable media coverage. In order to evaluate the representation of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in the popular media, we conducted a content analysis of North American newspaper articles. We also explored whether different themes emerged in relation to the implementation of public funding for ART in Quebec, Canada. Print and online newspaper articles from 2005 to 2011 were retrieved using the terms "in-vitro fertilization", "infertility treatment", "assisted reproductive technology", and "IVF treatment". Totally, 719 newspaper articles met inclusion criteria and were coded according to predetermined categories. Risks (63%) and ethical issues (61%) related to ART were most commonly featured. Quebec-based articles were mostly concerned with the politics and financial issues governing ART, and were less likely to report the risks and emotional impact of ART than other North American press. Newspapers tended to emphasize extreme scenarios as well as controversial cases that may not represent the everyday realities of ART. Changes in public policy may also engender shifts in the tone and content of media reports. It is important to establish resources that can inform the public as well as prospective infertility patients about their condition and potential treatment options.

  14. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida; Forman, Julie L; Hougaard, Charlotte Ø; Schmidt, Lone

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results as to whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed that women in ART treatment, with no live birth yet, had a lower risk of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth. Women had the highest risk of unipolar depression 0-42 days after a live birth (adjusted hazard ratio 5.08, 95% CI 3.11-8.29) compared with women with no live birth. A lower, but still increased, risk of unipolar depression, was found in women 43 days to 1 year and >1 year after a live birth compared with women with no live birth yet. Motherhood is an important trigger of unipolar depression in women conceiving after ART treatment. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Microbial colonization of follicular fluid: alterations in cytokine expression and adverse assisted reproduction technology outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Elise S; Allan, John A; Cunningham, Kelly; Mengersen, Kerrie; Allan, Janet M; Launchbury, Tara; Beagley, Kenneth; Knox, Christine L

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have measured cytokines expressed within follicular fluid and compared the profiles with the aetiology of infertility and/or successful or unsuccessful assisted reproduction technology (ART) outcomes. In this study, 71 paired follicular fluid and vaginal secretions collected from ART patients were cultured to detect microorganisms and tested for the presence of cytokines. Patient specimens were selected for assay based on two criteria: whether the follicular fluid specimen was colonized (with microorganisms prior to oocyte retrieval) or contaminated by vaginal flora and; the aetiology of infertility. Patients included fertile women (with infertile male partners; n = 18), women with endometriosis (n = 16) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, n = 14), or couples with a history of genital tract infection (n = 9) or idiopathic infertility (n = 14). Microorganisms and cytokines were detected within all tested specimens. Colonizing microorganisms in follicular fluid were associated with: decreased fertilization rates for fertile women (P = 0.005), women with endometriosis (P = 0.0002) or PCOS (P = 0.002) compared with women whose follicular fluid was contaminated at the time of oocyte retrieval and with decreased pregnancy rates for couples with idiopathic infertility (P = 0.001). A single cytokine was discriminatory for women with an idiopathic aetiology of infertility (follicular fluid interleukin (IL)-18). Unique cytokine profiles were also associated with successful fertilization (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18 and vascular endothelial growth factor). Follicular fluid is not sterile. Microorganisms colonizing follicular fluid and the ensuing cytokine response could be a further as yet unrecognized cause and/or predictor of adverse ART outcomes and infertility.

  16. Births resulting from assisted reproductive technology: comparing birth certificate and National ART Surveillance System Data, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Marie E; Boulet, Sheree; Martin, Joyce A; Kissin, Dmitry

    2014-12-10

    This report compares data on births resulting from assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures from 2011 birth certificates with data from the 2011 National ART Surveillance System (NASS) among the subset of jurisdictions that adopted the 2003 revised birth certificate as of January 1, 2011, with information on ART. Birth certificate data are based on 100% of births registered in 27 states and the District of Columbia. NASS data included all ART cycles initiated in 2010 or 2011 for which a live birth in 2011 was reported. The same reporting area was used for both data sources and represents 67% of all births in the United States in 2011. A ratio was computed by dividing the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures for NASS data by the percentage for birth certificate data. A ratio of 1.0 represents equivalent levels of reporting. Because this reporting area is not a random sample of births, the results are not generalizable to the United States as a whole. Overall, the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures was 2.06 times higher for NASS data (1.44%) compared with birth certificate data (0.70%). The ratio for each jurisdiction varied from 1.04 for Utah and Wisconsin to 7.50 for Florida. Higher-risk groups had more consistent reporting. between data sources [e.g., triplet or higher-order multiples (1.36) compared with singletons (2.11)]. Births resulting from ART procedures appear to be underreported on the birth certificate; however, the magnitude of underreporting varied by jurisdiction and maternal-infant health characteristics.

  17. Possible risk for cancer among children born following assisted reproductive technology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner-Geva, Liat; Boyko, Valentina; Ehrlich, Shelley; Mashiach, Shlomo; Hourvitz, Ariel; Haas, Jigal; Margalioth, Ehud; Levran, David; Calderon, Ilan; Orvieto, Raoul; Ellenbogen, Adrian; Meyerovitch, Joseph; Ron-El, Raphael; Farhi, Adel

    2017-04-01

    Among children conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART), increased risk of adverse birth outcomes has been observed, including multiple births, preterm births, and congenital malformations. Regarding cancer among ART-conceived children, findings are discrepant. This is a historical cohort of 9,042 ART-conceived children and 211,763 spontaneously conceived (SC) children born from 1997 through 2004. The median duration of follow-up was 10.6 years (interquartile range 9.0-12.3) in the ART group and 9.3 years (interquartile range 8.0-10.6) in the SC group. The cohort database was linked with the Israel National Cancer Registry updated until December 31, 2011 using each child's personal identification number. Twenty-one cases of cancer were identified in the ART group (2.2 per 10,000 person-years), as compared to 361 cancer cases in the SC group (1.8 per 10,000 person-years). The relative risk (RR) for overall cancer in the ART group compared to the SC group adjusted for maternal characteristics was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.75). ART children had a significantly increased risk for specific cancers, although based on small number of cases, including two cases of retinoblastoma (RR 6.18, 95% CI 1.22-31.2), as well as four cases of renal tumors (RR 3.25, 95% CI 1.67-6.32). A statistically significant increased risk for two pediatric cancers was found. However, for overall types of cancer the risk estimate was elevated but not statistically significant. Further studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up time are warranted in order to either confirm or refute these findings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in patients undergoing assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, M; Gosili, R; Hosseini, R; Arabipoor, A; Ahmadi, J; Chehrazi, M

    2014-05-01

    To compare the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) between pregnancies conceived spontaneously and pregnancies conceived following assisted reproductive technology (ART). This cross-sectional study evaluated the medical records of 215 women who conceived spontaneously and 145 women who conceived following ART from September 2011 to October 2012. Exclusion criteria were: polycystic ovary syndrome, maternal age ≥40 years, family history of diabetes in first-degree relatives, pre-pregnancy diabetes, glucose intolerance treated with hypoglycaemic agent (e.g. metformin), history of GDM, history of stillbirth, recurrent miscarriage, history of baby with birth weight ≥4kg (macrosomia), parity >3, Cushing syndrome, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hypothyroidism. For better comparison of the incidence of GDM, the ART group was further subdivided into: (i) an in-vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) group (n=95); and (ii) an intrauterine insemination (IUI) group (n=50). The diagnosis of GDM was based on the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. The incidence of GDM was significantly higher in the IVF/ICSI and IUI groups (43% and 26%, respectively) compared with the spontaneous pregnancy group (10%). Age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and weight gain in pregnancy were similar among women with GDM in all three groups. In addition, the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was significantly higher in the IVF/ICSI group (21%) compared with the spontaneous pregnancy group (7%). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated four strong risk factors for GDM: age, BMI, mode of ART and progesterone use during pregnancy. This study indicated that the risk of GDM is two-fold higher in women with singleton pregnancies conceived following ART compared with women who conceived spontaneously. In addition, progesterone use during pregnancy was found to be an important risk factor for GDM. This subject requires further study

  19. Twins conceived using assisted reproduction: parent mental health, family relationships and child adjustment at middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kayla N; Koh, Bibiana D; Connor, Jennifer J; Koerner, Ascan F; Damario, Mark; Rueter, Martha A

    2014-10-10

    Compared with singletons, what is the parent mental health, parent-child and couple relationship satisfaction, and child adjustment of 6- to 12-year-old assisted reproduction technology (ART) twins and their families? There are no differences between 6- and 12-year-old ART twin and singleton families in parent mental health or family relationships; however, twins had significantly fewer behavior and attention problems than singletons in middle childhood. When ART twins are younger than 5 years old, parents have more mental health difficulties and poorer parent-child relationship quality, and no differences have been found in ART twin and singletons' psychosocial adjustment. However, studies have only examined the implications of ART twin status in families with infant and toddler aged children. A cross-sectional study of 300 6-12-year-old ART children (n = 124 twins and n = 176 singletons) from 206 families at a reproductive endocrinology clinic in the USA. Patients from one clinic with a child born between 1998 and 2004 were invited to participate in an online survey (82% recruitment rate). Participants provided information on each 6- to 12-year-old ART child in the family, and responded to questions on parent mental health, family relationships and child adjustment. There were no differences in parent mental health or family relationships in families with 6- to 12-year-old ART twins versus singletons. However, twins (M = 2.40, SE = 0.35) had significantly fewer behavior problems than singletons (M = 3.47, SE = 0.36; F(1, 201) = 4.54, b = 1.08, P family demographics are representative of US ART patients, patients are from one US clinic. Responses also are from one family member and may be subject to social desirability biases. Additionally, our data did not include identification of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Studies on infant and toddler ART twins suggest these families have parents with more mental health difficulties and lower parent-child relationship

  20. Maternal, perinatal and long-term outcomes after assisted reproductive techniques (ART): implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaulikar, Vikram Sinai; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam

    2013-09-01

    The use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) is on the rise throughout the world and the number of babies born as a result of ART has reached an estimated total of 5 million since the world's first, Louise Brown, was born in 1978. Data from many prospective and retrospective studies have suggested increased risks of adverse maternal, perinatal and long-term outcomes after ART compared to natural conception. Recent research suggests that underlying maternal factors rather than ART methods themselves play a significant role in causing such outcomes. Couples attempting ART need to be provided with accurate and reliable information on risks of adverse reproductive outcomes and reassured that absolute risks appear small. Clinicians need to remain vigilant about increased risk of pregnancy complications and formulate a plan of care for the woman, from periconception to the puerperium, which aims to prevent or minimise maternal and perinatal morbidity. This review attempts to summarise the available data on reproductive outcomes after ART and provide guidance to the obstetricians and primary care physicians about management of ART pregnancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes associated with underlying diagnosis with and without assisted reproductive technology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Luke, Barbara; Tobias, Michael; Gopal, Daksha; Hornstein, Mark D; Diop, Hafsatou

    2015-06-01

    To compare the risks for adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes by diagnoses with and without assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment to non-ART pregnancies in fertile women. Historical cohort of Massachusetts vital records linked to ART clinic data from Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Not applicable. Diagnoses included male factor (ART only), endometriosis, ovulation disorders, tubal (ART only), and reproductive inflammatory disorders (non-ART only). Pregnancies resulting in singleton and twin live births from 2004 to 2008 were linked to hospital discharges in women who had ART treatment (n = 3,689), women with no ART treatment in the current pregnancy (n = 4,098), and non-ART pregnancies in fertile women (n = 297,987). None. Risks of gestational diabetes, prenatal hospitalizations, prematurity, low birth weight, and small for gestational age were modeled using multivariate logistic regression with fertile deliveries as the reference group adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, chronic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and plurality (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). Risk of prenatal hospital admissions was increased for endometriosis (ART: 1.97, 1.38-2.80; non-ART: 3.34, 2.59-4.31), ovulation disorders (ART: 2.31, 1.81-2.96; non-ART: 2.56, 2.05-3.21), tubal factor (ART: 1.51, 1.14-2.01), and reproductive inflammation (non-ART: 2.79, 2.47-3.15). Gestational diabetes was increased for women with ovulation disorders (ART: 2.17, 1.72-2.73; non-ART: 1.94, 1.52-2.48). Preterm delivery (AORs, 1.24-1.93) and low birth weight (AORs, 1.27-1.60) were increased in all groups except in endometriosis with ART. The findings indicate substantial excess perinatal morbidities associated with underlying infertility-related diagnoses in both ART-treated and non-ART-treated women. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of varicocele surgery in the era of assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Chiles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of innovative techniques for addressing infertility has made for exciting times in the arena of andrology. The success of microTESE for retrieving sperm has enabled azoospermic men to have the opportunity to father biological children when it was previously impossible. The ability to offer a variety of assisted reproductive techniques that includes intracytoplasmic sperm injection has opened the door for couples with male factor infertility who were otherwise untreatable. With the multitude of options available to infertile couples, however, comes an unsurprising degree of controversy regarding what treatments should be offered and when. Complicating the picture is the question of if and when varicocele repair should be undertaken, and the financial implications of the treatment decisions that are made. The infertile couple with varicocele warrants careful consideration. The overall efficacy of varicocele repair as well as cost-effectiveness of repair compared to immediate microTESE in azoospermic men and assisted reproductive technology in men with suboptimal semen parameters will be reviewed.

  3. [Opinion survey on the use of assisted reproductive technologies applied to inhabitants of Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Florencia; Teitelbom, Berta; Russo, Moisés; Salas, Sofía P; Zegers Hochschild, Fernando

    2013-07-01

    Advances in reproductive medicine and the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have a great impact in the lives of people and the conformation of their families. To report the results of an opinion survey applied to inhabitants of Santiago, Chile about the use of ART to conceive. A survey was designed and applied to a random representative sample of 1.500 people between the ages of 18 and 65 in the 34 municipalities of Santiago. Eighty eight percent of respondents support the use of medical assistance to conceive children. Wide approval exists for the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) by heterosexual couples, even when not married (85.9%) and by single women (70.4%), by both mole and female participants of every socioeconomic level, age group and religious affiliation. Support decreases significantly when the use of IVF is considered for post-menopausal women (35.1 %) and by same-sex couples (26.6%). Results of this survey indicate that the majority of inhabitants in Santiago favor the use of ART, including IVF. This support decreases significantly for elderly women and homosexual couples.

  4. Are there optimal numbers of oocytes, spermatozoa and embryos in assisted reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milachich, Tanya; Shterev, Atanas

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this overview is to discuss the current information about the search for the optimum yield of gametes in assisted reproduction, as one of the major pillars of IVF success. The first topic is focused on the number of male gametes and the possible impact of some genetic traits on these parameters. The number of spermatozoa did not seem to be crucial when there is no severe male factor of infertility. Genetic testing prior to using those sperm cells is very important. Different methods were applied in order to elect the "best" spermatozoa according to specific indications. The next problem discussed is the importance of the number of oocytes collected. Several studies have agreed that "15 oocytes is the perfect number," as the number of mature oocytes is more important. However, if elective single embryo transfer is performed, the optimal number of oocytes will enable a proper embryo selection. The third problem discussed concerns fertility preservation. Many educational programs promote and encourage procreation at maternal ages between 20-35 years, since assisted reproduction is unable to fully overcome the effects of female aging and fertility loss after that age. It is also strongly recommended to ensure a reasonable number of cryopreserved mature oocytes, preferably in younger ages (<35), for which an average of two stimulation cycles are likely required. For embryo cryopreservation, the "freeze all" strategy suggests the vitrification of good embryos, therefore quality is prior to number and patient recruitment for this strategy should be performed cautiously.

  5. Cell and genetic predictors of human blastocyst hatching success in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrkasheva, Anastasiya G; Dolgushina, Nataliya V; Romanov, Andrey Yu; Burmenskaya, Olga V; Makarova, Nataliya P; Ibragimova, Espet O; Kalinina, Elena A; Sukhikh, Gennady T

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to identify cell and genetic predictors of human blastocyst hatching success in assisted reproduction programmes via a prospective case-control study. Blastocysts, donated by couples in assisted reproduction programmes were used. Hatching success assessment was performed after 144-146 h post-fertilization. The mRNA expression levels of cathepsin V (CTSV), GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) and human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit 3, 5, 7 and 8 (CGB) genes were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratio (OR) of hatching due to zona pellucida (ZP) thickness, oocyte and sperm quality, embryo quality and mRNA expression of CTSV, GATA3 and CGB genes in blastocysts was determined. From 62 blastocysts included in the study, 47 (75.8%) were unable to hatch spontaneously. The ZP thickening, and oocyte and sperm quality did not affect human blastocyst ability to hatch, except the combination of cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic oocyte dysmorphisms (OR = 1.25; 95% confidence interval = 1.08, 1.45). Hatching-capable blastocysts had higher Gardner scale grade and mRNA expression of CTSV, GATA3 and CGB genes than hatching-incapable blastocysts. The human blastocyst hatching success depends on the blastocyst Gardner grade, but not on ZP and gamete quality. Blastocyst development was regulated by CTSV, GATA3 and CGB gene expression.

  6. Fake it till you make it: Policymaking and assisted human reproduction in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Françoise; Downie, Jocelyn; Snow, Dave

    2014-06-01

    The Assisted Human Reproduction Act (AHR Act) came into effect in 2004. The AHR Act stipulates in s.12 that no reimbursement of expenditures incurred in the course of donating gametes, maintaining or transporting in vitro embryos, or providing surrogacy services is permitted, except in accordance with the regulations and with receipts. Ten years later, Health Canada still has not drafted the regulations governing reimbursement. Section 12 is therefore still not in force. Health Canada and others have asserted that there is a Health Canada policy on reimbursement and that reimbursement with receipts is legally permissible. We dispute the existence of such a policy and its legitimacy (if it exists). We also challenge the decision by Health Canada not to produce regulations and thereby make it possible for Parliament to bring s.12 into force. This intentional lack of action is worrisome on at least two fronts. First, it sidesteps the processes required for regulations and thereby ducks the Parliamentary oversight very deliberately built into the AHR Act. Second, it leaves Canadians who provide and who access assisted human reproduction uncertain about what is and is not permitted, and therefore fearful of, or at risk of, prosecution. We conclude that Health Canada should take the steps necessary to put regulations in front of Parliament so that Parliament will then be able to pass regulations and bring s.12 into force. Canadians should demand no less.

  7. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brittany J; Hilton, Tara N; Rivière, Raphaël N; Ferraro, Zachary M; Deonandan, Raywat; Walker, Mark C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved. A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical) were included in the review. There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal) complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old). This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a pregnancy with a similar risk profile to that of her younger counterparts when using donated oocytes.

  8. Neonatal outcome following new assisted reproductive technology regulations in Turkey - a nationwide multicenter point prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultursay, Nilgun; Yalaz, Mehmet; Koroglu, Ozge Altun

    2015-01-01

    In March 2010, a new legislation about assisted reproductive technology (ART) activities, favoring single embryo transfer, was introduced in Turkey. Consequences of new regulations on neonatal outcome have not been evaluated in multicenter studies yet. In this study, our aim was to evaluate neonatal outcome of infants from medically assisted reproduction (MAR) pregnancies in the post-legislation era. A point prevalence study was conducted at 51 centers in Turkey on 1 April 2013. Data about fertility treatments and neonatal characteristics were evaluated for "live births" (Group 1) and "patients being cared in the NICU" (Group 2). Seventeen (4%) of 420 infants in group 1, and 89 (8.1%) of 1094 infants in group 2 were born after MAR pregnancies. The ratio of multiple births in MAR pregnancies was still very high as 47.1% for group 1, 69.1% for group 2 infants. MAR babies constituted 9.9% of infants in Level 3 NICUs and 7.6% infants in Level 2 NICUs. MAR was associated with increased risk of multiple births and prematurity. After the new legislation, multiple birth rates are still high in MAR pregnancies, resulting in unfavorable neonatal outcomes. Efforts to decrease multiple birth rates should be encouraged.

  9. Yoga Can Improve Assisted Reproduction Technology Outcomes in Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Sara; Darbandi, Mahsa; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-07

    Context • Depending on the cause of the infertility, nonsurgical or surgical treatments may be used to treat men and women with infertility. Despite improved outcomes due to medical advances, assisted reproductive technology (ART) for couples with infertility is sometimes unsuccessful. Success may be affected by the patient's social, psychological, and physical status. Objective • The study examined the effects of yoga-including asanas (yoga poses), pranayama (proper breathing), shavasana, and meditation-on male and female fertility and ART outcomes. Design • The research team performed a literature review, electronically searching for articles published between January 1978 and January 2016 in the PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar databases. Setting • The study took place at the Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center at the Avicenna Research Institute at the Academic Center for Education, Culture, and Research (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Participants were couples with infertility taking part in 87 reviewed studies. Intervention • Yoga was the intervention. Outcome Measures • The outcome measures comprised fertility factors in males and females, fertility rate, and ART success rate. Results • The reviewed studies showed that yoga can provide stress management for patients with infertility, with beneficial effects on fertility, helping couples give birth. They found that yoga also could reduce pain; decrease depression, anxiety, and stress; reduce the rate of assisted vaginal delivery; and improve fetal outcomes. Conclusions • Yoga can help couples overcome infertility and increase the ART success rate by improving the physiological and psychological states of both men and women.

  10. [Literature review and state of the art of the Italian law on medically assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Delbon, P; Conti, A; Sirignano, A

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the current situation of medically assisted reproduction in Italy after the promulgation of Law 40 in 2004. This law is actually completely different from the origin version. The controversial points like reproduction for couples who bear genetic diseases, prohibition of heterologous fertilization, cryoconservation of the embryos, obligation to perform just one and contemporaneous implant of all the embryos produced, are today definitively erased. This new situation is due to the jurisprudence of the Italian Courts but especially to the changes introduced by the European Court of Human Rights and by the questions of constitutionality raised by some Italian Courts. After analysis of the legislation, the views of various authors are compared, and the weaknesses and strong points of the law are considered from the point of view of legal medicine, science and bioethics. After ten years of operation of this law Italy has returned to a situation that existed before the law. In fact the old law was only full of prohibitions. Now is possible to do heterologous fertilization and this article photographs the current situation of hospitals for assisted procreation in Italy. The work also comments on procreative tourism, a direct consequence of this law, and on the status of women, who must be the subject and not the object of the legislation.

  11. Thromboprophylaxis in women undergoing gynecological surgery or assisted reproductive techniques: new advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piróg, Magdalena Maria; Jach, Robert; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) affects 0.1-0.3% people each year. The risk of VTE following gynecological surgery and invasive procedures is well established and presents one of the major challenges in gynecological practice. Moreover, commonly use assisted reproductive techniques (ART) are reported to increase the risk of VTE. Despite continued efforts to reduce its incidence, postoperative VTE remains the second most common perioperative complication and the third most common cause of mortality. Several practice guidelines have been developed regarding prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. However, there is a large inconsistency between the recommendations and the medical practice in various centers. Moreover, prophylaxis in gynecological patients and women undergoing ART should be chosen individually for the patient, taking into account the possible risk factors for VTE and perioperative bleeding complications. Until recently, the percentage of women, who have not received anticoagulant prophylaxis or administrated it inadequately may reach 50%. This paper presents the current recommendations regarding thromboprophylaxis in women undergoing gynecological surgery or assisted reproductive techniques and addresses challenging practical issues in this field.

  12. Systematic evaluation of the quality of clinical practice guidelines on the use of assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarra-Vilchez, Rosa Bertha; Barajas-Nava, Leticia; Aleman, Alicia; Solà, Ivan; Gich, Ignasi; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    To conduct a systematic evaluation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on the use of assisted reproductive technologies. We searched Medline, the Turning Research into Practice database, and guidelines-specific databases from December 2006 to November 2011. Three reviewers independently assessed each Guideline using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. A standardized score was calculated separately for each of the six domains. Fourteen Guidelines were included. Overall, the quality of these was suboptimal. The scores for each AGREE II domain ranged between 37% and 80%. Three (22%) were deemed "Recommended"; nine (64%),"Recommended with modifications"; and two (14%), "Not recommended". Agreement among reviewers was very good (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient: 0.915 [95% CI 0.807-0.970]). The overall quality of the CPGs on Assisted Reproduction Techniques published during the last 5 years is suboptimal. Most Guidelines present significant shortcomings in important domains such as "stakeholder involvement", "rigor of development", and "applicability". Instruments such as the AGREE II and "the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Evaluation" system could prove useful to improve CPGs in this field. Guideline users could benefit from the present results when choosing which guidelines to implement.

  13. A retrospective study of the effect of increasing age on success rates of assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Yvonne M; Ryan, Michael; Martyn, Fiona; Wingfield, Mary B

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the effect of increasing age on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology, particularly among women aged 40 years or older. A retrospective analysis was conducted using prospectively collected data for all in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles among women aged 30-35 years or 40-44 years conducted at Merrion Fertility Clinic, Dublin, Ireland, between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. The relationship between age and treatment outcome was assessed. Among women aged 30-35 years, 726 cycles led to 281 (38.7%) clinical pregnancies and 242 (33.3%) live births. By contrast, among women aged 40-44 years, 433 cycles led to 102 (23.6%) clinical pregnancies and 64 (14.8%) live births (both Ptechnology are decreased among women aged older than 40 years. Fertility clinics have a responsibility to fully inform this group about the limitations of assisted reproductive technology. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  14. Maternal Exposure to Second-hand Smoke and Super Ovulation Outcome for Assisted Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Ganji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of smoking cigarettes is followed by diverse effects on ovaries anddeveloping follicles but the effect of passive smoking on ovarian function is unknown. On the otherhand, the ovarian response to induction is a very important step in assisted reproduction. The aimof this study is to compare ovarian response in passive smokers and non-passive smokers in anassisted reproductive program.Materials and Methods: In a cohort study at the Isfahan Fertility and Infertility Center, there were 72women in the passive smoker group and 72 women in the non-passive smoker group who underwentan assisted reproductive technology (ART program. The follicle number at administration of humanchorionic gonadotropin (HCG, number of gonadotropin ampoules and duration of super ovulationinduction were compared.Results: Statistical analyses indicated that the number of mature follicles in the passive smoker groupwas not different from the control group; but the number of unresponsive cycles to super ovulation inthe passive smoker group (33.3% was significantly higher than the control group (12.5%. Durationof induction and number of gonadotropin ampoules were not different between the two groups.Conclusion: The results of this study show that exposure to second-hand smoke increases the chanceof unresponsiveness to ovulation induction. This condition may be due to the result of decline inovarian reserve in second-hand smokers. The duration of induction and number of gonadotropinampules is similar in the two groups. Furthermore, the results show that exposure to cigarette smokedoes not clinically impact women with good ovarian reserve.

  15. Irish public opinion on assisted human reproduction services: Contemporary assessments from a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David J; Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Hawrylyshyn, Christine A; Sokol, Piotr; Walsh, Anthony Ph

    2013-12-01

    To measure Irish opinion on a range of assisted human reproduction (AHR) treatments. A nationally representative sample of Irish adults (n=1,003) were anonymously sampled by telephone survey. Most participants (77%) agreed that any fertility services offered internationally should also be available in Ireland, although only a small minority of the general Irish population had personal familiarity with AHR or infertility. This sample finds substantial agreement (63%) that the Government of Ireland should introduce legislation covering AHR. The range of support for gamete donation in Ireland ranged from 53% to 83%, depending on how donor privacy and disclosure policies are presented. For example, donation where the donor agrees to be contacted by the child born following donation, and anonymous donation where donor privacy is completely protected by law were supported by 68% and 66%, respectively. The least popular (53%) donor gamete treatment type appeared to be donation where the donor consents to be involved in the future life of any child born as a result of donor fertility treatment. Respondents in social class ABC1 (58%), age 18 to 24 (62%), age 25 to 34 (60%), or without children (61%) were more likely to favour this donor treatment policy in our sample. This is the first nationwide assessment of Irish public opinion on the advanced reproductive technologies since 2005. Access to a wide range of AHR treatment was supported by all subgroups studied. Public opinion concerning specific types of AHR treatment varied, yet general support for the need for national AHR legislation was reported by 63% of this national sample. Contemporary views on AHR remain largely consistent with the Commission for Assisted Human Reproduction recommendations from 2005, although further research is needed to clarify exactly how popular opinion on these issues has changed. It appears that legislation allowing for the full range of donation options (and not mandating disclosure of

  16. SIAMS survey on sexological screening during the assisted reproductive technologies in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, G; Limoncin, E; Mollaioli, D; Gravina, G L; Carosa, E; Di Sante, S; Gianfrilli, D; Lombardo, F; Lenzi, A; Jannini, E A

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of sexual function is fundamental to the Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). Nevertheless, it is still not a common clinical routine among infertility centres. The aim of this survey is to describe the main aspects of sexological screening that are considered in Italian centres of ART. After the consensus of the Italian Society of Andrology and Sexual Medicine (SIAMS), a mailing list of reproductive medicine centres was created. Then, we sent a questionnaire concerning the essential characteristics of sexological screening. The respondents to compilers of the questionnaire sent back the information from their centres, and an analysis of absolute frequencies and percentages was performed. First, 16 centres completed and returned the questionnaire, while 5 ignored the invitation. The main findings concerned the wide use consideration of vardenafil 10 mg (68.7%; 11/16) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in comorbidity with reproductive problems, the diffuse administration of International Index of Erectile Function (68.2%; 11/16) and Structured Interview for the Erectile Dysfunction (50%; 8/16) as psychometric tools and lesser use of Female Sexual Function Index (31.2%; 5/16) for the evaluation of female sexuality in the infertile couple. To conclude, we noticed a major focus on male sexuality and the eventual treatment or evaluation of sexual dysfunction compared to female sexuality. This aspect highlights an important issue for clinical practice to strongly consider and eventually reinforce. In this regard, improvement of the assessment and treatment of possible female sexual problems in reproductive medicine seems necessary.

  17. The impact of endometriosis on the outcome of Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Comadran, Mireia; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Souza, Maria do Carmo B; Carreras, Ramon; Checa, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis has been described to impair fertility through various mechanisms. However, studies evaluating the reproductive outcomes of women undergoing assisted reproductive technologies show controversial results. The aim of this study is to assess whether the reproductive outcome is impaired among women with endometriosis-associated infertility undergoing IVF. A retrospective cohort study was performed, including women undergoing IVF reported by the Red Latinoamericana de Reproduccion Asistida (Redlara) registry, between January 2010 and December 2012. The study group included women with endometriosis-associated infertility, and the control group women with tubal factor, endocrine disorders or unexplained infertility. Women above 40 years, severe male factor and premature ovarian failure were excluded. The reproductive outcomes of between both groups were compared. The primary outcome was live birth. Secondary outcomes included clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, number of oocytes retrieved and number of fertilized oocytes. Outcomes were assessed after the first fresh IVF cycle, and were adjusted for age and number of embryos transferred. A total of 22.416 women were included (3.583 with endometriosis and 18.833 in the control group). Mean age of patients in the endometriosis group and control group was 34.86 (3.47) and 34.61 (3.91) respectively, p = 0.000. The mean number of oocytes retrieved were 8.89 (6.23) and 9.86 (7.02) respectively, p = 0.000. No significant differences were observed between groups in terms of live birth (odds ratio (OR) 1.032, p = 0.556), clinical pregnancy (OR 1.044, p = 0.428) and miscarriage rates (OR 1.049, p = 0.623). Women with endometriosis had significantly lower number of oocytes retrieved (incidence risk ratio (IRR) 0.917, 95% CI 0.895-0.940), however, the number of fertilized oocytes did not differ among the two groups when adjusting for the number of oocytes retrieved (IRR 1.003, p = 0.794). An age

  18. Female Obesity and Clinical Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART): an Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heidar Heidari Khoei

    2016-01-01

    Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has been developed to be used for reproductive-age women with primary and secondary infertilities. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic for both women and men and a major global health concern. The direct effect of Body Mass Index (BMI) increase on the outcomes of ART is still unclear. This study aimed to carry out a systematic review of the available scientific evidence to assess the effects of obesity on the clinical outcome of ART treatment. Numerous studi...

  19. Authors' reply to comment on "Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S.; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our national register-based study (1) was to investigate the risk of a new episode of unipolar depression among women treated with assisted reproductive technology (ART) in regards to whether they had achieved a live birth (as a result of treatment or spontaneous conception) or not. He...... compared to women having conceived spontaneously. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Camera-based driver assistance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, camera-based driver assistance systems have taken an important step: from laboratory setup to series production. This tutorial gives a brief overview on the technology behind driver assistance systems, presents the most significant functionalities and focuses on the processes of developing camera-based systems for series production. We highlight the critical points which need to be addressed when camera-based driver assistance systems are sold in their thousands, worldwide - and the benefit in terms of safety which results from it.

  1. 2014-2017. How medically assisted reproduction changed in Italy. A short comparative synthesis with European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvasi, A; Signore, F; Napoletano, S; Bruti, V; Sestili, C; Di Luca, N M

    2017-01-01

    More than ten years after law n. 40 of February 19, 2004 became effective, regulation on medically assisted reproduction has dramatically changed outlook. The authors report on the steps that led to these changes through Courts' rulings, the Supreme Court's verdicts and the European Court of Human Rights' decisions, as well as ministerial regulations and guidelines concerning medically assisted reproduction. The aforementioned jurisprudential evolution was set to reach a new balance between the embryo's right to its own dignity and the woman's right to health and freedom of self-determination in reproduction. No court ruling denies that embryos have also to be safeguarded. In fact, there are still numerous prohibitions, including using embryos for experimental purposes. Judges aim primarily at avoiding that embryos' rights overcome the right to parenthood. The authors review the legislation of the various European countries: some have adopted a legislation to regulate medically assisted reproduction, while others have developed in this field some recommendations or guidelines. This is why they call for enactment of a European law governing the implementation/operational methods of medically assisted reproduction in order to avoid the scourge of procreative tourism to countries that have a more permissive law.

  2. The Social Impact of the Offer of Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) in a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tonia; Corrêa, Marilena C D V

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report the procedures undertaken in the laboratory of semen of a university hospital specialized in human reproduction in Rio de Janeiro, principally Homologous Artificial Insemination (HAI) taking into account a more social aspect. This descriptive and retrospective study was based on documentary research. The source of information included medical records and registers containing the procedures performed in the laboratory of semen and the HAI. Testimonies, questionings and suggestions given by the couples during the process were also registered. The couples were clearly informed about the techniques and many times they externalized their demands, doubts and desires in relation to the procedures, treatment and issues concerning their wish to have children and start a family. The discussion shows concerns over the techniques and theories used in this context when performing procedures in the laboratory of semen. The bond to the service remains based on the idea that "now my dream of having kids will come true". Nevertheless, for the operationalization of the access to ARTs, at the public sector of medicine, we should count on the implementation of the National Politics in Assisted Reproduction. It did not take place and today it has even been removed, no longer being in force. It makes very clear the distance between the "accomplishment of the desire for children" and the reality of the provision of means and resources for ART at the medical public level in Brazil.

  3. The Judicial effects of heterologous assisted reproduction in accordance with the civil and family regulations in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel León Ortiz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the application of bio-technological resources for assisted human reproduction with the concept of filiation, with the understanding that the civil legislation in Mexico City was one of the first in our country that recognized the right to biomedical resources for assisted reproduction (AR as a source to determine the filiation between the children of AR and the spouses or partners who decide to turn to fertility treatment. Other entities of the federation would later adhere to this, although with more specific rules.

  4. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison BJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brittany J Harrison,1 Tara N Hilton,1 Raphaël N Rivière,1 Zachary M Ferraro,1–3 Raywat Deonandan,4 Mark C Walker1–3,51Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4University of Ottawa Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 5Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, CanadaObjectives: This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved.Methods: A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical were included in the review.Conclusion: There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old. This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a

  5. Potential of human twin embryos generated by embryo splitting in assisted reproduction and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Laila; Ogilvie, Caroline; Khalaf, Yacoub; Ilic, Dusko

    2017-03-01

    Embryo splitting or twinning has been widely used in veterinary medicine over 20 years to generate monozygotic twins with desirable genetic characteristics. The first human embryo splitting, reported in 1993, triggered fierce ethical debate on human embryo cloning. Since Dolly the sheep was born in 1997, the international community has acknowledged the complexity of the moral arguments related to this research and has expressed concerns about the potential for reproductive cloning in humans. A number of countries have formulated bans either through laws, decrees or official statements. However, in general, these laws specifically define cloning as an embryo that is generated via nuclear transfer (NT) and do not mention embryo splitting. Only the UK includes under cloning both embryo splitting and NT in the same legislation. On the contrary, the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine does not have a major ethical objection to transferring two or more artificially created embryos with the same genome with the aim of producing a single pregnancy, stating that 'since embryo splitting has the potential to improve the efficacy of IVF treatments for infertility, research to investigate the technique is ethically acceptable'. Embryo splitting has been introduced successfully to the veterinary medicine several decades ago and today is a part of standard practice. We present here an overview of embryo splitting experiments in humans and non-human primates and discuss the potential of this technology in assisted reproduction and research. A comprehensive literature search was carried out using PUBMED and Google Scholar databases to identify studies on embryo splitting in humans and non-human primates. 'Embryo splitting' and 'embryo twinning' were used as the keywords, alone or in combination with other search phrases relevant to the topics of biology of preimplantation embryos. A very limited number of studies have been conducted in humans and non

  6. Gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rates for assisted reproductive technology (ART) and other births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Abrar A; Wang, Alex Y; Hilder, Lisa; Li, Zhuoyang; Lui, Kei; Farquhar, Cindy; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-01

    Is perinatal mortality rate higher among births born following assisted reproductive technology (ART) compared to non-ART births? Overall perinatal mortality rates in ART births was higher compared to non-ART births, but gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rate of ART births was lower for very preterm and moderate to late preterm births. Births born following ART are reported to have higher risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to non-ART births. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 407 368 babies (391 952 non-ART and 15 416 ART)-393 491 singletons and 10 877 twins or high order multiples. All births (≥20 weeks of gestation and/or ≥400 g of birthweight) in five states and territories in Australia during the period 2007-2009 were included in the study, using National Perinatal Data Collection (NPDC). Primary outcome measures were rates of stillbirth, neonatal and perinatal deaths. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to estimate the likelihood of perinatal death. Rates of multiple birth and low birthweight were significantly higher in ART group compared to the non-ART group (P ART births (16.5 per 1000 births, 95% CI 14.5-18.6), compared to non-ART births (11.3 per 1000 births, 95% CI 11.0-11.6) (AOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.26-1.68). However, gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rate of ART births (including both singletons and multiples) was lower for very preterm (ART births. Congenital abnormality and spontaneous preterm were the most common causes of neonatal deaths in both ART and non-ART group. Due to different cut-off limit for perinatal period in Australia, the results of this study should be interpreted with cautions for other countries. Australian definition of perinatal period commences at 20 completed weeks (140 days) of gestation and ends 27 completed days after birth which is different from the definition by World Health Organisation (commences at 22 completed weeks (154 days) of

  7. EC assisted start-up experiments reproduction in FTU and AUG for simulations of the ITER case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granucci, G.; Ricci, D.; Farina, D.; Figini, L. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Cavinato, M. [F4E C/Josep Pla2, Torres Diagonal Litoral - Building 83 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Mattei, M. [CREATE via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Tudisco, O. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    The breakdown and plasma start-up in ITER are well known issues studied in the last few years in many tokamaks with the aid of calculation based on simplified modeling. The thickness of ITER metallic wall and the voltage limits of the Central Solenoid Power Supply strongly limit the maximum toroidal electric field achievable (0.3 V/m), well below the level used in the present generation of tokamaks. In order to have a safe and robust breakdown, the use of Electron Cyclotron Power to assist plasma formation and current rump up has been foreseen. This has raised attention on plasma formation phase in presence of EC wave, especially in order to predict the required power for a robust breakdown in ITER. Few detailed theory studies have been performed up to nowadays, due to the complexity of the problems. A simplified approach, extended from that proposed in ref[1] has been developed including a impurity multispecies distribution and an EC wave propagation and absorption based on GRAY code. This integrated model (BK0D) has been benchmarked on ohmic and EC assisted experiments on FTU and AUG, finding the key aspects for a good reproduction of data. On the basis of this, the simulation has been devoted to understand the best configuration for ITER case. The dependency of impurity distribution content and neutral gas pressure limits has been considered. As results of the analysis a reasonable amount of power (1 - 2 MW) seems to be enough to extend in a significant way the breakdown and current start up capability of ITER. The work reports the FTU data reproduction and the ITER case simulations.

  8. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Newborn Size in Singletons Resulting from Fresh and Cryopreserved Embryos Transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Levi Dunietz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate the association of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART and small newborn size, using standardized measures; and to examine within strata of fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer, whether this association is influenced by parental infertility diagnoses. We used a population-based retrospective cohort from Michigan (2000-2009, Florida and Massachusetts (2000-2010. Our sample included 28,946 ART singletons conceived with non-donor oocytes and 4,263,846 non-ART singletons.Regression models were used to examine the association of ART and newborn size, measured as small for gestational age (SGA and birth-weight-z-score, among four mutually exclusive infertility groups: female infertility only, male infertility only, combined female and male infertility, and unexplained infertility, stratified by fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer.We found increased SGA odds among ART singletons from fresh embryos transfer compared with non-ART singletons, with little difference by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 1.18 (95% CI 1.10, 1.26, male infertility only: 1.20 (95% CI 1.10, 1.32, male and female infertility: 1.18 (95% CI 1.06, 1.31 and unexplained infertility: 1.24 (95% CI 1.10, 1.38]. Conversely, ART singletons, born following cryopreserved embryos transfer, had lower SGA odds compared with non-ART singletons, with mild variation by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 0.56 (95% CI 0.45, 0.71, male infertility only: 0.64 (95% CI 0.47, 0.86, male and female infertility: 0.52 (95% CI 0.36, 0.77 and unexplained infertility: 0.71 (95% CI 0.47, 1.06]. Birth-weight-z-score was significantly lower for ART singletons born following fresh embryos transfer than non-ART singletons, regardless of infertility diagnoses.

  9. Assisted reproductive technology use and outcomes among women with a history of cancer†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Spector, Logan G.; Leach, Richard E.; Williams, Melanie; Koch, Lori; Smith, Yolanda R.; Stern, Judy E.; David Ball, G.; Schymura, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How do the assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes of women presenting for ART after cancer diagnosis compare to women without cancer? SUMMARY ANSWER The likelihood of a live birth after ART among women with prior cancer using autologous oocytes is reduced and varies by cancer diagnosis but is similar to women without cancer when donor oocytes are used. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Premenopausal patients faced with a cancer diagnosis frequently present for fertility preservation. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Population-based cohort study of women treated with ART in NY, TX and IL, USA. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Women with their first ART treatment between 2004 and 2009 were identified from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database and linked to their respective State Cancer Registries based on name, date of birth and social security number. Years were rounded, i.e. year 1 = 6–18 months before treatment. This study used reports of cancer from 5 years, 6 months prior to treatment until 6 months after first ART treatment. Women who only presented for embryo banking were omitted from the analysis. The likelihood of pregnancy and of live birth with ART using autologous oocytes was modeled using logistic regression, with women without prior cancer as the reference group, adjusted for woman's age, parity, cumulative FSH dosage, infertility diagnosis, number of diagnoses, number of ART cycles, State of residency and year of ART treatment. Results of the modeling are reported as adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and (95% confidence intervals). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The study population included 53 426 women; 441 women were diagnosed with cancer within 5 years prior to ART cycle start. Mean (±SD) age at cancer diagnosis was 33.4 ± 5.7 years; age at start of ART treatment was 34.9 ± 5.8 for women with cancer compared with 35.3 ± 5.3 years for women without cancer (P = 0.03). Live

  10. First-trimester screening in pregnancies conceived by assisted reproductive technology: significance of gestational dating by oocyte retrieval or sonographic measurement of crown-rump length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, A.C.; Loft, A.; Pinborg, A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate, in pregnancies conceived by assisted reproductive technology, whether determination of gestational age (GA) by date of oocyte aspiration (DOA) or crown-rump length (CRL) at first-trimester screening influences the distribution of serum and sonographic markers or the perfo......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate, in pregnancies conceived by assisted reproductive technology, whether determination of gestational age (GA) by date of oocyte aspiration (DOA) or crown-rump length (CRL) at first-trimester screening influences the distribution of serum and sonographic markers......). Weight-corrected log multiples of the median (MoM) marker distributions specific for IVF pregnancy were established using multiple log regression and compared for DOA- and CRL-based GA calculation. RESULTS: GA determined by CRL was significantly larger, albeit slightly, than was GA determined by DOA...

  11. [Research progress on the safety of offsprings conceived by assisted reproductive technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liya; Qian, Yeqing; Jin, Fan

    2017-05-25

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) employs superovulation, in vitro culture and other micromanipulation to complete oocyte maturation, fertilization and early embryo development. Although these techniques have been successfully applied to solve infertility problems, the process may interfere in cell proliferation, differentiation and growth. The clinical and laboratory studies on the safety issue of ART are reviewed in this article. Studies found that the incidence of birth defects increased in ART offspring. Superovulation, in vitro culture and intracytoplasmic sperm injection may induce epigenetic aberrations during embryo development, which would influence the development of ART conceived children. The epigenetic susceptibility related to ART might be transmitted to subsequent generations, and the potential impact on ART offspring still need further investigation. In addition, ART treatments may also increase the risk of genetic diseases.

  12. Should older and postmenopausal women have access to assisted reproductive technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Imogen

    2005-01-01

    In vitro fertilisation and other assisted reproductive technologies (ART) now enable many women to have children, who would otherwise have remained childless. The most obvious application for these technologies is to help physically infertile, but otherwise healthy young women to have children. However, increasingly, other groups are seeking access to ART to conceive, raising ethical questions about who should be allowed to use these technologies to bear children. In particular, the question of access to ART by lesbian couples and single groups has roused considerable ethical, legal and public debate. This paper examines the perhaps less often considered issue of older and postmenopausal women, who are infertile due to age, using ART to conceive. A range of objections have been made to allowing these women access to ART, including concerns about their ability to care for the child, the risk of birth defects and the 'unnaturalness' of extending childbearing capacity beyond the menopause. This paper examines these objects and provides some responses.

  13. Assisted reproduction with gametes and embryos: what research is needed and fundable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, George E

    2016-01-01

    Principles for selecting future research projects include interests of investigators, fundability, potential applications, ethical considerations, being able to formulate testable hypotheses and choosing the best models, including selection of the most appropriate species. The following 10 areas of assisted reproduction seem especially appropriate for further research: efficacious capacitation of bovine spermatozoa in vitro; improved in vitro bovine oocyte maturation; decreasing variability and increasing efficacy of bovine superovulation; improved fertility of sexed semen; improving equine IVF; improving cryopreservation of rooster spermatozoa; understanding differences between males in success of sperm cryopreservation and reasons for success in competitive fertilisation; mechanisms of reprogramming somatic cell nuclei after nuclear transfer; regulation of differentiation of ovarian primordial follicles; and means by which spermatozoa maintain fertility during storage in the epididymis. Issues are species specific for several of these topics, in most cases because the biology is species specific.

  14. Failures (with some successes) of assisted reproduction and gamete donation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Although the possibilities for the treatment of infertility have been improved tremendously, not every couple will be treated successfully. Crude overall pregnancy rates of 50-65% per patient can be achieved nowadays, irrespective of the type of profertility treatment applied first. IVF only accounts for about 20% of the pregnancies achieved. Dropout is an important reason for not reaching the estimated pregnancy rate. Even after failed IVF, spontaneous pregnancies do occur. Sperm and oocyte donation (OD) offer additional chances to subfertile couples. Severity of the male factor (in sperm donation) and young donor age (in OD) are important determinants of success. Analysis of assisted reproduction technology outcomes would benefit from more universally accepted definitions and deserves better statistical analysis. Long-term cumulative live birth rates of 80% may be expected if dropout can be limited. Milder stimulation, a patient-friendlier approach and better counseling may help to keep more patients in the program.

  15. The influence of thyroid autoimmunity on embryo quality in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, A; Sabbadin, C; Marin, L; Ragazzi, E; Dessole, F; Armanini, D; Donà, G; Bordin, L; Ambrosini, G

    2018-02-20

    The influence of thyroid autoimmunity in assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcome in euthyroid women is still controversial. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated embryo quality in 123 euthyroid women undergoing ART with or without thyroid autoantibodies (TAA). Embryo quality was assessed in 119 embryos of 29 infertile patients with TAA and in 394 embryos of 94 infertile patients without TAA. Our results showed not statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, anti-Müllerian hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels between cases and controls. Thyroid stimulating hormone was within the normal range, but significantly higher in TAA patients compared with the controls (2.4 ± 0.8 vs. 2 ± 0.9 mIU/L, respectively, p women with at least one autoantibody (p women undergoing ART even when thyroid function is normal.

  16. Significance of positive semen culture in relation to male infertility and the assisted reproductive technology process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Joshua S; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2017-10-01

    There are currently no WHO guidelines on the indications for semen culture; however, semen cultures are performed in the evaluation of male infertility and the assisted reproductive technology (ART) process. The relevance and significance of positive semen cultures is widely debated in the literature, with no current consensus on the usefulness of this test in relation to male infertility. We review the pathogenic mechanisms of potentially pathogenic bacteria, general bacteria, urethral flora, and skin flora on sperm parameters. We also present, possible routes of semen contamination, measures to reduce contamination, and the clinical significance of culture contamination. First, it is critical to distinguish round cells in semen as leukocytes from immature germ cells. Second, it is critical to distinguish leukocytospermia from infected semen in order to guide management.

  17. The paternal genome and the health of the assisted reproductive technology child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena EM Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a number of children born by assisted reproductive technology (ART are increasing each year across the developed world, the health of such offspring is a matter of public concern. Does the integrity of the paternal genome impact on offspring health? In societal terms, as birth rates fall, and the Western population become unsustainable, do the benefits outweigh the costs of creating and providing for this ART conceived subpopulation? There are little data to date to answer these questions. The long-term health of such children has largely been ignored, and success measured only by early (prebirth outcomes such as embryo quality or pregnancy. However, there are powerful paradigms such as ageing and smoking that give vital clues as to the potential impact of unhealthy spermatozoa on disease risk, mental and physical health, fertility and mortality of these offspring.

  18. Psychological Disorders among Iranian Infertile Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Mansoureh; Salsabili, Nasser; Akbari Asbagh, Firouzeh; Teymouri, Robab; Pourmand, Golamreza; Soleimanieh Naeini, Tahereh

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, infertility affects 10%-15% of couples and most of them seek medical help including Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) treatments. Undergoing ART treatments create many physical and emotional burdens. This study examined the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile males and females as well as their spouses, unlike previous studies that examined mainly females with infertility. Subjects in this descriptive analytical design were recruited from the IVF Department of Mirza Koochak Khan Hospital and the Rouyesh Infertility Treatment Center of Tehran, Iran between Aug 2014 and Sep 2015. Overall, 256 couples (64% response rate), consisting of 78 infertile male and their spouses and 50 infertile female and their spouses, were included in this research. The psychological disorders were measured by the Persian version of Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised and Cattle Inventory. Psychological disorders of infertile couples are significantly associated with increasing age, higher education, longer duration of infertility and unemployment ( P ART treatments.

  19. The understanding and acceptability of assisted reproductive technology (ART) among infertile women in urban Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabamwo, A O; Akinola, O I

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study was carried out to assess the awareness and acceptability of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) among infertile women in Lagos, Nigeria. Self-administered questionnaires on the knowledge of ART in the women were used. After a brief exposé on ART, questions relating to their attitude were answered. A total of 166 women were studied. Only 51.8% had any knowledge of ART and most of these had poor knowledge. A total of 137 women would embrace ART if offered but 29 would not, for reasons such as religion, fear of side-effects, failure and unaffordable costs. There is a paucity of good knowledge of ART. A significant number of the women would consider ART if offered. There is thus a need to create more awareness about the possibilities offered by ART, as well as instituting low cost ART strategies in developing world countries.

  20. Pregnancy following breast cancer using assisted reproduction and its effect on long-term outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldrat, Oranite; Kroman, Niels; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2015-01-01

    treatment. In this study, we evaluated the impact of ART on pregnancy and long-term outcomes of young breast cancer survivors. METHODS: This is a multi-centre retrospective study in which women who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2000 and 2009, and had a pregnancy following breast cancer diagnosis......% of the spontaneous and ART groups, respectively. Mean follow-up between conception and last follow-up was 63 and 50 months in the spontaneous and ART groups, respectively with no difference in breast cancer outcome observed between the two groups (p=0.54). CONCLUSION: Pregnancy using ART in women with history......INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: We have previously shown that pregnancy is safe following breast cancer, even in endocrine sensitive disease. Yet infertility remains common following systemic treatment. To date, no study has evaluated the safety of assisted reproductive technology (ART) after breast cancer...

  1. Kant's 'formula of humanity' and assisted reproductive technology: a case for duties to future children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Tatiana

    2017-11-01

    The paper asks the question whether Kant's ethical theory can be applied to issues in assisted reproductive technology (ART). It argues against three objections to applying Kant's ethics to ART: (i) the non-identity objection, (ii) the gen-ethics objection, and (iii) the care-ethics objection. After showing that neither of the three objections is sufficiently persuasive the paper proposes a reading of Kant's 'formula of humanity,' and especially its negative clause (i.e., the 'merely as means' clause), that can be of some guidance in ART. The paper conclude that although Kant's 'formula of humanity' cannot be used as a simple litmus test for determining whether an ART practice is morally permissible or not, it nonetheless can supply us with some guidance in our moral deliberation.

  2. Assisted reproductive technology in India: A 3 year retrospective data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Assisted reproductive technology (ART has grown by leaps and bounds in the last few years. India has one of the highest growths in the ART centers and the number of ART cycles performed every year. Very soon India will be the leader in the world of ART in terms of a number of cycles. With the advances of technology and availability of techniques even in tier II and tier III cities our country, the results still vary dramatically. There is no standardization of protocols and reporting is very inadequate. Furthermore, there are only ART guidelines and no law still exists. Our first and the biggest challenge is to document the tremendous work being done in India and on the basis of analysis of this work, a proper registry can be made and guidance given to all on standardization and improvement. This is the 8 th edition of National ART Registry of India being presented and analyzed.

  3. Effect of assisted reproductive technology on fetal brain development assessed by prenatal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Linliang; Xu, Yongle; Li, Hong; Ling, Chen; Choy, Kwong Wai; Xia, Fei; Deng, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether assisted reproductive technology (ART) affects the development of the fetal central nervous system (CNS). This study was carried out on women with singleton pregnancies, including 427 women who became pregnant by ART and 32,859 women with natural conceptions (NCs). The cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) width, transverse cerebellar diameter (TCD), cisterna magna (CM) depth, and lateral ventricle width were measured by ultrasound for 72 normal ART fetuses and 201 normal NC fetuses. The malformation rate of CNS was determined for both groups. In both groups, significant positive correlations with gestational age were found for CSP width (ART: r=0.7841, NC: r=0.7864; P0.05). The development and malformation rate of the fetal CNS is not significantly different between ART and NC fetuses, thus, ART does not affect the development of the fetal brain.

  4. Association between serum folate and vitamin B-12 and outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Audrey J; Chiu, Yu-Han; Williams, Paige L; Ford, Jennifer B; Toth, Thomas L; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-10-01

    Preconceptional folate and vitamin B-12 have been linked to beneficial reproductive outcomes in both natural pregnancies and those after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the associations of serum folate and vitamin B-12 with ART outcomes. This analysis included a random sample of 100 women (154 ART cycles) participating in a prospective cohort study [Environment and Reproductive Health (EARTH)] at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center (2007-2013). Serum folate and vitamin B-12 were measured in blood samples collected between days 3 and 9 of treatment. Generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age, BMI, and race were used to evaluate the association of serum folate and vitamin B-12 with ART outcomes. Women in the highest quartile of serum folate (>26.3 ng/mL) had 1.62 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.65) times the probability of live birth compared with women in the lowest quartile (Women in the highest quartile of serum vitamin B-12 (>701 pg/mL) had 2.04 (95% CI: 1.14, 3.62) times the probability of live birth compared with women in the lowest quartile (women with serum folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations greater than the median had 1.92 (95% CI: 1.12, 3.29) times the probability of live birth compared with women with folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations less than or equal to the median. This translated into an adjusted difference in live birth rates of 26% (95% CI: 10%, 48%; P = 0.02). Higher serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B-12 before ART treatment were associated with higher live birth rates among a population exposed to folic acid fortification. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00011713. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Current progress on assisted reproduction in dogs and cats: in vitro embryo production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvoni, G C

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the development of assisted reproduction techniques in dogs and cats is their application to non-domestic canine and feline species, most of which are considered threatened or endangered. Among these techniques, an entirely in vitro system for embryo production is effectively an important tool for conservation of wildlife. In the last decade, progress has been made in embryo production in carnivores. It has been shown that canine oocytes can resume meiosis in vitro and that these oocytes can be fertilized and developed in vitro, although at a much lower rate than most other domestic animal oocytes. The reason lies in the dissimilarities of reproductive physiology of the dog compared to other species and the lack of precise information concerning the oviductal environment, in which oocyte maturation, fertilization and early embryonic development take place. Successful in vitro embryo production in the domestic cat has been attained with oocytes matured in vitro, and kittens were born after transfer of IVM/IVF derived embryos. On the basis of these results the in vitro fertilization of oocytes has also been applied in several non-domestic feline species. The effectiveness of such protocols in the preservation of genetic material of rare species can be improved by developing better techniques for long-term storage of gametes. In dogs and cats sperm cells have been successfully frozen and the cryopreservation of oocytes would greatly increase their availability for a range of reproductive technologies. Cryopreserved cat oocytes can be fertilized successfully and their development in vitro after fertilization is enhanced when mature oocytes are frozen. Thus refined techniques of oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro coupled with oocyte cryopreservation could allow for an easy establishment of genetic combinations when male and female gametes in the desired combination are not simultaneously available, and the propagation of endangered carnivores

  6. Impact of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in women on oxidative stress in the antral follicle and assisted reproduction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Ashraf; Ramezanzadeh, Fatemeh; Esfahani, Mohammad Hosein Nasr; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar; Nejat, Saharnaz; Rahimi-Foroshani, Abbas

    2013-08-01

    Cigarette smoke contains many oxidants and may alter the human reproduction by inducing oxidative stress (OS) in both active and passive smokers. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure on oxidative stress in the follicular fluid and the assisted reproduction outcomes. An observational prospective study was carried out on 236 infertile women, who underwent assisted reproduction cycles. The ETS exposure was assessed using self-reported ETS exposure and the cotinine level in follicular fluid. To evaluate the OS in follicular fluid (FF) malon-di-aldehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured. The number of retrieved oocytes, rate of metaphase II stage oocytes, fertilization rate, good cleavage rate, and no-fragmented embryo rate were considered as the assisted reproduction outcomes. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index, duration, and etiology of infertility; P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. The MDA and TAC levels in FF were not related to the self-report number of the weekly ETS exposure and cotinine levels in FF. Also, the number of retrieved oocytes, MII stage oocytes, fertilization rate, good cleavage rate, and no-fragmented embryo rate were not related to the cotinine level and weekly ETS exposure. However, in women whose cotinine levels in FF were lower and equal/above 3.5 ng/ml, the number of retrieved oocytes was higher (12.63 ± .71 vs. 9.28 ± 1.11, P = 0.01). The relationship between the MDA level and cleavage rate (Beta = -18.5, confidence interval-34.9 and-2.1, P assisted reproduction success by influencing the number of available oocytes. Although, the OS in a follicular environment affect the ability of oocytes to reach the specific cleavage stages at appropriate time intervals, it does not mediate poor-assisted reproduction outcomes due to ETS exposure.

  7. Assisted reproduction in Indonesia: policy reform in an Islamic culture and developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Taylor E

    2015-11-01

    This article considers how religious and economic factors shape assisted reproductive technology (ART) policy in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim country. Infertility clinic policies are grounded on both the views of the country's powerful Islamic coalition and those of the worldwide Islamic community. Indonesian government officials, physicians, and Islamic scholars have expressed concern over who can use ART and which procedures can be performed. Indonesia has also faced economic challenges related to ART, including inadequate health insurance coverage, inequitable access to ART, and maintenance of expensive ART infrastructure. The prohibitive price of infertility treatment and regional differences in the provision of health care prohibit most Indonesians from obtaining ART. In the absence of a shift in religious mores and a rapid reduction in poverty and inequality, Indonesia will need to adopt creative means to make ART both more available and less necessary as a solution to infertility. This paper suggests policy reforms to promote more affordable treatment methods and support preventative health programmes to reduce infertility rates. This country-specific analysis of the laws and customs surrounding ART in Indonesia reveals that strategies to reduce infertility must be tailored to a country's unique religious and economic climate. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Responding to Requests for Assisted Reproductive Technology Intervention Involving Women Who Cannot Give Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Jennider S; Penrose, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    One of the plots of the Canadian science fiction thriller Orphan Black involves a scheme to create dozens of siblings by harvesting the eggs of one woman, fertilizing them with the sperm of a single man, and implanting them for gestation in dozens of apparently willing surrogates.¹ The casualness of the procedure speaks to how comfortable we have all become with reproduction by technology. Yet there are still aspects of this process that remain outside the normative boundaries of most of our worldviews. This article considers recent advances in assisted reproductive technology (ART) that can result in a viable, fertilized embryo even when the mother is herself either permanently unconscious from a severe injury or has actually lost all brain function and therefore meets the legal criteria for brain death. It reviews these advances and applies them to four scenarios, or vignettes, that represent different concerns about the prospective mother’s intent to reproduce before losing her ability to give consent.

  9. Women with one ovary in assisted reproduction technologies: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Sofia, Bouchlariotou; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Panagiotis, Tsikouras; Rösing, Beniamin; Beniamin, Rösing; Neulen, Josef; Josef, Neulen

    2012-10-01

    A number of patients who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) have only one ovary. This article reviews the clinical implications of the absence of an ovary on the reproductive potential and the outcome in ART cycle. MEDLINE, Pubmed, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the 1980s through April 2010. Randomized, controlled trials; systematic reviews of trials; and observational studies; all restricted to English-language articles. This review includes 58 articles. Women with a single ovary did not, in general, respond as well to ovulation induction treatment than women with two ovaries in ART cycles. It appears however, that once women with a single ovary achieve the stage of embryo transfer, they can be reassured that their chances of having a child are the same as women with two ovaries. Whether the right or left ovary responds better to superovulation is a question which remains unanswered in the literature. The authors could not address all management questions, and excluded non-English-language literature.

  10. GnRH antagonist, cetrorelix, for pituitary suppression in modern, patient-friendly assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Ezcurra, Diego

    2009-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues are used routinely to prevent a premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. In contrast to GnRH agonists, antagonists produce rapid and reversible suppression of LH with no initial flare effect. To review the role of cetrorelix, the first GnRH antagonist approved for the prevention of premature LH surges during controlled ovarian stimulation in modern ART. A review of published literature on cetrorelix. Both multiple- and single-dose cetrorelix protocols were shown to be at least as effective as long GnRH agonist regimens for pituitary suppression in Phase II/III clinical trials. Furthermore, cetrorelix co-treatment resulted in similar live birth rates but a shorter duration of gonadotropin stimulation, a lower total gonadotropin dose requirement and lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome compared with long agonist regimens. A single-dose cetrorelix protocol further decreased the number of injections required. Preliminary studies have also produced promising data on the use of cetrorelix in modified ART protocols, such as frozen embryo transfer and donor oocyte recipient cycles. Cetrorelix offers a potential therapeutic alternative to GnRH agonists during controlled ovarian stimulation and has become an integral part of modern, patient-friendly reproductive medicine.

  11. Dual ovarian stimulation and random start in assisted reproductive technologies: from ovarian biology to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiarelli, Alberto; Venturella, Roberta; Vizziello, Damiano; Bulletti, Francesco; Ubaldi, Filippo M

    2017-06-01

    The opportunity to use gonadotropins to stimulate the growth of antral follicles coming from different follicular waves available in different moment of the menstrual cycle allowed the implementation of innovative protocols in assisted reproductive technologies. The purpose of this review is to explore the possible advantages related to these new controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) strategies. Women exhibit major and minor wave patterns of ovarian follicular development during the menstrual cycle, as it is in animal species. These observations led to the introduction of two new strategies for COS: the random start and the double ovarian stimulation within a single menstrual cycle. The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist COS protocols, started randomly at any day of the menstrual cycle, is today a standard procedure in those cases where obtaining oocytes is an urgent task, such as in case of fertility preservation for malignant diseases or other medical indications.On the other hand, in poor prognosis patients, double ovarian stimulation has been suggested with the aim of maximizing the number of oocytes retrieved within a single menstrual cycle and, in turn increasing the chance to obtain a reproductively competent embryo. Randomized control trials are necessary to confirm these preliminary findings.

  12. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. HLA-G profile of infertile couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Nardi, Fabiola Silva; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; da Graça Bicalho, Maria

    2016-12-01

    HLA-G codes for a non-classical class I (Ib) protein which is mainly expressed in trophoblast cells. Many pieces of evidence pointed out its essential role conferring immunological tolerance to the fetus. Some HLA-G alleles have been linked to enhanced or reduced HLA-G protein levels expression, which have been associated with reproductive failure. In this study 33 couples undergoing ART (assisted reproduction treatment; n=66) and 120 couples who conceived naturally (controls; n=240) were enrolled in the study. Genotyping was performed by SBT and tagged an 1837bp at 5'URR as well as exons 2, 3 and4 of HLA-G. Alleles, genotypes and haplotypes were compared between infertile and control groups using Fisher Exact Test. The haplotype HLA-G ∗ 010101b/HLA-G ∗ 01:01:01 showed statistically significant higher frequency in control groups. The immunogenetics of infertility is complex and might be dependent on different genes involved in the establishment of a successful pregnancy. A better understanding of HLA-G alleles and haplotypes structure and how the genetic diversity at their regulatory sites could impact on their level of expression and build up the susceptibility or protection conditions may shed light on the comprehension of immunogenetics mechanisms acting at the fetus-maternal interface. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Soy food intake and treatment outcomes of women undergoing assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Jose C; Afeiche, Myriam C; Gaskins, Audrey J; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Williams, Paige L; Wright, Diane L; Toth, Thomas L; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-03-01

    To study the relation of dietary phytoestrogens intake and clinical outcomes of women undergoing infertility treatment with the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Prospective cohort study. Fertility center. A total of 315 women who collectively underwent 520 ART cycles from 2007 to 2013. None. Implantation, clinical pregnancy, and live birth rates per initiated cycle. Soy isoflavones intake was positively related to live birth rates in ART. Compared with women who did not consume soy isoflavones, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratios of live birth (95% confidence interval) for women in increasing categories of soy isoflavones intake were 1.32 (0.76-2.27) for women consuming 0.54-2.63 mg/d, 1.87 (1.12-3.14) for women consuming 2.64-7.55 mg/d, and 1.77 (1.03-3.03) for women consuming 7.56-27.89 mg/d. Dietary soy intake was positively related to the probability of having a live birth during infertility treatment with ART. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Najmeh; Yazdkhasti, Fariba; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traitsincluding sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy. This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V), Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised) and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ) were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for Pwomen underwent ART (Pwomen sought surrogacy (Pwomen who sought surrogacy (Pwomen who sought either ART or surrogacy (Pwomen who underwent treatment using ART compared women who tended to have surrogacy. This study shows that demographic variables are effective in happiness of infertile women. Also, there is a significant relation among sensation seeking, flexibility and happiness in infertile women.

  16. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-10-03

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture of the hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but also other biologically active contaminants, such as growth factors, binding proteins and prion proteins. The actual amount of molecular LH in hMG preparations varies considerably due to the purification process, thus hCG, mimicking LH action, is added to standardise the product. However, unlike LH, hCG plays a different role during the natural human menstrual cycle. It is secreted by the embryo and placenta, and its main role is to support implantation and pregnancy. More recently, recombinant gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional differences between LH and hCG and assesses the clinical implications of hCG-supplemented urinary therapy compared with recombinant therapies used for ART.

  17. The appeal to nature implicit in certain restrictions on public funding for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Drew; Braunack-Mayer, Annette

    2011-10-01

    Certain restrictions on public funding for assisted reproductive technology (ART) are articulated and defended by recourse to a distinction between medical infertility and social infertility. We propose that underlying the prioritization of medical infertility is a vision of medicine whose proper role is to restore but not to improve upon nature. We go on to mark moral responses that speak of investments many continue to make in nature as properly an object of reverence and gratitude and therein (sometimes) a source of moral guidance. We draw on the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein in arguing for the plausibility of an appeal to nature in opposition to the charge that it must contain a logical fallacy. We also invite consideration of the moral plausibility of some appeal to nature. Finally, we examine what follows in the case of ART. Should medicine respect as natural limits that should not be overcome: the need for a man and a woman in reproduction; menopause; and even declining fertility with age? We must first ask ourselves to what degree we should defer to nature in the conduct of medicine, at least in the particular if not the general case. This will involve also asking ourselves what we think is natural and in what instances and spirit might we defy nature. Divergent opinions and policies concerning who should receive ART treatment and public funding are more easily understood in view of the centrality, complexity and fundamental nature of these questions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Is there a critical endometrioma size associated with reduced ovarian responsiveness in assisted reproduction techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Maria Elisabetta; Rizzello, Francesca; Barone, Stefano; Pinelli, Sara; Rapalini, Erika; Parri, Cristiana; Caracciolo, Domenico; Papageorgiou, Savvas; Cima, Gianpaolo; Gandini, Loredana

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the relationships between ovarian endometrioma size, ovarian responsiveness and the number of retrieved oocytes following ovarian stimulation. A prospective study was conducted in a public clinical assisted reproduction centre. A total of 64 infertile women with monolateral endometriomas undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection were included in the study. The total number of follicles, number of follicles ≥ 16 mm and number of oocytes retrieved of ovaries containing endometrioma and normal ovaries were compared. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess whether number of follicles and collected oocytes varied by endometrioma size, age, basal FSH concentration. Significantly lower numbers of follicles ≥ 16 mm (P = 0.024) and oocytes retrieved (P = 0.001) in the ovaries containing endometrioma were observed. In patients with endometriomas ≥ 30 mm, endometrioma size was the most influential contributor to the total number of follicles and oocytes retrieved. Ovarian endometriomas result in reduced response to ovarian stimulation, compared with the response of the contralateral normal ovary in the same individual. In case of endometriomas Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inpatient hospitalizations in women with and without assisted reproductive technology live birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Gopal, Daksha; Diop, Hafsatou; Missmer, Stacey A; Coddington, Charles C; Luke, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate frequency of hospitalization before, during, and after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment by cycle outcome. Six thousand and one hundred thirty women residing in Massachusetts undergoing 17,135 cycles of ART reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SARTCORS) from 2004 to 2011 were linked to hospital discharges and vital records. Women were grouped according to ART treatment cycle outcome as: no pregnancy (n = 1840), one or more pregnancies but no live birth (n = 968), or one or more singleton live births (n = 3322). Hospital delivery discharges during 1998-2011 were categorized as occurring before, during, or after the ART treatment. The most prevalent ICD-9 codes for non-delivery hospital discharges were compared. Groups were compared using chi square test using SAS 9.3 software. The proportion of any hospitalization was 57.0, 58.3, and 91.3% for women with no pregnancy, no live birth, and ART singleton live birth, respectively; the proportion of non-delivery hospitalizations was 30.4, 31.0, and 28.3%, respectively. The non-ART delivery proportion after ART treatment did not differ by group (33.4, 36.2, and 36.9%, respectively, p = 0.17). Most frequent non-delivery diagnoses (including fibroids, obesity, ectopic pregnancy, depression, and endometriosis) also did not differ by group. A secondary analysis limited to only women with no delivery discharges before the first ART cycle showed similar results. All groups had live birth deliveries during the study period, suggesting an important contribution of non-ART treatment or treatment-independent conception to overall delivery and live births. Hospitalizations not associated with delivery suggested similarity in morbidity for all ART patients regardless of success with ART treatment.

  20. Does Bariatric Surgery Improve Assisted Reproductive Technology Outcomes in Obese Infertile Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Marco; Sosa Fernandez, Loredana M; Sosa Fernandez, Laura V; Manigrasso, Michele; Elmore, Ugo; De Palma, Giovanni D; Musella, Mario; Milone, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the impact of bariatric surgery on obese infertile women seeking an assisted reproductive technology. All obese women with a history of assisted reproductive technology (ART) failure that underwent ART treatment cycles both prior to and following bariatric surgery were included. ART outcomes were compared evaluating the duration and dose of gonadotrophins used; the measurement of day 3 FSH; the anti-mullerian hormone dosage; the number of follicles >15 mm; the number of retrieved and fertilized oocytes; the number of metaphase II, metaphase I and germinal vesicle oocytes; the number of embryos obtained; the number of top-quality oocytes and embryos; the number of transferred embryo; the pregnancy rate and the live birth rate. Forty women were included. The total number of gonadotropin units required and in the length of stimulation following bariatric surgery decreased (p = .001), with an increase of the number of follicles ≥15 mm (p = .005), of retrieved oocytes (p = .004), of top-quality oocytes (p = .001) and metaphase II oocytes (p = .008). More oocytes were fertilized (4.2 ± 1.7 vs 5.3 ± 2.4; p = .02). After surgery, we have registered also a better number of top-quality embryos (0.5 ± 0.6 vs 1.1 ± 0.9; p = .003). Pregnancy rate following the bariatric surgery increased to 15/40 (37.5%) (p women seeking an ART treatment.

  1. Risk of ectopic pregnancy associated with assisted reproductive technology in the United States, 2001-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kiran M; Boulet, Sheree L; Kissin, Dmitry M; Jamieson, Denise J

    2015-01-01

    To assess national trends in ectopic pregnancy incidence among assisted reproductive technology users and identify risk factors associated with ectopic pregnancy. We identified 553,577 pregnancies reported to the National ART Surveillance System between 2001 and 2011. Of those, 9,480 were ectopic, of which 485 were heterotopic. As a result of small numbers, ectopic and heterotopic pregnancies were combined for analysis. We assessed temporal trends in annual ectopic pregnancy rates using Poisson regression. We used log-binomial regression models with generalized estimating equations for correlated outcomes within clinics to calculate unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient characteristics and treatment factors. The rate of ectopic pregnancy declined from 2.0% (n=735, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-2.2) in 2001 to 1.6% (n=968, 95% CI 1.5-1.7) in 2011 (P for trend ectopic pregnancy rate ranged from 2.0% (n=7,469, 95% CI 1.9-2.0) for fresh, nondonor cycles to 1.0% (n=641, 95% CI 0.9-1.1) for fresh, donor cycles. Among fresh, nondonor cycles, the rate of ectopic pregnancy was 1.6% (95% CI 1.4-1.7) when one embryo was transferred compared with 1.7% (95% CI 1.7-1.8), 2.2% (95% CI 2.1-2.3), and 2.5% (95% CI 2.4-2.6) when two, three, or four or more embryos were transferred, respectively (adjusted risk ratios 1.11, 95% CI 0.94-0.30; 1.33, 95% CI 1.12-1.56; and 1.49, 95% CI 1.25-1.78). Ectopic pregnancy incidence after assisted reproductive technology has decreased over time, but factors such as multiple embryo transfer increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. II.

  2. Effect of Embryo Banking on U.S. National Assisted Reproductive Technology Live Birth Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Albertini, David F; Darmon, Sarah K; Gleicher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) reports generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) exclude embryo banking cycles from outcome calculations. We examined data reported to the CDC in 2013 for the impact of embryo banking exclusion on national ART outcomes by recalculating autologous oocyte ART live birth rates. Inflation of reported fresh ART cycle live birth rates was assessed for all age groups of infertile women as the difference between fresh cycle live births with reference to number of initiated fresh cycles (excluding embryo banking cycles), as typically reported by the CDC, and fresh cycle live births with reference to total initiated fresh ART cycles (including embryo banking cycles). During 2013, out of 121,351 fresh non-donor ART cycles 27,564 (22.7%) involved embryo banking. The proportion of banking cycles increased with female age from 15.5% in women 44 years. Concomitantly, the proportion of thawed cycles decreased with advancing female age (P banking cycles led to inflation of live birth rates in fresh ART cycles, increasing in size in parallel to advancing female age and utilization of embryo banking, reaching 56.3% in women age >44. The inflation of live birth rates in thawed cycles could not be calculated from the publically available CDC data but appears to be even greater. Utilization of embryo banking increased during 2013 with advancing female age, suggesting a potential age selection bias. Exclusion of embryo banking cycles from national ART outcome reports significantly inflated national ART success rates, especially among older women. Exclusion of embryo banking cycles from US National Assisted Reproductive Technology outcome reports significantly inflates reported success rates especially in older women.

  3. Effect of Etanercept on the Success of Assisted Reproductive Technology in Patients with Endometrioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önalan, Göğşen; Tohma, Yusuf Aytaç; Zeyneloğlu, Hulusi Bülent

    2017-11-24

    To determine the effects of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (etanercept) on pregnancy outcomes in patients with endometrioma who were treated with assisted reproductive technology. Sixty-eight infertile patients who had endometrioma were included in our retrospective case-control study. We administered etanercept (Enbrel, 50 mg in 1 mL intramuscularly) to 19 patients on the second day of their previous menstrual cycle. All patients were treated with assisted reproductive technology. Pregnancy and live birth rates (LBR) were documented. When all other parameters (age, body mass index, infertility) are supposed to be constant, the clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in patients who used etanercept in an antagonist protocol than in patients who did not use etanercept (χ2 = 5.547; p = 0.019) but LBR did not reach a statistical significance (χ2 = 3.179; p = 0.075). The use of etanercept had an OR of 4.17 (95% CI 1.23-14.14) compared with not using etanercept for clinical pregnancy rate. The use of etanercept increased the rate of pregnancy (χ2 = 6.55; p = 0.01). The pregnancy rate with the use of etanercept had an OR of 4.23 (95% CI 1.35-13.25) compared with patients who did not use etanercept. In the same way, the use of etanercept increased LBR twofold, but it is not significant in the border line (χ2 = 3.771; p = 0.052). Etanercept may be a new non-hormonal therapy that may be an adjunct to treatment of infertile women with endometrioma. However, the safety of etanercept on embryos and fetuses has not been fully clarified. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Regulating Lesbian Motherhood: Gender, Sexuality and Medically Assisted Reproduction in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Cristina Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses juridical discourses about Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR in Portugal, focusing specifically on the access of lesbians to this type of intervention. Empirical data refer to an exploratory research that combined the analysis of legislation with non-directive interviews to five judges from Family and Juvenile Courts of Law of the Northern Region of Portugal. One argues that the representation of motherhood present in the law reinforces and reproduces normative sexuality and femininity while simultaneously justifies the exclusion of lesbians from MAR. As such, although Portuguese legislation emerges as a mechanism of partial deregulation of the gender regime since it appears to weaken the practical and causal association between sexuality and procreation, in fact, it ends up reinforcing dominant ideas of femininity and family. As for the judges who were interviewed, their representations of motherhood are broad enough to encompass medically assisted motherhood and/or motherhood accomplished within a lesbian couple. This is achieved through a process of normalisation of the lesbian and/or of lesbian motherhood, which may resort to five different assumptions: (i parenthood as a desire inherent to every human being; (ii motherhood as a defining element of femininity; (iii motherhood as a project framed by a stable conjugal relationship; (iv lesbian motherhood as something that can be accomplished through “natural” means; (v parenthood as a mechanism of social reproduction of the gender regime. These assumptions are differently combined and support different positions regarding lesbian motherhood: although some judges seem to concur with the preservation of heteronormativity, most favour legal changes to encompass other models of sexuality and family.

  5. New Zealand University students' knowledge of fertility decline in women via natural pregnancy and assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Nathanael; Rosario, Roseanne; Shelling, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Female fertility declines with age. University students are the group of people most likely to postpone parenthood, yet several international studies have shown that they overestimate their fertility. We designed a questionnaire based on a previous study in Israel, where university students were asked to answer questions related to their awareness of fertility decline in spontaneous and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) pregnancies, and methods they considered would prolong their reproductive lifespan. Our study has shown that New Zealand University students overestimated the rates of pregnancy for both spontaneous natural and IVF pregnancies. Students are mainly aware of the availability of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), but overestimate their effectiveness. Few students mentioned non-medical or well-being initiatives as measures to prolong parenthood. It is important that university students are aware of the rate of fertility decline in women, as although ARTs can be effective at times, they are not a guaranteed solution to an ageing woman's fertility. New Zealand University students, like other cohorts, overestimated the chances of a woman getting pregnant and predicted the fertility decline to occur much later than it does in reality.

  6. Perinatal outcome of singleton siblings born after assisted reproductive technology and spontaneous conception: Danish national sibling-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Pinborg, Anja; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Vestergaard, Christina; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2011-03-01

    To compare the perinatal outcome of singleton siblings conceived differently. National population-based registry study. Denmark, from 1994 to 2008. Pairs of siblings (13,692 pairs; n = 27,384 children) conceived after IVF, intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI), frozen embryo replacement (FER), or spontaneous conception subcategorized into five groups according to succession: [1] IVF-ICSI vs. spontaneous conception (n = 7,758), [2] IVF-ICSI vs. FER (n = 716), [3] FER vs. FER (n = 34), [4] IVF-ICSI vs. IVF-ICSI (n = 2,876), and [5] spontaneous conception vs. spontaneous conception (n = 16,000). Observations were obtained from national registries. Birth weight, gestational age, low birth weight (conception method. Higher risk of low birth weight with (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95%CI, 1.1-1.7] and preterm birth (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6] was observed in IVF/ICSI compared with spontaneous conception. When differentiating between order and mode of conception, it seems that assisted reproductive technology plays a role in mean birth weight and risk of low birth weight and preterm birth. Birth weight was higher in siblings born after FER compared with fresh embryos replacement. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporal and geospatial trends in male factor infertility with assisted reproductive technology in the United States from 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odisho, Anobel Y; Nangia, Ajay K; Katz, Patricia P; Smith, James F

    2014-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence of male factor infertility diagnosis within the context of assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics and its geographic and temporal distribution from 1999-2010. Population study based on patients presenting for care at ART centers. Clinics providing ART services. All male patients seeking infertility care at ART clinics. Data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, analyzed, geocoded, and mapped. Prevalence of male factor infertility diagnosis in a couple seeking infertility care. Between 1999 and 2010, 1,057,402 cycles of ART using nonfrozen, nondonor eggs were performed, increasing from 62,809 cycles in 1999 to 99,289 cycles in 2010. Nationwide in ART clinics, the period prevalence of isolated male factor infertility was 17.1% and the prevalence of overall male factor infertility diagnoses was 34.6%. The highest prevalence was reported in New Mexico (56.4%) and lowest in Mississippi (24.2%). The prevalence of male factor infertility diagnosis varies significantly by time and space within the United States, whereas its overall prevalence has remained remarkably stable. This study provides the spatial analytic framework for future research to explore factors associated with male factor infertility. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. reproduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and research, such as human reproductive cloning.“ However, despite advances in ART the proportion of ... religions such as Islam completely forbid them, and in many countries there is strict regulation of treatment. Although sperm cryopreservation in humans was introduced in 1953,13 sperm donation commenced using.

  9. Can the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) be used to accurately report clinic total reproductive potential (TRP)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Hickman, Timothy N; Kinzer, Donna; Penzias, Alan S; Ball, G David; Gibbons, William E

    2012-04-01

    To assess whether total reproductive potential (TRP), the chance of a live birth from each fresh cycle (fresh cycle plus frozen transfers), could be calculated from the national Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) database and whether information not available in SART CORS resulted in significant changes to the TRP calculation. Retrospective study using SART CORS and clinic data. Three assisted reproductive technology clinics. Women undergoing ART. None. Two- and three-year TRPs for 2005 and 2006 were calculated according to patient age at cycle start by linking fresh to frozen cycles up to first live birth. Clinic records were used to adjust for (remove) frozen cycles that used more than one fresh cycle as a source of embryos and for any embryos donated to other patients or research or shipped to another facility before a live birth. TRP was higher than fresh per-cycle rates for most ages at all clinics, although accuracy was compromised when there were fewer than 20 cycles per category. Two- and 3-year TRPs differed in only 2 of 24 calculations. Adjusted TRPs differed less than three percentage points from unadjusted TRPs when volume was sufficient. Clinic TRP can be calculated from SART CORS. Data suggest that calculations of clinic TRP from the national dataset would be meaningful. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intrauterine administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciunas, Laurentiu; Tsampras, Nikolaos; Coomarasamy, Arri; Raine-Fenning, Nick

    2016-05-20

    Subfertility affects 15% of couples and represents the inability to conceive naturally following 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. Assisted reproduction refers to procedures involving the in vitro handling of both human gametes and represents a key option for many subfertile couples. Most women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment will reach the stage of embryo transfer (ET) but the proportion of embryos that successfully implant following ET has remained small since the mid-1990s. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone synthesised and released by the syncytiotrophoblast and has a fundamental role in embryo implantation and the early stages of pregnancy. Intrauterine administration of synthetic or natural hCG via an ET catheter during a mock procedure around the time of ET is a novel approach that has recently been suggested to improve the outcomes of assisted reproduction. To investigate whether the intrauterine administration of hCG around the time of ET improves the clinical outcomes in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction. We performed a comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, registers of ongoing trials andreference lists of all included studies and relevant reviews (from inception to 10 November 2015), in consultation with the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating intrauterine administration of hCG around the time of ET in this review irrespective of language and country of origin. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, extracted data from studies and attempted to contact the authors where data were missing. We performed statistical analysis using Review Manager 5 in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of

  11. Assisted reproductive techniques for cattle breeding in developing countries: a critical appraisal of their value and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2012-01-01

    Commercialization of animal biotechnologies, including those related to reproduction [also known as assisted reproductive techniques (ARTS)], is an increasing reality in developing countries, following the enormous flow of information around us and the increasing global commercial interests in areas where cattle production has its major assets. The present review discusses the achievements of various biotechnological tools for reproduction in cattle including semen handling for artificial insemination (AI), superovulation and embryo transfer (MOET), in vitro handling of oocytes and production of embryos, reproductive cloning and emerging technologies (sex selection, gene targeting and nuclear transfer for livestock transgenesis, genomics for marker-assisted selection, etc.). The application of these technologies for cattle breeding is critically discussed in relation to their impact in the improvement of the efficiency of dairy and beef production in developed and - particularly - in developing countries, which ultimately rule the possibilities of a competitive and sound production of food for human consumption. Despite the remarkable progress made and the punctual importance of some of the above-mentioned technologies, AI remains the most important assisted reproductive technology (ART) in developing countries. Any attempt to gain widespread of any other ART under the predominant economical conditions in developing countries ought to match the simplicity and the success of AI as a breeding tool. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Italian law on medically assisted reproduction: do women's autonomy and health matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riezzo, Irene; Neri, Margherita; Bello, Stefania; Pomara, Cristoforo; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-07-23

    In Italy in 2004, a very restrictive law was passed on medically assisted reproduction (MAR) (Law 40/2004) that placed Italy at the most conservative end of the European spectrum. The law was widely criticized and many couples seeking MAR brought their cases before the Italian Civil Courts with regard to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), donor insemination and the issue of consent. Ten years on, having suffered the blows of the Italian Constitutional Court, little remains of law 40/2004. In 2009, the Constitutional Court declared the maximum limit of the number of embryos to be produced and transferred for each cycle (i.e. three), as stated in the original version of the law, to be constitutionally illegitimate. In 2014, the same Court declared as unconstitutional the ban on donor insemination, thus opening the way to heterologous assisted reproduction. Heterologous MAR is therefore perfectly legitimate in Italy. Finally, in 2015 a further ruling by the Constitutional Court granted the right to access MAR to couples who are fertile but carriers of genetic diseases. However, there is still much room for criticism. Many couples and groups are still, in fact, excluded from MAR. Same-sex couples, single women and those of advanced reproductive age are, at the present time, discriminated against in that Italian law denies these subjects access to MAR. The history of Law 40/2004 has been a particularly troubled one. Numerous rulings have, over the years, dismantled much of a law constructed in violation of the rights and autonomy of women and couples. However, a number of troubling issues still exist from what is left of the law and the debate is still open at national and transnational level regarding some of the contradictions and gaps in the law highlighted in this article. Only by abolishing the final prohibitions and adopting more liberal views on these controversial yet crucial issues will Law 40/2004 become what it should have been from the start, i.e. a

  13. Effectiveness of human menopausal gonadotropin versus recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted reproductive cycles: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wely, Madelon; Westergaard, Lars G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; van der Veen, Fulco

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of hMG and recombinant FSH after down-regulation for ovulation stimulation in assisted reproductive cycles. Design: Meta-analysis. Setting: Infertility centers providing assisted reproductive techniques. Patient(s): Two thousand thirty women undergoing IVF or

  14. Past performance of assisted reproduction technologies as a model to predict future progress: a proposed addendum to Moore's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jacques; Alikani, Mina; Bisignano, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    The ultimate goal of IVF is to achieve healthy, single, live births following each single-embryo transfer. A timeline for this eventuality has never been defined. National implantation rates from 2003-2010 provided by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies (SART) in the USA were evaluated. Regression analysis was applied to the annual trends. A high correlation was noted showing a linear increase from year to year ranging between 0.3% and 1.5% when maternal age was not higher than 42. This relationship can be retrospectively applied to earlier SART data reports. This incline may be partly technology driven and resembles Moore's law, which describes annual improvements in microchip performance. Based on the assumption that technology will continue to drive progress, the length of time required to reach 100% implantation was calculated. The interval varied between 43 years (AD 2053) for the youngest age group (Assisted Reproductive Technologies (SART; www.sart.org). Through SART, individual clinic's outcomes may be assessed. Although live birth and pregnancy are considered the gold standard of success, the investigators took the approach that those outcomes are often biased due to transfer of multiple embryos. The present analysis was therefore performed on individual embryos, by using the implantation rate to compare national and individual clinic datasets. National implantation rates show a linear increase from year to year ranging between 0.3% and 1.5% for patients aged technology driven. This is an intriguing effect also seen in the computer industry where there has been a doubling of computer speed and memory for the past 47 years, a phenomenon anticipated by Moore's law. We predict that the annual increase in implantation will also continue as new technologies become available. Based on current trends, the length of time for 100% implantation rates was calculated. Time to achieving 100% implantation varied between 43 years (AD 2053) for the youngest

  15. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score

  16. Live birth and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease receiving assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz; Larsen, P V; Fedder, J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the chance of live births and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) compared with women without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This was a nationwide...

  17. The total pregnancy potential per oocyte aspiration after assisted reproduction-in how many cycles are biologically competent oocytes available?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmen, J G; Rodríguez, N M; Andreasen, L D

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: While stimulation of women prior to assisted reproduction is associated with increased success rates, the total biological pregnancy potential per stimulation cycle is rarely assessed. METHODS: Retrospective sequential cohort study of the cumulative live birth rate in 1148 first IVF/ICSI...

  18. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harper, J.; Geraedts, J.; Borry, P.; Cornel, M.C.; Dondorp, W.J.; Gianaroli, L.; Harton, G.; Milachich, T.; Kaariainen, H.; Liebaers, I.; Morris, M.; Sequeiros, J.; Sermon, K.; Shenfield, F.; Skirton, H.; Soini, S.; Spits, C.; Veiga, A.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Viville, S.; de Wert, G.; Macek, M.

    2014-01-01

    Study question: How has the interface between genetics and assisted reproduction technology (ART) evolved since 2005? Summary answer: The interface between ART and genetics has become more entwined as we increase our understanding about the genetics of infertility and we are able to perform more

  19. [Extension of assisted reproductive technologies with donor sperm (ARTD) to non-medical indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In France as in other countries, more and more single women and lesbian couples wish to become mothers. To carry through their parenting project they may consult a physician in France and often go abroad in order to get Assisted Reproductive Technologies with donor sperm (ARTD). Should ARTD be available to those women in France? The physician has not to take the decision. In such situations ARTD has no medical indication or contraindication. This assisted procreation raises many questions on children development and well-being. The results of studies made in other countries are often reassuring but their methodologies do not allow any conclusion to be drawn and grey areas persist. Therefore it should be necessary to develop a research effort in the field as it recently started in France. Would ARTD access to women without a male partner be legalized, the law should respect the ethical principles of non-payment and anonymity associated with donation of all body components. In any case, it should also allow an efficient medical care to be performed to ensure under the best conditions the well-being of the children and their mothers.

  20. Impact of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in women on oxidative stress in the antral follicle and assisted reproduction outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Ashraf; Ramezanzadeh, Fatemeh; Esfahani, Mohammad Hosein Nasr; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar; Nejat, Saharnaz; Rahimi-Foroshani, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoke contains many oxidants and may alter the human reproduction by inducing oxidative stress (OS) in both active and passive smokers. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure on oxidative stress in the follicular fluid and the assisted reproduction outcomes. Materials and Methods: An observational prospective study was carried out on 236 infertile women, who underwent assisted reproduction cycles. The ETS exposure was assessed using self-reported ETS exposure and the cotinine level in follicular fluid. To evaluate the OS in follicular fluid (FF) malon-di-aldehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured. The number of retrieved oocytes, rate of metaphase II stage oocytes, fertilization rate, good cleavage rate, and no-fragmented embryo rate were considered as the assisted reproduction outcomes. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index, duration, and etiology of infertility; P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The MDA and TAC levels in FF were not related to the self-report number of the weekly ETS exposure and cotinine levels in FF. Also, the number of retrieved oocytes, MII stage oocytes, fertilization rate, good cleavage rate, and no-fragmented embryo rate were not related to the cotinine level and weekly ETS exposure. However, in women whose cotinine levels in FF were lower and equal/above 3.5 ng/ml, the number of retrieved oocytes was higher (12.63 ± .71 vs. 9.28 ± 1.11, P = 0.01). The relationship between the MDA level and cleavage rate (Beta = −18.5, confidence interval-34.9 and-2.1, P reproduction success by influencing the number of available oocytes. Although, the OS in a follicular environment affect the ability of oocytes to reach the specific cleavage stages at appropriate time intervals, it does not mediate poor-assisted reproduction outcomes due to ETS exposure. PMID:24379845

  1. Multivariate analysis of factors affecting probability of pregnancy and live birth with in vitro fertilization: an analysis of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Valerie L; Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Alvero, Ruben; Frattarelli, John L; Usadi, Rebecca; Grainger, David A; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate factors predictive of clinical pregnancy and of pregnancy loss from assisted reproductive technology (ART) using data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology database for 2004-2006. Retrospective cohort. Clinic-based data. The study population included 225,889 fresh embryo transfer cycles using autologous oocytes and partner semen. None. Clinical intrauterine gestation (presence of gestational sac) and live birth (>or=22 weeks gestation and >or=300 g birth weight). Increasing maternal age was significantly associated with a reduced odds of conception and increased fetal loss until 19 weeks gestation, but not with later pregnancy loss. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), assisted hatching, and increasing number of embryos transferred had significant positive effects on the odds of conception and pregnancy continuation through the first trimester, but did not affect the risk of later loss. Blacks, Asians, and Hispanics had significantly lower odds of clinical pregnancy compared with whites. Also compared with whites, Hispanics and Asians had a significantly greater risk of pregnancy loss in the second and third trimesters, and blacks had a significantly greater risk of pregnancy loss in all trimesters. Certain demographic and ART treatment parameters influenced chance of conception and early pregnancy loss, whereas black race and Hispanic ethnicity were also significantly associated with late pregnancy loss in ART-conceived pregnancies. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ovulatory disorders are an independent risk factor for pregnancy complications in women receiving assisted reproduction treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Sumita; Hng, Tien-Ming; Smith, Howard; Bradford, Jennifer; McLean, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Conception using assisted reproduction treatments (ART) has been associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications. It is uncertain if this is caused by ART directly, or is an association of the underlying factors causing infertility. We assessed the relationship between assisted conception (AC) and maternal or fetal complications in a large retrospective cohort study. In a nested cohort of women receiving infertility treatment, we determined if such risk rests predominantly with certain causes of infertility. Retrospective database analysis of 50 381 women delivering a singleton pregnancy in four public hospital obstetric units in western Sydney, and a nested cohort of 508 women receiving ART at a single fertility centre, in whom the cause of infertility was known. A total of 1727 pregnancies followed AC; 48 654 were spontaneous conceptions. Adjusted for age, body mass index and smoking, AC was associated with increased risk of preterm delivery (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.50-2.02), hypertension (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.34-1.82) and diabetes (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.30-1.75). In the nested cohort, ovulatory dysfunction was present in 145 women and 336 had infertility despite normal ovulatory function. Ovulatory dysfunction was associated with increased risk of diabetes (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.72-5.02) and hypertension (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.15-5.00) compared to women with normal ovulatory function. Assisted conception is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications. This risk appears greatest for women whose underlying infertility involves ovulatory dysfunction. Such disorders probably predispose towards diabetes and hypertension, which is then exacerbated by pregnancy. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Birthweight percentiles by gestational age for births following assisted reproductive technology in Australia and New Zealand, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuoyang; Wang, Yueping A; Ledger, William; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-01

    What is the standard of birthweight for gestational age for babies following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment? Birthweight for gestational age percentile charts were developed for singleton births following ART treatment using population-based data. Small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) births are at increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A birthweight percentile chart allows the detection of neonates at high risk, and can help inform the need for special care if required. This population study used data from the Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Database (ANZARD) for 72 694 live born singletons following ART treatment between January 2002 and December 2010 in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 69 315 births (35 580 males and 33 735 females) following ART treatment were analysed for the birthweight percentile. Exact percentiles of birthweight in grams were calculated for each gestational week between Week 25 and 42 for fresh and thaw cycles by infant sex. Univariate analysis was used to determine the exact birthweight percentile values. Student t-test was used to examine the mean birthweight difference between male and female infants, between single embryo transfer (SET) and double embryo transfer (DET) and between fresh and thaw cycles. Preterm births (birth before 37 completed weeks of gestation) and low birthweight (fetal growth standards but only the weight of live born infants at birth. The comparison of birthweight percentile charts for ART births and general population births provide evidence that the proportion of SGA births following ART treatment was comparable to the general population for SET fresh cycles and significantly lower for thaw cycles. Both fresh and thaw cycles showed better outcomes for singleton births following SET compared with DET. Policies to promote single embryo transfer should be considered in order to minimize the adverse perinatal outcomes associated

  4. Sujetos y cuerpos asistidos: un análisis de la reproducción asistida en el Río de la Plata = Assisted subjects and bodies: an analysis of assisted reproduction in the Río de la Plata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Cherro, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of assisted reproductive technologies in the Rio de la Plata and the cultural senses that underlie this process, allow the reproduction of certain subjects while deny or limit the reproductive potential of others. To distinct which one can be elective for procedures, technologies play an important role in defining what is natural and what is not. In this paper I describe the forms of domination on body dimension that the development of assisted reproductive technologies in the Rio de la Plata imposes to women and which are the cultural bases that support this process. This goal is achieved using interviews with specialists in TRA and also with women who have gone through different treatments. It can be concluded that there is a strong heterocentered order in the practice of rioplatense reproductive medicine in addition to a guidance to take control urgently and specifically to the female body

  5. AMH and AMHR2 polymorphisms and AMH serum level can predict assisted reproduction outcomes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Carla; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Gastaldo, Guilherme G; Christofolini, Denise M; Cordts, Emerson Barchi; Barbosa, Caio P; Bianco, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    In human assisted reproduction, the ovarian response to exogenous recombinant Follicle-stimulating Hormone (FSH) therapy is variable and difficult to predict. The standard protocol of ovarian hyperstimulation can result in satisfactory response; however, an unsatisfactory response necessitates FSH dose adjustment or results in ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Polymorphisms in AMH and AMHR2 genes appear to affect hormone biological activities, thus affecting follicle recruitment and development, leading to infertility. We aimed to evaluate AMH and AMHR2 polymorphisms in infertile women, and correlate those findings with AMH, FSH and estradiol serum level response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH), as well as assisted reproduction outcomes. A cross-sectional study comprising 186 infertile women that underwent one cycle of high complexity assisted reproductive treatment. Blood samples were collected and a TaqMan assay was used for AMH G146T/rs10407022 and AMHR2 A-482G/rs2002555, A10G/rs11170555, C1749G/rs2071558 and G4952A/rs3741664 genotyping, and FSH, estradiol and AMH levels were measured. The findings were correlated to human reproduction outcomes. AMH rs10407022 and AMHR2 rs2002555 polymorphisms were not associated with hormonal measurements, whereas AMHR2 rs11170555 and rs3741664 were positively associated with AMH, estradiol and FSH levels. The genotype distribution of AMH and AMHR2 genes according to Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation did not show a positive association. However, an association with AFC, degree of oocyte maturation (allele G of AMHR2 rs2071558) the number of embryos produced (alleles T and G of AMH rs10407022 and AMHR2 rs2002555, respectively) and frozen embryo (allele G of AMHR2 rs11170555) were found to be statistically associated. Considering COH, serum AMH and AFC were a positive predictor to OHSS. Regarding serum AMH and assisted reproduction outcomes, a positive correlation with all variables studied was found

  6. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in relation to history of infertility and use of assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Snigdha; Wang, Hongyue; Hoeger, Kathy; Swan, Shanna H; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Redmon, Bruce J; Nguyen, Ruby; Barrett, Emily S

    2015-11-01

    To examine urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in pregnant women with planned pregnancies in relation to history of infertility and use of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Phthalate metabolite concentrations were measured in first-trimester urine samples collected from women participating in a prospective pregnancy cohort study. Prenatal clinics. A total of 750 women, of whom 86 had a history of infertility. Forty-one women used ART to conceive. None. Primary outcomes were concentrations of four metabolites of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and their molar sum (∑DEHP). Multivariable analyses compared phthalate metabolite levels in [1] women reporting a history of infertility vs. those who did not (comparison group); and [2] those who used ART to conceive the index pregnancy vs. women with a history of infertility who did not use ART. Among women with a history of infertility, ∑DEHP was significantly lower in women who conceived after ART compared with those who did not (geometric mean ratio: 0.83; 95% confidence interval 0.71-0.98). Similar significant associations were observed for all of the individual DEHP metabolites. There were no differences in DEHP metabolite concentrations between women with a history of infertility and the comparison group. Women who used ART to conceive had lower first-trimester phthalate metabolite concentrations than women with a history of infertility who did not use ART. Further research is needed to explore whether those pursuing fertility treatments take precautions to avoid exposure to environmental toxins, to improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of letrozole in assisted reproduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Antonio; Herrero, Julio; Landeras, José; Navarro, Esperanza; Neyro, José L.; Salvador, Cristina; Tur, Rosa; Callejo, Justo; Checa, Miguel A.; Farré, Magí; Espinós, Juan J.; Fábregues, Francesc; Graña-Barcia, María

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Letrozole is the third-generation aromatase inhibitor (AI) most widely used in assisted reproduction. AIs induce ovulation by inhibiting estrogen production; the consequent hypoestrogenic state increases GnRH release and pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) synthesis. METHODS A systematic search of the literature was performed for both prospective and retrospective studies. Meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were performed for three comparisons: letrozole versus clomiphene citrate (CC), letrozole + FSH versus FSH in intrauterine insemination (IUI) and letrozole + FSH versus FSH in IVF. In the absence of RCTs, non-randomized studies were pooled. RESULTS Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Four RCTs compared the overall effect of letrozole with CC in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. The pooled result was not significant for ovulatory cycles (OR = 1.17; 95% CI 0.66–2.09), or for pregnancy rate per cycle (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 0.73–2.96) or for pregnancy rate per patient (OR = 1.37; 95% CI 0.70–2.71). In three retrospective studies which compared L + FSH with FSH in ovarian stimulation for IUI, the pooled OR was 1.15 (95% CI 0.78−1.71). A final meta-analysis included one RCT and one cohort study that compared letrozole + gonadotrophin versus gonadotrophin alone: the pooled pregnancy rate per patient was not significantly different (OR = 1.40; 95% CI 0.67–2.91). CONCLUSIONS Letrozole is as effective as other methods of ovulation induction. Further randomized-controlled studies are warranted to define more clearly the efficacy and safety of letrozole in human reproduction. PMID:18812422

  8. The association between poor ovarian response and thrombophilia in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Ben-Ami, Moshe; Izhaki, Ido; Jadaon, Jimmy; Brenner, Benjamin; Sarig, Galit

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between thrombophilic risk factors and poor ovarian response in an assisted reproductive technologies (ART) setting. This is a preliminary prospective cohort study in a university affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Eighty-nine infertile women undergoing IVF-ET treatment were recruited. Following IVF-ET treatment, the 28 women that had ≤ 3 oocytes on retrieval were the study group, and the 61 women that had ≥ 4 oocytes on retrieval were the control group. All women underwent ovarian reserve testing and thrombophilia work-up prior to treatment. Patients' characteristics, except for chronological age, were similar between the two groups. Women in the study group had clear manifestations of low ovarian reserve, evident by ovarian reserve testing, controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation and IVF-ET treatment results, as compared to the control group. The incidence of all thrombophilias tested was similar between the study and control group. Moreover, the incidence of any single or combined thrombophilia was also similar between the two groups. Logistic regression model analysis and Pearson correlation tests did not show significant correlation between number of oocytes retrieved and thrombophilia. Furthermore, basal ovarian reserve tests did not differ between women with and without thrombophilia. When only the 48 women ≤ 35 years of were analyzed, the five women in the study group had significantly higher incidence of a single as well as combined thrombophilia as compared to the 43 controls. Thrombophilic risk factors have no correlation with poor ovarian response in the general infertile population undergoing ART. Whether premature low ovarian reserve is linked to thrombophilia remains to be established. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum and follicular fluid organochlorine concentrations among women undergoing assisted reproduction technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Missmer, Stacey A; Altshul, Larisa; Vitonis, Allison F; Ryan, Louise; Cramer, Daniel W; Hauser, Russ

    2009-07-14

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides, is widespread among the general population. There is evidence of adverse effects on reproduction and early pregnancy in relation to organochlorine exposure but human studies remain limited. The increased use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) presents unique opportunities for the assessment of environmental influences on early pregnancy outcomes not otherwise observable in humans, but studies need to be designed to maximize the efficiency of the exposure data collected while minimizing exposure measurement error. The present study was conducted to assess the correlation between concentrations of organochlorines in serum and follicular fluid samples collected from a subset of women undergoing ART in a large study that took place between 1994 and 2003, as well as the temporal reliability of serum organochlorine concentrations among women undergoing multiple ART cycles in the study. PCB congeners (118, 138, 153, and 180), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT), the DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and mirex were measured in 72 follicular fluid samples and 265 serum samples collected from 110 women. Organochlorine concentrations in paired serum and follicular fluid samples were correlated, with Pearson and Spearman coefficients ranging from 0.60 to 0.92. Serum organochlorine concentrations were two- to three-fold greater than in follicular fluid, and a significant inverse trend was observed in the distribution of follicular fluid:serum ratios with increasing molecular weight of the compound (p-value for trend single serum sample to adequately represent a more biologically relevant dose (concentrations in follicular fluid), as well as exposure levels over time, in epidemiological studies of ART outcomes in relation to organochlorine exposure.

  10. Serum and follicular fluid organochlorine concentrations among women undergoing assisted reproduction technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Louise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs and organochlorine pesticides, is widespread among the general population. There is evidence of adverse effects on reproduction and early pregnancy in relation to organochlorine exposure but human studies remain limited. The increased use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART presents unique opportunities for the assessment of environmental influences on early pregnancy outcomes not otherwise observable in humans, but studies need to be designed to maximize the efficiency of the exposure data collected while minimizing exposure measurement error. Methods The present study was conducted to assess the correlation between concentrations of organochlorines in serum and follicular fluid samples collected from a subset of women undergoing ART in a large study that took place between 1994 and 2003, as well as the temporal reliability of serum organochlorine concentrations among women undergoing multiple ART cycles in the study. PCB congeners (118, 138, 153, and 180, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (p,p'-DDT, the DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene (HCB, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and mirex were measured in 72 follicular fluid samples and 265 serum samples collected from 110 women. Results Organochlorine concentrations in paired serum and follicular fluid samples were correlated, with Pearson and Spearman coefficients ranging from 0.60 to 0.92. Serum organochlorine concentrations were two- to three-fold greater than in follicular fluid, and a significant inverse trend was observed in the distribution of follicular fluid:serum ratios with increasing molecular weight of the compound (p-value for trend Conclusion Our results support the use of a single serum sample to adequately represent a more biologically relevant dose (concentrations in follicular fluid, as well as exposure levels over time, in epidemiological studies of

  11. Assisted reproduction techniques in Latin America: the Latin American Registry, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Crosby, Javier; Musri, Carolina; Urbina, Maria Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Multinational data on assisted reproduction techniques (IVF and intractytoplasmic sperm injection [ICSI], frozen embryo transfer, oocyte donation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis and fertility preservation) were collected from 159 institutions in 15 Latin American countries. A total of 41.34% of IVF-ICSI cycles were conducted in women aged 35-39 years and 23.35% in women aged 40 years and older. After removing freeze-all cases, delivery rate per oocyte retrieval was 25.05% for ICSI and 27.41% for IVF. Multiple births included 20.78% twins and 0.92% triplets and over. In oocyte donation, twins reached 28.93% and triplets 1.07%. Preterm deliveries reached 16.4% in singletons, 55.02% in twins and 76% in triplets. Perinatal mortality in 18,162 births was 23 per 1000 in singletons, 35 per 1000 in twins, and 36 per 1000 in high-order multiples. Elective single embryo transfer represented 2.63% of fresh transfers, with a 32.15% delivery rate per transfer. Elective double embryo transfer represented 23.74% of transfers, with a 41.03% delivery rate per transfer; 11,373 babies (62.6%) were singletons; 6398 (35.2%) twins, and 391 (2.2%), triplets and more. Given the effect of multiple births on prematurity, morbidity and perinatal mortality, reinforcing the existing trend of reducing the number of embryos transferred is mandatory. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased incidence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia after assisted reproductive technology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueping A; Chughtai, Abrar A; Farquhar, Cynthia M; Pollock, Wendy; Lui, Kei; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    To determine the association between assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and the rate of combined gestational hypertension (GH), preeclampsia (PE). Retrospective population study. Not applicable. A total of 596,520 mothers (3.6% ART mothers) who gave birth between 2007 and 2011. Not applicable. Comparison of the rate of GH/PE for ART and non-ART mothers, with odds ratio (OR), adjusted odds ratio (AOR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) used to assess the association between ART and GH/PE. The overall rate of GH/PE was 4.3%, with 6.4% for ART mothers and 4.3% for non-ART mothers. The rate of GH/PE was higher for mothers of twins than singletons (12.4% vs. 5.7% for ART mothers; 8.6% vs. 4.2% for non-ART mothers). The ART mothers had a 17% increased odds of GH/PE compared with the non-ART mothers (AOR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.10-1.24). After stratification by plurality, the difference in GH/PE rates between ART and non-ART mothers was not statistically significant, with AOR 1.05 (95% CI, 0.98-1.12) for mothers of singletons and AOR 1.10 (95% CI, 0.94-1.30) for mothers of twins. The changes in AOR after stratification indicated that multiple pregnancies after ART are the single most likely explanation for the increased rate of GH/PE among ART mothers. The lower rate of GH/PE among mothers of singletons compared with mothers of twins suggests that a policy to minimize multiple pregnancies after ART may reduce the excess risk of GH/PE due to ART treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Maternal Smoking Among Women With and Without Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Van T.; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Bernson, Dana; Copeland, Glenn; Boulet, Sheree L.; Zhang, Yujia; Jamieson, Denise J.; England, Lucinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate smoking prevalence during the year before pregnancy and during pregnancy and adverse outcomes among women who delivered infants with and without assisted reproductive technology (ART) using linked birth certificates (BC) and National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data. Methods Data were analyzed for 384,390 women and 392,248 infants born in Massachusetts and Michigan during 2008–2009. Maternal smoking prevalence was estimated using smoking indicated from BC by ART status. For ART users, to evaluate underreporting, prepregnancy smoking was estimated from BC, NASS, or both sources. Effect of prenatal smoking on preterm and mean birthweight (term only) for singleton infants were examined by ART status. Results Maternal smoking prevalence estimates were significantly lower for ART users than nonusers (pre-pregnancy = 3.2% vs. 16.7%; prenatal = 1.0% vs. 11.1%, p smoking information from BC and NASS, prepregnancy smoking prevalence estimates for ART users could be as high as 4.4% to 6.1%. Adverse effects of smoking on infant outcomes in ART pregnancies were consistent with the effects seen in non-ART pregnancies, specifically decline in infant birthweight and increase in preterm delivery, although association between smoking and preterm was not significant. Conclusion A low, but substantial proportion of ART users smoked before and during pregnancy. As ART users are highly motivated to get pregnant, it should be clearly communicated that smoking can decrease fertility and adversely affect pregnancy outcomes. Continued efforts are needed to encourage smoking cessation and maintain tobacco abstinence among all women of reproductive age. PMID:27243366

  14. AB28. Management of male factor infertility: present on the assisted reproductive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a common yet complex problem affecting approximately 10-15% of couples attempting to conceive a baby. Especially, 40-50% of these factors are known as male-related disorders. Unlike female infertility, the cause of which is often easily identified, diagnosing male factors can be difficult. Male infertility is due to low sperm production, abnormal sperm function or blockages of sperm transport. Classical semen analysis in laboratory, which include sperm concentration, motility and morphology gives an approximate evaluation of the functional competence of spermatozoa, but does not always reflect the quality of sperm DNA. The fertilizing potential of sperm depends not only on the functional competence of spermatozoa but also on sperm DNA integrity. The most commonly used techniques to assess sperm DNA integrity are the TUNEL assay, Comet assay, SCSA assay and hallo sperm assay. Recent studies have highlighted the significance of sperm DNA integrity as an important factor which affects functional competence of the sperm. Sperm DNA damage has been closely associated with numerous indicators of reproductive health including fertilization, embryo quality, implantation, spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations. To overcome male infertility, there are variety of surgical and non-surgical urological procedures and medical-pharmacological interventions, and advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Among the surgically retrieved methods, there are TESE, TFNA, PESA and MESA that is used with ICSI. The ART, augmented with ICSI in moderate to serve cases, efficiently treat a variety of male infertility disorders by constituting validated and successfully treatment methods. Also, this technique is employed because the limited numbers and functional capacity of motile sperm that can be obtained. Especially, there are technologies such as IMSI and PICSI that are used to select healthy sperms.

  15. The "vanishing follicle" in women with low number of developing follicles during assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Yakovi, Shiran; Izhaki, Ido; Haddad, Sami; Ben-Ami, Moshe

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of the "vanishing follicle" phenomenon in women with low number of developing follicles in assisted reproduction. Women with ≤ 6 follicles on the day of hCG administration with ≥ 14mm diameter were prospectively studied. Primary outcome measures were disappearance of ≥14mm and all-diameter follicles on the day of oocyte pick-up compared to the day of hCG administration. Among the 120 women recruited, 95 were found eligible and completed the study. The "vanishing follicle" phenomenon occurred in 3.1% (95% confidence level: 0.7%-9.0%) and 18.9% (95% confidence level: 11.6%-28.3%) of cases affecting ≥14mm and all-diameter follicles, respectively. In all cases, mid-late follicular serum LH and P levels remained within normal follicular phase range and trans-vaginal scan did not show signs of ovulation. Markedly, the main significant difference between the study and control groups in the ≥14mm follicle group was serum E 2 level on the day of hCG administration; median (Interquartile range), corresponding to 395 (382.0-405.5) versus 823.0 (544.5-1291.0) pg/mL, respectively (P=0.04). The same trend was encountered in all-diameter vanishing follicles group but it did not reach significance. Interestingly, in all-diameter vanishing group, chronic smoking and the P/E 2 ratio on the hCG day were significantly higher than controls. Post hoc multiple logistic regression analysis of data in accordance with the Bologna criteria reveled that antral follicle count was found to significantly affect the development of the "vanishing follicle" phenomenon. The "vanishing follicle" phenomenon occasionally occurs in women with low number of developing follicles during assisted reproduction with no signs of ovulation. Our preliminary findings suggest that this phenomenon may be related to exhausted ovarian reserve however, an early-unrecognized LH elevation could not be ruled out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy Associated With Assisted Reproductive Technology in the United States, 2001–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kiran M.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess national trends in ectopic pregnancy incidence among assisted reproductive technology users and identify risk factors associated with ectopic pregnancy. METHODS We identified 553,577 pregnancies reported to the National ART Surveillance System between 2001 and 2011. Of those, 9,480 were ectopic, of which 485 were heterotopic. As a result of small numbers, ectopic and heterotopic pregnancies were combined for analysis. We assessed temporal trends in annual ectopic pregnancy rates using Poisson regression. We used log-binomial regression models with generalized estimating equations for correlated outcomes within clinics to calculate unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient characteristics and treatment factors. RESULTS The rate of ectopic pregnancy declined from 2.0% (n5735, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–2.2) in 2001 to 1.6% (n=968, 95% CI 1.5–1.7) in 2011 (P for trend ,.001). The ectopic pregnancy rate ranged from 2.0% (n=7,469, 95% CI 1.9–2.0) for fresh, nondonor cycles to 1.0% (n=641, 95% CI 0.9–1.1) for fresh, donor cycles. Among fresh, nondonor cycles, the rate of ectopic pregnancy was 1.6% (95% CI 1.4–1.7) when one embryo was transferred compared with 1.7% (95% CI 1.7–1.8), 2.2% (95% CI 2.1–2.3), and 2.5% (95% CI 2.4–2.6) when two, three, or four or more embryos were transferred, respectively (adjusted risk ratios 1.11, 95% CI 0.94–0.30; 1.33, 95% CI 1.12–1.56; and 1.49, 95% CI 1.25–1.78). CONCLUSION Ectopic pregnancy incidence after assisted reproductive technology has decreased over time, but factors such as multiple embryo transfer increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:25560107

  17. Attitude of teachers to school based adolescent reproductive health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... Attitude of Teachers to School Based Adolescent Reproductive Health Interventions. Seven secondary schools were selected among the nine public secondary schools in Sagamu through simple random sampling using balloting method. In the chosen schools, after consent was obtained from.

  18. Gender Based Violence and its Effects on Women's Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender Based Violence and its Effects on Women's Reproductive Health: The Case of Hatcliffe, Harare, Zimbabwe. ... scaling up of policy enforcement in order to curb the gruesome effects of GBV. (Afr J Reprod Health 2014; 18[1]: 110-122). Keywords: physical abuse, sexual violence, forced marriages, Hatcliffe, Zimbabwe ...

  19. Attitude of teachers to school based adolescent reproductive health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... adolescent sexual behaviour, including contraceptive use is important. The attitude of teachers to school-based adolescent reproductive health services was assessed among two hundred and twenty three teachers in Sagamu. Forty seven percent of them were trained family life educators while 52.9% had ...

  20. Attitude of teachers to school based adolescent reproductive health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adults may facilitate or obstruct healthy sexual behaviours by adolescents; hence information on their attitude towards adolescent sexual behaviour, including contraceptive use is important. The attitude of teachers to school-based adolescent reproductive health services was assessed among two hundred and twenty three ...

  1. The Reproduction Performance of Tegal Duck Based on Hematology Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismoyowati Ismoyowati

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the physiological indicator of Tegal duck based on the hematological parameters and its relation to reproduction performances.  The research materials were 20 heads of male and 100 heads of female Tegal ducks. Parameters measured were erytrocyte, leucocyte, differential leucocyte, hemoglobin, hematocrit, protein total, albumin and globulin, and reproduction performances (semen volume and egg production.  Method of the research was experimental with Completely Randomized Design,  and data were analysed using analysis of variance and correlation.  The result of the experiment showed that hematological parameters of Tegal duck that had high production were high significantly (P<0,05 different than the others, except on albumin value.  It was concluded that reprodution performances of Tegal duck was highly affected by its hematologys status. (Animal Production 8(2: 88-93 (2006   Key Words: Reproduction performances, Tegal duck, hematology status

  2. Assisted reproductive technology and pregnancy-related hypertensive complications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, C; Tsioufis, C; Michalopoulou, H; Makris, T; Papademetriou, V; Stefanadis, C

    2013-03-01

    Hypertensive complications in pregnancy are the leading cause of maternal morbidity, at least in the developed countries. In recent years, infertility issues are managed with ever growing therapeutic options namely assisted reproductive technologies (ART), which improve the ratio of successful induction of pregnancy. It is still debated whether various ART modalities are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including hypertensive complications, particularly with higher incidence of preeclampsia. The main source of controversy stems from the diversity of effect modifiers modulating the association between ART-oriented pregnancy and hypertensive disorders. Indeed, women undergoing an ART procedure are affected by diverse causes of infertility, are frequently characterized by different genetic patterns with respect to their artificially conceived embryo and experienced multiple gestations. In order to investigate whether ART modalities are associated with increased incidence of hypertensive complications in pregnancy, we reviewed all published studies carried out before the end of 2010 and identified in the PubMed database. Among the 47 studies finally selected and by acknowledging the potential of shortcomings related to the different study design and populations, the overall evidence suggests that ART-oriented pregnancies-especially the in-vitro fertilization techniques-are accompanied by increased risk for gestational hypertension and preeclampsia as compared with non-ART pregnancies, even after adjustment for confounders. Multiple gestations, advanced age and underlying polycystic ovary syndrome resulted in constant confounders of the questioned association. Reducing multiple gestations by implementing single embryo techniques might be the therapeutic limiting step to lower the rate of hypertensive complications in assisted pregnancies.

  3. Intrapartum and neonatal outcomes in singleton pregnancies following conception by assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozdarz, Kellie M; Flatley, Christopher J; Kumar, Sailesh

    2017-12-01

    To characterise maternal demographics and ascertain whether clinically important differences exist in the intrapartum and neonatal outcomes associated with assisted reproductive technology (ART). A retrospective study was undertaken between January 2007 and December 2013 of all singleton pregnancies conceived via ART at a major tertiary unit in Brisbane, Australia. Intrapartum outcomes were mode of delivery and indication for emergency caesarean. Neonatal outcomes investigated were gestation at delivery, birth weight, Apgar scores, acidosis at birth, respiratory distress, need for resuscitation, admission to neonatal intensive care and stillbirth. There were 4733 (7.4%) ART and 59 277 (92.6%) spontaneous conception pregnancies. Women who conceived using ART were less likely to have a spontaneous vaginal delivery (odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% CI 0.57-0.64) and were more likely to require operative or assisted birth: elective caesarean (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.31, 95% CI 1.22-1.40), emergency caesarean (aOR 1.19, 95% CI 1.09-1.28), or instrumental delivery (aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.32-1.58). Neonates who were conceived using ART were less likely to be born at term (aOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.58-0.71) and have lower birth weights. No differences were observed in rates of respiratory distress, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, or stillbirth between the ART and spontaneous conception cohorts. The odds of neonatal acidosis (OR 0.71, 95% CI0.63-0.81) were lower in the ART cohort. Although higher rates of operative deliveries were seen for women who conceive using ART, neonatal outcomes were generally no different between the two cohorts. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Homocysteine in embryo culture media as a predictor of pregnancy outcome in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyama, Burcu Aydin; Cepni, Ismail; Imamoglu, Metehan; Oncul, Mahmut; Tuten, Abdullah; Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Kervancioglu, Mehmet Ertan; Kaleli, Semih; Ocal, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether homocysteine (hcy) concentrations in embryo culture media correlate with pregnancy outcome in assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles. Forty patients who underwent single embryo transfer at the infertility clinic of a tertiary care center were recruited for this case-control study. Spent embryo culture media from all patients were collected after single embryo transfer on day 3 (n = 40). Hcy concentrations in embryo culture media were analyzed by enzyme cycling method. Patients were grouped according to the diagnosis of a clinical pregnancy. Sixteen patients were pregnant while 24 patients failed to achieve conception. Mean Hcy levels in the culture media were significantly different between the groups (p < 0.003), as 4.58 ± 1.31 μmol/l in the non-pregnant group and 3.37 ± 0.92 μmol/l in the pregnant group. Receiver operator curve analysis for determining the diagnostic potential of Hcy for pregnancy revealed an area under the curve of 0.792 (confidence interval: 0.65-0.94; p < 0.05). A cut-off value of 3.53 μmol/l was determined with a sensitivity of 83.3%, and a specificity of 68.8%. Lower hcy levels were associated with a better chance of pregnancy and better embryo grades. Hcy may be introduced as an individual metabolomic profiling marker for embryos.

  5. A descriptive study of culture media in Brazilian assisted reproduction clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartmann, Ana; Amaral, Amanda Turato Barbosa do; Gonçalves, Letícia

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to draw a profile of the most commonly used media and protocol characteristics from assisted reproduction technology (ART) facilities in Brazil. To obtain an overview of ART methods and culture media, a questionnaire was given to embryologists from ART clinics in Brazil. Further research in scientific papers and journals was carried out for describing the processes around Brazil, USA and Europe. From the questionnaire, we found that the embryo medium mostly used is CSCMTM from Irvine Scientific, represented 37.04% in Brazilian ART clinics; interestingly, 70.37% of clinics exchange the embryo media bath; however, 70.37% do not change the media type. Transfers in Brazilian clinics were variable, but day 3 transfer was a procedure seen in 37.04%. The remaining embryos are habitually maintained in prolonged cultivation in 51.85% of the clinics interviewed. Although there are numerous studies trying to better understand embryo culture media influences, there is a lack of evidence for choosing one as the most appropriate. In short, it is a random decision for such an essential stage of In Vitro Fertilization.

  6. Methotrexate treatment for ectopic pregnancy after assisted reproductive technology: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohannessian, A; Crochet, P; Courbiere, B; Gnisci, A; Agostini, A

    2016-06-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) occurs in 2% to 5.6% of pregnancies achieved by assisted reproductive technology (ART). EP treatment options include medical treatment by uses of methotrexate (MTX) systemic injection. The objective of this study was to compare MTX treatment effectiveness for EP occurring spontaneously or following ART. A case-control study performed in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at a tertiary health care center in France. Twenty EP achieved by ART (ART group) and 60 spontaneous EP (SEP group) received MTX treatment between January 2002 and May 2012. The main outcome measures were MTX treatment failure rates, number of MTX injections administered and recovery time. MTX treatment failure rates observed in ART and SEP groups were similar (3/20 [15%] versus 10/60 [17%]: OR=0.88 [0.22-3.58]). Mean duration of recovery time in patients with successful MTX treatment did not differ between ART and SEP groups (33±14 days versus 28±13 days, P=0.39). A second MTX injection was required more frequently in ART group than in SEP group (10/20 [50%] versus 10/60 [17%]: OR=5 [1.65-15.15]). It is concluded that MTX treatment is equally effective for spontaneous EP and EP achieved by ART, two injections of MTX being more frequently required in case of ART. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased Length of Awareness of Assisted Reproductive Technologies Fosters Positive Attitudes and Acceptance among Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Fortin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The field of infertility medicine has witnessed a surge of scientific developments in recent years, but research on public attitudes towards infertility treatments has remained minimal. This study examined the social and demographic factors that affect women’s attitudes towards assisted reproductive technology (ART in general, as well as their opinions of specific issues related to ART. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2011 to April 2011 by means of an online survey administered to a sample of 287 women. Results: Women with a longer length of awareness of ART had significantly greater attitudinal favorability towards ART. Political affiliation was also significantly related to general attitudes, as well as several specific aspects of ART issues. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that several factors influence attitudes that women hold in regards to ART. Identifying some of these factors serves as a crucial starting point for devising strategies to increase public acceptance of ART.

  8. Incidence of abnormal offspring from cloning and other assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan R

    2014-02-01

    In animals produced by assisted reproductive technologies, two abnormal phenotypes have been characterized. Large offspring syndrome (LOS) occurs in offspring derived from in vitro cultured embryos, and the abnormal clone phenotype includes placental and fetal changes. LOS is readily apparent in ruminants, where a large calf or lamb derived from in vitro embryo production or cloning may weigh up to twice the expected body weight. The incidence of LOS varies widely between species. When similar embryo culture conditions are applied to nonruminant species, LOS either is not as dramatic or may even be unapparent. Coculture with serum and somatic cells was identified in the 1990s as a risk factor for abnormal development of ruminant pregnancies. Animals cloned from somatic cells may display a combination of fetal and placental abnormalities that are manifested at different stages of pregnancy and postnatally. In highly interventional technologies, such as nuclear transfer (cloning), the incidence of abnormal offspring continues to be a limiting factor to broader application of the technique. This review details the breadth of phenotypes found in nonviable pregnancies, together with the phenotypes of animals that survive the transition to extrauterine life. The focus is on animals produced using in vitro embryo culture and nuclear transfer in comparison to naturally occurring phenotypes.

  9. Assisted reproductive techniques in Latin America: The Latin American Registry, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Schwarze, Juan Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Musri, Carolina; Urbina, Maria Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Multinational data on assisted reproduction techniques undertaken in 2014 were collected from 159 institutions in 15 countries in Latin America. Treatments included IVF/ ICSI, FET, OD, PGD and fertility preservation (FP). 41.34% of IVF/ICSI cycles were performed in women aged 35 to 39 years and 23.35% in women aged 40 and older. After removing cases with total freezing, delivery rate per oocyte retrieval was 25.05% for ICSI and 27.41% for IVF. Multiple births included 20.78% twins and 0.92 % triplets and over. In OD, twins reached 28.93% and triplets 1.07 %. Preterm deliveries reached 16.4% in singletons, 55.02% in twins and 76% in triplets. Perinatal mortality in 18,162 births was 23 per 1000 in singletons, 35 per 1000 in twins, and 36 per 1000 in high-order multiples. Elective single embryo transfer (eSET) represented only 2.63 % of fresh transfers, with a delivery rate of 32.15% per transfer. Elective double embryo transfer (eDET) represented 23.74% of transfers, with a delivery rate of 41.03% per transfer. Among babies born during this period 11,373 (62.6%) were singletons; 6,398 (35.2%) twins, and 391 (2.2%), triplets and more. Given the effect of multiple births on prematurity, morbidity and perinatal mortality, reinforcing the existing trend of reducing the number of embryos transferred is mandatory.

  10. Outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and subsequent self-reported life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivasaari-Pirinen, Paula; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Hippeläinen, Maritta; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Heinonen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    To compare life satisfaction between women with successful or unsuccessful outcome after assisted reproductive treatment (ART) by taking into account the time since the last ART. Cohort study. Tertiary hospital. A total of 987 consecutive women who had undergone ART during 1996-2007 were invited and altogether 505 women participated in the study. A postal enquiry with a life satisfaction scale. Self-reported life satisfaction in respect to the time since the last ART. In general, women who achieved a live birth after ART had a significantly higher life satisfaction than those who had unsuccessful ART, especially when compared in the first three yea